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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 25, 2017 7:00am-8:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and christian fraser. more failed fire—safety tests on high rise buildings. every sample of cladding looked at so far has failed to meet safety standards. 3a towers in 17 areas of england have now been identified as a fire risk. following the grenfell tower tragedy as many as 600 blocks may need to be examined. the government says work is taking place around the clock. hundreds of residents in north london have spent a second night away from their homes after four buildings were evacuated, but some are still refusing to go. good morning, it's saturday 25th june. blackmail fears are raised after a cyber attack on parliament. in sport, england get a shock in the opening match of the women's world cup. we must be more physical is the
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orderfrom lions coach we must be more physical is the order from lions coach warren gatland after they were outclassed by the all blacks in the first test. and it was worth the wait. two years after a serious accident meant the foo fighters had to pull out of glastonbury, they make their triumphant return. and stav has the weather. good morning, a north—south split today, most places largely dry, brighter and cooler in the north, cloudy and slightly milder in the south. all the details for you in about 15 minutes. stav, thanks very much. good morning. first, our main story. fire safety tests on 3a samples of cladding from tower blocks in england have failed, according to new figures released by the government. that means a 100% failure rate so far. in north london, residents have spent a second night in temporary accommodation after camden council evacuated four high rise blocks because of fire safety concerns. nick quraishi has the latest. testing around the clock.
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the government says as many as 600 high—rise blocks will need to be checked for fire safety. councils are being urged to prioritise buildings they're most worried about. so far 3a samples of cladding examined across 17 councils in england haven't met the required standards, a 100% failure rate. the councils include manchester, hounslow and plymouth. fire authorities are also having to examine exposed pipes, cable ducts, escape routes and fire doors. it's a huge undertaking and it's not just residential blocks. checks are taking place in scores of nhs buildings, like hull royal infirmary. ministers say a failed test doesn't necessarily mean a building has to be evacuated, but in north london hundreds of people are spending a second night in temporary accommodation. camden council says it was left with no choice because of multiple fire safety failures. some, though, still don't want to go. the council officials came
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to the door, banging on the door, "get out, get out," but the chap round the hallway said, "no, she's not going, she's getting on for 80, she can't go anywhere, she's got a cat." by night the pockets of resistance against evacuation are evident. the council has said it has spent more than £500,000 paying for hotels. nick quraishi, bbc news. susanna amend dozer joins susanna amend dozerjoins us from oui’ susanna amend dozerjoins us from our london i'iewsi'ooiti. susanna amend dozerjoins us from our london newsroom. we can't go to her, shall we go to catriona renton in canberra? -- camden. the government is saying 100% failure rate, is that right? we are here to
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talk to the residents that have been staying overnight. we have heard about these 3a buildings across the 17 local authority areas where the tests have happened and it's not just in london boroughs, but in other parts of the country, manchester and plymouth among those places but let me tell you about what's happening here this morning. we are outside the rest centre where residents from the blocks here have been staying, some for the last two nights. i'm joined by been staying, some for the last two nights. i'mjoined by sayid, one of the residents in the tower blocks. you stayed at the rest centre last night, it's much quieter here now as things ease of. have they found you somewhere to stay yet? last night at midnight they let me know i could stay with my mother. it's a waiting game of not knowing where you're going that was eating me away. sayid, you grew up here and it's way
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you've spent your whole life, how much of a shock on friday night was it to be told you had to evacuate? it was panic, sheer panic. my heart couldn't stop pounding. how long did we have to leave? it took hours to find out where we needed to go, what we needed to do and neighbours were at odds with each other with conflicting information. are you feeling better now you know where you're going? i feel better, feeling better now you know where you're going? ifeel better, it feels like i'm going to start my life all over again. a little bit of relief but not much batter. how are yourfamily relief but not much batter. how are your family feeling? phone calls, texts, where are you, how are you going to be, come two hours? as much asi going to be, come two hours? as much as i appreciate their love towards me and others, it's not as easy as you think. we have seen the frustrations on people have had, some people have stayed in their
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flats and have been told by the council they should leave and don't wa nt to council they should leave and don't want to and others feel there's been an overreaction, how do you feel about that? i feel for them. not knowing where you're going to stay is better... it is far worse than knowing where you're going to stay the night. what can we do? they created this panic. sayid, thank you for coming to talk to us this morning. as you can see, it is a lock, and quieter so perhaps the initial confusion starting to ease but of course there's long—term matters, people for the next three 01’ matters, people for the next three orfour matters, people for the next three or four weeks obviously are going to have to wait until they can get their normal lives back together. difficult situation, thanks very much, roger evans in the last hour was critical of camden council but we have a statement from them. they said last night the give executive andi said last night the give executive and i had a public meeting to discuss the residents complaints, we
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construct it a giant fire inspection with the london fire brigade, we anticipate these works will be completed within three to four weeks. we hope to catch up with our political correspondentat some stage. the government says imports such as coffee, clothing and cocoa products should not see any notable price rise after brexit. 48 of the world's poorest countries will continue to have duty free access to the uk. our business correspondent joe lynam has more. some of our most popular ingredients and products, like cocoa or bananas, are grown in some of the world's poorest countries. to help almost 50 of them expand their economies, the eu already allows them to export their goods tariff free into europe. now the government has confirmed that this will be maintained after britain leaves the eu. it means products such as bananas, sugar and coffee should not be any more expensive for uk households when imported after 2019. the uk imports almost £20 billion a year tariff free from 48 developing countries, including haiti, ethiopia, bangladesh and sierra leone.
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exports of arms and defence equipment are not included in this trade agreement. we want as we leave the european union to be champions of globalfree trade, pointing out that it has already taken more people out of poverty in the last 25 years than in the whole of human history up to that point. we've got to keep that momentum going, we've got to get the big economies opening up and we've got to give the opportunities to the developing countries to trade their way out of poverty. shaming britain quits the european customs union as well as the eu it will be free to conduct its own trade deals with any country. that could allow it to expand the list of poor countries with tariff—free access to uk markets in future. joe lynam, bbc news. pakistan government officials say at least 100 people are reported to have been killed and dozens more badly injured when a lorry transporting oil burst
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into flames in punjab. 0ur pakistan correspondent secunder kermani joins us now on skype from kharachi. secunder, what more do we know about what has happened? what we believe to have happened is an oil tanker was driving outside the city in the central province of punjab in central pakistan when it overturned, we're not quite sure of the cause of the accident but after it overturned it began to leak out fuel, local people came to try to collect some of that fuel, at which page the fuel caught light in a large explosion. i've seen footage and pictures from the scene that showed dozens and dozens of charred bodies and charred vehicles by the roadside because so many people were trying to collect fuel, that's what explains the large death toll. local army helicopters had been used to try to transport the casualties to
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nearby hospitals and the blaze is 110w nearby hospitals and the blaze is now under control. the death toll is expected to rise as the day goes on. thanks very much, secunder kermani talking to us there. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, has urged theresa may to set up a cross—party commission to advise her on brexit. writing in the mail on sunday, he says such a commission could "hold the ring for the differences to be fought out" and "draw much of the poison from the debate". six years since making his glastonbury debut on one of its smallest stages, ed sheeran will be closing the festival as the top billed act later on this evening. last night the us rock band foo fighters finally had their chance to headline at pilton farm two years after an injury meant they were forced to pull out of the festival. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is there. a headline set by rock band foo fighters... here he is, jeremy corbyn! he wasn't one of the headline
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artists, but perhaps unsurprisingly he drew one of the biggest crowds so far. do you know politics is actually about everyday life. the labour leader was always going to be a big draw for a left—leaning audience at a festival like this. jeremy corbyn‘s appearance is another demonstration of his current popularity with young people in particular. among the day's musical highlights, a vibrant, energetic katy perry. and liam gallagher dedicating don't look back in anger to those killed in the london and manchester terror attacks and the grenfell tower victims.
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lizo mzimba, bbc news, glastonbury. did you watch the interview with liam? i did see that. i didn't, i saw him singing. he said i'm still a scallywag but before the gigs i go straight, drinking cider vinegar and honey and he goes to bed earlier. that's not very rock ‘n‘ roll! he said the only thing he is frightened of is losing his voice. he did well last night even though he was singing a noel song. we like a good panda story here on breakfast, so let's tell you about some new arrivals in germany. meng meng and jiao qing were jetted in yesterday as a gift from china. later, they were unveiled at a press conference where all was going well until the chinese ambassador got a little too close to one of the cages. have you ever seen a panda do that?
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pandemonium! a roar! did you get that, pandemonium? you never see them roar, they always look quite cute. if i was stuck in a small box with loads of people staring at me i might give out a little roar. anyway! let's change the subject. it's estimated that betting on sports matches is worth up to £650 billion per year globally, with up to 70% of the bets on football. last week the fa announced it was ending its sponsorships with betting companies, a move praised by one family campaigning for better awareness of problem gambling. you would obviously welcome this
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move by the fa, you're pleased to hear about it? it's a good move, i think the reasons behind why they have done this are different to the debate about gambling addiction, this is more about corruption and issues with conflict of interest and betting on sports. the wider issue here is people get addicted to gambling, there's1 million people estimated to be addicted to gambling in the country and adverts that are so in the country and adverts that are so pervasive in things like football games and sports matches drove down people like my dad and it's a psychological thing. i welcome what they have done, the rest of the industry should follow. tell us about your dad and how bad it got for him, something his family and close friends were unaware of? for him, something his family and close friends were unaware of7m was, people call gambling addiction the secret addiction and it's like if you had an alcoholic in your family you would know because you would see them coming home drunk and
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you would notice changes in behaviour but with gambling you don't see any of that, and my dad particularly betted a lot online. for 30 years he was gambling like ez and olympic sport. any and every where he could find to gamble he did, he got into huge amounts of debt, he remortgaged the house and took out credit cards and loans and bankrupted took out credit cards and loans and bankru pted the family. took out credit cards and loans and bankrupted the family. we say about £500,000 with the mortgage. he stole from his employers to keep the whole thing going and to pay for his addictionjust to keep thing going and to pay for his addiction just to keep up that facade. as a family we didn't know. three years ago he came home one evening and said, look, i told you i was going away for a training course over the weekend and that isn't what it was. he was going to court, he was being sentenced for fraud and we didn't even know he was being sentenced, he didn't even say that much. we got a call from his
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solicitor the next evening saying you might be wondering why your dad hasn't come home, he's in a van on his way to prison right now and that's how it unfolded. gerry barton has been banned for 18 months but he says... on the one hand you can't hand out stiff sentences the gambling and then on the other hand be hand in glove with betting companies. i wonder, do you think that even if there was no e—mail ‘s advertising or text messages, wouldn't gamble isjust fine gambling? like any addiction you can find it anywhere? as a society we need to look at ways to make sure people are not falling into the trap. people who do have this addiction or personality trait find it easy to get hooked. when he went to prison, his phone came back, they gave it to us, you cannot have one in prison. there were hundreds and hundreds of text messages came
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through from dozens of different sites, encouraging him to return and gamble. where are you? we miss you... are free bonus for betting... when i watch the football, between the first and the second half this betting that comes up and i think, like a flutter. but i would not be thinking about it normally. hundreds of thousands of people also gamble responsibly. it is a legitimate business and there is a role for betting companies within our society. there isn't there are a legitimate industry. that is important to say. there is a regulator and they turn over a lot of money and they are an integral pa rt of money and they are an integral part of our society. but we need to look for more social responsibility. this is the 21st of century and people have addictions. 0ur message is really that what the fa has done is really that what the fa has done isa is really that what the fa has done is a good step and we would like to see the rest of the industry do
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something similar. how was your father? is he getting back on his feet? he is. he is trying hard. it is difficult to get work with a conviction and we are both audi pushing this message saying that gambling is a serious addiction. let's put it on the same stage as alcohol and drug addiction. my father is home. my mother has been quite kind and stuck by him. a huge impact on the entire family. thank you for coming in. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: more failed safety tests on tower blocks across england — every sample of cladding examined so far is a fire risk. 0fficials investigating a cyber attack on the houses of parliament say the threat has been contained — it's believed hackers attempted to gain access to mps e—mails. am afraid we cannot promise the glorious sunshine of last weekend. but we can bring your sunrise from
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this morning. it is right. it is not too bad. we had a little cloud yesterday and temperatures reached close to mid—20s. a little cooler and fresh today with more cloud around, particularly for england and wales. an area of low pressure across the north of scotland which bought them a windy day. that will continue to push away today so the wind is easing here and a brightening sky appearing across the northern half of the country. england and wales will have a weather front bringing cloud and outbreaks of rain. showers across the north—west of the highlands. the odd heavy one. good spells of sunshine around. winds falling lighter but a cooler air mass today that you will notice. temperatures best around 15 or 17 degrees. england and wales have a lot of cloud around. getting into the north of england late this afternoon but for the south—east and into the south england and wales, alp breaks
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of light and patchy rain. it looks like it could be cloudy and damp at glastonbury through the day. similar picture as well fall the tennis. —— for the tennis. a few degrees down on the values of yesterday. cloudy this evening with the odd spot of rain and eventually that will clear away and cooler fresher conditions push down from the north. a chilly night to come. these are the town and city values but in the countryside it could be single figures. this is the pressure chart into monday and tuesday. this area of low pressure is likely to bring wet weather through monday and tuesday. uncertainty to its track and extent but it looks like monday, to begin with, a fresh start but across southern and eastern areas quite warm. tuesday rain will spread northwards and eastwards. spells of
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heavy rain, and a good watering for the garden after the hot weather. quite breezy because of the low pressure and sunshine will be limited as well. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. anand menon from the uk in a changing europe research group is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to him in a minute. first of all, let's have a look at the front pages this morning. the front page of the observer, this is a story following on from the g re nfell tower a story following on from the grenfell tower tragedy in which they look at public safety in particular in schools. they say there has been a turnaround in certain safety standards which will be applied to schools and there was some suggestion that sprinters would not be required they are reviewing that 110w be required they are reviewing that now and saying that they absolutely
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must be fitted. the sunday times over blackmail story on the front page there. 10,000 people who work in westminster were to change the password. we will shortly. same story on the sunday telegraph this morning. concern is the blackmail be an issue after the security e—mail ‘s passwords was potentially compromised. and the mail on sunday has... a bit more than the story in newsweek magazine this week. effectively it is the same interview but they have gone back to the lady who conducted the interview and got a few more details from her about what he said. the reluctant prince harry. that is the front pages. and we have been looking at the week it was and the offer that theresa may put on the table for the citizens, european citizens. they are not happy. no. i think european citizens. they are not happy. no. ithink the european citizens. they are not happy. no. i think the story in the observer brings out the human element of this. they talk to eu citizens who are living here and the impact that the uncertainty is
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having on their life. whatever deal we get with the european union, we will impose new rules and it will impact some people because they fall oi'i impact some people because they fall on the wrong side of them. i thought it was interesting that there is a human face put on it so it is not merely a question of numbers. laura kearns burke suggested... i won't ask you, this is what you do day to day, she suggested at some point will will have a hybrid court where we have the european court of justice and british judges sitting together in the same court. a model exists? does it exist anyway? they have variations on that for trade deals. we spoke about a trade deal with the united states and they were going to create a mechanism to settle disputes. the fact is they don't necessarily trust us and we don't necessarily trust us and we don't necessarily trust us and we don't necessarily want to use their court. so having a hybrid teams to have —— seems to be a good idea. i
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thought this story was interesting, just because we see more and more of it now. we will face is trade. e—mail isa it now. we will face is trade. e—mail is a good way to contact mps, they are more accessible. as they begin to get paranoid about what is in their inbox and who can see it, that will have repercussions for how easy it is to contact them. the foreign state, the headline refers to, who are they talking about in particular? the story says is that people are pointing the finger at russia. but it is notoriously difficult to think of print anybody. the country mentioned is russia. more detail in the washington post about the attack on the russian attack on americans through the election season. quite extraordinary. it is aimed at every level. voting, facebook, social media, politicians and it is widespread. it is a massive issue
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because so much about politics is 110w because so much about politics is now electronic in our recent election a of campaigning took place on facebook. it was targeted. you can imagine if hackers could get into that than they could subvert the democratic process. two versions of the jeremy corbyn story this morning. the sunday express has this headline of him speaking at glastonbury yesterday and the fact that he decided to be there rather than mark armed forces day. the sunday mirror paints it differently. jc and the sunshine band. many supporters at glastonbury forjeremy corbyn. it is a left—wing field there, sophie cannot do it there he can't do it anywhere. most two stories together underline how differently you see the world depending on the newspaper you read. corbyn is the star of the show at glastonbury and mirror, otherwise he is refusing to attend armed services
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day. i don't think that crowd there was totally unanimous in their support. now, but it was a healthy majority in terms of reaction. he would be there. he gave up his ticket to come and beat you. why we re ticket to come and beat you. why were you going to be there? my whole family are there at the moment. they have a connection with radiohead. the drummer is my brother. that is so the drummer is my brother. that is so cool! why on earth are you on the sofar?! you could have had backstage tickets... sofar?! you could have had backstage tickets. . . yes sofar?! you could have had backstage tickets... yes but i don't like to change my mind close to. and i am 110w change my mind close to. and i am now the sort of person who secretly cheers when i hear it is raining there. plus, iam here for cheers when i hear it is raining there. plus, i am here for rachel. women's cricket. i am a little disappointed about this. i had big hopes row team. i mean, it is not over yet. be it lost theirfirst
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game. i came to from the other side, for a couple of reasons. india is a country where attitudes women are not exactly progressive and i think a successful indian women's cricket tea m a successful indian women's cricket team could do so much for women in india. the second thing i thought was brilliant was the captain of the indian team came out with the best quote ever. after the game a reporter said to her who is your favourite male cricketer then and she said that when the men play due to their favourite female cricketer is? but they are not professional in india where as they are in australia in the uk? absolutely. but if women's cricket will catch on it needs to catch on in india because they are the cricketing capital of they are the cricketing capital of the world. i imagine all potential players out there. like women's football. it is growing fast. andrew marr is on bbc one after breakfast this morning — andrew, what's on today's programme?
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iam glad i am glad you have been talking about cricket because among my newspaper reviewers today is henry blaeu felt, cake may be involved. my main political guest is the man many tory mps want to be the next prime minister, that is david davis. for the labour party, debbie abrahams is the labour party, debbie abrahams is the work and pensions spokesman. she will talk about whether it is really possible for labour to end conservative austerity. and i am joined by andrew scott, moriarty too many people from the sherlock series but he is also studying hamlet in the west end at the moment. look forward to that later on. later this morning we will meet to people who have made it onto this year's happy list. we got talking about this and wondering what makes you happy. what makes you happy right now? for us
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this morning we found that one of the production team has got a brand—new puppy, a gorgeous little thing. watch this. look at him attempting to get down the stairs. it isa attempting to get down the stairs. it is a huge leap when you are that age. so what makes you happy this morning? no surprise that we have had plenty of animal pictures from you. this is from swindon. these are two romanian street dogs that she rescued and every morning she wakes up rescued and every morning she wakes up to their smiles. and this is ronnie and reggie, two new kittens in sheffield. they are exploring their new environment. if you have any non— animal pictures, maybe a garden... no-one has tweeted as a picture of their children. how about your sunnyside eggs? obviously no 1's children is making them happy at this time of the morning. headlines are coming up. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast
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with rachel burden and christian fraser. coming up before 8am, holly will be here with the sport but first a summary of this morning's main news. fire safety tests on 3a samples of cladding from tower blocks in england have failed, according to new figures released by the government. that means a 100% failure rate so far. in north london, residents have spent a second night in temporary accommodation after camden council evacuated four high rise blocks because of fire safety concerns. nick quraishi has the latest. testing around the clock.
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the government says as many as 600 high—rise blocks will need to be checked for fire safety. councils are being urged to prioritise buildings they're most worried about. so far 3a samples of cladding examined across 17 councils in england haven't met the required standards, a 100% failure rate. the councils include manchester, hounslow and plymouth. fire authorities are also having to examine exposed pipes, cable ducts, escape routes and fire doors. it's a huge undertaking and it's not just residential blocks. checks are taking place in scores of nhs buildings, like hull royal infirmary. ministers say a failed test doesn't necessarily mean a building has to be evacuated, but in north london hundreds of people are spending a second night in temporary accommodation. camden council says it was left with no choice because of multiple fire safety failures. some, though, still don't want to go.
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the council officials came to the door, banging on the door, "get out, get out," but the chap round the hallway said, "no, she's not going, she's getting on for 80, she can't go anywhere, she's got a cat." by night the pockets of resistance against evacuation are evident. nick quraishi, bbc news. a cyber attack on the parliamentary computer system appears to have been contained according to government sources. officials at the houses of parliament said there had been a determined attempt by hackers to identify weak passwords for e—mail accounts used by mps, peers and their staff. conservative mp andrew bridgen has raised concerns that it could leave people open to blackmail. the national cyber security centre is now investigating what happened. we know that our public services were attacked, so it's not at all surprisingly that there should be an attempt to hack into parliamentary e—mails.
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it's a warning to everybody, whether they‘ re in parliament or elsewhere, that they need to do everything possible to maintain their own cyber security, including having complex and therefore safer codewords. hundreds have been killed and many injured when a lorry carrying oil burst into flames in the job said pakistani authorities. people had gathered to get fuel from the vehicle which overturned and then it caught alight. firefighters have been tackling the blaze, which is said to be under control, although the road remains closed. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, has urged theresa may to set up a cross—party commission to advise her on brexit. writing in the mail on sunday, he says such a commission could "hold the ring for the differences to be fought
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out" and "draw much of the poison from the debate". better late than never. the foo fighters finally took the top billed slot at last night's glastonbury festival. the band's front man dave grohl apologised for being two years late to the gig and performed a number of their best known songs. he broke his leg. they were originally meant to headline the festival in 2015 but that injury forced them to pull outjust weeks before. you've heard of crufts, but there's an alternative dog competition that you might not be familiar with. this is martha. she's a neapolitan mastiff and she's just been named this year's world's ugliest dog. she beat 13 other contenders to claim the title, winning a trophy and £1,200. the big—jowled crowd—pleaser won overjudges by sprawling across the stage instead of doing any tricks. the event usually includes lots of dogs who have been rescued. martha isn't bothered, she collapsed
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and thejudges martha isn't bothered, she collapsed and the judges liked it.|j martha isn't bothered, she collapsed and the judges liked it. i like martha isn't bothered, she collapsed and thejudges liked it. i like her style! i was pleased to see at glastonbury yesterday there was a tent if you wanted to watch the lions. many revellers may have done, having had some sleep or very little, . .. having had some sleep or very little,... wouldn't have helped them, they would have been better going to watch the foo fighters. not the result we wanted. such a positive start. flashes of brilliance. it was the bounce of the ball. two inches short in the first two minutes? five attempts at tries but we got two but the problem was the all blacks had three attempts and they took all three. 13—15 was the end result but not in our favour. warren gatland is looking ahead to the next test on saturday. lions head coach warren gatland said his side must be more physical after they were tamed by the all blacks in the first
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test in auckland. george north and jonathan joseph will both start against the hurricanes in wellington on tuesday. and rory best returns as captain, he was skipper for their best win on the tour against the chiefs last week. and gatland believes all their problems from the first test can be fixed for the next two. those things are all fixable for me. the all blacks haven't played champagne rugby and throwing the ball all over the place, fairness to them, they were very direct up front so we them, they were very direct up front so we need to make sure we're better in those areas in terms of combating them for next week. it was a really disappointing start for england, the hosts of this women's world cup. they lost by 35 runs against india in derby. it would have been a record—breaking victory if they'd made their target of 282 but they fell short. joe wilson reports. think globally, what women's cricket needs is to motivate interest in india. derby's welcome perhaps made the point about the size of the indian market. locally, well, perhaps decent crowd expected early england wickets, instead they saw one of the most exciting young talents in world
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cricket enjoying herself. smriti mandhana made 90 in a style to light up any occasion. supported by her teammates and also by dropped england catches. this one was beyond beaumont on the boundary but fast bowler katherine brunt had been blunted. india made 281. whenever england seemed to be getting close in the chase, runouts held them back, that was captain heather knight gone. fran wilson played the innings of her career so far, 81 and england hoping. guess what, she was run out. replays revealing her bat wasn't grounded. in the end england finished 35 runs short, their preparation had seemed strong, i wondered if on this big occasion some of the players might have frozen. we didn't start the way we wanted to which meant we were always struggling uphill, but something we will have to look at. i don't think it was anything to do with freezing, we didn't quite bowl the way we wanted to and india really put the pressure back on us.
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a significant and even historic result in women's cricket but it doesn't meaning and are out. remember initially all the eight teams play each other in a round robin stage and england will expect to win their next match in leicester against pakistan on tuesday. mind you, they expected to win their opening match here against india. joe wilson, bbc news, derby. lewis hamilton said the pressure was amazing after he produced what he called a beautiful lap to take pole for this afternoon's azerbaijan grand prix. when the session was held up by a crash, the drivers only had time for one flying lap at the end of qualifying and hamilton went almost half a second quicker than his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas. it was all or nothing. the lap just got better
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and better throughout. i saw valtteri just ahead, i knew he was doing a good lap, i came across and i knew coming down to the last corner, please be enough. i'm ecstatic. roger federer is in really good form on grass in the run—up to wimbledon. he reached the final of the halle open in germany with a straight sets win over karen khachanov. federer is back up to fifth in the world rankings and he'll be looking for a 19th grand slam title at wimbledon, which starts a week tomorrow. and in the other warm—up event at queen's marin cilic beat gilles muller to set up a meeting with feliciano lopez in today's final. cilic has only had his serve broken once in the tournament so far. petra kvitova says she's feeling no pain and couldn't have imagined a better comeback as she reached her first final since her playing hand was injured in a knife attack six months ago. she'll face australia's ashleigh barty in the final of the aegon classic in birmingham, after her semi—final opponent lucie safa rova was forced to retire.
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there were some strong performances from great britain's athletes at the european team championships in lille. at one point they led the standings but they finished the second day of three in third place. eilidh doyle produced one of the best performances, running a season—best in the 400—metre hurdles. aiden o'brien finished royal ascot as champion trainer for the eighth time. and the feature race was won by the 9—2 shot the tin man. the second—favourite stormed through in the diamond jubilee stakes, with around three quarters of a furlong to go. england will meet malaysia this afternoon in the third/fourth placed playoff at the hockey world league in london. they were beaten 2—0 by the netherlands in the semi—finals but if they win this afternoon, they'll reach the world league final in india this december. it was a largely disappointing saturday for britain's boxers at the european championships in ukraine, picking upjust one gold out of a possible seven.
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that went to liverpool's 21—year—old peter mcgrail in the bantamweight division. he had to shake off a point deduction and a partisan crown to beat home favourite mykola butsenko on a split decision now how about this for a quick recovery? britain's scott redding was in fifth place during qualifying for the dutch grand prix in assen when this happened with five minutes of the session remaining. now moto gp riders are a determined bunch. down, but farfrom out, the 24—year—old sprinted back to the pits and when he got therejumped on a spare bike and went back out like nothing had happened. he was rewarded for his efforts getting his fifth place back after slipping out of contention. impressive, quite a recovery, don't think i could manage that one. the king at the list of the lions to play the hurricanes on tuesday, gatlin has made it clear the midweek tea m gatlin has made it clear the midweek team is in with a shout of making the test team if anyone plays well. —— gatlin and. out of that side, who might be putting their name out there to be considered? possiblyjoe marler, there was a problem with the
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scrum. they needed to slow the breakdown down, improve the scrummage and that is why read best has been included, he's one of the best when it comes to that. and haskel and tipperary in the back row, interesting to see how they get on. james has tweeted, stop complaining about the lions test match, a great game with many positives. you're right, it was a great game. it's one of the biggest sporting events taking place this year, but the chances are you've never heard of it! thousands of athletes from 23 islands around the world have travelled to gotland in sweden for the 2017 island games. they'll battle it out over a week of sporting events each hoping to bring home the gold. jen smith has travelled to sweden to meet athletes as they prepare for the start of the competition. 23 island nations each with small populations come together every two yea rs populations come together every two years to compete in their own
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bespoke competition. some have travelled from the arctic, others from warmer climes. so why? the island games is a wonderful event for islands with a population of less tha n for islands with a population of less than i think 100,000, but it is an event where we can come together regardless of the distance in between us, we can come together and celebrate what we all love to do and what we do best to represent our islands. for us gibraltarians definitely because olympics, europeans, we don't have a chance of meddling, this is where we have the chance of meddling finally so this isa chance of meddling finally so this is a big deal for us. it's about competition but also about making friends and having fun and meeting a lot of cool people. this year scotla nd lot of cool people. this year scotland is the host, a swedish island in the baltic sea and around 60,000 people live here —— gotland. but one week injune 2000
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competitors from islands as far afield as st helier in the south atla ntic afield as st helier in the south atlantic and bermuda in the caribbean will come here. so how much work was involved in putting that altogether? how much work? a lot of work. i've been employed for 2.5 is and we've been at this since 2007 or something like that so it's ten yea rs 2007 or something like that so it's ten years in the making basically from the first thought of may be hosting the games again to maybe this date. this day could see the beginning ofan this date. this day could see the beginning of an olympic career like it has for some well—known brits. beginning of an olympic career like it has for some well-known brits. we have some veterans in the cycling clu b have some veterans in the cycling club and they want to beat mark cavendish, funny to see where he's gone now, there's some young hopefuls from the isle of man following in his footstep so we will see where they are in a few years. for some it is closer than that. andy from the isle of wight hopes to make it to the gold coast next april. i compete for scotland in the, while games, i've done the last three games and the qualifying distances 67.5, which i'm sure this
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year, i want that qualifying distance and get the trip to australia next year. while it's known as the friendly games, there's still some serious competition. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: more failed safety tests on tower blocks across england — every sample of cladding examined so far is a fire risk. officials investigating a cyber attack on the houses of parliament say the threat has been contained — it's believed hackers attempted to gain access to mps emails. thank you so much for some of the gorgeous pictures you have been sending us this morning. we will look at more of them a little later on but making as much happier than the weather today. hello! what a happy picture. there are some good pictures out there. i put the satellite picture in to show you the gaps in the cloud at the moment because there is a lot of brightness
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this morning. more cloud further west and it looks like scotland and northern ireland are doing the best with the sunshine. you can see this corner of scotland but notice the pictures i've been getting from the midlands and across southern and eastern areas there are good holes in the cloud that thick cloud awaits in the cloud that thick cloud awaits in the winds and it will spread it eastwards into the midlands, towards eastern and south—eastern england. further north it is a bright picture and we will lose those strong winds slowly through the day across the northern isles and north—east of scotland. getting sunshine, it will not be too bad. a few sunshiny bits around. sunny skies getting on towards northern england but the weather front will bring thick cloud through wales for much of the midlands and into the south as well. grant midlands and into the south as well. g ra nt leve ns midlands and into the south as well. grant levens —— grey and leaden skies. temperatures around 18 or 19
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degrees in the same to the tennis in london. you will be lucky if you catch any brightness. it will stay great to end the day. the weather front will clear off towards the near continent overnight and then the wind light everywhere. chilly, chillier than we have been used to. down to single figures in rural areas. high—pressure dominates and this area of low pressure will come into play later on in in monday for increasing cloud and range in northern ireland and western fringes of england. so most of the country, friday to start the working week. we're skipping or some slightly warmerairoff we're skipping or some slightly warmer air off the near continent so it could be looking at the mid—20s celsius again across the south and east. the rest of the week wears on areas of low pressure allow you to bring breezy spells and heavy rain. it will be breezy as low pressure will be in charge and there will be
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a lot of cloud. we could see something a little thundery pushing off the near continent as well. a lot of uncertainty so keep checking the forecast. let's whisk you away from all that cloud now. time for the travel show. hello and welcome to the travel show with me, ade adepitan, coming to you this week from ghana. and it's the perfect place to kick back, relax and look at some of our favourite stories from the programme over the last couple of months. let's kick—off with rajan's truly epic
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journey across india. as the country prepares to celebrate its 70th anniversary of independence, in march, he set off to travel from gujarat in the west, all the way to assam in the east, and he met some amazing people, including the mystical dancing monks on the island of majuli. majuli island is home to 22 monasteries or satras. initially established in the 16th century by the assamese guru sankardeva. boys are instructed from a very young age in the religion he preached, vaishnavism, an offshoot of hinduism. the monks are celibate, and according to their beliefs, they worship only one god, follow a vegetarian diet and reject the caste system. and here, at uttar kamalabari,
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the doctrine includes this special art form. this form of classical dance is now recognised by the authorities as a genre in its own right, and many of these monks have performed around the world. that was amazing, thank you very much indeed. i know you spend a lifetime learning the skills of this, can i have a go? can i try? like this? the arm is through here. 0k. one, two, three, four... there are 64 positions in this classical dance and i'm having trouble with the first two. he makes it look so easy. that is incredibly difficult.
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and ijust think i'm going to leave it to the experts. sometimes you just have to give up and let them carry on. an exquisite performance. sitting on this beach in ghana, it is hard to believe that only a few months ago i was a world away in terms of geography and temperature, when i took a special trip to finnish lapland to meet the sami people who live a life dominated by snow, reindeer and where temperatures sometimes drop as low as —40 celsius. true story. there are more reindeers than people in lapland. these animals need large areas
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of unspoiled forest to find the little food buried under the snow. so there you see how the reindeer live in the winter. they get their own food in the forest, they eat the lichen, they are digging the snow off and the eat the lichen on the land. there they are, they are all coming down from the hills. they know you're here. reindeer herding is in petri's blood. these animals have been crucial to his family for survival for generations, providing food, clothing and transport. we are surrounded by reindeer. this is so beautiful. look at them. he shouts. look at them all coming. yes. they both shout. petri supplements their diet
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to increase their chances of survival till the springtime. look at it! so how cold does it get out here, petri? now it's only —5... only —5? three weeks ago it was —44. —44? the coldest it has been is 1999 january, one week and it was —55. oh, my! now it is like the summer! are we going to build the fire? yes. cool well, i've had an amazing time here in finnish lapland, and this place just gets to you.
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it has a real rugged beauty. it's the furthest north in the world i've ever been to, and it feels like i'm at one with nature. you know what, it's been such a privilege to spend time with the sami people. back in april, henry travelled to thailand to pay a visit to the world's first ever elephant hospital, just in time to meet their newest and cutest arrival. what kind of patients do you have? we have all kinds of illnesses, sicknesses, knife wounds, gunshot wounds. some have diarrhoea,
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constipation, cataracts. some have serious like cancer and tumours. the most difficult cases are the victims of landmines. for motala, each day starts with her prosthetic being fitted, so she can walk out for breakfast. wow, so this is the prosthetic leg. can i see? heavy. so heavy! it weighs a good, at least 15 kilograms. in the early morning and late afternoon, when the sun is not too hot, motala will walk out for a few hours. there you go. adult females weigh just under three tonnes on average. so the prosthetic is needed to give vital relief to her other three legs which are under enormous pressure.
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how long did it take her to get used to the prosthetic leg? five to seven days. then she gets used to it? yes. the focus here is an working with elephant owners in the community, to help any animal that needs medical attention. the baby! they also have a nursery section and i'm fortunate enough to be able to see a newborn. so how old is the baby? nine days. the baby's name. his name is mina. it is humbling to see the connection doctor kay has with these animals, as she gives baby mina a checkup. it is amazing to see elephants like these that would have otherwise
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died in the wild to be thriving in the hospital, and spending time with doctor kay and soraida, learning the ins and outs of what goes on here has been an absolutely amazing experience that i won't forget any time soon. and to finish this week's programme, will it back to my trip to ghana in april, when i went to a monkey sanctuary to meet some of its rather cheeky residents. hello. look at that! that's so cute! you said they're not shy. look, emilia. wow! that's so nice. i am amazed at how much banana
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a little monkey like that can eat! that monkey must have eaten at least ten bananas. they can eat more than ten. the villages here believe these monkeys are sacred. there are two types. the cheeky mona and the black and white colobus, which is slightly more aloof but with good reason. declining numbers through habitat loss means they're currently listed as a vulnerable species. there can't be many places left where you are virtually guaranteed a sighting. and don't forget to check
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out our website or follow us on social media. but for now, from me, ade adepitan and the rest of the travel show team here in wonderful sunny ghana, it's goodbye. more failed fire—safety tests on high rise buildings. every sample of cladding looked at so far has failed to meet safety standards. 3a towers in 17 areas of england have now been identified as a fire risk. following the grenfell tower tragedy, as many as 600 blocks may need to be examined. the government says work is taking place around the clock. hundreds of residents in north london have spent a second night away from their homes after four buildings were evacuated, but some are still refusing to go. good morning it's sunday 25thjune.
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blackmail fears are raised after a cyber attack on parliament. in sport changes for the lions after defeat to the all blacks. rory best returns as captain for the match against the hurricanes, as they try to regroup for the next two tests.

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