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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 24, 2017 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at ten. thousands of people have been evacuated from tower blocks in north london, over concerns about fire safety. they identified a number of issues in the blocks around the insulation, around gas pipes going into flats, around gas pipes going into flats, around fire doors, and the message to me was that the combination of the flammable external cladding and theseissues the flammable external cladding and these issues inside the block meant that the building wasn't safe. they have to do whatever it takes to get their buildings safe and any necessary works they do, if they need support from the government, we can work with them. some residents spent the night in hotels or on airbeds in a leisure centre. 83 people have refused to leave. the general advice is to get out and evacuate. but until circumstances
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change, i intend staying put. the other headlines on bbc news this morning leader of the commons andrea leadsom calls on broadcasters to be more patriotic when reporting on brexit negotiations. it's been a year it would be helpful if broadcasters were willing to be a bit patriotic. the country took a decision... it's an almighty battle in auckland as the lions fall behind the all blacks in their first test in new zealand. also in the next hour, radiohead take to the stage for glastonbury‘s opening night. 20 years after their first legendary performance at the festival, thom yorke loses himself for 120 minutes. and at 10:30, this week the travel show comes from ghana. good morning. i'm outside the swiss
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cottage leisure centre where more than 100 people have spent the night based on advice that people should leave the chilcots flats. their concerns are based around a number of issues. the four buildings are clad in similar material to grenfell tower, where at least 79 people died in a fire last week. some people, 83 households, have
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said they want to stay put, they don't want to leave. among those who have left, there's concern and questions about whether they actually needed to leave overnight in the way that they did. i'll be talking to the leader of the council ina talking to the leader of the council in a moment and put some of those questions to her. you can see people coming and going from the leisure centre. some people have been arriving with their belongings packed in travel bags in the last few minutes. you may be able to see that lady with a doing who is concerned about where she's going to stay where she can find that has pet—friendly accommodation. but one resident of one of the tower blocks who wanted to remain anonymous has been expressing her thoughts on what has been happening.” been expressing her thoughts on what has been happening. i am having a p0p has been happening. i am having a pop at you in a funny kind of way, but i'm so absolutely stressed.” know. why was hotels not looked at
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before we were all evacuated. i've sat ina before we were all evacuated. i've sat in a chair over here since 9 o'clock last night, i'm 72 years old. i suffer with emphysema. now i'm being told they can't rehouse me because i've got a doing. what do they want me to do with my doing? ! put my doing to sleep? ! we definitely can get you housing for your doing? but when? we have got hotel rooms identified at the moment, so what we'll do is go down, talk to the team. there are over 100 hotel rooms that are waiting for people, so let's go down and have a discussion and we'll find somewhere for you. yes, but what year are you coming back to me... i'm coming back to you right now. josh see ya gould, it's been a trying night for many people. i want to clarify details with you. we are talking more than
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600 who've moved voluntarily from the flat? that's right. and 83 households or 83 people wanting to stay? my last briefing was that 83 households wanted to stay. we are knocking on the doors and having conversations with those people at the moment so that is a moving picture. how many households and people do you think you will be able to persuade to move today? look, it was a really deeply distressing night. i got the news from the fire services that their belief was that the block was not safe to stay in at 5pm. we had to act incredibly swiftly to move people out of those blocks. people were having their doors knocked on late into the night. people were distressed. we needed to give them that accurate information at the time that i think in the morning, having the fire services with us, having those conversations, we'll be able to persuade people to move because
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those blocks are not safe. persuade people to move because those blocks are not safem persuade people to move because those blocks are not safe. if people still don't want to leave and leave their flats to go shopping or to go to work, would you then say to them you won't allow them to re—enter? anyone who wants to go back into the building to get possessions, they can go in and get possessions but they'll have to leave the building in halfan they'll have to leave the building in half an hour and then be accompanied by fire services. so if people left for whatever reason, would they be allowed to re—enter? the same would apply, they would have half an hour to go in and get their belongings. i understand more than a hundred people spent the night here at this leisure centre. what efforts are going on now? some people have already been found hotel accommodation. what efforts are going on now to find accommodation for this hundred or so people? it's such an unprecedented situation. we had 4,000 people no those blocks, so council staff, volunteers, have been working through the night. we have
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identified hotel accommodation and temporary housing, we are working with other boroughs and people here are moving out slowly, we are having those conversations, but of course people are tired. people have had a terrible night. we just people are tired. people have had a terrible night. wejust want people are tired. people have had a terrible night. we just want to get people into secure accommodation as quickly as possible. so where will you be putting them all? the lady you be putting them all? the lady you just talked about is on her way to britannia hotel which has provision for doings. ah, the lady with the doing? she's been found some ie come daily politics, yes. we have council housing building that we have been building in camden which we have expedited, we have 270 hotel rooms booked, all different hotels, so we have a range of different options, student accommodation. we are doing everything we can to move people in. a lot of people have chosen to go to friends and family, but if that was a temporary solution and they want to be housed, they should come to the centre and talk to our staff. 0bviously, the centre and talk to our staff. obviously, you have based you say, your decision to move people out on
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advice from the fire service. what do you say to those people that the manner in which this evacuation has been carried out has been a slightly knee—jerk reaction and that it could have been done in a more ordered way, if i can use that word? have been done in a more ordered way, ifi can use that word? so, i talked to the fire service at 5, they told me it was their view that they told me it was their view that the blocks were not safe. at that point, it's friday night, we were talking about 4,000 people, i was like, is there anything we can do to keep the blocks safe, with already had 24-7 keep the blocks safe, with already had 24—7 fire wardens in place; can we have fire engines outside and they said there was nothing they could do to guarantee the safety. in that situation, we had to act swiftly. so just to be clear, two days ago i remember reading the statement, in the studio you had announced 24—7 fire safety patrols, you considered the possibility of paying for fire crews to stay
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outside the tower blocks overnight but the fire service were saying, no, that won't give an absolute guarantee of safety? they said that what you would need is four outside each block and they didn't have that, you know, for them, serving all of london thatjust wasn't possible. they said there was nothing they could do collect livingively, they were working closely together to keep people safe in the blocks so we decided to move them out. 0bviously in the blocks so we decided to move them out. obviously we like to do things properly, we'd loved to have had a proper residents' meeting, shared advice, had conversations like previously, but we had to act fast to keep people safe. if it had been a matter of the exterior cladding and that is a big enough issue in itself of course, but if it had been purely to do with the exterior cladding, would people have been able to stay there, but i understand there are some interior issues as well? we were first in the queue to test on cladding. we find that the panelling was on the combustible material, on the end,
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but the material inside was safe. we thought the fire patrols then was enough to be safe. i had a meeting on thursday night, there were concerns raised. the fire service we re concerns raised. the fire service were checking in the day and there we re were checking in the day and there were internal issues, so with a combination of that and the external cladding, it was found that it wasn't safe. how are you going to fund all of this? do you know what, at the moment, we are focussed on getting scared tired people into accommodation, safe and secure, we are not concerned about money at this moment, we are going to act. later on we'll have those conversations with government, we'll wa nt conversations with government, we'll want support but it's not for right now, we have just want support but it's not for right now, we havejust got want support but it's not for right now, we have just got to act. so you don't have any idea of the cost at this stage? we don't. we had to just get a plan in place to move people as quickly as possible and people, resident safety was the priority, not cost. 0k. georgia gould, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us. much for taking the time to talk to us. on the issue of what all of this is going to cost, the local
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government and communities secretary, sajid javid has been saying that councils will get financial support. 0ur position has been very clear on this. public safety is absolutely paramount. you cannot put a price on people's lives. they're priceless. so local authorities, they have to do whatever it takes to get their buildings safe and any necessary works they do, if they need support from the government, we can work with them, absolutely. if there's a local authority and housing association — lyse not forget them, they own many of the tower blocks —— please — if they need financial support, not all will knees it, but if they do, we'll work with them to make sure they have the resources needed to do this work, absolutely that will not be put at risk. whatever is necessary to keep people safe, that work should happen, shouldn't be slowed down because of debates about costs, it should be work that should go on immediately and any council, any housing association that needs financial
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support, we'll make sure they get it. well, other councils in england are also taking action on fire safety — the leader of birmingham council, john clancy can join us now. birmingham has more than 200 tower blocks. bring us up—to—date with your assessment of the safety of those blocks? we have 213 tower blocks in birmingham. it's a huge estate with the largest local authority in europe. none of our tower blocks has the come bustible cladding that was on grenfell —— combustible cladding. we have a daily assessment of all of the tower blocks, we did that before grenfell and continue to do that, so we continue to inspect them every day. each block has a current fire safety certificate and we work very closely with the fire service. but nevertheless, we feel in all the assessment and speculation that's taken place assessment and speculation that's ta ken place over the assessment and speculation that's taken place over the last week or so, one of the things that in all of
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the assessments that was being punched out to me was the importance of sprinklers as a fire suppressant. how many of those blocks currently have sprinklers? we have sprinklers in almost all of them in relation to some communal areas and especially where there are waste shoots for example. but our proposal is toen sure that every flat has the fire suppressant sprinklers and indeed other fire suppressant facilities. we think that that is really, really important. we think it's incredibly important. we think it's incredibly important to actually provide reassurance to our tenants in our city because this is a really difficult time for them. it's an awful event in london. but, as i've said, there is actually a collective national trauma in relation to our tower blocks and people are going to bed afraid and we think it's really, really important that we say in birmingham, we will do whatever it
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ta kes, birmingham, we will do whatever it takes, we will find the funding that we can to ensure that we will do that and do whatever it takes in birmingham. so you are talking about retro fitting the tower blocks. do you have any idea how much that is going to cost and do you know where the money is going to come from? well, it took us a while — one of the things that happened was the west midlands fire chief basically said he believed that retro fitting of sprinklers should be one of our responses here. when your chief fire 0fficer responses here. when your chief fire officer of your region tells you that, as a leader of the city you have to listen to that. we started to look at the figures andth and it comes out at around £31 million. that is a huge sum of money. comes out at around £31 million. that is a huge sum of moneym comes out at around £31 million. that is a huge sum of money. it is. of course, clearly, preserving and keeping people safe, you can't put a figure on that. clearly not. this money does have to be found from somewhere. will it come with government help? well one thing is
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clear, ing government help? well one thing is clear,ing this a national emergency and there needs to be a national response. clearly, i heard what the secretary of state said earlier, and obviously i welcome that. there is not fully funding pledged. from our point of view, if that money doesn't come from government, we'll find it and we will do so. we'll look at our cap tap programme and bring forward and prioritise the retro fitting. if necessary , and prioritise the retro fitting. if necessary, we'll sell assets to do that. what matters here is we'll do what it takes in birmingham to do this. john clancy, leader of birmingham city council, thank you very much for talking to us here on the bbc news channel. we are outside swiss cottage leisure centre with people from the chilcots tower blocks here
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in camden in north london, they've spent the night here. the council leader says the council staff are urgently working to find accommodation for anyone who's spent the night here so they don't have to spend another night on an air bed. some people have been found accommodation in hotels or have gone to stay with family and friends. the situation is that more than 600 households have been evacuated since the council says the fire service warned them around 5 o'clock yesterday evening that the safety of those people in those blocks couldn't be guaranteed and the council took the decision to order this evacuation. more than 83 households or about 83 households though saying they don't want to leave. the council say they, along with the fire service, will be talking to those people in those households today and trying to persuade them to do so. they don't have an idea, they say, yet of how they are going to pay for this. they say safety is the first priority. we
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have heard from the government promising financial asix tan for work that is needed. whether that will cover the cost of temporarily accommodating people, we don't know. for the moment from camden, back to you in the studio ben. thousands of people have been evacuated from tower blocks over concerns about fire safety. some residents spent the night in hotels or on air beds in a leisure centre. 83 households have refused to leave. andrea leadsom calls on broadcasters to be more patriotic when reporting on brexit negotiations. time for the sport now. here is holly. i don't know if it's good news but the british and irish lions seem to be heading for a defeat in the first test against the all blacks in auckland after a try apiece it was
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just about honours even at half time. the all blacks went ahead but they have scored two more tries an with just ten minutes left, its 30-8. the all with just ten minutes left, its 30—8. the all blacks are on a 23—year unbeaten run. elsewhere, scotla nd 23—year unbeaten run. elsewhere, scotland and ireland have wrapped up their summer tours. townsend suffered his first defeat in charge of scotland. they lost 27—22 to fiji. ireland completed a series whitewash over japan with fiji. ireland completed a series whitewash overjapan with a 35—13 win in tokyo. the women's cricket world cup starts today with the icc hoping it will be a turning point for the whip's game. england go into the tournament on the back of some strong warm—up performances. they ta ke strong warm—up performances. they take on india in the opening match in derby where a sell—out crowd of 3,000 is expected. in derby, a group of professional sportswomen prepare for a competition which aims to be noticed around the world. they're england and england is where it began. in
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1973, birmingham hosted the final of the first ever women's world cup. won by england, these players basically had to pay to play. heather knight is a year into her captaincy of the current england team, first game against india, winning nation this year, gets £660,000. money has come a long way. is that an incentive? is that something the players will think about whose you go into the tournament? no, i don't think so. 0bviously tournament? no, i don't think so. obviously it's a nice touch by the icc to show where the women's game is at at the moment. it's a good statement by them in terms of moving towards parity. firstly the priority is lifting the trophy at lord's. the key is to unlock the potential of india. that's the market for cricket. signs of progress? there was a kit launched featuring women's players alongside the men. india's women have never won the world cup. 0utsiders again this time. victory would speed up the quality. this is
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a stage where most of the matches have been broadcasted and it increases the viewing. india is a country boro cricket is a religion. boysin country boro cricket is a religion. boys in state schools if england an wales still get more opportunity to play cricket than girls. inspiration often play cricket than girls. inspiration ofte n co m es play cricket than girls. inspiration often comes from the top. the world cup, england's opening batter lauren winfield will miss this match through injury. the captain is fit, calm and ready. england have won the toss and put india in to bat. that starts in ten minutes. jason roy became the first player in t20 cricket history to be given out for obstructing the field. england were cruising towards their target of 175 when south africa claimed roy had deliberately got in the way of a throw and he was dismissed. england needed a four
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from the last bowl but dawson missed it. the series decider is at cardiff tomorrow. british men's tennis number three dan evans says he's let a lot of people down after being provisionally suspended after being tested positive for cocaine. he could be banned for up to four yea rs. could be banned for up to four years. i was notified a few days ago that i fail add drugs test in april where i tested positive for cocaine. this was taken out of the competition and context completely unrelated to tennis. i made a mistake and i must face up to it. i do not condone for one second to anyone that this was acceptable behaviour. i've let a lot of people down. my family, coach, team, sponsors, british tennis and my fans. ican sponsors, british tennis and my fans. i can only deeply apologise from the bottom of my heart. kvitova's come back is still going well. she's through to the semi—finals in birmingham after beating her opponent. this was her
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fifth match since returning after she was stabbed in the hand six months ago. max verstappen dominated in the grand prix but gave his mechanics extra work to do with seconds remaining of the second session. the afternoon shadows caused problems for a few drivers. palmer struggling to judge his braking distance. winter won the big race on day four of royal ascot. the fillies took centre stage in the coronation staiks and winter ridden by ryan moore and trained by aidan 0'brien, launched a late charge. that is all the sport for now. you can keep up—to—date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. more in the next hour. more than 100 people are feared
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buried, after a massive landslide in china's sichuan province around 40 homes have destroyed in a village in maoxian county, after the side of a mountain collapsed. a video, posted by the chinese state media, shows the rescue operation that's happening. emergency teams are having to climb over a vast area in which bulldozers are being used to clear their way. the bbc‘s stephen mcdonnell is following the story from beijing and sent this update. the bad news is that it's being estimated there could be more than 140 people trapped underneath this huge landslide. 40 homes covered in those rocks in rubble and mud. the good news though, according to the local government, is that apparently, a couple and a baby were found alive underneath the rubble and rescued. now, as is the way with these things, when somebody is pulled out alive, it urges the rescu e rs pulled out alive, it urges the rescuers to go on to continue the
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huntin rescuers to go on to continue the hunt in the hope that they might find someone alive. when you see those pictures, it's hard to imagine anyone's survived it but they are trying very hard to reach anyone else that they can. the leader of the house of commons, andrea leadsom has said it would be helpful if broadcasters "were willing to be a bit patriotic" with regards to brexit. she made the comment while being questioned by newsnight‘s emily maitliss about the uk's position in talks with the eu. we had various different elected eu politicians saying it's a good start, of course it's very... it's beena start, of course it's very... it's been a year, it's been a year...m would be helpful if broadcasters we re would be helpful if broadcasters were willing to be a bit patriotic. the country took a decision this government is determined to deliver sorry are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for asking how negotiations are going? we all need to pull together as a country, we
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took a decision a year ago today to leave the european union. the outgoing leader of the liberal democrats, tim farron, has described andrea leadsom's remarks as "a sinister threat to the free media" — and said she should apologise. radiohead topped the bill on the opening night of glastonbury, 20 years after one of their most famous performances at the festival. today will see katy perry and the foo fighters take to the pyramid stage. lizo mzimba is at the festival. thousands coming out of their tent now and many seem to feel it was a successful opening day for glastonbury. artists like lord, royal blood, playing at various sites across glastonbury, dizzee rascal played too. all topped off by radiohead, playing here 20 years after their very first glastonbury
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appearance. # i wish i was special #. for thousands of fans, radiohead really are so very special. receiving a rapturous reception in front of a packed pyramid stage. # i'm a creep, i'm a weirdo. this was the musical climax to a day that featured a few unexpected celebrity appearances. # by a tender young maiden... earlier, kris kristofferson was accompanied on stage by a guitar—playing johnny depp. watching them, another hollywood star, brad pitt. and one more famous face admitted that this was set to be his very first glastonbury. yeah, 42 years old and it is my first festival. first time here. i am excited. slightly nervous because i don't know what to expect but, obviously,
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apart from the great acts and people having fun. i am looking forward to it. later today, names who will make an appearance on the main stage include katy perry, foo fighters and labour party leaderjeremy corbyn. the weather is much more in keeping to what regular glastonbury goers expect, after a few days of dry heat, there's been a bit of rain overnight and this morning a bit of mud appearing across the site. but not too much. people do not seem to mind after such a successful first day. they're looking forward to another two days of music here which will be topped off on the main pyramid stage on monday night by ed sheeran. thank you very much. let us find out what the rest of the weather is doing with stav. last week we were looking at
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temperatures in low 30s, this weekend something a bit more normal for the time of year. it will feel on the cool side, particularly across the northern half where we have some strong winds. sunshine and showers for many this week, but it should feel warm, particularly today. many eastern areas sheltered from the wind are seeing some good spells of sunshine. the culprit for the strong wind across the north of the country is this area of low pressure, deep for the time of year. weather fronts further south bringing the thicker cloud and damp weather across glastonbury through the afternoon. the odd shower here and there. when the sunshine breaks through, it should feel pleasantly warm. for the rest of the afternoon, i think eastern areas always best with the sunshine. further north, we have the gales, gusts of 40 to maybe
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50mph across scotland in towards 0rkney and shetland. blustery showers may be merging together to produce longer spells of rain towards the end of the day. the best of the sunshine across eastern england, northern ireland variable cloud and brightness at times. the best of the brightness for england to the near higher ground next to the pennines. further south, a scattering of showers. temperatures ranging between 20—22. it could make 24, 25 across the south—east. this evening, the showers begin to fizzle away from central and southern and eastern parts. for most it should be dry. more cloud piling into the west by the end of the night. longer spells of rain in north—west england, to the south—west parts of england and western wales. temperature—wise, quite mild. the windy weather pulls away as the low pressure moves off in towards scandinavia. we are into a run of more north—west winds, so a touch cooler across the board. the
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cooler air will introduce a few blustery showers. the further south you are, more in the way of cloud. patchy rain remaining in the west. temperature—wise, 15—21 or 22 in the south—east.

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