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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 24, 2017 9:00am-10:01am BST

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headlines are coming up. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. thousands of people are told to leave their homes as high rise blocks in north london are evacuated over fire safety fears. concerns were raised over cladding and gas pipe insulation. more than 800 homes are affected. the council has called it an "unprecedented operation". post—grenfell we are in a completely different situation and we are going to have to ask questions. my number one priority is to get residents out, get them into temporary accommodation and to do the works to make the buildings safe. 83 people have refused to move. some residents spent the night in local hotels on air beds in local leisure centres. i intend to stay put. i intend to return tonight. the council need to be seen to be doing something, this is a knee—jerk reaction from them but it is pandemonium.
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tower blocks on m estates have now failed fire safety tests since the grenfell disaster. earlier the communities secretary, sajid javid, told breakfast that money will be made available to councils that need it. they have to do whatever it takes to get their buildings safe and any necessary works they do, if they need support from the government, we can work with them. good morning it's saturday 24th june. also ahead. the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, tells broadcasters they should be more "patriotic" in their coverage of brexit talks. morning, it's advantage all blacks. the world champions are already 10—0 ahead at eden park where they haven't been beaten for 23 years.
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and 20 years since their first headline set, we'll get reaction after radiohead played the pyramid stage on the opening night of glastonbury. and stav has the weather. good morning. big difference in the weekend this weekend to last weekend. fresher this weekend, very windy in the north. details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due to concerns about fire safety. camden council told people in five towers on the chalcots estate to move after the fire service said their safety could not be guaranteed. 650 properties have been evacuated. 83 people refused to leave. 0ne tower cleared as safe.
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here is nick quraishi with the details. "we cannot guarantee your safety." the message from camden council as 4000 residents were told to leave their homes late on friday night. individuals are not being forced to leave, they are being told to leave for their own safety and it's up to them to decide. i intend to stay put and go back in there tonight. i think it is a knee—jerk reaction from the council. in the aftermath of grenfell tower, cladding here had been ruled unsafe. concerns have also been raised about fire doors and gas pipes. any area which was not completely to the best standards was a deep concern given the combination and that was the message from the fire services today. the issue is a combination of the two factors that is why we have taken the action we have taken tonight. at the leisure centre, air beds was assembled to cater for up to 100 residents. it will take up to four weeks to remove the external cladding and during that time, people are being urged to stay with family and friends or in hotels. camden council has already secured
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270 rooms in london and has spent the night transporting people. some residents said the first they knew was on the news. children, families, babies, they have nowhere to go. and i just think they left everything too late in dealing with it. this time of night, it is half past one now, it is ridiculous. grenfell tower was destroyed from the bottom to the top. we now know the fire started in a kitchen in a lowerfloor. police have also confirmed what eyewitnesses said — the origin of the inferno was a hotpoint fridge freezer. 14 buildings in nine areas of england are now known to have cladding which prompts concerns. ten days on from the worst fires since world war two, the shadow looms large over social housing. earlier on breakfast, the communities secretary,
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sajid javid, told us that councils would get financial support for all works needed. 0ur position has been very clear on this. public safety is absolutely paramount. you cannot put a price on people's lives. they're priceless. so local authorities, they have to do whatever it takes to get their buildings safe and any necessary works they do, if they need support from the government, we can work with them, absolutely. i'm trying to work out who they means, you are saying you will work with them. is that a pledge that all that money will be found centrally or not?“ there is a local authority and housing associations, let's not forget them, they own many of the tower blocks, if they need funtial support, not all will need it, but if they need funtial support, we'll work with them to make sure that they have the resources they need to do this necessary work, absolutely, that will not be put at risk. we can speak now to catriona renton who is outside the swiss cottage leisure centre in camden where some residents spent the night. more information emerging? that is
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right. in the last few minutes, we have been hearing from the leader of the council. we know over 600 households moved out of their homes asa households moved out of their homes as a result of the evacuation and we have heard that 83 households stayed put in their homes, they were persuaded and encouraged by the fire service and the council to move out, but they decided not to. we have heard from the council lead they're the fire service will go back and ask and speak to those families again. i've seen people coming here all night and these people are still arriving to get support, to get register and then hopefully to get moved on to other accommodation. the council's found a number of hotel rooms and we have seen people again throughout the night and morning being taken away from here in taxis to hotels around the city of london. now, some people, according to one of the councillors who has been in
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the area this morning, have been offered some accommodation, but a p pa re ntly offered some accommodation, but apparently it's too far away from family and friends for them to go to, so it's a fluid situation here at the moment. we are still seeing people arriving. we have heard some stories over the night of families not really knowing what to do, some having their doors knocked at 2, 2. 30 am, with young children and leaving their properties then, coming here to seek some refuge. of course, people now waking up as well, people that did manage to get some sleep here, have also moved out. we had that update from the council leader, councillor georgia gould, just 15 minutes ago. council leader, councillor georgia gould, just 15 minutes agom raises huge questions for us and we are going to be having to investigate every element. i mean questions for us locally and nationally about fire regulation, look, i think post—grenfell we are ina look, i think post—grenfell we are in a completely different situation and we are going to have to ask all of the questions. my number one priority is to get residents
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securely out, into secure temporary accommodation and to do the works to make the buildings safe. we have seen angry make the buildings safe. we have seen angry scenes make the buildings safe. we have seen angry scenes this morning. councillor gould left the interview and some residents confronted her. 0ne and some residents confronted her. one woman we spoke to earlier asked her, why had we been told everything was safe yesterday afternoon and then yesterday evening being told then yesterday evening being told the property was unsafe and she had to get out. of course, this will develop throughout the day. we have been hearing people's individual stories as they try to find accommodation, try to find places to stay while this work is carried out. as councillor gould has said, she thinks this could take three to four weeks but teams are working on it now. she said this was something the council had to do. to clarify the figures, the council confirming 650 households have been evacuated. 83 people right now who've refused to
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leave and in terms of what happens next they are saying they are going to send in council officials aloaning with the fire service to try to encourage those people to leave, as to whether they'll be forced to leave at a later stage, she said that is the decision they'll come to. they're hoping to persuade people voluntarily to leave the buildings. that is the update in terms of the camden council leader. the leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom has said it would be helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk's position in talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected politicians saying it's a good start. of course, it's very early days. it's been a year.. it's very early days. it's been a year. .. it it's very early days. it's been a year... it would be helpful if broadcasters were willing to be a
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bit patriotic. the country took a decision. this government... sorry, it's unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together asa going? we all need to pull together as a country. we took a decision a year ago today to leave the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron described andrea leadsom's remarks asa described andrea leadsom's remarks as a threat to the free media and suggested she should apologise. more than 100 people are missing after a landslide in south western china. around a0 homes were destroyed when the side of a mountain collapsed in the sichuan province. a rescue operation is now taking place to try to locate the missing. radiohead topped the bill on the opening night of glastonbury, 20 years after one of their most famous performances at the festival. today will see katy perry and the foo fighters take to the pyramid stage. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is there. a warning, his reports contains flashing images. # i wish i was special #
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for thousands of fans, radiohead really are so very special. receiving a rapturous reception in front of a packed pyramid stage. # i'm a creep, i'm a weirdo. this was the musical climax to a day that featured a few unexpected celebrity appearances. # by a tender young maiden... earlier, kris kristofferson was accompanied on stage by a guitar—playing johnny depp. watching them, another hollywood star, brad pitt. and one more famous face admitted that this was set to be his very first glastonbury. yeah, 42 years old and it is my first festival. first time here. i am excited. slightly nervous because i don't know what to expect but, obviously, apart from the great acts
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and people having fun. i am looking forward to it. later today, names who will make an appearance on the main stage include katy perry, foo fighters and labour party leaderjeremy corbyn. thousands of people living in 600 high—rise buildings across england are waiting to find out if their homes are covered in combustible cladding, as urgent tests are being carried out following the grenfell tower fire. 7? newsub let us have 7 7 newsub let us have a 7? newsub let us have a look 7 7 newsub let us have a look at one oi’ 7 7 newsub let us have a look at one or two stories in the papers. this is what the daily telegraph is taking a look at this morning, saying that hospital buildings are being subjected to urgent fire safety tests over fears that some
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may be covered in flammable cladding. that is last night. it says schools, universities, offices public buildings being checked for panels that may be a fire risk. sajid javid reiterating that all money necessary will be found centrally by central government, this morning. the mirror, this is the image in connection with what the image in connection with what the cause of the fire was. we know it to be a fridge freezer now according to the fire services. many question marks now, both about the arrangements within the building itself and the lack of fire safety arrangements. also now, of course, those questions being asked much more widely in many other parts of the uk as local authorities look at the uk as local authorities look at the tower buildings they have. we know 14 blocks in nine areas have been identified as dangerous. we can talk to our guest again from camden
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where people have been evacuated from their homes overnight as we have been talking about. arnold, thank you very much for talking to us. thank you very much for talking to us. yesterday when we spoke to you, you joined us on the sofa and you we re very you joined us on the sofa and you were very concerned about the process and the safety of people in light of the dangers of some of this cladding. do you feel that the right action's been taken this morn something -- this morning? yes, i to. i was saying from day one, if you had buildings built like g re nfell tower, you had buildings built like grenfell tower, you must evacuate them straightaway. you don't know what day it could catch fire, it could be the same day, it could be tomorrow, it could be a month's time, you simply don't know. but are you going to play russian roulette with your tenants and occupants, hats off to camden for taking action. the action has been taken. can you tell us the process? we spoke to georgia gould who was talking to us about the cooperation
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the council had with the fire safety department. who leads decisions when it comes to whether people should be evacuated from their homes? it comes to whether people should be evacuated from their homes7m it comes to whether people should be evacuated from their homes? it would bea evacuated from their homes? it would be a joint decision between the people involved and various advisers and from then on, they would have their emergency plans which they bring into action. until the fire brigade were there telling them what to do, no action had been taken. it's taken over a week before they have got these people out of a highly dangerous building. is it time to say we should be more cautious, get them out for a week, and if the fire brigade say it's safe, allow them back in? you know, how far do you go, what price is a life7 how far do you go, what price is a life? we have lost huge numbers of people. it was totally avoidable. at last, people are starting to take action. i now hear councils across
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great britain at last are putting in sprinkler systems to their buildings. that's been called for by me and many other people for years. it's been called for in inquest after inquest and it's taken until now to actually take the action. action too late but we are going to save many, many lives in the future. what would your call then be now? that everyone if any building which there is any doubt about the safety of cladding or gas pipe insulations should all be evacuated, people should all be evacuated, people should be evacuated from the buildings now7 should be evacuated from the buildings now? well, with the gas installations, cut them off outside the building. you have got no gas. people might not be able to heat, their property, but at the moment you don't worry about that in summer. you don't worry about that in summer. they may not be able to cook but arrangements can be made to put
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electric cookers in. you know, my goodness, there are companies over here which would supply cookers the next day, you know. we can sort these things out very simply. next day, you know. we can sort these things out very simplylj would these things out very simply.” would like to use your expertise in helping us go through the process now of an investigation. camden council says it's going to investigate the buildings over the next few days. in practical terms, what will that involve? well, the investigations will first of all start off with finding how the building is constructed. they'll need experts in there to actually check the designs. they'll then go back on the paperwork and follow the paper trail. but very often, the paper trail. but very often, the paper trials are very thin on the ground. you know, we don't know where the system's broken down. now, who said that they hadn't ordered this type of material, they didn't believe they were getting this type of material. so who on the train is the person who got it wrong, as it
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were, was it the architect, the contractor, the cladding company in placing the order or the supplier? lots of questions. they are going to have to go through it all. lots and lots of questions to be asked, as you have highlighted. thank you very much for your time today and yesterday, of course, here on bbc breakfast. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. bolt bot good spells of sunshine this morning. showers in the forecast today and tomorrow. the northern half of the country will be breezy. windy in scotland where we'll see gales. unseasonably windy on saturday into the start of sunday here. the winds will pick up towards
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0rkney and shetland. the best of the sunshine sheltered eastern areas in scotland. for northern ireland, a bit of sunshine here and there and also some cloud. nice spells of sunshine across north—eastern england and in towards the midlands. southern counties rather cloudy because of a weak weather front. we could see some damp weather around glastonbury for a time. it should start to dry up through the afternoon, given some brightness though it will feel quite warm. for the afternoon, sheltered eastern areas always do the best with the brightness. eastern wales, east of the pennines, the south—east of england and the north—east of scotland. it's going to be very windy indeed so it will feel cooler. a warm afternoon in the south, nhs to be out and about, not too hot or cold. the showers across the south begin to ease away this evening. for most, it should be dry. another
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plume of cloud and some rain will push towards western parts, particularly over the higher ground. into sunday, a bit of a change. it's a similar picture, the strong winds are pulled away. we have a run of north—west winds. that the will introduce fresher air across—the—board. it will introduce brighter skies. much of central, southern england in towards wales, we could then be seeing a lot of cloud. top temperatures 21 or 22. further north, feeling fresher around the mid teens. a touch cooler on sunday but brighter in the north. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. the former england cricketer lucy person is a headteacher and also a director for the england and wales cricket board. good morning. can we clear up a
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couple of things. well done, you predicted the all blacks would be ahead. the score i think is 13—8 at the moment. and we were talking to you about hobbyhorse showjumping. and you hadn't heard of it before, you have now! you were saying you used to do that as a child? well, yes, idid. i used to do that as a child? well, yes, i did. ithink we used to do that as a child? well, yes, i did. i think we all galloped around the garden, haven't we all done that. gallopy gallopy. diana from droitwich used to do it as a child. her horses were bean sticks. she had several, all sizes all named. did you have a name for yours7 named. did you have a name for yours? not that i'd have remembered. mike's is called charlie. let us get on to your choice of stories. there is always a fascination with harry
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potter. what have you picked out? this article is about the impact of harry potter and the series 20 years on. children's books can be political and it talks about how it's used as a vehicle for that. it's an interesting article on how harry potter has influenced the way we see writers writing, whether you can write your novel in starbucks or costa or whatever it is.” can write your novel in starbucks or costa or whatever it is. i can't believe it's been 20 years. do you think harry potter has had a tangible impact on young people reading more, literally one book? yes. you have seen, because you are a head teacher, this sort of thing? yes. there is no doubt. it's galvanised a lot of much better children writing than perhaps is now appealing to children more. i
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wouldn't necessarily say the calibre is better but they've understood the format that works really well for the modern reader. when i say to you that honey has a wardrobe made up of chanel wardrobes, bikinis and dressing gowns, what would you think of7 dressing gowns, what would you think of? i know because i've already seen the picture. i love my doing but i'm not sure she has that sort of a look. he's a springer—doodle. he's not as tiny as that. or as well dressed. he doesn't tend to wear clothes at all to be fair to him. i was struck by the ridiculous nature of the pampering of the pooch with doing psychologists charging beened 190 an hourto doing psychologists charging beened 190 an hour to work out why the doing has issues. a doing with issues7 doing has issues. a doing with issues? yes. if you are a doing looking like that you probably have got issues. so you dress your doing like that and then wonder what the problem is and spend money on trying
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to decide what it is. it's stupid. thin blue line now, yellow and pink, the gay pride police car? yes. now, you see, the police have a hard time and they make an effort to be inclusive which i think is fantastic. they have a sense of humourand fantastic. they have a sense of humour and what they've done is, the sussex police have decorated two of theircars in the sussex police have decorated two of their cars in the pride colours ready for festivals at hastings and eastbourne and they are getting a ha rd eastbourne and they are getting a hard time for spending £750. for me it shows police are reaching out to communities and it's great and it's a nice story showing the police have a nice story showing the police have a sense of humour. school dinners, we re a sense of humour. school dinners, were you a a sense of humour. school dinners, were you a fan? not of tapioca with that tangerine thing at the top, no. we hadjam! i that tangerine thing at the top, no. we had jam! i ask because so much is related to children's well—being in terms of how well they eat, how much they know about food, you know. you hear stories about kids not knowing
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that chips come from potatoes, that kind of thing. we have lots of cookery shows that can provide information. but apparently, they are not so helpful? no. because they're saying that the type of food that a lot of the programmes generate with packed full of high fats and sugar to make them look really attractive. so this particular university in belgium has done a study which has looked at the fa ct done a study which has looked at the fact that children who watch the tv cookery programme would eat one—and—a—half times as many pancakes as the people who sit and watch a gardening show. you may not have ta ken the watch a gardening show. you may not have taken the study, but... that's not just have taken the study, but... that's notjust children though is it, that's all of us? correct. tune into mary berry's cakes and you want sticky toffee pudding for pudding. so you watch food on tv and you want to eat? it's creating early eating habits not in the best interests for the children. then you would have to
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ask the people to cook bad food. healthy food isn't bad food. good point. we are entitled to indulge. it offers ideas into that world. nigella lawson and jamie oliver declined to comment on this. we don't need them because we have michelle roux jr. don't need them because we have michelle rouer. . what do you think7 michelle rouer. . what do you think? healthy food doesn't have to be horrible, iagree think? healthy food doesn't have to be horrible, i agree 100%. think? healthy food doesn't have to be horrible, iagree100%. we think? healthy food doesn't have to be horrible, i agree 100%. we are a very healthy food show, i can prove that this morning. prove away. what have you got on, good morning? good morning. 0ur guest is in fraining for a 100 mile walk so he's stopped by for healthy food and drink. it's bill bailey. food heaven? big fan of spicy food, asian food, aubergines. sounds healthy. hell? not a big
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offal fa n sounds healthy. hell? not a big offal fan so i tend to avoid it if i can but i'm willing to be persuaded. we have got offal as your hell. my guests are with me. you are going to be cooking something as well? i'll make sticky glue nous rice dumplings. a bit of spice in there. william you are doing a bit of chocolate? chocolate cake. a real ta ke chocolate? chocolate cake. a real take on an old favourite. we are doing a afterfa cake tart, pastry case filled with almond and marmalade filling and a chocolate muse on top. —— chocolate mousse on top. lots of lovely wines? yes, modern, traditional, traditional stuff from the new world and new wines from the traditional world. you are in for a feast. see you at 10. always lovely to see you michelle
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roux jr. . always lovely to see you michelle rouer. . thank you very much. see you shortly. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before ten, holly will be here with the sport. we will have the latest on the british lions and all blacks game thatis british lions and all blacks game that is on as we speak. but first a summary of this morning's main news. around 4,000 people were told to evacuate their homes in camden, north london last night due to concerns about fire safety. the buildings are clad in similar material to grenfell tower, where at least 79 people died in a fire last week. camden council told residents in five towers on the chalcots estate to move after the fire service said their safety could not be guaranteed. in the last hour the council has confirmed to breakfast that 650 properties were evacuated, 83 people refused to leave their homes. 0ne tower has been cleared as safe.
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we asked the fire service is to come in and they did checks all day. they identified a number of issues in the blocks around the insulation, around gas pipes going into flats, around fire doors. their message to me was that the combination of flammable external cladding and the issues inside the block meant that the building was unsafe. a lot of people, as you have mentioned, people, as you have mentioned, people have been saying to us, they have been praising the council for the swift response. it remains the case that these people have been living in a building, ora number of buildings, that they should never have been in? it raises huge questions for us and we're going to be going to investigate every element. questions for us locally, questions nationally about fire regulations. i think post—grenfell we're in a completely different situation and we're going to have to ask all of these questions.
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right now, my number one priority is to get residents securely out that building, to get them into secure accommodation and do the works we need to do to make the building safe. have you got reassurances from central government about costing 7 have you asked if the money will be provided to do the work and to help housing many families? we have acted as swiftly as we possibly can. we have booked hotel rooms ourselves. we are working with student halls, with other boroughs around temporary accommodation. we are not stopping and waiting for anyone. we just have to get on and move people safely because it is distressing enough. we have been here all night talking to people, being asked to leave your home on a friday evening, at such short notice, is deeply, deeply upsetting. i think the number one concern is to upsetting. i think the number one concern is to move upsetting. i think the number one concern is to move those people safely into accommodation, and we are not worrying about money at the
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moment. 0bviously are not worrying about money at the moment. obviously we will be having conversations with central government later on. we are taking legal advice around some of the contracts, around the cladding. right now, the only thing that is our priority is to move people swiftly into secure accommodation. that was georgia gould, the leader of the county council. the leader of the house of commons andrea leadsom has said it would be helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk's position in talks with the eu. we had various different eu politicians, the elected politicians saying it was a good start. of course it is very early days. it has been a year... it would be helpful... it would be helpful if broadcasters would be bit patriotic. the country made a decision... unpatriotic? are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going? we all need to pull
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together as a country. we made a decision one year ago today to leave the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron, has described andrea leadsom's remarks as "a sinister threat to the free media" — and said she should apologise. more than 100 people are missing after a landslide in south western china. around 40 homes were destroyed when the side of a mountain collapsed in the sichuan province. a rescue operation is now taking place to try to locate the missing. katy perry and the foo fighters will top the bill at glastonbury today. last night, radiohead took to the pyramid stage, 20 years after first being the headline act at the festival. it's expected around 135,000 people will be in attendance over the weekend. those are the main stories. there is a huge game going on. have you been
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trying to resist knowing the score? there's no point. sometimes we put up there's no point. sometimes we put up warnings, but the bottom line is that it up warnings, but the bottom line is thatitis up warnings, but the bottom line is that it is happening right now. that's right. it is half—time at the minute. i know you will be wanting to watch this. at the minute, i'm afraid the all blacks are ahead. but it has been a brilliant game. it's been tight, actually. it is 13—8 at the minute. that is pretty good? it was 10—0 earlier. the minute. that is pretty good? it was 10-0 earlier. yes, they have brought back from that early lead. it was close in the first half, very exciting. we have been gripped. the early penalty from taylor, who scored a converted try, which we can see here, giving him that 10—0 lead. we we re see here, giving him that 10—0 lead. we were worried. actually, the lions we re we were worried. actually, the lions were not ready to lay down. they came back. they scored one of the great lions test tries. that is what it is already being described as.
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that got them back in the game just before half—time. great work by liam williams and elliot daly, who were two surprise names in the starting 15. they eventually set up sean o'brien. 13 15. they eventually set up sean 0'brien.13 — eight at the break. ireland have wrapped up a series whitewash over japan with an emphatic 35—13 win in tokyo — but scotland have lost their final tour match — they went down 27—22 to fiji. jason roy became the first player in international t20 cricket history to be given out for obstructing the field, as england lost to south africa byjust three runs at taunton. england were cruising towards their target of 175 when south africa claimed roy had deliberately got in the way of a throw and he was dismissed. england needed a four from the last ball — but liam dawson missed it. the series decider is at cardiff tomorrow. the women's cricket world cup starts today, with the icc hoping it'll be a turning point for the women's game. england go into the tournament on the back of some strong
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warm—up performances — they take on india in the opening match in derby, where a sell—out crowd of three—thousand is expected. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. in derby, a group of professional sportswomen prepare for a competition which aims to be noticed around the world. they are england and england is where it began. in 1973, birmingham hosted the final of the first—ever women's world cup, won by england and these players basically had to pay to play. heather knight is a year into her captaincy. the first game is against india, and the winning nation this year gets $666,000. money has come a long way. is it an incentive? something the players will think about? i don't think so. it is a nice touch by the icc to show where the women's game is at the moment. i think it is a good statement by them, but in terms of practicalities it doesn't change it.
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globally, the key is to unlock the potential of india. that is the market for cricket. signs of progress — well, there was a kit launch featuring women's players alongside the men. india's women have never won the world cup and are outsiders again this year. but victory would speed up equality. this is a stage where most of the matches are televised and broadcast and it increases the viewership and, you know, india is a country where cricket is a religion. boys in state schools in england and wales still get more opportunity to play cricket than girls. inspiration often comes from the top. at the world cup, the opening batter will miss this match through injury. the captain is fit, calm and ready. british men's tennis number three dan evans said he'd let a lot of people down, after being provisionally suspended for testing positive for cocaine.
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he'll miss wimbledon, of course, but he could be banned for up to four years. i was notified a few days ago that i'd failed a drugs test in april, where i tested positive for cocaine. this was taken out of competition and the context was completely unrelated to tennis. i made a mistake and i must face up to it. i do not condone for one second to anyone that this was acceptable behaviour. i've let a lot of people down, my family, my coach, my team, sponsors and the british tennis and my fans. i can only deeply apologise, from the bottom of my heart. petra kvitova's comeback is still going well. she's through to the semi—finals of the aegon classic in birmingham after beating kristina mladenovic. this was kvitova's fifth match since returning to the circuit, after she was stabbed in the hand six months ago. max verstappen dominated day one of practice for the azerbaijan grand prix. but he did give his red bull mechanics some extra work to do,
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with just seconds remaining of the second session. and the afternoon shadows caused problems for a few drivers — jolyon palmer struggling tojudge his braking distance. lewis hamilton almost collided with kimi raikkonen and could only manage 10th. the odds on favourite "winter" won the big race on day four of royal ascot. the fillies took centre stage in the coronation stakes and winter, ridden by ryan moore and trained by aidan 0'brien, launched a late charge to add it to her english and irish 1000 guineas triumphs. that all your sport. i'm going to go and watch the second half of this match. are they going to win? you can't ask that! just leave it out there. we will get an update on the weather inafew we will get an update on the weather in a few minutes. it was in 2014 when the so called islamic state group began to seize large swathes of territory
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in syria and iraq. mosul, iraq's second city, fell under the group's control, forcing hundreds of thousands of civilians to flee heavy fighting as iraqi forces tried to recapture it. yesterday, iraq's prime minister said the city will be liberated within days, after islamic state destroyed an 800 year old mosque in mosul, which he declared was "an official declaration of defeat". we're joined by professor paul rogers, a security lecturer at the university of bradford. is that a fair assessment? that it isa is that a fair assessment? that it is a declaration of defeat? to some extent, yes. they are not yet defeated. we thought the entire battle to take mosul would take two months, it is now on to the eighth month. they are restricted to less than a square mile of the old city. it is proving difficult to disrupt them, but they will finally be defeated. why should we be focusing on mosul now? when it comes to assessing their control, their
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organisation or the ability of governments to tackle them? to some extent, because it has been symbolic. the thing is, isis is already changing, and changing rapidly. they started by creating the caliphate, a geographical caliphate. that is not what al-qaeda was about. it is now losing that caliphate. it has been facing an intense airwar caliphate. it has been facing an intense air warfor three caliphate. it has been facing an intense air war for three years. they killed 50,000 isis supporters in that period. they are going underground, so they will continue in iraq but they will not be holding territory. they are already letting of bombs elsewhere. let's visualise this with the matter. —— map. these we re this with the matter. —— map. these were the areas that were controlled by them. if we move the map on, and it has moved on, we can see the control has receded in iraq and north—western syria. control has receded in iraq and north-western syria. in terms of territorial control, we can see that. they lost east mosul four
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months ago. but there were bombs left off in east mosul yesterday. they are still there, but underground. they are going underground. they are going underground and they are also expanding overseas. they are significant in afghanistan, the southern philippines, which was a huge surprise, and even in egypt. the third thing they are doing is taking the war to what they see as the enemy, us. 0verthe taking the war to what they see as the enemy, us. over the last few yea rs we have the enemy, us. over the last few years we have seen the enemy, us. over the last few years we have seen all of these attacks. the belgians were lucky, the bomb attack on the main railway station didn't decimate. if it had done, it would have been very bad. you're talking about the symbolic meaning of mosul, we saw the map. where do they go? where do the fighters go? they disappear, but many of them still exist? they do, it is like the taliban in 2001. they melt away and then come back. they are basically in communities. there is an underlying level of support.
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because they no longer controlled territories, that does not mean they don't disappear. al-qaeda never really control any territory. it is a different war. the forces have gone for a stronghold, they can show the world something that is being done there, the hardest part of the equation is the next bit? yes, they are now accepting themselves that they are losing this territory. they are now saying this is a symbol of what we could achieve, but now we are going to go underground and undermine states. it is a different kind of war. i would love to say the war is coming to an end and we're heading the 17th year, and i'm afraid not, it's a long way to go. the point charlie was making, 0k, they may be defeated but the problem is still on the ground there are so many groups representing discontent, rising up, diminishing all the time,
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that's not going to go away? people very rarely look at that background. we have a problem right across the middle east and in other parts of the world where more and more people think they are on the margins, so they are angry and resentful. many of them fall back on the religious identity, which is islam or another religion, or something political. the problem the indians have, it's maoists. it is this marginalised world. people who have gone through university, and can't getjobs. it's a worldwide phenomenon. we are moving into the era of regular war, revolts from the margins. the problem is, it is not something we can defeat with conventional military. thank you very much. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. a mixed picture? that is what you
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have been saying, but i have been really enjoying the pictures behind you, they are glorious. some are from weather watchers, some are in the generic folder we have. i am trying to paint a better picture, there is going to be some sunshine around. it is not going to be doom and gloom. it won't be as hot and sunny as it was last weekend. something a bit more comfortable this weekend. there will be some rain and showers in the forecasts. it's going to be breezy, particularly the northern half of the country and the northern part of scotland. that is because of this, a deep area of low pressure, unseasonably windy weather to the far north. there could be a bit of transport disruption through the afternoon period. blustery showers as well. maybe longer spells of rain moving in later. the best of the brightness will always be a cross sheltered eastern parts of scotland, the pennines and the south—east. through the morning we have have this week whether from struggling southern counties. that has been
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thick enough to produce light and patchy rain. a little bit of light rain around in glastonbury. as we head into the afternoon, if we get brightness it will feel quite warm. the air mass is quite warm. when we get the sunshine, feeling pleasant. maybe the odd spot of rain. 40 or 50 miles an hour across northern ireland and the northern isles, with blustery showers and longer spells of rain moving in. between 20 and 18 degrees for many. it is really feeling quite pleasant. any showers which develop across the south should clear where this evening. for the first part of the night, dry. rain pushing into more westerly areas, and blustery wind across scotland. that area of low pressure clears away gradually on sunday, towards scandinavia. then we are in
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with some slightly more north—westerly wind. with that comes some more brighter conditions. we will see the sunshine for scotland, northern ireland, england. ithink we are looking at cloudier skies for the midlands southwards. maybe 2122 in the south—east. so, not a bad weekend. would you say it is camping weather? yes. all of those areas where you get the sunshine, it will be lovely. cooler than of late. this is where we test if he has got it right. it is glastonbury. are there raindrops there? i'm not sure. lizo mzimba is there. give us a sense of how the weather is and what has been happening so far. it is what you would call more traditional glastonbury weather. with the end of a heat wave it has
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been very hot and dry out here. that has confused quite a lot of people that are not used to it. this is much more familiar for regular glastonbury goers. a bit of hazy weather, rain, quite damp underfoot. depending on how it turned out later on, we will see how muddy it gets. people have enjoyed the first few days. as for the whole experience, the big headliners last night on the pyramid stage were radiohead. they drew quite a big crowd. radio had fa ns drew quite a big crowd. radio had fans seemed to love it. it was the 20th anniversary of their first appearance here at glastonbury. because this is glastonbury, there is lots of other music fans around but maybe not that into radiohead. we wa nted but maybe not that into radiohead. we wanted to see what they think. you are not huge fans, but he went to see. what did you think? we were not massive fans before we went to see them. we got a lot of recommendations from friends, people that were big fans. they said to go and see them. we went with an open mind and pub it was a mixed review.
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we enjoyed the music a lot. i don't think the band showed enough of themselves on the screen. there was not enough personalisation. we cannot really see what they were doing. we couldn't see them on the screens, we could barely see the actual pyramid stage. did you watch the whole thing? it went on for quite a long time if you are not a huge fan. we went to the john peel stage instead. we went there for the experience, we experienced what radiohead wanted to put across to us. radiohead wanted to put across to us. that is what it is about for them. it was a massive experience, but then for the last half an hour, we thought, let's go and enjoy something else. he wanted to see clea n something else. he wanted to see clean bandit, i made her go to radiohead instead. your second glastonbury for both of you, who are
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you looking forward to seeing? lsu a nswer you looking forward to seeing? lsu answer that one! —— you looking forward to seeing? lsu answerthat one! —— i you looking forward to seeing? lsu answer that one! —— i will let you a nswered answer that one! —— i will let you answered that one. we're going to see foo fighters tonight, ed sheeran tomorrow will be great. and seeing jeremy corbyn is going to be great as well. run thejewels, they are a p pa re ntly as well. run thejewels, they are apparently really good. how does it compare to the previous glastonbury? a lot drier. it was so sunny. people we re a lot drier. it was so sunny. people were melting in their tents. everybody was out of their tents. last year it was raining and everybody stayed in a tent a lot more. people were out, chatting to each other, it was nice. same atmosphere, loads of fun. everybody is so friendly. thank you for talking to us. we will be here all day at glastonbury. ed sheeran is playing tomorrow. katy perry, foo fighters on the main stage, jeremy corbyn will be introducing the band there. we will be here with all of
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that later. i like it when people dress appropriately for the story they are covering. paula radcliffe hasjoined us covering. paula radcliffe hasjoined us this morning. look at this, you have dressed appropriately. you've got your trainers on, shorts, the whole works. it's my only time of the day to put this on. you have this on because you're going to run out of the studio? yes, down the canal bank. how often do you go for a run, everyday? yes, if! can. i enjoy it and it makes me feel better for the day, i think things through in my head. not necessarily training, it isjust in my head. not necessarily training, it is just for you? in my head. not necessarily training, it isjust for you? yes, it now is just leisure time. it was a lwa ys it now is just leisure time. it was always pleasure, but there was usually a function and training purpose. now it is whatever i want to make of it. talk us through what is happening, the european team championships taking place in lille?
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it started as the european cup and it has now become the european team championships. there are supposed to be 12 teams taking part in the super league section. but russia are not there because they are still banned. so there are 11 teams. the first night was last night and they did qualifying round so that we got eight for the short track events. who should we be looking out for, the stars and people who have something special? there are some good names. 0ur something special? there are some good names. our team from britain is wea ker good names. our team from britain is weaker than it has been in previous yea rs. weaker than it has been in previous years. i think our biggest battle, if you like, will be to make sure we are not in the relegation zone at the end of the weekend. can you explain why? we have trials next weekend. a lot of athletes are focusing on the home championships. i think british athletics have said
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they are going to let the athletes focus on what is important on that. we have the likes of jake wightman, who ran very well in oslo last week and won the 1500 metres. following in the illustrious footsteps of andy baddeley, to win that. he will be in a tough race today. we have sophie hutchens, eilidh child came through co mforta bly. hutchens, eilidh child came through comfortably. everybody qualified into the final eight. some of the events were taking place yesterday and we have got some of the stills. maybe you could talk us through who we are seeing? that is harry, he qualified fine. sorry, we should have told you we were going to do this. if you can tell me who that is... it is this. if you can tell me who that is...itisa this. if you can tell me who that is... it is a nice picture! it is a montage. you talked about some other
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competitors, the 1500 metres, and you a golden era of middle—distance running, sebastian coe, steve cram. your name is obviously included in those great names. is there still a bit of the british athletes that has that kind of looming over them a bit, that is what people still hark back to? yes and no. certainly, in the men's1500 metres, 800 metres, that was a little bit of a millstone. the minute anybody put in a great performance, suddenly they have that around their neck. they are going to be the next sebastian coe. i think that has happened less on the women's side. i think now attitudes are changing. we are seeing young athletes, particularly scottish athletes, the likes of lynsey sharp, jake wightman, they are coming through and running
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really well with the attitude, well, if laura muircan really well with the attitude, well, if laura muir can do it, i can do it. they are inspiring one another? yes, building off each other. we have seen that, but not as much as we have at the moment. can we talk about something less savoury that has hit the sport, the doping allegations, the proposals of stripping athletes of world records. these are the world records set before 2005 because of when doping procedures were brought in. your reaction was one of strong disappointment, is that fair to say? just remind us again, how did you actually... how did you feel? did you take that as a personal affront? idid take you take that as a personal affront? i did take it personally and i was very hurt and frustrated, a little bit upset about it. it wasn't the iaaf, it was the european association, a proposal they put to
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the iaaf and wanted to get accepted. for me, it was just very heavy—handed. there were saying, yes, we're not accusing anybody of anything, wejust yes, we're not accusing anybody of anything, we just want to start again, that it didn't ring true. there were just saying, 0k, we can't believe any of those performances so we will push everything to the side and start again. we are not yet at a point where we are in a position to say that credibility is there, there is enough faith in the testing system, enough faith in everything going on to try to be able to do that. you should never throw away the history and what the sport is built on. punishing athletes twice, that was the biggest thing. for those that don't know, you are the current world record holder in the marathon? so that is yours. you have that. that is your record. under these guidelines, that would not exist, is that right? well, they
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we re exist, is that right? well, they were saying you would be listed as a former world record—holder. for me, you become a former world record—holder when somebody beats your time. not because the administrators decide to make it like that. it is all in the balance. we wa nt like that. it is all in the balance. we want things that are good for the sport, but i don't think it is the right way to make it better for the sport. i think it is better to concentrate on things like the new athletics integrity unit that is really restoring balance a little bit. we are the first international body took take huge steps to be independent and do everything to protect the credibility and integrity within athletics. i think it is better to get to that point and keep the faith, restore the faith in the sport coming in.” asked you how you felt initially and you said upset, disappointed, everybody would understand that. yesterday, the outgoing uk athletics chief suggested that you understood it was for the greater good. is that
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true? i read his comments, he said, we would all do things for the greater good of the sport. he wasn't sure that was the way to do it. that is kind of what i am saying. yes, we all do want to see the sport, a sport we all love, we want to see it ina sport we all love, we want to see it in a better place. we want to see it fairly represented as the great sport that it is. yes, there is a doping problem, but it is not as big as in other sports, we arejust doing a lot more to fight it and a lot more to bring it into the open and make it a better sport for every clea n and make it a better sport for every clean athlete out there and protect them. i think we all want to do things. there are certain things where you are not going to give up things you have worked very hard for without a fight, just in the name of it being for the good of the sport. to raise athletes cheating and then lose records because of athletes that chose to cheat. i wish we had more time to talk to you but we are at the end of the programme. enjoy your run. we've got to go for a run. coverage of the european team
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championships is on the red button from 12.50. that's all from us. this is bbc news. the headlines at ten. thousands of people have been evacuated from tower blocks in north london, over concerns about fire safety. they identified a number of issues in the blocks around the insulation, around gas pipes going into flats, around gas pipes going into flats, around fire doors, and the message to me was that the combination of the flammable external cladding and
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theseissues the flammable external cladding and these issues inside the block meant that the building wasn't safe. they have to do whatever it takes to get their buildings safe and any necessary works they do, if they need support from the government, we can work with them. some residents spent the night in hotels or on airbeds in a leisure centre. 83 people have refused to leave.
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