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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 25, 2017 8:00am-9:00am BST

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following the grenfell tower tragedy, as many as 600 blocks may need to be examined. the government says work is taking place around the clock. hundreds of residents in north london have spent a second night away from their homes after four buildings were evacuated, but some are still refusing to go. good morning it's sunday 25thjune. blackmail fears are raised after a cyber attack on parliament. in sport changes for the lions after defeat to the all blacks. rory best returns as captain for the match against the hurricanes, as they try to regroup for the next two tests. and it was worth the wait — two years after a serious accident meant the foo fighters had to pull out of glastonbury they make their triumphant return.
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and stav has the weather. good morning. a bit of a north and south split, most places dry, brighter and cooler in the north, slightly milder in the south. all details and 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. fire safety tests on 3a samples of cladding from tower blocks in england have failed, according to new figures released by the government. that means a 100% failure rate so far. in north london, residents have spent a second night in temporary accommodation after camden council evacuated 4 high rise blocks because of fire safety concerns. nick quraishi has the latest. by by night, the pockets of resistance against evacuation are evident. katrina renton is in camden for us. i have a statement from camden council saying, we anticipate these works will be completed in 3—4 weeks but it is hugely inconvenient and
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stressful for some of the residents? that's right. that's what the council have been trained all along. they are asking and thanking people here for bearing with them. you will see is much quieter here. we've seen it get much quieter in the last few hours. when i was here at 11 o'clock last night there were more people registering and more people moving through, being taken away to hotels. places to stay. others going to stay with friends and family. that initial confusion has certainly eased. about a0 people stayed here overnight last night, compared to 100 on friday night. that gives you an idea that things are settling down. i did speak to people as they we re down. i did speak to people as they were leaving here this morning. one family was telling me how tired they are. they stayed there last night and said they didn't get much sleep and said they didn't get much sleep and looking forward to having somewhere to stay tonight. the council said they found the families, and they are hoping to get to sleep. i also spoke to abdi, who
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has a two —month—old baby. he chose to stay in his flat. he says he feels safer there and he will wait there until he hears from the council there is something convenient for him and his family. some have been defined and they denounce. the council's message to them if they want them to leave. if they don't there are legal route they don't there are legal route they could go down. they say they don't want to do that, though and they want people out of the building so they want people out of the building so they can get on with the work that needs to be done. some practicalities, people arriving here today. each household in to £100. people coming here to get up. there has also been indeed celebration organised by the council is they don't want people to miss out on that. the short—term uncertainty seems to be settling but questions being asked over the long term. and a moment will speak to a liberal democrat member of the all—party
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parliamentary fire and safety rescue group. pakistan government officials say at least a—hundred people are reported to have been killed and dozens more badly injured when a lorry transporting oil burst into flames in punjab. police said a crowd had gathered to collect fuel leaking from the vehicle which had overturned on the main highway from the city of bahawalpur. fire fighters have been tackling the blaze which is said to now be under control. fire fighters have been tackling the blaze which is said to now be under control. the price of imports such as coffee, clothing and cocoa products shouldn't significantly rise after brexit, according to the government. a8 of the world's poorest countries will continue to have duty free access to the uk. our business correspondent joe lynam has more. some of our most popular ingredients like bananas and cocoa grown in some of the well‘s most porous, economies. the er allowed them to export their goods tariff free. products such as bananas, sugar and
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coffee should not be any more expensive for uk households when imported after 2019. the uk imports almost £20 billion a year tariff free from a8 developing countries, including ethiopian, bangladesh and sierra leone. export of arms and defence equipment are not included in this trade agreement. we want, as we leave the european union, to be champions of european free trade, pointing out it has already taken more people out of poverty in the last 25 years than in the whole of history up until that point. we have to keep that momentum going. we have to keep that momentum going. we have to get the big economies opening up and we have to give the opportunities to those developing countries, to trade their way out of poverty. assuming britain quits the european customs union as one of the eu, it will be free to conduct its own trade deals with any countries. that could also allow it to expand the list of poor countries with tariff free deals in future. yemen
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is facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world according to the world health organisation and un children's agency. there have been more than 200,000 suspected cases and 1300 deaths. the outbreak spread because of the collapse of the health system during the civil war. the archbishop of canterburyjust in worldly has urged theresa may to set up worldly has urged theresa may to set upa worldly has urged theresa may to set up a cross—party commission to advise her on brexit. he said such a commission could hold the ring for the differences to be fought out and draw much of the poison from the debate. better late than never. the us rock band through fighters finally took the top billed slot at last night's glastonbury festival. they were absolutely immense last night apparently. they apologise for being too years later the gig and
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performed a number of their best songs. they were originally meant to headline the festival in 2015 but an injury. to pull out a few weeks before. our paper review this morning, and our guest is here rather than at glastonbury. one of the stories we will talk about is if some the bottom of the sunday telegraph. the tories plotting to skip toxic generation and install youngerface as skip toxic generation and install younger face as next leader. a p pa re ntly younger face as next leader. apparently there is actually a different story in the sunday telegraph, saying hammond is the favourite for many of the remainers. there's people like dominic raab, who was on the brexit side. priti patel, sajid javid and the 2010 inta ke patel, sajid javid and the 2010 intake including joe johnson. front page of the observer this
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morning looking at fire safety and public buildings. it is an absolutely key issue. this question of whether the government should declare a state of emergency because of the fire safety crisis, that suggestion has been put about by the liberal democrats. earlier this morning we spoke to one resident who is refusing to leave his home. morning we spoke to one resident who is refusing to leave his homelj understand what they‘ re is refusing to leave his homelj understand what they're trying to do but i just understand what they're trying to do but ijust think it's a knee jerk reaction and overcoat of the situation. as long as i've lived there, we have known any major problems. these have only come to light now. whatever level of danger which in, it's been the same for yea rs. which in, it's been the same for years. previously when works have been done in the building they have done it around us, i think this is the way it should carry on, rather than causing elements of fear and cows than causing elements of fear and cows around them welding. roger eva ns, cows around them welding. roger evans, one of the irritated residents of one of those blocks.
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thank you forjoining us this morning. 100% fail rate so far on these blocks that have been tested. that is going to cost an awful lot of money, to put right, isn't it? that is going to cost an awful lot of money, to put right, isn't mm is. the cladding is not the only issue, as the camden residents have found out. it is also fire regulations haven't been observed inside the buildings as well when other works have gone on. that is the particular issue in camden, why the particular issue in camden, why the blocks have had to be evacuated. well done to camden for doing that so well done to camden for doing that so quickly and checking everything. the problem is that if the fire service they ate building is unsafe, then the landlord, whether that is, must take that seriously. that is exactly why we are extremely concerned, obviously, that all the buildings tested so far have failed the cladding test, but they need to check inside as well. when was the last time the regulations were changed on cladding? it seems it is a problem with the testing regime.
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it absolutely is. the part the regulations haven't been changed in decades and the all—party parliamentary group have been arguing for years, long before i went into the house of lords, and two ministers of all parties, that these regulations needed to be updated, not just the these regulations needed to be updated, notjust the new building materials like cladding but have sprinklers inside and make sure all the other fire regulations sprinklers inside and make sure all the otherfire regulations inside, so the otherfire regulations inside, so if there is a one flat there is plenty of time for everyone to get out. that is the sort of thing a blind eye has been turned toward checks haven't been made that put some of these buildings at risk, which is why they need to be checked. we are all focusing on the moment on housing blocks but i'm sure other people are doing what i do, wandering round towns and cities, looking at at buildings and thinking, there's some cladding as well. we're talking about schools, hospitals, office blocks, how far could this goes? schools and offices
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usually have a much more rigorous internal fire safety routine. there will be fire wardens on all floors, they will run practices regularly. i'm not aware of that happening in many tower blocks. it's good practice and night urged landlords of tower blocks to look at that sort of tower blocks to look at that sort of safety element. that's the sort of safety element. that's the sort of thing that can make all the difference when there is a fire. what we're asking for is something slightly different. we are saying that in the areas where councils are having to evacuate flats, the government should intervene much more strongly and provide help, with lots of love other agencies coming in to help. i have been hearing on bbc and other broadcast media saying there is enough information, there isa there is enough information, there is a worry about the long—term housing implications, london doesn't have much spare housing available at all. that is why this is an emergency on the same scale as the cumbrian flooding is a 2015, when thousands of people had to evacuate
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their homes. you are a liberal democrat and there is political capital to be gained out of this. would you appreciate or at least go as far to say as a lot of this has been politicised. you said yourself, it's gone back decades and decades, through a labour government, a coalition government which were part of, and through a conservative government. this is a collective responsibility for this? disses cross— party responsibility for this? disses cross—party and none. it is absolutely a safety issue. it is a disgrace that ministers and the department have ignored safety pleas from experts and from all additions like us, who have been concerned because the fed interest and experience of fire safety elsewhere. it has to be dealt with. it has to be dealt with urgently. the more buildings that failed the cladding test m ea n buildings that failed the cladding test mean we have to change the attitude and i'm pleased the government is beginning to do it but there's a more urgent need, with people on blow—up beds in leisure centres not knowing what's going to happen to them over the next weeks
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and months, that also needs to be resolved and very urgently. looking at the front page of the observer today, ministers in panic overfire u—turn in schools. the background is where they were going to roll back on regulation and red tape, they're 110w on regulation and red tape, they're now thinking twice. do we need a national review of fire safety, where we look at all the regulations? we absolutely do. one reason i was interested in this, i was chair of governors of a primary school that was burned down. we asked the sprinklers to be put in, it was very distressing and affected the children in a fairly major way with exam paper missing and all those sort of things, so when we asked we were told sprinklers are unnecessary in schools. we finally got them and then last year the government cancelled it again. i think they finally understood that the cost to the country, to individual communities of not following fire safety is too risky.
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which many, many campaigners the safety have been arguing for for yea rs. safety have been arguing for for years. baroness sal brinton, we are grateful for your time, years. baroness sal brinton, we are gratefulfor your time, thank years. baroness sal brinton, we are grateful for your time, thank you. let's ta ke grateful for your time, thank you. let's take a look at this morning's weather. we know some places have a bit of sunshine already today. that's right, good morning. not a bad looking day. a bit more cloud around today than yesterday, but some lovely spells of sunshine this morning. thicker cloud across north—west england, west and wales and south—west england, rain bearing. the best of the sunshine in scotla nd bearing. the best of the sunshine in scotland at the moment. this will filter into northern ireland and then northern england as the head through the afternoon. fairly strong winds this morning across northern, north—eastern scotland, but thankful to say is that area of low pressure pushes away, though wind will ease down. fairly brisk winds through the afternoon. not bad in the sunshine but temperatures are not touched down on yesterday's values. more
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sunshine in the north because it's a little dry. for england and wales with that weather front straddling central areas, the odd bit of rain, had to say exactly where, but expect the odd spit spot in the air. for glastonbury looks much like yesterday, rather cloudy. temperatures 18—19, expect the odd spit or spot of rain. the same in london for queen's tennis. 20 or 21 if you get a little brightness, but pretty doubtful as the cloud and outbreaks of rain move southwards this evening. overnight it should eventually career awaits. winds will be quite liked. a chilly night, without chilly air mass. we could be looking at single figure values in some rural spots. high pressure dominating on monday, low pressure sta rts dominating on monday, low pressure starts to push up the south—west, bringing inquiry increasing cloud.
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for northern ireland, you will be seeing the rain pushing through the afternoon. elsewhere, a good—looking day, sunny spells, scooping up a bit of warm airfrom day, sunny spells, scooping up a bit of warm air from the day, sunny spells, scooping up a bit of warm airfrom the near day, sunny spells, scooping up a bit of warm air from the near continent. we could be looking at 2a—25d in the south—east. for the week ahead, spells of heavy rain at times, typically tuesday onwards. quite breezy thanks to low pressure, and skies would generally be pretty cloudy. thank you. we have to go for an afternoon not so we can get up tonight for ed sheeran. yes, yes, but i'm working early monday morning so it might not work for me. but if you have been enjoying glastonbury from your sofa we their lives now and see how what it's like early on a sunday morning. ed sheeran tonight and barry gibb taking to the pyramid stage later today. our correspondent has been there all weekend. lovely to see you. just take us through some of
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the highlights from yesterday. a really good day of music yesterday, helped by the relatively good weather. only a few bits of rain. one of the big things for many people was one of the biggest stars in the world, katy perry, on the pyramid stage. at glastonbury, people come to see all sorts of different musical acts and buy their tickets before they know who will be here. for artists, it's tickets before they know who will be here. forartists, it's not tickets before they know who will be here. for artists, it's not their hard—core here. for artists, it's not their ha rd—core fans here. for artists, it's not their ha rd—core fa ns out here. for artists, it's not their hard—core fans out there in huge numbers a lot of the time, so they need to play their hits. that is exactly what katy perry did. got a fabulous reaction when she played them of her best—known songs and ended her set by crowd surfing over the crowd, in front of the pyramid stage. a wonderful and typical performance by her. her dancers behind looking wonderfully eccentric. across the rest of the site, people are still remembered the recent events. william gallagher dedicated a performance of don't look back in
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anger to the victims of grenfell tower. stormzy also made reference to g re nfell tower. stormzy also made reference to grenfell tower when he performed on the other stage. the evening finished off on the main pyramid stage with a performance by foo fighters, the big headliners. they had a slightly chequered history with glastonbury. they had to cancel two years ago because one of the members of the band fell off the stage in europe and broke her leg, so couldn't come here and perform. they were replaced by florence and the machine abdul osman it. when they played here in 98, foo fighters, they played the same time as an england world cup match so the audience here went off to watch that, many of them, so they had a relatively small audience. that was not what last night was like. they had a huge audience here. they played well, a big and tight set that when done incredibly well with everybody playing here. as for today, another day of highlights across the place. on the other stage, emeli sande will be
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performing. on the pyramid stage people like jamie cullum, barry gibb will be here and the evening will end with the man himself, ed sheeran. he's had a phenomenally successful year with his album dominating the singles chart, and after a glastonbury where it's normally been very muddy and wet and a bit miserable for some people, people are generally looking forward to ed sheeran finishing a weekend that's been music filled and relatively mild free. that is always a bonus! thank you very much. you're watching breakfast on bbc news. it is 8:20am. time for a look at the newspapers. anand menon is safe with us this morning and will tell us what caught his eye ina and will tell us what caught his eye in a second. a quick look at the front pages... we start with the observer, as we were just hearing,
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there is a bit of a panic over regulations, fire regulations and a bit of a u—turn. where they were cutting back on red tape and attitudes towards fire safety, now they are reviewing all of those. there is call for a cross—party commission to look at them. front page of the sunday times reporting on the cyber attack affecting people who work in westminster, mps and peers on their star. they think 10,000 people are being advised to change their passwords after what has been described as a sustained undetermined effort by hackers to break into sensitive e—mail account and speculation about who may have been behind it. one of the papers this morning suggesting it was russia. lakmal fears after mps hit by cyber attack. 10,000 locked out of their accou nts attack. 10,000 locked out of their accounts yesterday. —— lacked male fears. there was a story about 1000
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password hacked that were on sale on social media. the mail on sunday rerunning a story from the week, having spoken to the journalist who spoke to prince harry. he said at the time that he didn't know any member of the royal family who wa nted member of the royal family who wanted to be king or queen but saw it as their public duty. a little bit more detail on that interview on the mail on sunday this morning. anand menon, welcome. you have picked up the sunday telegraph story we will speaking about. the story about the next generation of tories and if there is someone to take over from theresa may. this is interesting. the tories are all thinking about the succession, whether they say so or not. there seems to be a group of tory mps who are saying it can't be any of the usual crowd, because they have had their time and usual crowd, because they have had theirtime and are usual crowd, because they have had their time and are responsible for what happened in the election and we need to look one generation down. if you think back to the labour leadership, whenjeremy corbyn was elected, the problem they had were so many of the candidates were
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tainted with the brush of the former labour government. tories are thinking about that and thinking, we need to avoid that and find something different. they would think back to 2005 anything, we had david cameron and no one knew about him when he took over? yes, there is a value in having someone who no one really knows particular well who can't be blamed for perceived failures of the government, who can give them a new start. is that a problem for parties, how they regenerate themselves? everybody faces this. one of the problems is when they are in power, the senior people in the party but their rental today —— proteges in place, and if that party is unpopular, they are tainted with the same brush. us politics, this in the observer this morning, a big spread talking about the civil war within the democratic party. yes, there were two things of note about this. first of all it is easy when thinking about america to only think about donald trump, because it is virtually impossible to take your
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eyes off him. at the same time there is normal politics going on. the normal politics at the moment is the democrats tearing themselves apart thinking if it should be bernie sanders who takes the party forward or someone else. bernie sanders out of it? no, still there and very active on social media and has a cult following. people compare him with jeremy corbyn. cult following. people compare him withjeremy corbyn. i think it is also useful in the sensor points out we are not as unique as we think, because exactly the same debates are taking part in the labour party at the moment. to what extent a ce ntre—left the moment. to what extent a centre—left party has to appeal to the centre ground to be successful. that mirrors what is happening in the democratic party right now. they just had this special election in georgia and threw money at that and thought they could win it and then didn't. yes. a huge morale blow to the party. yes, and those are saying we need a change of direction... everyone interprets things as they
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wish. the left of the party are saying hillary clinton fail because she was too centrist. a story we spoke about last week on 100 days. whether the eu actually need us. i was surprised because i was in brussels on monday, they said people in europe want brexit to work because they don't want us back. lot of interesting things, one of which is how important mood is in politics. everyone now thinks the eu is recovering, simply because emmanuel macron has brought a feel—good factor. it is worth point out he hasn't done anything yet. for all the talk of him and angela merkel looking good in photos, when they think about substance, like how to reform the eurozone, you get the impression they are still on opposite sides of the debate and will find it hard to agree. after the election result here a lot of talk about the softening of the outcome of brexit and perhaps still maintaining close ties with europe one way or another and people suggesting there is a way out of it,
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maybe it doesn't have to happen at all. i think what we get a sense of is actually europe want rid, we've made a decision and were quite unified? there is a sense europe can do things without as they couldn't do things without as they couldn't do with us because we whizz blocked it, that's certainly true. if the eu looks successful it changes the terms. brexiteers in the debate talked about us being shackled to cause, but this could change the debate. oxford pc students want to ban roads. except they don't. this isa ban roads. except they don't. this is a silly debate, they want to ban the long ones, not the short ones. if you're a scholarship you get along one, but people insure gowns are feeling inferior. the whole world i know nothing about! thank you so much for your time this morning. great happy with us, thank you. let's talk happy. just before nine o'clock we will meet two people who have made on this year's happy
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list. we want to know what's making you happy this morning. we were saying there weren't many children in photos and suddenly there is a plethora of them. we started off with this one, from one of our production team who has a new puppy, a welsh terrier, he's gorgeous! this is him as he attempts to get down from the enormous step. their egos, in the air. brave, very brave. —— there he goes. a rush of cat and dog photos, and then finally some babies. this is damien and joe's daughter erin, making them happy. this is the view from tim nuttall‘s bedroom. that would make me quite happy as well. is the scene in east yorkshire. and alex wa kes is the scene in east yorkshire. and alex wakes up every morning to these seagulls. i don't know if i do that, very noisy! whatever floats your boat.
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there are loads more on our twitter timeline, very lovely. thank you for sending them in. we will be back with a summary of the morning's main news in a moment, stay with us. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and christian fraser. coming up before seven, holly will be here with the sport. coming up before nine, holly will be here with the sport. but, first, a summary of this morning's main news. fire safety tests on 3a samples of cladding from tower blocks in england have failed, the government has revealed. it comes after fire safety testing after the grenfell tower tragedy. 17 local council areas are affected — including manchester, plymouth, portsmouth and the london boroughs of barnet, brent and camden. hundreds of residents of a council estate in the swiss cottage area of london have spent a second night away from their homes, as camden council tries to empty four tower blocks so that fire safety improvements can be made. earlier this morning, we spoke to
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one resident from the chalcots estate who is refusing to leave his home. i understand what they are trying to do but i think it is a knee jerk reaction and overkill to the situation. as long as i have lived there, we haven't known any major problems, these have only come to light that so whatever level of danger we are to light that so whatever level of dangerwe are in, to light that so whatever level of danger we are in, it's been the same the years. previously webworks that need to be done in the building, they've done it around us and i think this is the way they should carry on, rather than cause elements of fear and chaos around the building. a cyber attack on the parliamentary computer system appears to have been contained according to government sources. officials at the houses of parliament said there had been a "determined" attempt by hackers to identify weak passwords for email accounts used by mps, peers and their staff. conservative mp andrew bridgen has raised concerns that it could leave people open to blackmail. the national cyber security centre is now investigating what happened. we know that our public services are attacked, so it's not at all surprising that there should be an attempt to hack into parliamentary e—mails.
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it's a warning to everybody, whether they‘ re in parliament or elsewhere, that they need to do everything possible to maintain their own cyber security, including having complex and therefore safer codewords. pakistan government officials say at least 100 people are reported to have been killed and dozens more badly injured when a lorry transporting oil burst into flames in punjab. police said a crowd had gathered to collect fuel leaking from the vehicle which had overturned on the main highway from the city of bahawalpur. fire fighters have been tackling the blaze which is said to now be under control. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, has urged theresa may to set up a cross—party commission to advise her on brexit. writing in the mail on sunday, he says such a commission could "hold the ring for the differences to be fought out" and "draw much of the poison from the debate." holly is back with the sport. so,
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the lions team for tuesday? yes, it has all have a bit of a shake—up, we are getting over the disappointment that we have been told to stop complaining, it was a good match. the british and irish lions against new zealand but it did feel a little bit inevitable, certainly in the second half. there were areas where we thought we would be stronger and we went and gatland will be having a look at that with this selection. we will... we have been given a few names. he said yesterday he wanted the team to be more physical. the problem is, this is when the togetherness spirit starts to split, we say, "why isjoe mahler not in the side?" and you are sticking up for the irish! rory best has been named captain and he is the right man for thejob! i may be slightly biased, but he is pa rt may be slightly biased, but he is part of the shake—up, along with george north and johnathan joseph. they will both start against the
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carrick rangers on tuesday —— the hurricane aims. and rory best returns as captain. he was skipper for their best win on the tour against the chiefs last week. and gatland believes all their problems from the first test can be sorted out for the next two. those things are all fixable for me. the all blacks haven't played champagne rugby and throwing the ball all over the place, fairness to them, they were very direct up front so we need to make sure we're better in those areas in terms of combating them for next week. england's cricketers had a really disappointing start to the women's world cup. in the opening match, they lost by 35 runs against india in derby. it would have been a record—breaking victory if they'd made their target of 282 — but they fell short, asjoe wilson reports. think globally, what women's cricket needs is to motivate interest in india. derby's welcome perhaps made the point about the size of the indian market. locally, well, perhaps decent crowd expected early england wickets, instead they saw one of the most
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exciting young talents in world cricket enjoying herself. smriti mandhana made 90 in a style to light up any occasion. supported by her teammates and also by dropped england catches. this one was beyond beaumont on the boundary but fast bowler katherine brunt had been blunted. india made 281. whenever england seemed to be getting close in the chase, runouts held them back, that was captain heather knight gone. fran wilson played the innings of her career so far, 81 and england hoping. guess what, she was run out. replays revealing her bat wasn't grounded. in the end england finished 35 runs short, their preparation had seemed strong, i wondered if on this big occasion some of the players might have frozen. we didn't start the way we wanted to which meant we were always struggling uphill, but it's something we will have to look at. i don't think it was anything to do with freezing, we didn't quite bowl the way
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we wanted to and india really put the pressure back on us. a significant and even historic result in women's cricket but it doesn't mean england are out. remember initially all the eight teams play each other in a round robin stage and england will expect to win their next match in leicester against pakistan on tuesday. mind you, they expected to win their opening match here against india. lewis hamilton said the pressure was "amazing", after he produced what he called a "beautiful lap" to take pole for this afternoon's azerbaijan grand prix. when qualifying was held up by a crash, the drivers only had time for one flying lap at the end of the session — and hamilton went almost half a second quicker than his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas. it was all or nothing. the lap just got better and better throughout. i saw valtteri just ahead, i knew he was doing a good lap, i came across and i knew coming down to the last corner, please be enough.
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i'm ecstatic. one football line for you — and england's under 21s now know who'll they'll face in the semi—finals of the european championship in poland. it'll be germany, after they lost to italy last night and finished runners—up in their group. there were some strong performances from great britain's athletes at the european team championships in lille. at one point they led the standings but they finished the second day of three in third place. eilidh doyle produced one of the highlights, running a season—best in the a00m hurdles. aiden o'brien finished royal ascot as champion trainer for the eighth time. and the 9—2 shot the tin man won the feature race on the final day — the diamond jubilee stakes — ridden by tom queally and trained byjames fanshawe. england will meet malaysia this afternoon in the third and fourth placed playoff at the hockey world league in london. they were beaten 2—0 by the netherlands in the semi—finals but if they win this afternoon, they'll reach the world league final
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in india this december. great britain won a record eight medals at the european boxing championships in ukraine. liverpool's peter mcgrail in the bantamweight division. now, how about this for a recovery. britain's scott redding was going well in qualifying for the dutch grand prix when he lost grip and his bike slipped out from under him. but he sprinted back to the pit lane, jumped on his spare bike and went out again, actually improving his best lap time and finishing fifth. good effort. but what you call getting back on the bike. thank you so much. now back to the main story, the government has been asked to assure councils across
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england that they will receive financial assistance for any necessary fire safety work to make buildings safe. our political correspondentjoins us now. when it comes to funding, these changes to make buildings more fire safe, we know these changes will need to be extensive from the kind of numbers we are looking at, what kind of reassu ra nces have we are looking at, what kind of reassurances have we had from the government that the money will be there? well, the government has said that although there is no blank cheque, what they are saying is that cost considerations shouldn't get in the way of this safety requirement that will be needed in the buildings. if you look at what we have had so far, 3a tower blocks in 17 local authority areas have failed those fire safety checks thus far, and we understand that a further 600 also tower blocks are being investigated and what the government are saying is that they want the local authorities and anyone concerned about the fire cladding
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and whether safety requirements are met to get in touch, so these checks can be carried out. in terms of the cost of this, we haven't got a big yearfor cost of this, we haven't got a big year for a jet cost of this, we haven't got a big yearfor a jet but this cost of this, we haven't got a big year for a jet but this is going to be huge, because there are just so many tower blocks —— we haven't got a figure for it yet. potentially so many tower blocks need updating. the other thing to ask about this morning is there are concerns about this cyber attack affecting people working at westminster, so it is not just mps and peers, but office staff as well. what can you tell us about that? this happened on friday, it was understood that there were breaches of security in terms of people's e—mails, that people were trying to, i suppose, break into people's e—mails. the concern being that potentially very sensitive information could be leaked to these hackers if they could get hold of it. as far as we know, none of that information has been breached. we
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understand the situation is under control now but a lot of mps have been concerned about this. the tory mp andrew bridgen was talking about it potentially leading mps or staff in parliament open to blackmail, that potentially sensitive information sent by constituents could be put out there into the public domain, so a lot of concern about this but they say at the moment, the situation has been contained. thank you, susana. and to bring you further to this fire safety measures, statement by camden cou nty safety measures, statement by camden county council, who have been evacuating those tower blocks in north london, they say work is continuing overnight and into the morning to support residents who have been evacuated and go on to say they have made a further 200 offers of accommodation to residents who have had to leave these towers. most of them, they say, have been accepted and further funding continues to be made available to ensure those currently in temporary accommodation have what they need and they go on to say that because they know some residents were not
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happy about leaving their homes, by remaining in the blocks, the residents risk delay the work that is required and the safety for anyone and they say for everyone affected, we know leaving your home is distressing and they understand residents are upset but the council must act and protect residents. that is from camden county council. we are going to talk about something we don't like to talk about and we should, that is funerals. from choosing the music to planning the order of service, organising a funeral is an important part of the grieving process. as funeral directors start to offer families greater involvement, a new documentary follows people as they help to prepare a body and decide to have a loved one at home in the days before a funeral service. rehana rose is a film maker who is documenting the work of a funeral directors, and hannah thompson arranged a personalfuneralfor her mum and features in the documentary. hannah, tell us about that funeral, what did you do differently? what
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did we do differently? first of all, we found an alternative funeral directors, really, who were based in brighton, which is where we replaced, and —— where we were based, and they came to collect my mother, quite gently, quite softly. they gave us lots of options about how she went. we felt like they were going to take care of her and we have no complaints. but it was different to a standard vero service in the sense that they took the body away —— standard funeral service. yes, they arrived and they give you options. i personally haven't really gone through a traditional funeral home, i have always used this company. i have had four deaths in three years and i think it reflects my family, they reflect my family and they are ecological, hands—on,
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creative and there are plenty of options. i think what people don't realise, rehana, options. i think what people don't realise, reha na, there options. i think what people don't realise, rehana, there are no fixed laws or rules when it comes to handling a deceased person after they have died, so you don't have to send them to an undertakers, they don't have to have a hearse, they don't have to have a hearse, they don't even have to have a traditional coffin. i have learned all of this along the way. in 2012, my mum died and a year later, an ex—partner died and 18 months after that, a good friend in brighton died, sol that, a good friend in brighton died, so i went to three funerals and the third funeral, my friend in brighton, my friend's partner, was supported by the company in brighton and it was a light bulb moment for me because whilst the other two funerals were obviously sad, they didn't seem to reflect the people and that was difficult. and when i we nt and that was difficult. and when i went to my friend's funeral, it wasn'tjust about
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went to my friend's funeral, it wasn't just about the funeral, it is about what happens from the point of death to the ceremony and the way these women supported and helped my friend's partner was extraordinary. so the body stays at home? not always, but you have that choice. and you are involved in the bombing? this company do not embalm. cara, who runs the company, was an embalmer but 15 years on, she doesn't do it because she finds it an invasive procedure. they prepare and dress the body. absolutely, and they encourage the loved ones to come in. it is not everyone's all but the fact is, it is about giving that option to people to allow them to realise you are not handing it all over. there was a quote that stood out to me, i was reading about the funeral director and she said it is about slowing the process down. we had a recent death in my family
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and it happens so quick, from death to funeral to cremation and you think, i didn't even get the chance to say goodbye, actually, it was so final and so quick. absolutely and i think kara says that and again, being a witness to it, being there with the camera, and those people allowing me to be there, i hear that allowing me to be there, i hear that all the time, that cara keeps them calm, tells them they have time to think about the decisions you are making, because you are in such a vulnerable state. yes, you don't actually know when to let them go and that is the point.|j actually know when to let them go and that is the point. i guess some people, that is why it is easier to hand over to funeral directors and say, you take control, i am in ms andi say, you take control, i am in ms and i can't deal with these decisions and that is where it helps ——iam in decisions and that is where it helps ——iamina decisions and that is where it helps —— i am in a mess. that is why it helps to talk about it beforehand to let people know what you like. there isa time let people know what you like. there is a time where if you don't isolate
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life to death, you have a chance to actually take that journey and understand that and comprehended and you have time to do that. it really helps. one thing that occurs to me, it isa helps. one thing that occurs to me, it is a modern invention because long ago, people couldn't afford funeral services and the family looked after it, everybody trooped through the front room and that is how it worked. absolutely and we we re how it worked. absolutely and we were connected and i think there has beena were connected and i think there has been a disconnect and i think what these women are trying to do and many others across the country are just encouraging people to ask questions and to make the funeral for the person they love, not for the funeral director. thank you so much, we really appreciate it. it is a beautiful film. rehana's documentary is called dead good and will be released next year. it's at this point that i say goodbye and go off to read the news for andrew, but in the meantime, here is one last look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning to you at
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home as well, some sunshine out and about, particularly england and wales and across scotland. i will show you the satellite picture which picks out the best of the sunshine across southern and eastern scotland, sunshine in towards northern ireland. plenty of holes in the cloud where we are seeing lots of sunny spells but further west, thicker cloud because of a weather front moving in which will introduce outbreaks of rain. it will spread eastwards and southwards as the afternoon wears on. meanwhile, further north, we're looking at some clear and cooler weather pushing its way southwards and that will introduce more sunshine. a few showers around in northern and western scotland and strong winds across the north—east down through the day. more sunshine getting in towards northern ireland and northern england by the time we reach the middle of the afternoon but further south, the weather front is there so rather cloudy skies and spots of rain. not quite as warm as yesterday but we may see some slices of sunshine pushing in towards the south—west later in the day, so it
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looks like there could be some rain at glastonbury, patchy rain, and the chance for some sunny spells towards the end of the day. for london, rather cloudy, temperatures around 20 or 21 for the tennis at queens club. brighter skies across the board finally pushing southwards by the time they reached the first part of the night, the cloud clearing to the south and the recipe for a cool night, light winds and clear skies and that cooler air mass, looking up values in single figures in room row places. we start on a chilly note on monday, high pressure dominates the scene but some could spells of sunshine and this area of pressure will bring increasing cloud to western areas and rain towards northern ireland as the day wears on but for much of scotland and england and wales, some good sunny spells and wales, some good sunny spells and a little bit warmer, scooping up there from the near continent, temperatures of 22—25d. the rest of the week, low pressure is in charge, some spells of heavy and maybe
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thundery rain and it will be quite breezy thanks to the low pressure and there will be a lot of cloud around too. not a complete wash—out, there will be a little bit of sunshine as well. back to you. it's one of the biggest sporting events taking place this year, but the chances are you've never heard of it. thousands of athletes from 23 islands around the world have travelled to gotland in sweden for the 2017 island games. jen smith is there for us this morning. it looks like a beautiful day there. so tell us a little bit more about the games and what will happen later. it is a beautiful day but it isa later. it is a beautiful day but it is a slightly windy day here, which might be troublesome for the first event of the 2017 island games, the men's triathlon. i don't know if you can see that jetty at there, that men's triathlon. i don't know if you can see thatjetty at there, that is where the first leg will get under way, the swimming for the triathlon and it is a very competitive event. ahead, this is one of the ones to
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watch. dan hawksworth from jersey is hoping to retain his title. he's a commonwealth level athlete and has appeared at the worlds and so this is serious stuff. 2300 competitors are here in gotland, this island in the baltic sea, along with their supporters, friends and relatives and coaches and the media like us. so why are we all here? something called the 2017 island games. 23 island nations, each with small populations, come together every two yea rs populations, come together every two years to compete in their own bespoke competition. some have travelled from the arctic, others from warmer climes. so, why? the island games is a wonderful event for islands with populations of less than i think 100,000, but it is an event where we can come together, regardless of the distance between us, we can come together and celebrate what we all love to do and what we do best to represent our
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islands. for us gibraltarians, definitely, because olympics, europeans, we don't have a chance of medalling and this is where we have a chance of medalling, so this is a big deal for us. it is about competition but also about making friends and having fun and meeting a lot of cool people. western isles! this year, gotland is the host, it isa this year, gotland is the host, it is a swedish island in the baltic sea and around 60,000 people live here, but for one week injune, over 2,000 competitors from islands as far afield as st helena in the south atla ntic far afield as st helena in the south atlantic and bermuda in the caribbean will come here. so how much work is involved in putting that altogether? how much work? a lot of work, i can tell you that. i've been employed for two and a half years and we have been at this since 2007 or something like that, so it is ten years in the making, from the 1st of may be host the games to coming to this day. and this they could see the beginning of
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an olympic career, like it has for some well—known brits. an olympic career, like it has for some well- known brits. we an olympic career, like it has for some well-known brits. we have some older veterans in the company and their claim to fame is that they once beat me mark cavendish, which is funny looking back now. there are some hopefuls from the isle of man that following in his footsteps and we will see where they are in a few yea rs. we will see where they are in a few years. and for some, it is closer than that. and it from the isle of wight hopes to make it to the gold coast next april. i compete for scotla nd coast next april. i compete for scotland now in the commonwealth games, i have done the last three games, i have done the last three games and the qualifying distance is 67.5m, which i'm just short of this year so i need to get the qualifying distance and get a trip to australia next year. so while as the friendly games, there is still some serious competition. and, andy, as you saw in that report, he is hoping to go for his ninth consecutive gold medal in the hammer throw, which would actually be an island games record and as he mentioned, he is hoping to also compete or to qualify for the
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commonwealth games, so it does show you the level of competition that you the level of competition that you can expect here. other highlights this week include a guernsey swimmer called miles munro, already a youth olympic champion and he will start his competition today and going all the way until thursday. also this afternoon, the women's football, a hotly contested event between the scandinavian island nations and the channel islands. and as i said, they are all here in gotland, we are here in the capital, a medieval town and you can see some of the ruins behind me, it is peppered with places like this, so 2300 competitors from 23 island nations, 16 sports across seven days of competition, so hopefully that has given you some flavour of what to expect here this week and maybe we will see you for gibraltar in 2019. it looks absolutely fabulous there, thank you. we regularly hear about the richest people in the world, or the most successful — but what about the happiest? this morning, the independent published its alternative list — the happy list.
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it celebrates those people who give kindness and compassion to help change the lives of people in their communities. we're delighted to be joined by two people on the list — mandy sanghera and michelle smith. you both are responsible for other people's happiness, how does that feel? well, it's a great honour and a privilege but actually, i think this is an amazing list and i feel honoured and lucky to be honoured because it celebrates ordinary people, celebrates people who are unsung heroes who necessarily might not get recognition for some of their work. and in fact, you both deal with pretty tough subjects in your lives. you, mandy, look after women's right, you have been campaigning for many years against fgm. i am human rights activist and doa fgm. i am human rights activist and do a lot of work globally and not just in the uk and i talk about harmful practices, so forced marriages, fgm and other harmful practices like witchcraft and do a
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lot of work with disability, which is where michelle and i found a lot of synergy today but what i was so pleased about being on this list, remiluc that britain recently with manchester and everything else, this is just manchester and everything else, this isjust a manchester and everything else, this is just a really feel—good list that i thought was a really lovely thing to wa ke i thought was a really lovely thing to wake up to. you talk about michelle here, you work in the volu nta ry michelle here, you work in the voluntary sector, effectively. yes, i rana social enterprise looking after people with learning difficulties and disabled people and older people. so like i say, these are tough subjects. i'm sure not every day is filled with happiness but there must be a great reward to come from it as well, tell us about that. i think the role that we do can be emotionally draining but it is also really emotionally rewarding as well, so every day, we work with our clients and they leave happy and smiling. what other little things you can do to make a difference to people's lives? we work with clients and teach them how to do art, stay
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safe on computers, we work with their physical health as well as emotional and mental well— being, so we have been teaching them how to learn new things like tai chi, we have an amazing in structure, and we ta ke have an amazing in structure, and we take them to the gym, because we are doing training for a run in the summer forecast country. and these things they simply wouldn't have you weren't there. yes, we have amazing volunteers and they come and give theirtime. volunteers and they come and give their time. like i wasjust saying, because obviously when i support a person that might be abused or might be fleeing a forced marriage or going through a harmful practice, now we are breaking up for summer holidays, which is the most vulnerable time for young people and if we look at the figures as well, we know that there are an awful lot of young people who are not going to have a summer holiday like you or i where we mightjust go off on a beach holiday or something else,
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some people might go away and be promised to marry somebody or somebody might be going through a horrific practice of fgm and this is why it is so important and it was a nice thing to wake up this morning, but however, the reality is we live in very different times right now and when we look at what is happening with brexit, what has happened in london and in manchester, in recent weeks... those big issues mean we can sometimes be very focused on our own lives because you close in, almost, but what you have done is open out and say i'm going to try and make a difference. and i think when we look at the spirit of british people in recent days, especially in manchester after the attack, and how people have come out, there is so much goodwill out here, would you not agree? absolutely. well those lucky that we are from the north and the clients we work with our amazing and it makes ourjob so much easier. so brilliant here and there are massive smiles on your faces, i love it. you are welcome any time. and we have had so many of your lovely
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pictures of what makes you happy this morning. sometimes, it is the little things. here is three—month—old jamie full of smiles in west lothian. and here is ted, especially happy when he is eating, according to helen and ian. and from tina and peter, the five attempts of ids, they are delighted to find out they are pregnant with twins. that is it from breakfast for now, hope you have a great sunday. stay happy. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 9: cladding on 3a tower blocks in 17 council areas in england has failed fire safety tests, the government says. so far, every sample has failed the tests. hundreds of residents in camden have spent a second night away from their homes after four buildings were evacuated over safety concerns. the government says prices for goods
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such as sugar and bananas won't rise after brexit, as many countries will continue to have duty—free access to the uk. the glastonbury festival gets under way for third and final day of performances, with ed sheeran providing this the grand finale on the main stage this evening. this the grand finale on the main stage this evening. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 — this mornings reviewers are the political commentator
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