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tv   Breakfast  BBCNEWS  June 25, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and christian fraser. more failed fire—safety tests on high rise buildings. every sample of cladding looked at so far has failed to meet safety standards. 3a towers in 17 areas of england have now been identified as a fire risk. following the grenfell tower tragedy as many as 600 blocks may need to be examined. the government says work is taking place around the clock. hundreds of residents in north london have spent a second night away from their homes after four buildings were evacuated, but some are still refusing to go. good morning, it's saturday 25th june. blackmail fears are raised after a cyber attack on parliament. in sport, england get a shock in the opening match of the women's world cup.
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they were outplayed by india, falling short in their run chase. and it was worth the wait. two years after a serious accident meant the foo fighters had to pull out of glastonbury, they make their triumphant return. and the weather. good morning, a north—south split today, most places largely dry, brighter and cooler in the north, cloudy and slightly milder in the south. all the details for you in about 15 minutes. stav, thanks very much. good morning. first, our main story. fire safety tests on 3a samples of cladding from tower blocks in england have failed, according to new figures released by the government. that means a 100% failure rate so far. in north london, residents have spent a second night in temporary accommodation after camden council evacuated four high rise blocks because of fire safety concerns. nick quraishi has the latest.
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testing around the clock. the government says as many as 600 high—rise blocks will need to be checked for fire safety. councils are being urged to prioritise buildings there are most worried about. so far 3a samples of cladding examined across 17 councils in england haven't met the required standards, a 100% failure rate. the councils include manchester, hounslow and plymouth. fire authorities are also having to examine exposed pipes, cable ducts, escape routes and fire doors. it's a huge undertaking and it's notjust residential blocks. checks are taking place in scores of nhs buildings like hull royal infirmary. ministers say a failed test doesn't necessarily mean a building has to be evacuated but in the london hundreds of people are spending a second night in temporary
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accommodation. camden council says it was left with no choice because of multiple fire safety failures. some, though, still don't want to go. the council officials came to the door, banging on the door, get out, get out, but the chap round the hallway said she's not going, she's getting on for 80, she can't go anywhere, she's got a cat. by night the pockets of resistance against evacuation are evident. the council has said it has spent more than £500,000 paying for hotels. it has promised to reimburse residents who have had to fork out for accommodation. but for those who have refused to move for a second night, they're being warned they could still be moved. nick quraishi, bbc news. catriona renton is in camden. some people are irritated about how it has all unfolded, catriona?m some people are irritated about how it has all unfolded, catriona? it is much calmer today than yesterday
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morning when we were here, when we we re morning when we were here, when we were here yesterday at around 11pm, it was busy with lots of people asking questions. i've been told overnight many more people have been taken to hotels so now a lot of people are in temporary accommodation, whether that's hotels 01’ accommodation, whether that's hotels or with family and friends. i've spoken with some people who stayed here overnight, we understand a0 people stayed here overnight, amongst them, children, i spoke to aao —year—old, he's really tired and he's gone two nights without any sleep, he has school tomorrow so he hopes he has somewhere nice to in which to stay tonight and the council we are told has found him somewhere ——1a—year—old. some people were defiant, they are staying, last night when i looked there were some lights on, fewer than the night before, some 20 families don't want to leave. abdi,
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this morning i spoke to him, he doesn't want to leave, he has a two—month—old baby and he said he feels safer until the council find him somewhere. £100 has been given out to every household today, that is happening here. there will be a special eid celebration for members of the muslim community because people at camden council say they don't want the people at the housing estate to miss out. thanks, such a difficult situation. in about half an hour we'll be checking in with one of the residents refusing to leave their home on the chalcots estate. a cyber attack on the parliamentary computer system appears to have been contained according to government sources. officials at the houses of parliament said there had been a determined attempt by hackers to identify weak passwords for e—mail accounts used by mps, peers and their staff. conservative mp andrew bridgen has raised concerns that it could leave people open to blackmail. the national cyber security centre is now investigating what happened. yemen is now facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world
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according to the world health organization and the un children's agency. there have been more than 200,000 suspected cases and 1,300 deaths. the outbreak has spread because of the collapse of the health system during the civil war the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, has urged theresa may to set up a cross—party commission to advise her on brexit. writing in the mail on sunday, he says such a commission could hold the ring for the differences to be fought out and draw much of the poison from the debate. the government says imports such as coffee, clothing and cocoa products should not see any notable price rise after brexit. a8 of the world's poorest countries will continue to have duty free access to the uk. our business correspondent joe lynam has more. some of our most popular ingredients and products, like cocoa or bananas, are grown in some of the world's poorest countries. do help almost 50
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of them expand their economies, the eu already allows them to export their goods tariff free into europe. now the government has confirmed that this will be maintained after britain leaves the eu. it means products such as bananas, sugar and coffee should not be any more expensive for uk households when imported after 2019. the uk imports almost £20 billion a year tariff free from a8 developing countries, including haiti, ethiopia, bangladesh and sierra leone. exports of arms and defence equipment are not included in this trade agreement. we want as we leave the european union to be champions of global free european union to be champions of globalfree trade, pointing out european union to be champions of global free trade, pointing out that it has already taken more people out of poverty in the last 25 years than in the whole of human history up to that point. we've got to keep that momentum going, we got to get the big economies opening up and we've got to give the open trinity is to the developing countries to trade their way out of poverty. shaming
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britain quits the european customs union as well as the eu it will be free to conduct its own trade deals with any country. that could allow it to expand the list of poor countries with tariff free access to uk markets in future. joe lynam, bbc news. six years since making his glastonbury debut on one of its smallest stages, ed sheeran will be closing the festival as the top billed act later on this evening. last night the us rock band foo fighters finally had their chance to headline at pilton farm two years after an injury meant they were forced to pull out of the festival. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is there. a headline set by rock band foo fighters... here he is, jeremy corbyn! he wasn't one of the headline artists, but perhaps unsurprisingly he drew one of the biggest crowds so far. do you know politics is actually about everyday
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life. the labour leader was always going to be a big draw for a left—leaning audience at a festival like this. jeremy corbyn's appearance is another demonstration of his current popularity with young people in particular. among the day's musical highlights, a vibrant, energetic katy perry. and liam gallagher advocating don't look back in anger to those who died in the london and manchester terror attacks and the grenfell to our victims. lizo mzimba, bbc news, glastonbury. idid i did watch katy perry. that was quite a moment, she was good. i was
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dancing around the sitting room in my pyjamas. i didn't get as far as the foo fighters, that's the life we lead! we like a good panda story here on breakfast, so let's tell you about some new arrivals in germany. meng meng and jiao qing were jetted in yesterday as a gift from china. later, they were unveiled at a press conference where all was going well until the chinese ambassador got a little too close to one of the cages. ididn't i didn't know they did that! you don't hear that, do you? that's the sound of an angry panda. the pair are the only pandas in germany and will shortly be transported to their new home at berlin zoo, where it's hoped they'll breed. of course, a lot of people are not terribly comfortable at looking at pandas in small, confined spaces. saw their teeth, you don't see them much, do you? shall we look at the papers? let's start with the 0bserver, ministers in panic u—turn
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over fire safety in schools. there we re over fire safety in schools. there were big rows around the grenfell tower tragedy, part of the reason was deregulation and getting rid of red tape. the observer is saying they are going to go the other way, cost saving measures are going to be cut in favour of a safety first attitude, especially with things like schools and health centres and hospitals around the country. it is reversed thinking within government. the cyber attack that has hit westminster on the front page of the telegraph and the sunday times this morning saying there are links to a foreign state being involved. they weren't aware of the severity of this, an attempt to compromise people's passwords. 10,000 people working in and around westminster have been told to change their passwords as a result of this but one 01’ passwords as a result of this but one or two mps are pretty unhappy, suggesting that the possibility of blackmail amongst obviously other sensitive issues being compromised.
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let's show you the sunday times, a story we will talk about this morning, blackmail danger after foreign state hacks mps. there was a story this week were 1000 passwords of mps were on sale on social media. this was a precaution. they knew they were under attack so they shut down the system so mps and peers weren't compromised. interestingly, looking at the sunday telegraph today, they say there's a prop up ca rizza today, they say there's a prop up carizza campaign going on in government today but there's two stories between the sunday times and the telegraph about who might succeed —— teresa. but philip hammond saying we need to go to the next generation, whoever that might be! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: more failed safety tests on tower blocks across england, every sample of cladding examined so far is a fire risk. 0fficials investigate a cyber attack on the houses of parliament say
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the threat has been contained. it's believed hackers attempted to gain access to mps e—mails. also coming up in the programme: spencer kelly and the team will have all the latest technology news in click. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. a mixed bag this morning, stav, a bit cloudy over here? that looks spectacular. lovely, a lovely sunset, quite cloudy out there, some gorgeous breaks like this one in the north—east. we've got some photos of beautiful sunrises across the south coast, so not all cloudy but generally today it's looking cloudy across england and wales compared to yesterday. still windy in the north as the pressure chart shows the area of low pressure pulling away. the winds and the gales easing down, turning brighter across scotland and northern ireland but further south the weather front will sink south. a few showers around, the odd heavy
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one, but generally light. the best of the sunshine for scotland into northern ireland and reaching northern england as well. the winds slowly easing down as well. on the cool side, across—the—board slowly easing down as well. on the cool side, across—the—boa rd today slowly easing down as well. on the cool side, across—the—board today it will be to look than yesterday. in england and wales, disappointingly cloudy because of the weather front sinking south, showery outbreaks of rain but many places should escape and stay fairly dry. a disappointing day again at glastonbury, great, leaden skies. the odds that of rain in the air, temperatures around 18 01’ in the air, temperatures around 18 or 19. for the tennis at queen's, also staying fairly cloudy with the odds that of rain, temperatures around 20. a few degrees down on yesterday. the weather fronts across england and wales will eventually move southwards overnight and clear away and the winds will ease down across—the—board, with away and the winds will ease down across—the—boa rd, with clear skies and the winds from the north—west, julian white than of late, rural areas down to single figures ——
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julian white. next week things are quite unsettled. this era of low pressure. uncertainty as to its extent and timing, it will move northwards to western parts of the country to bring a cloudy day for western fringes of britain and an increasingly wet day for northern ireland, some of the rain getting do north—west england and south—west scotla nd north—west england and south—west scotland but further south and east, scooping up warm airfrom france scotland but further south and east, scooping up warm air from france so quite warm with some sunshine. next week, like i mentioned, it will be more unsettled because of areas of low pressure, breezy at times as well and rather cloudy. towards the end of the week it looks like a mixture of heavy showers and sunny spells. we were all complaining last week, it was too hot! be careful what you wish for! will to reindeer now — don't worry we're not starting the countdown to christmas already. for the natives of alaska, the challenge of climate change means that traditional hunting seasons are becoming shorter, so there's a need to breed new stock for farming. our us correspondentjames cook has travelled to america's most northerly state to find out more.
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this is roger. isn't he cute? don't worry. he is a pet. but his cousins may not be so lucky. reindeer meat is lean, tender, high in protein and low in cholesterol. in russia they needed is astute, in finland as part of the soup and in alaska... we load up of the soup and in alaska... we load up the fat bass with lots of berries, different kinds of berries. it is tasty. traditionally this land was home to hunters of wild caribou. but as temperatures rise, everything changes. the coast of alaska, people are used to fending for themselves, to surviving without outside help. but even here, there is now a feeling that the rest of the world
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should pay attention, because local problems are becoming global concerns. and while politicians wonder those problems, these people are finding that hunting is harder than ever. the elders, they are watching climate change and verses back on the day when they knew exactly when to go hunting and to do this and that. now they have to play with the weather. the winters are colder and a little shorter and spring is coming earlier and a lot warmer. and so the reshaping of alaska, with permafrost melting and place is thawing provides an opportunity. we have millions of hectares of the most productive ranch land in the world. but it is underutilised. we can put reindeer on these ranch land is. but there is
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a problem. reindeer have good pr. we need reindeer to feed people and so i guess it is myjob to take the magic out of christmas. plans are now off or to fly thousands of reindeer to remote alaskan villages forfarms. reindeer to remote alaskan villages for farms. rump of reindeer to remote alaskan villages forfarms. rump of rudolph reindeer to remote alaskan villages for farms. rump of rudolph could yet become an alaskan delicacy. i don't know of this sort of christmas in several months time is what makes you happy later this morning bath... dashmac later this morning we'll be meeting two people who've made it on to this yea r‘s happy list. so we were thinking — what is making you happy this morning? for us, when we arrived in the office we found that one of the production team has a brand new puppy! look at him! that makes me happy. you can e—mail us — bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or tweet us using #bbcbrea kfast
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look at his little ears! goes lapping up and down. so sweet. now it's time for the film review with ben brown and mark kermode. we'll be back with the headlines at 6:30. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so, mark, what do we have this week? very interesting bunch this week. we have in this corner of the world, a very impressive japanese anime. transformers: the last knight, the saga rumbles on. and hampstead, a film which does exactly what it says on the tin. so, in this corner of the world, a war movie with a difference? interesting.
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it is an anime based on a manga of the same name. it goes from the ‘30s to the mid—a05. a young girl, when she gets to the age of 18, marries someone she has barely met before. she goes to live in a different home and start a new life of which she makes the most, but meanwhile the spectre of war is looming in the background. but normal life carries on. here is a clip. they speak japanese.
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thunder rumbles what is impressive about this is that, like a film like grave of the fireflies, it talks about a very dark subject matter, in a way that has an innocence and universality that a live—action movie couldn't do. we saw from that clip the cloud that we know is moving towards hiroshima. and our heroine is an artist, and at certain moments in the movie she looks up and sees explosions in the sky as explosions of paint. there are moments when the narrative deals with very dark stuff that you would get in a war movie, but it does so by the animation unravelling and becoming drawings and becoming fragments of animation, and, by looking at global events and tragedies through the eyes of a particular character, it manages to watch as if from a distance or slightly sculptured, without ever looking away
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from harsh realities. this opens on wednesday, and if you like a film like your name, which was a big hit, and is returning to cinemas soon, i think this is well worth checking out. it has won numerous awards and it's easy to see why. a real integrity to it. the triumph is it approaches a difficult subject matter in a way that, to me, seems universal. and it does that thing that animation can do that a live—action film can't do, to look at the world in a different way, to make us see these events in a different and personal way. i liked it very much and i think you will too. thank you. and transformers: the last knight — i suspect you don't like it as much and i suspect i won't either. let's talk about it. it's one of the least offensive of the transformers movies. it's the latest michael bay smash. it looks back to the past to arthurian legend and wibbles around in stonehenge and looks for mysticism and out to outer space for an interplanetary conspiracy.
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it's basically transformers meets monty python and spinal tap, but without the jokes. anthony hopkins is in it and he's laughing all the way to the bank, as this kind of eccentric aristocrat who has a butler who is like c3p0 from star wars. he believes the only way to save the planet is to bring together an historian and mark wahlberg'sjunkyard king to save the world, which, frankly, on the evidence of the film, is not worth saving. 0n the plus side, there are less leering shots with the camera looking up the skirts of its performers than we have had in previous michael bay movies. his pornographic sensibility is toned down slightly. the plot makes no sense whatsoever, despite the endless scenes of people explaining the plot to each other, and indeed pointing at things that are happening on screen and telling us what we are looking at. it is massively incoherent, staggeringly dull and whoppingly overlong, although in terms of the rest of the transformers movies it is less offensive.
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i was not offended, i was just bored. it was like being shouted to sleep. did you fall asleep? no, i have to say, my job is to stay awake. believe me, there were many moments in which i was going, you have to stay awake, something interesting might happen. no, it's ok, it's not going to. got it. now, hampstead, a romcom for the older audience? you've seen the poster, right? that tells you everything you need to know, as does the title. thinking about hampstead, the heath, expensive properties and some artisan residence. 0ver there is highgate cemetery and a pond... at the centre of it, brendan gleeson is a beardy wild man living in a shack he's built on the heath under the radar. he is under threat of eviction from property developers, and along comes diane keaton, the recently widowed hampstead resident, who tries to help him save his shack and gets very little thanks for her work. here is a clip.
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may i ask you something? sure. yeah, it's about what happened the other day, and those people — they really wanted to help you and i do too. i don't need any help. of course you do. we all need help. i didn't ask for any. well, what do you mean? look, i'm no—one's charity case, 0k? i'm a man who lives as he chooses to, and i'm not going to any court or any hearing either. no—one is taking my home from me! 0k, all right, mr angry. 0k, listen, there's no reason to wake the dead here — none. the dead make more sense to me. oh, my god. ok, that's enough. i don't know... how can you expect anyone to put up with all this nonsense? all right, i'm sorry, i'm sorry. i was wrong. well, i don't know. no, i'm sorry. i really am. it won't happen again. here is the thing with this film, i like both of those performers
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and you would have to be pretty hard—hearted to get annoyed with the movie, although i have read that some reviews have taken against it. it is basically... you know the movie you think it is? it is exactly that movie. in the back of it there is a true story, isn't there? there really was a guy who had a shack and he had to fight a legal battle, although i have to say this film's relationship with reality is inspired by that true story, but it's passing at very best. compared to this, notting hill, the richard curtis movie, looks like a really hard—hitting, tough and gritty film about urban crime. or something like truly madly deeply suddenly looks like a scary gothic horror movie in comparison. it is about as twee as it's possible for a movie to be. and itjust does all the things you expect this kind of movie to do. but i didn't dislike it, because i like those two performers. i like their characters. despite the fact i don't believe in any of it at all. it is a film which is best summed up as perfect wednesday afternoon
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viewing, which will go down well with a cup of tea and a biscuit, and that's the kind of movie it is. and it's supposed to be a romcom. is it romantic and funny? it is romantic and i laughed a couple of times. a lot of the scenes in hampstead, you watch, thinking, no, you could not afford to get a cup of tea there, you couldn't get a parking space there. there is no way that would happen! now, best out at the moment. by the time it gets dark, you will have to search this movie out because it is a limited release and an extraordinary thai movie by anocha suwichakornpong. it starts off as a film about an atrocity that happened in the mid—19705 and somebody trying to make a film about this. and then what happens is it becomes a much more amorphous study of the relationship between memory and history, and the inability of cinema to capture history perfectly.
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it's a film which takes in the whole history of cinema right back to melies and forward to digital technology. it's witty and moving and it's strange. it keeps looping back on itself and is clearly a film which cannot be described in terms of plot, but if you like the films of, say, apichatpong weerasetha kul, which i know you do, then it's really well worth seeking out. but it's a very small release and you will need to seek it out, but i was knocked out by it. i went in with no knowledge of it at all and, although i did not understand a lot of it, it was really fascinating. i really enjoyed it. it's called by the time it gets dark. 0k, and best dvd is a movie you have talked a lot about. and you will talk again, so that is fine. here's the thing with moonlight, you cannot say too many times how good it is. this became a major award winner. when first seen, it was considered to be a little independent arthouse movie with limited appeal, but i think it is beautifully directed and fantastically played,
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story of a life in three separate chapters, and it does everything that you want cinema to do. it tells a story that makes you feel involved in the characters, even if your life is nothing like theirs at all. it's compassionate and humane and thrilling in terms of its cinematic construction. and i confess i have seen it four times now, and i will probably go back and watch it again. wow. i have seen it once. but you loved it? i did love it. see it again, you will love it even more. 0k, fine. now, a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that's it for this week, though. thanks for watching. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast
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with rachel burden and christian fraser. coming up before 7am, holly will be here with the sport but first a summary of this morning's main news. fire safety tests on 3a samples of cladding from tower blocks in england have failed, according to new figures released by the government. that means a 100% failure rate so far. in north london, residents have spent a second night in temporary accommodation after camden council evacuated four high rise blocks because of fire safety concerns. nick quraishi has the latest. testing around the clock. the government says as many as 600 high—rise blocks will need to be checked for fire safety. councils are being urged to prioritise buildings they're most worried about. so far 3a samples of cladding examined across 17 councils in england haven't met
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the required standards, a 100% failure rate. the councils include manchester, hounslow and plymouth. fire authorities are also having to examine exposed pipes, cable ducts, escape routes and fire doors. it's a huge undertaking and it's not just residential blocks. checks are taking place in scores of nhs buildings ministers say a failed test doesn't necessarily mean a building has to be evacuated, but in north london hundreds of people are spending a second night in temporary accommodation. camden council says it was left with no choice because of multiple fire safety failures. some, though, still don't want to go. the council officials came to the door, banging on the door, "get out, get out," but the chap round the hallway said she's not going, she's getting on for 80, she can't go anywhere, she's got a cat. by night the pockets of resistance against evacuation are evident. nick quraishi, bbc news.
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yemen is now facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world according to the world health organization and the un children's agency. there have been more than 200,000 suspected cases and 1,300 deaths. the outbreak has spread because of the collapse of the health system during the civil war. a cyber attack on the parliamentary computer system appears to have been contained according to government sources. officials at the houses of parliament said there had been a determined attempt by hackers to identify weak passwords for e—mail accounts used by mps, peers and their staff. conservative mp andrew bridgen has raised concerns that it could leave people open to blackmail. the national cyber security centre is now investigating what happened. we know that our public services we re we know that our public services were attacked, so it's not at all surprisingly that there should be an attempt to hack into parliamentary e—mails. it's a warning to
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everybody, whether they're in parliament or elsewhere, that they need to do everything possible to maintain their own cyber security, including having complex and therefore safer codewords. better late than never. the us rock band foo fighters finally took the top billed slot at last night's glastonbury festival. the band's front man dave grohl apologised for being two years late to the gig and performed a number of their best known songs. he broke his leg. they were originally meant to headline the festival in 2015 but that injury forced them to pull outjust weeks before. you've heard of crufts, but there's an alternative dog competition that you might not be familiar with. this is martha. she's a neapolitan mastiff and she's just been named this year's world's ugliest dog. she beat 13 other contenders to claim the title, winning a trophy and £1,200. the big—jowled crowd—pleaser won overjudges by sprawling across the stage instead of doing any tricks. the event usually includes lots of dogs who have been rescued. what do they call those, chinese
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crested dogs? not totally beautiful. i'm glad we're not seeing their owners, aren't dogs meant to look like their owners? big jowl. martha's owner is very nice, looks nothing like her! no big jowls! on that note! thanks for the introduction! thanks for that! that wasn't a link at all! i thought she wasn't a link at all! i thought she was gorgeous personally! i thought she was beautiful. so, cricket? not a good start, was it? i was listening to them in the week and i had big hopes. it's like everything at the minute, a theme rolling that we have high hopes for the yesterday for the women's world cup but there was one thing to take away is it is helping the sport. that's what the
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tournament was about, changing it around but still for england not the result they wanted. they are the hosts of the women's world cup, but they ended up losing by 35 runs against india in derby and that would have been a record—breaking victory if they have made their target of 282 but they fell short. think globally, what english cricket needed was to develop interest. locally and decent crowd expected early england wickets, instead they saw one of the most exciting young talents in world cricket enjoying herself. she made 90 in a style to light up any occasion. supported by her teammates and also by dropped england catches, this one was beyond beaumont on the boundary but fast bowler katherine brunt had been blunted. india made 281. whenever england seemed to be getting close in the chase, runouts held them back, that was captain heather
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knight gone. fran wilson played the innings of her career so far, 81 and england hoping. guess what, she was run out, replays revealing her bat wasn't grounded. in the end england we re wasn't grounded. in the end england were 35 runs short, their preparation had seemed strong, i wondered if on this big occasion some of the players might have frozen. we didn't start the way we wa nted frozen. we didn't start the way we wanted to which meant we were always struggling uphill, but something we will have to look at. i don't think it was anything to do with freezing, we didn't quite bowl the way we wa nted we didn't quite bowl the way we wanted to and didn't put the pressure back on —— india put the pressure back on —— india put the pressure back on us. a significant and even historic result in women's cricket but it doesn't meaning and are out. remember initially all the eight teams play each other in a round robin stage and england will expect to win their next match in leicester against pakistan on tuesday. mind you, they expected to win their opening match here against india.joe win their opening match here against india. joe wilson, bbc news, derby.
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lions head coach warren gatland said his side must be more physical after they were tamed by the all blacks in the first test in auckland. they lost by 30—15, so he's likely to change things around for their next match, against the hurricanes on tuesday. with two tests to come, gatland says don't write them off just yet. we said if we did drop a couple of games it wouldn't be the end of the world because it was about improving and getting better from world because it was about improving and getting betterfrom week world because it was about improving and getting better from week to week and getting better from week to week and we've demonstrated that as a group. we've got better the longer we've been in new zealand, the longer time we've had together, the more trainings and more combinations and experience, the opposition of new zealand rugby and we said we'd do that and i think we've achieved that so far. lewis hamilton said the pressure was amazing after he produced what he called a beautiful lap to take pole for this afternoon's azerbaijan grand prix. when the session was held up by a crash, the drivers only had time for one flying lap at the end of qualifying
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and hamilton went almost half a second quicker than his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas. it was all or nothing. the lap just got better and better throughout. i saw valtteri bottas just ahead, i knew he was doing a good lap, i came across and i knew coming down to the last corner, please be enough. i'm ecstatic. roger federer is in really good form on grass in the run—up to wimbledon. he reached the final of the halle open in germany with a straight sets win over karen khachanov. federer is back up to fifth in the world rankings and he'll be looking for a 19th grand slam title at wimbledon, which starts a week tomorrow. and in the other warm—up event at queen's marin cilic beat gilles muller to set up a meeting with feliciano lopez in today's final. cilic has only had his serve broken once in the tournament so far. petra kvitova says she's feeling no pain and couldn't have imagined a better comeback as she reached her first final since her playing hand was injured
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in a knife attack six months ago. she'll face australia's ashleigh barty in the final of the aegon classic in birmingham, after her semi—final opponent lucie safa rova was forced to retire. former england rugby league boss steve mcnamara had a losing start at catalans head coach as they were beaten 2a—16 at warrington in the super league. aiden 0'brien finished royal ascot as champion trainer for the eighth time. and the feature race was won by the 9—2 shot the tin man. the second—favourite stormed through in the diamond jubilee stakes, with around three quarters of a furlong to go. there were some strong performances from great britain's athletes at the european team championships in lille. at one point they led the standings but they finished the second day of three in third place. eilidh doyle produced one of the best performances, running a season—best in the a00—metre hurdles. england will meet malaysia this afternoon in the third/fourth placed playoff at the hockey
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world league in london. they were beaten 2—0 by the netherlands in the semi—finals but if they win this afternoon, they'll reach the world league final in india this december. it was a largely disappointing saturday for britain's boxers at the european championships in ukraine, picking upjust one gold out of a possible seven. that went to liverpool's 21—year—old peter mcgrail in the bantamweight division. sir ben ainslie has admitted that his team got aspects of their boat design and strategy wrong after failing to qualify for the america's cup final. they were comprehensively beaten by team new zealand and ainslie is planning some changes. for sure we're going to have to mix things upa for sure we're going to have to mix things up a little bit. after a couple of weeks of sitting back and reflecting on it i'm quite clear in the direction i want to take the team. probably will be a few difficult conversations, but that's
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the nature of development sport, you have to keep evolving and moving forwards and we've got a great core tea m forwards and we've got a great core team here, i couldn't be prouder of the achievements of everyone involved and now excited to move forward to the next cup and an exciting time ahead. a lot of disappointments coming through against new zealand. a lot of disappointments coming through against new zealandm a lot of disappointments coming through against new zealand. it will turn, keep the faith! you say that but i did say do you think the lions could win and both of you said no!|j think could win and both of you said no!” think we were feeling burned after yesterday morning but we will build it up during the week. when council officials knocked on the doors of 650 flats on the chalcots estate in north london on friday night, most of the residents heeded their advice to evacuate immediately due to fire safety concerns. but a small number, thought to be around 20, are refusing to move. one of them is roger evans and we can speak to him now. hi, roger. how are you doing this morning? good morning. to be honest i'm feeling quite nervous and
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scared, not because of the building, i'm feeling intimidated and bullied by camden council representatives. tell us a little bit more about that. we have to say we don't have camden council here to respond directly, but what intimidation are you talking about? i went out yesterday afternoon to get away from what's happening and when returned to the tower block last night there we re to the tower block last night there were security officials outside the building preventing us from getting back in. they'd actually locked the doors to the building to stop people getting access. when one of the security guys open a door i went to get in and i was being physically restrained by his colleagues preventing me from entering my own tower block. eventually i got in, but it is now a level of intimidation to prevent us from going back a building which, as far as i'm concerned, is as safe now as it has been for the last however many years, certainly as long as
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i've lived there. i understand your resista nce i've lived there. i understand your resistance to move and it's been a nightmare for everyone involved working and living there but they do have your safety at heart, they have your own safety and interests at heart, i guess what they're trying to do is absolutely inshore that this particular tower block is fit to live in an the only way they can do that and go about their work and get it done is by moving everyone out. do you not have any sympathy with that? i understand what they are trying to do but i think it is a knee—jerk reaction and it is overkill. as long as i've lived there we haven't known any major problems, these have only come to light now so whatever level of danger we are light now so whatever level of dangerwe are in light now so whatever level of danger we are in it's been the same for years. previously when works have needed to be done in the building they have done it around us and this is the way it should carry on rather than causing this element of fear and chaos. just because they have only picked up on these issues now doesn't mean they should ignore them. have they explained specifically what the issues are
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with the tower block? we know cladding is part of it but it isn't the whole story, is it? planning isn't the main thing, they are certainly going to change and remove it, we understand it is gas pipes and things within the building but no one was clear. there were workmen yesterday, we've been seeing no evidence that they were in there, no one knows what needs to be done and how long it will take. they were talking about evacuation for two to four weeks but we know with council projects that they can take a lot longer. thank you very much, roger. i appreciate the difficulties you're facing, roger evans, one of the residence at the tower block in camden in north london. more on that later —— residents. we will speak to a member of the all party fire safety a nd a member of the all party fire safety and rescue group. we will get the thoughts of her later. let's get the thoughts of her later. let's get the weather with stav. good morning. another lovely sunrise
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picture from east sussex. all the photos are coming from the south and east coast because elsewhere it is pretty cloudy but i will show you cloudier pictures later on. this area of low pressure has brought windy weather to the north of the country. easing down so the winds here. a weather front straddling england and wales and that rain across wales and north—west england will continue to spread eastwards through the afternoon. brighter skies further north, cooler, fresh air, pushing down across scotland and into northern ireland and northern england as the afternoon wears on. a few showers around, hit and miss and if you catch the sunshine it won't be too bad as the winds ease down but cooler and fresher here, mid—teens at best. england and wales, cloudy skies, a bit of brightness in higher ground but cloudy across—the—board, temperatures here a notch down on yesterday, 17 to 21. for glastonbury
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again it will be largely cloudy, maybe some spots of rain in the air, the winds remaining light and the same for the queens tennis in london, looks like we will see highs of 20 or21, a london, looks like we will see highs of 20 or 21, a couple of degrees down on yesterday but the skies staying cloudy. cloudy skies this evening with outbreaks of rain clearing, overnight it looks like it will be dry, lighter winds for all evenin will be dry, lighter winds for all even in the north of scotland with clear skies and winds coming from the north—west, a chilly night in rural places, single figures. 0n monday this area of low pressure, uncertainty as to its extent and timing but it looks like it will bring wet weather across the western side of the uk through the day. initially it is a bright, dry start for most for northern ireland it will turn wet through the day with increasing winds. further and east you are, a dry day and quite warm, 2a25 in the south—east. for the weekend, unsettled, spells of heavy
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rain especially on tuesday, breezy at times and quite a lot of cloud around but that said a bit of sunshine here and there. we are talking about what makes us happy. thank you for all of the pictures. lots of pictures you have sent through. joan on twitter says that she is happy because she is on holiday in about to fly out to new york for 11 nights. i am envious. now on breakfast we join spencer kelly and the team for click. we'll be back with the headlines at 0700. la la la los angeles. a city of many sights. there's the movies. the beaches.
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the high life. and in between each of them... ..a whole lot of this. with hardly any rail alternative, the traffic here drives the locals to distraction. it's led some of the bigger thinkers to suggest radical alternatives. electric car and space travel guru elon musk has even started digging a tunnel. he envisions an asimovian network of car and passenger carrying tubes underneath cities in the future. how boring. meanwhile, back in the almost real world of marina del rey, a more modest way to reduce traffic. two electric cars that belong to a whole apartment block. envoy operates a closed car share system. the vehicles can be booked out by residents only and used for up to three hours at a time. now this is not a car that
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you would use to drive to work and back because you'd end up paying for and hogging it for the whole day. this is much more a car that you would use for convenience, popping out for the occasional errand. we believe that if it's a two car household we can hopefully reduce that to one. experts say that for every shared car it takes 11 off the road. so we are working with developers on communicating that with policymakers in the city, saying if we include car sharing within communities, we should be able to reduce our parking requirements on new developments. the abundance of everything here in the us is evident, and it's thanks in no small part to having one of the best educated and most skilled workforces in the world. and it is from right here that the xprize in education was born. now this is a competition that encourages entrepreneurs to use tech to teach.
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now the finalists have been announced in london this week and dan will take a look at some of them in a minute. but first he travels to tanzania to see what's in store for those hoping to offer something new to the next generation. we are travelling a long way from any town or city to visit some of the 200 children in a village in northern tanzania. we are booting up a tablet, the first one. the interesting thing here is that most of these children, about all of them, have not seen a tablet before. but not only that, a lot of them wouldn't have gone to school even before, so the learning process itself is brand—new. the whole programme is in swahili so the local children can understand. i think they are going
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to need more tablets! laughter this is one of about 150 villages in tanzania chosen as the test—bed for the global learning xprize. within a few months, a000 tablets will be given out. the challenge, to teach a 7—11—year—olds to read, write and do maths over the next year. the most effective app will win $10 million. the prize here though will be much more valuable. older children can walk up to four hours to get to and from school. for younger ones, like seven—year—old amina, that's simply too far. she's been lucky, she is one of those that's been chosen to take part in the xprize challenge. at the start she has not seen a tablet before, so she's not used to touching screens. and when it comes to reading, she doesn't know more than one or two words in a sentence. butjohn, who is with the project,
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thinks the tablet will help her eventually to read fluently. back in the capital, dar es salaam, the world food programme is testing solar panel stations that will monitor the progress of each child when they recharge. that way if a tablet breaks, the youngster can get a new one without having to start lessons from the beginning again. in london this week, 11 semifinalists from seven different countries were chosen from the nearly 200 teams that entered. they will refine their software before the final five are chosen to go to tanzania to start the year—long project with the children. so the problem is that there are about 60—100 million kids who have no access to school because school is too far. then you have 250 million more who go to school and leave without ever having learned to read or write a word.
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and these are kids in botswana, boston, brighton — it doesn't matter. kids go to school all over the world and they go, they don't learn and why is that? that's the question we are trying to address. in our greatest desire, every single child on planet earth has access to a world—class education in the palm of their hand. every single child has his or her potential fulfilled. that's the dream and it's not a far—fetched dream. it is possible. we are hoping to be back next year to see how the teams get along but for now it's time to say goodbye. we've brought some biscuits to say thank you and suddenly the difficulties the team will face when they arrive become clear. with just 20 or so tablets per village there simply won't be enough for everyone to take part. to reduce potentialjealousy, the tablets will be locked to only run the educational software. but everyone wants one. a village mama has been chosen to settle any disputes, and the scheme's partners unesco will be asking some other important
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questions about tablets too. we are doing an assessment of the social and emotional impact of such learning. because we expect quite some criticism from that side. we are engaging with the psychologists, anthropologists, educationalists, to try to understand what does it do to the child? is that an option that is ethical? because children go to school, they are socialised also, it's not only the learning, it's learning much more, to be part of the group. it's just like back at home. now they've got tablets they are not really talking to anybody. this is my first time to see people learning by using tablets. it's my first time. so the scene is set, there are about six or seven children around each individual tablet and we've seen more. the education department from tanzania is here too looking
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at this project so there's a lot at stake. it's notjust $10 million, it could be the answer to the whole country's education problems. and even the whole of africa's. right, what should we play, what's your favourite game? i think we should do... we should do flags and i'll take you both on. that was dan, and now time for some fun and games with these two clowns. not being rude, they are actually trained circus clowns. but they're also the bosses of a company called two bit circus, and they want to build an enormous high—tech fun house in downtown los angeles. protect that ball. so we are building what we call a micro amusement park. it's a 50,000 square feet entertainment complex dedicated to the future of fun.
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the future of fun! that's a catchphrase. well, you know, here's the thing. there is this period of time when kit comes out of the lab, before it's ready for the home, that it's perfect for out—of—home. you know, you can do some vr in your home right now, but it is so much cooler if it's social like this and has environmental effects and all sorts. motion platforms, your friends can play with you. brent and eric have been making high—tech games and showpieces for corporate events for a few years. their planned amusement complex will be a permanent home to some of their greatest hits. along with new experimental experiential oddities being developed by their team of computer scientists, roboticists and engineers. we've got machines that can cut metal and cut wood, we can prototype our circuit boards here, we have people writing software. and the beautiful thing about this place is that at the end of almost every day,
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there is something new to play with. it's maximum fun. the philosophy here seems to be tinker first, think later. i don't actually know the point of this game. neither does anyone else here. this is the ultimate play space and a great coming together of people with many different skills. we are drawing on multiple industries. so, we have a lot of people from the games industry here. so all of the development that's gone into sophisticated 3—d game engines like unity and unreal, we can put that to work building immersive environments. my background and the background of some others here is in robotics and sensors. and we bring...we come with a completely different toolkit. but the combination of those two things makes programming around here really exciting. but there is still one big build remaining. we are standing right in the middle of our micro amusement park.
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most of it is going to be a big open space. the kitchen will be in that corner. a 100 seat interactive supper club is going to be over there. with $15 million backing from companies including intel and japanese ventures, brent hopes that this 50,000 square feet space in downtown la will become the first of many two bit circuses around the world. you are opening in... february? early, early 2018. ok, i think you've got a bit of work to do. we've got some work to do, it's a little empty, you can see, it will be a lot more fun when we are done. but, yeah, from the moment we break ground to the moment we are ready to open, its four, five months. well, if they can pull it off this is going to be an incredible space and a perfect excuse for us to come back here in january to see how they got on. ok, that's it for this week, follow us on twitter and facebook
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for loads more stuff throughout this and every week. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and christian fraser. more failed fire—safety tests on high rise buildings. every sample of cladding looked at so far has failed to meet safety standards. 3a towers in 17 areas of england have now been identified as a fire risk. following the grenfell tower tragedy as many as 600 blocks may need to be examined. the government says work is taking place around the clock. hundreds of residents in north london have spent a second night away from their homes after four buildings were evacuated, but some are still refusing to go.
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