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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 25, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at five: tests continue on cladding from tower blocks around the country as every one of the 3a samples tested so far fails to meet fire safety standards. the brexit secretary, david davis, says he's not certain the uk will get a withdrawal deal with the eu, and the government is prepared to "walk away". you can be sure there will be a deal, of which the deal i want, the free trade agreement, the customs agreement and so on, it's... i'm pretty sure, but i'm not certain. 140 people are feared killed in pakistan after a tanker transporting oil burst into flames. two children are in intensive care after a car ploughed into a group of pedestrians outside a sports centre in newcastle. police say they don't believe the incident is terrorism—related. organisers of istanbul's annual gay pride march say it will go ahead despite a ban by the authorities of turkey's largest city. turkish police have
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fired rubber bullets. performances are in full swing for the final day of glastonbury, where ed sheeran will bring the show to a close on the pyramid stage later tonight. and after a chaotic race, red bull's daniel ricciardo wins the azerbaijan grand prix. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. camden council in london says around 200 residents from 120 households are still refusing to leave several tower blocks that have been judged by the fire services too dangerous to live in. the council says those residents risk holding up work to make their homes say. —— safe.
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tests are continuing on cladding from tower blocks around the country after it was revealed every one of the 34 samples tested has failed to meet fire safety standards. the cladding tested so far is from buildings in 17 local council areas. i have to ask a supervisor whether they will let me back in if i leave... despite being told his tower block isn't safe, roger evans is refusing to go, believing the council is overreacting. each time he leaves, he's worried he won't be allowed back in. how do you feel about that? scared, i feel really nervous, upset, distressed. why won't you leave? as far as i'm concerned, this building is as safe now as it was last week, nothing has changed. but the council is clear — the cladding has failed safety checks and there are concerns about fire doors and gas pipes. the council have again today been knocking on the doors of people who don't want to leave, telling them that if they don't go, they risk delaying the work designed to make their homes safe. they say they could ultimately pursue a legal route to get people out, but at the moment they want to use persuasion. so far, 200 offers of accommodation
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have been made to residents, hundreds of others are staying with friends or family, but this could go on for weeks. some had to bed down for the night at the leisure centre. it's like starting a new life again, and how long am i going to go for? things have not been going smooth, as they should have in many people's eyes, and it shouldn't have happened like this. work has already started to improve this block which wasn't evacuated. there are concerns over many other high—rises — 34 tower blocks in 17 areas have failed tests. more checks are continuing at pace. i think they've done the right thing, you have to err on the side of caution. you can't play russian roulette with people's safety. they've received the advice from the experts, and acted on the advice. the local government organisation says where cladding fails safety tests, buildings will not necessarily be evacuated, but it's warning all areas waiting
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for test results to prepare contingency plans, so measures can be taken quickly. in the past hour since hearing from the leader of the council, the scale of the operation facing the authority is becoming clearer, the fa ct authority is becoming clearer, the fact that 200 residents are so far refusing to leave the tower blocks. the fact that hundreds of people who have been staying with friends or family, some are turning up at the leisure centre, saying to the council, we can no longer stay with friends and family. we can no longer put upon them. we need accommodation elsewhere. it is clear there will not be enough hotels to accommodate eve ryo ne not be enough hotels to accommodate everyone immediately, so the council is saying tonight, once again, some people will have two bed down here at the leisure centre. the council
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leader regarding the people who aren't going to leave, who aren't willing to make that move says what they want to do at the moment is persuade them to go. that is the right thing that should happen. so we have people knocking on those doors, talking to people about the safety risks. but we have also dispatched social workers to have individual conversations with those families, with those individuals, about what will help them to move out. i've been talking to many of those people overnight, and some of them do want to leave, but they don't want to come and spend a night here, which of course i completely understand. so what we want to do is get those people directly into appropriate accommodation. you know, there are some specific issues, some people with agoraphobia, particular medication, they want to be sure they've got the right accommodation. so after i've spoken and given this update, i'm going myself, back to the blocks, to knock on doors, and have those conversations. you're talking about persuasion, but if people are stubborn and say they will not leave, they don't think they want to leave, are you going to force them out? so we're really clear that those
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buildings are not safe. and that's what the fire services have told us. we're now going to have to work very closely with the fire services. we're in constant communication with them. it's their advice that counts on this. if it comes to the point where people really, really won't leave, that is last resort, the last thing i want to do is force people out of their homes. the conversations i've been having the resident in the building is they are willing to work with us, and i'm going to have those conversations again tonight. the most important thing is we were with them. if those buildings aren't safe, if it comes to that, we will work with the fire services on it. is there a deadline? it's an emerging picture. the most important thing is we also have people awake, on those blocks going up and down. and when i first had the conversation with the fire services, when they said to me that it wasn't safe, they were clear that it wasn't safe to spend a night there, when the whole blog was sleeping.
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where we have residents, we are making sure we are continuing to knock on their doors, i'm sure it is deeply disrupting for them, having the conversation again and again, keeping people wake, making sure there are people on the block. the fire services are saying it's not safe to stay, and they need to go. we've also started work, and for us to complete that work as quickly as possible, and get people back, we want those buildings to be empty. one man we have been following over the past couple of days is roger eva ns, the past couple of days is roger evans, who lives in one of the tower blocks, but so far has refused to go. the council leader is saying to residents like you, work with her to solve the situation. why are you not doing that? i am more than happy to. i have been told she will visit us and talk to each tenant individually. i am waiting for that arrival, but i am getting my information from the media. no one from the council is telling me this. we had a visit earlier this afternoon from someone from the council. i am afternoon from someone from the council. lam mostly afternoon from someone from the council. i am mostly in my flat, the
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most disconcerting thing from that conversation was that the works may ta ke conversation was that the works may take now up to six weeks. as suspected, we have no idea how long any work is likely to take, so we don't know how long we will have to be out of our homes. the council says the danger is that if tenants like you remain in the flats that aren't safe, people could be out of their homes for even longer.|j aren't safe, people could be out of their homes for even longer. i don't believe them. i think they are lying. works have happened in the powerbooks over the years. they have worked around the residents. i have said, if anything worked around the residents. i have said, ifanything needs worked around the residents. i have said, if anything needs to be done, switch off the power or water, direct work around my flat, i am happy to vacate if they give me enough notice. but there is no way they need to evacuate the whole tower block to do some work to various parts of the building. they are saying they being open and honest with residents about safety concerns they've discovered, they are looking after your safety, what is it going to take to get you to go? number one, no one knows
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anything. they have had engineers and the fire brigade. until they get into the building and start working, i'io into the building and start working, 110 one into the building and start working, no one knows what is required and how long it takes. i am no one knows what is required and how long it takes. lam happy no one knows what is required and how long it takes. i am happy to have a conversation, i am open to negotiation. but for now, it is better i stay put. i am a taxpayer and a council taxpayer, i am trying to save the council money by not having them put me up in a hotel. and the general disorientation and destruction involved, for now, i prefer to stay where i am. when needs must, i am happy to discuss the options. even if you are at risk, as they see it. i don't believe i am more at risk than i was a week ago, a month ago or a year ago. i a week ago, a month ago or a year ago. lam bobby a week ago, a month ago or a year ago. i am bobby safer, a week ago, a month ago or a year ago. lam bobby safer, because a week ago, a month ago or a year ago. i am bobby safer, because there are security people in the foyer, what i am worried about is intimidation from council security. there is a police presence. are they going to try to legally enforce my eviction from the property? what if they go down that route? they are
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trying to persuade you...” they go down that route? they are trying to persuade you... i am happy to have a conversation but we haven't had a reasonable conversation yet. we are talking about thousands of people. can they have conversations with each individual? there are not that many people left in the building. they know where i am, i am people left in the building. they know where i am, lam happy to people left in the building. they know where i am, i am happy to talk. they are making it up as they go along, this is the reality of the situation. camden did a very good job, ifind situation. camden did a very good job, i find than supportive and encouraging, however, idon't job, i find than supportive and encouraging, however, i don't want to leave. i don't think it is essential i do at the moment. thank you butjoining us. the council leader talking to the people still in the blocks, but as we saw from one resident here, those conversations are not going to be easy. looks like a long night in camden. simon, thank you for updating us. the brexit secretary, david davis, has said he is "pretty sure", that the uk can reach a suitable deal with brussels on leaving the european union, but has suggested britain may need a transitional arrangement if everything isn't agreed
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within the two—year time frame. mr davis insisted that britain had to be ready to walk away if the deal was a bad one. susana mendonca reports. we've had some smiles and that never—ending handshake, but behind the scenes of the brexit negotiations, the man charged with doing a deal for britain seems uncertain as to whether he'll get one. i'm pretty sure, i'm not 100% sure, it's a negotiation. because you said right at the beginning of this, "we are guaranteed to get a deal, you can be sure we'll get a deal." we can be sure there will be a deal, of which the deal i want, which is the free trade agreement, the customs agreement and so on, it's... i'm pretty sure, but i'm not certain. what the brexit secretary did seem certain about was that a transitional arrangement with the eu of between one to two years would have to be done. he said if there was no deal that would be better than a punishment deal, and he had a promise for eu citizens living here.
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we're trying to ensure that every individual citizen gets their current position, as it were, locked in place for them, so the anxiety can go. this is the real issue, it's about people's anxiety, it's not about the prospect of deporting people, it's about the anxiety that they can't stay — that's the real issue. more details of that offer to eu citizens living and working in the uk will be laid out tomorrow, but it's already been criticised by the european commission and the labour party for not going far enough. the irish border is another issue britain wants settled. we want to have effectively an invisible border between the north and south. now, there are technical ways of doing that — number plate recognition on vehicles, tagging of containers. the liberal democrats accused the brexit secretary of inspiring as much confidence as a drunken trapeze artist, and said people should have the option of turning back. if it's a bad outcome or if there's no outcome,
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which is potentially worse, with a catastrophic cliff edge, we should have the option of the public approving it or not approving it. as britain awaits the eu's go—ahead on trade talks, the government's promising tariff—free trade on goods, like bananas that come from developing nations, will continue. that trade is worth £20 billion a year, but that's less than 5% of the value of the uk's total imports, so a trade deal with the eu is the big prize. susana mendonca, bbc news. at least six people have been injured, three of them seriously, when a car collided with pedestrians in newcastle this morning. police have arrested a 42—year—old woman. the car mounted a pavement outside westgate sports centre, where hundreds of people were celebrating eid, which marks the end of ramadan. after the prayers, we were wishing everybody happy eid,
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and suddenly we heard a lot of screaming. we did not know what it was. we were just talking when we heard a woman came from outside, started driving into the people. she had a nissanjuke. she came from outside and started driving into people. she lost power. i do not think she has lost control of the car. there is a few casualties, people who are seriously injured. people were panicking, but the police did a greatjob to calm the people down. i have seen some injured people, some families, badly injured. it happened like that. i was on the floor. the front wheel passed me. it did not hit me. it didn't hit you? yes. and my brother—in—law has been hit, so right now he is in the ivi, taken by ambulance. everybody was panicking, but she did not do it on purpose, honestly. eyewitness accounts of the accident
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this morning in newcastle. the headlines on bbc news: tests continue on cladding from tower blocks around the country as every one of the 34 samples tested so far fails to meet fire safety standards. the brexit secretary, david davis, says he's not certain the uk will get a withdrawal deal with the eu and the government is prepared to "walk away" officials in pakistan say at least 140 people have died after an overturned oil tanker caught fire in punjab province. more than 140 people are feared to have been killed in pakistan, when an oil tanker, which had overturned on a highway, caught fire. villagers in the punjab province had rushed to the roadside after the tanker tipped over, many others are in critical condition in hospital.
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fire fighters have now brought the blaze under control. richard lister reports. the tanker blazed for hours after the explosion. onlookers struggled to control their grief. the blast consumed everything around it, killing scores of people in an instant and injuring many more. nearly all the victims came from surrounding villages. the tanker had come off the road, spilling thousands of litres of fuel. in this impoverished area, people rushed to collect it. it's thought someone lighting a cigarette may have caused the explosion. the charred wreckage gives an idea of how many people were there. pictures too graphic to broadcast showed bodies piled by the road. "children were bringing buckets to take the petrol", he said. "there was a huge crowd and suddenly an enormous explosion." this man had a lucky escape, he'd already taken some petrol and then felt dizzy because of the fumes and decided not to go back for more. the army flew out some of
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those injured by helicopter. for many of the other casualties, the nearest hospitals were a two—hour drive. with so many people critically injured and requiring specialist burns care, the medical services have been stretched to the limit; hospital teams working flat out to assist the injured and console the bereaved. richard lister, bbc news. rescue officials in china are warning it's unlikely anyone else will be found alive after a huge landslide destroyed a mountain village in sichuan province. a couple and their baby were found in the early hours after the landslide on saturday, but since then, only bodies have been pulled from the rubble in maoxian. it's feared more than a hundred bodies lie under the mud and debris. david campa nale reports. the hope of finding any more survivors is now thought to be pretty slim. scores of houses have been buried when a cascade of rocks and earth swept down on a mountain
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burying some 40 homes. the bodies of over a dozen people have so far been recovered, but many more are feared trapped beneath the rubble. despite this, more than 3000 rescuers have been deployed to the scene of the tragedy. specially trained rescue dogs are scouring the debris. emergency workers had some early success emergency workers had some early success when they found this baby and its parents. translation:- around 5am, and its parents. translation:- around sam, the baby started crying so around sam, the baby started crying soi around sam, the baby started crying so i changed the nappies and heard a loud noise. iwent so i changed the nappies and heard a loud noise. i went to the front door, but was hit by wind and water, and stones came flying and it pinned me down to the ground. my wife and i slowly got up, helped the baby and escaped. they have also been reports that three metres underground there may still be villagers trapped alive. listening devices have been deployed to pick up any signs of life. heavy rain is thought to have
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triggered this landslide after the top section of a mountain came loose and came down onto the village below. landslides are a regular danger in mountainous regions of china. especially during heavy rains. local police say a lack of vegetation in the area made the landslide much worse. at least seven people have died in the high—altitude tourist resort of gulmarg in indian—administered kashmir, when the world's second highest cable car crashed. police say the cable that operates the six—seat cabins snapped due to strong winds. hundreds are still stranded in the cabins. a rescue operation is under way. organisers of istanbul's annual gay pride march say it will go ahead despite a ban by the authorities of turkey's largest city. the event has been called for sunday evening in the city's taksim square. authorities banned the march for third year in a row, citing security concerns after threats from far—right groups. our correspondent mark lowen is there for us now.
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n ewsa g e nts newsagents have reported suggesting police have used rubber bullets in an attempt to break up groups of marchers. what have you seen? there have been skirmishes. we saw a few minutes ago, some on taksim square, military releasing tear gas. we have heard reports of probable it's on —— rubber bullets. police were under orders to not let anybody participate in the march. nobody could even get a rainbow flag. we saw one person changing their t—shirt off because it had "pride" and rainbow lettering. the authorities have clamps down hard on public order to ban the gay pride
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march. what supporters and organisers say is it is a convenient scapegoat for an increasingly islamist government. and the march is an anathema of the government. b get the mood around here. a heavy police presence, and this is the scene replicated down the main shopping street here. nobody is able to come onto here. this was not the scene for over a decade. for a decade, the gay pride march took place with tens of thousands of people on the street. really, there has been an increasing clamp down on these kind of marchers, and a feeling here that a government that once held its hand out to the old dbt community is becoming increasingly conservative. dbt community is becoming increasingly conservativelj dbt community is becoming increasingly conservative. i was going to ask about that, that is one way to read it, this is another protest that the government might
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fear it would be effectively hijacked by opponents of the president. but is it fair to say also that president erdogan and the ruling party is increasingly less well disposed towards this community than perhaps has been the case in tu rkey‘s than perhaps has been the case in turkey's more liberal past.|j than perhaps has been the case in turkey's more liberal past. i think that's absolutely the case. even though they have claimed there is a reason behind the cancellation, there have been marches in this city and other cities before. there is really a feeling that it was the purpose of this march itself. bear in mind, turkey is still a eu member. some people think they will never reach their goal, and delegates of the danish and dutch
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governorate are here, and the european union as well, in istanbul today, to support the parade, to say that respecting minority rights, respecting lgbt that respecting minority rights, respecting lg bt rights that respecting minority rights, respecting lgbt rights in any country, and turkey in going against it, is showing a flagrant disrespect for the respect and need to respect human rights. really, the good is as will fall on deaf ears here in a country where the more liberal side of the country feels increasingly ostracised. and the president is moulding turkey in his conservative pious image. thanks very much. royal bank of scotla nd thanks very much. royal bank of scotland is cutting more than 400 jobs in this country dealing with loa ns to jobs in this country dealing with loans to small businesses. many will be moved to india. the bank, which is 73% owned by the taxpayer, sayegh as part of the drive to reduce
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costs. up to 90 e—mail accounts are 110w costs. up to 90 e—mail accounts are now thought to have been comprised during yesterday's cyber attack on polymer. official says there has been a determined attempt by hackers to access accounts used by mps, peers and their staff. a teenage boy has been arrested on suspicion of the attempted rape of an eight—year—old girl in manchester. the boy, believed to be 14 or 15 yea rs the boy, believed to be 14 or 15 years old, was detained after officers were told the girl had been attacked yesterday evening. the united nations says the number of suspected cases of cholera in yemen has now passed 200,000. the world health organisation and the un children's agency, unicef, say the country is facing the worst cholera outbreak in the world. rylee carlson reports. this 8—year—old is being taken care of at a camp.
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unicef says the country has the worst cholera outbreak in the world. cholera is a treatable disease, but health officials are worried a lack of access to medical care will mean more people will be infected, and more will die. this is double the caseload of two and a half weeks ago. we think and fear that the number will reach 300,000 just in the next few weeks. the rate we are seeing is unprecedented. we are recording something like 5,000 cases a day. the scale of the outbreak is devastating. overall, more than 200,000 people are thought to have become infected. so far, 1,300 have died, of those, a quarter are children. more than two years of conflict in yemen have devastated the country. fighting between rebels and government forces have killed more than 8,000 people. as is usually the case, civilians are paying the highest price. the situation is really
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a disaster at the moment. it is basically the result of continued conflict, and it is absolutely man—made. health care systems have collapsed. almost seven million people in yemen are on the brink of famine, making them more susceptible to diseases like cholera. unicef and the world health organization said they are trying to teach people how to protect themselves by cleaning and storing drinking water, but the fighting means they do not have access to every area, making it difficult to stop the disease from spreading. rylee carlson, bbc news. let me take you to our main story, the ongoing testing of cladding in residential tower blocks around the
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country, specifically around england. we have an update on the number of tests carried out, the failure rate. it now has been confirmed that 60 buildings, material from 60 confirmed that 60 buildings, materialfrom 60 buildings has failed those tests. though 60 buildings are across the country, 25 local authority areas affected. i will run through those very quickly for you. a number of london boris, barnett, brent, camden, hounslow, islington, lambeth, and wandsworth. other council areas outside of london, one building in doncaster, which has failed, four buildings across manchester that have failed, one in norwich, three in plymouth, two in portsmouth, three in stockton on tees, we think one of those is in billingham, according to residents there. they said they have been told this by the local authority, and
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five in sunderland. that is how the 25 local authority areas are made up, and the rough proportions of buildings. that's not surprisingly, the largest cities affected the most, london and manchester. the government says work is continuing iv building search establishment to see as much samples as possible as soon see as much samples as possible as soon as see as much samples as possible as soon as they can. hundreds of people in spain have been evacuated from the path of a huge forest fire. the blaze broke out in a pine forest near the city of huelva last night. windy conditions are making it difficult to bring the flames under control. reports from the area say the fire may have been started deliberately. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, has urged theresa may to set up a cross—party commission to advise her on brexit. writing in the mail on sunday, he says such a commission could "hold the ring for the differences to be fought out" and "draw much of the poison from the debate". the former snp leader,
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gordon wilson, has died after a short illness. he was 79. mr wilson led the party from 1979 to 1990 and represented dundee east at westminster for 13 years. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, said he'd made an "immense" contribution to the success of the snp. performances are under way on the final day of the glastonbury festival. ed sheeran will bring the show to a close on the pyramid stage later on this evening. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is there. he's spoken to chic guitarist, nile rodgers, who is playing at the festival for the second time. we were here four years ago, and it was insane, so god only knows what's going to happen today. you've played all over the world, of course. what makes glastonbury special? what made you agree to come back? well, the numbers are pretty insane. we just like the vibe. it's interesting that ijust happened to come here at a time
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where london feels... i don't know if the word is "magical", that probably is not the right word, but i landed the day after the fire, and i volunteered, and i was hanging out with a lot of the kids who are volunteering, and it was just amazing to me. a real sense of community. i was blown away, i felt the love and the compassion, and it was also nice to get my hands dirty a bit. i started out as a community volunteer, so it was sort of... it was really cool, man, it was great to be with my peeps. and music—wise, what will it be like when you are out on stage, all those people, chic performing? that part‘s easy, that is second nature. we just love playing, we're so old school. wejust like to get in front of people, play, and we read the crowd.
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we do not even know yet what our set list is going to be. at the moment, we only know our first song and our last song. you've been doing a lot of stuff recently, a tedx talk? yes, as part of my we are family foundation charity, we have an event that we host called tede. and we've already done our third event in london, which happened yesterday. it was the most magical we have ever had. now that word magical is appropriate, because yesterday was off the charts, it was incredible. and finally, is there anyone else looking forward to seeing here at glastonbury? such a wide variety of artists! i'll probably just run into a bunch of my friends. i tried to look at the schedule and see who i could pop over and see real quick, but you know, i don't know. i have just got to look at the landscape and see who is close by so we can do everything we need to do. our real responsiblity is to put on a show for the people.
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i will see my friends, and ijust did a recording with everybody anyway, so i just saw them all. talking to our correspondent rhys thomas imbula —— correspondent lizo mzimba there. what about the weather? it has really been one of those mod free glastonbury weekends, and i think a pleasant weekend for most of you sunny spells across the uk. one or two showers in the day here and there are a cross east wales, the midlands, east anglia, and they could push across somerset. mostly clear skies and light winds through
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the night, much fresher than what we have been used to particularly across inland and wales. temperatures could get down to single figures. a fresh start on monday, dry sunny one for the vast majority, isolated showers in northern scotland, mostly dry, but cloud increases from the west through the day and into the afternoon, northern ireland turning grey a cross afternoon, northern ireland turning grey across southern afternoon, northern ireland turning grey across southern areas afternoon, northern ireland turning grey across southern areas with outbreaks of rain. it could be a little on the heavy side. temperatures, though, not too bad after that chilly start. quite pleasa nt after that chilly start. quite pleasant with light winds and sung—joon overhead though a bit more close the afternoon. enter the evening and overnight rain from northern ireland spread into central and southern scotland, parts of england and the west of wales, setting us into a completely different week than last week. all of us will see rain at some point, cloudier and cooler than the week just gone. hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines at 5.30pm:
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cladding on 34 tower blocks in 17 local authorities fail fire safety tests. ministers say every building tested so ministers say every building tested so far has failed. camden council says residents who refuse to leave blocks that are being evacuated are delaying the work and need to leave for their safety. there are some specific issues — some people with agoraphobia, particular medication. they want to be sure that they've got the right accommodation. you can be sure there'll be a deal, but the deal i want, —— the brexit secretary david davis says he's "pretty sure" the uk can reach a suitable deal with brussels. if not, the uk has to be prepared to walk away from talks. an oil tanker that crashed in pakistan's punjab province has left at least 140 people dead, most of whom were collecting leaking fuel before it exploded. six people were injured — three of them seriously — after a car ploughed into a group of pedestrians outside a sports centre in newcastle. police say it's not terror—related.
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police in istanbul have fired on the gay pride march. and it has been an interesting day of sport. tim has all the details. thank you. one of the most dramatic races of the formula one season took place in azerbaijan this afternoon. there were three retirements, three safety cars and numerous crashes — all before they got half way through the race in baku! there was so much action we don't have time to show it all, but nick parrott has picked out the highlights — and will tell you who won it. blue skies in azerbaijan did not point to a store in baku, but it rained chaos from first to last.
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this seemingly ending the hopes of kimi raikkonen. hamilton escaped from pole position but as he got the cure for the restart, sebastian vettel got too close. team radio: you literally turned on and hit me. so much debris was there that the race was suspended. hamilton's hopes of victory faded after the restart. he was dropped to nine behind vettel. the briton could only recovered to finish fifth behind the german. in front of them daniel ricciardo claimed red bull's first win this season and valtteri bottas engineered a remarkable recovery, petting lance stroll to second place. it was a race of you will ever forget. second place. it was a race of you will everforget. —— second place. it was a race of you will ever forget. —— petting second place. it was a race of you will everforget. —— petting lance stroll. studio: eventful to say the least! to cricket... south africa were chasing 182 to win the final t20 international against england in cardiff. with the series tied at 1—1 — debutant dawid malan led the way for england with an impressive 78.
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but some tight south africa bowling at the death prevented england pushing their score to nearer 200. in reply, south africa lost key man ab de villiers for 35 — handing mason crane his first international wicket in the process. they're currently 121—6 with 20 balls remaining. not much chance for south africa. feliciano lopez has caused a big shock and beaten marin cilic in a fitting final at the queen's club in london. number four seed cilic began the match as favourite and took the first set without much fuss — six games to four. but the 35—year—old spaniard, who knocked out stan wawrinka on his way to the final, fought back and levelled things — by winning the second set tie—break. that was followed by another compelling set which again depended on a tie—break. and it was won by the world number 32.
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i cannot believe that i've finally won this trophy. i've been waiting so won this trophy. i've been waiting so long, 15 or 16 years, to be here holding the strawberry. i thought at the end of the tie—break after losing a few matches i was not going to be able to make it, but i was a bit lucky at the end of the day. i won today and i also want to congratulate my toughest opponent today, and also the best of luck for wimbledon. roger federer looks in great shape for the start of wimbledon a week tomorrow, after winning a ninth halle open title in germany. it took him just 53 minutes! the 18—time grand slam champion outclassed the home favourite alexander zverev 6—1, 6—3 in the final. after winning the australian open, the 35—year—old sat out the entire clay court season, as he targets a record eighth wimbledon title. he didn't drop a set in the whole of this tournament. i was doubting myself a little bit, losing the first round, you know,
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for the first time in 15 years on grass, that was always going to shake me a little, and it did. let that be forgotten, to move on, to remind myself i can play well on grass, it gives me great confidence, and of course i'm on cloud nine right now after the ninth win in halle. a wonderful place to win because i am not sure i will get the chance again so important to join this one. in the women's game... petra kvitova has won herfirst title since being injured in a knife attack at the end of last year. she's won the aegon classic in birmingham, coming from a set down to beat australian ashleigh barty. the two time wimbledon champion was told by her surgeon that she might never play again, but has recovered in some style to claim a 20th career singles title — and continue the ideal preparations for wimbedlon. lions' head coach warren gatland says they have a huge week ahead of them, after defeat to the all blacks in the first test. they take on the super rugby champions hurricanes in wellington on tuesday. and gatland says there
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are still test places available for anyone who performs. rory best returns as captain for the hurricanes match — he was skipper for their best win on the tour so far, against the chiefs last week. every game, we have taken each one in isolation, and obviously everyone knew the biggest picture was the first test selection, that has been and gone now so first test selection, that has been and gone now so now we first test selection, that has been and gone now so now we have a chance asa and gone now so now we have a chance as a squad to put our hand up for selection for the second test and thatis selection for the second test and that is what is important and i think if we start to look beyond and think if we start to look beyond and think too much about saturday, you ta ke think too much about saturday, you take your eye off tuesday, take your eye off the ball, the defending champions, one of the strongest franchises there is, so do that and you will not need to worry about saturday. the guys on tuesday night get a chance to go and be very physical. both the contact area on attack. it was the one area that was disappointing from our point of view. and there were a lot of things we did that were incredibly positive
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and we can on as well. a tough task ahead of them, haven't they? great britain have slipped to fourth place on the final day of the european athletics championships taking place in lille. one of the best performances ocame from marc scott in the men's 3000 metres. he finished second and gained a new personal best of 7 minutes 58.52 seconds. james bowness secured third place in the men's 800 metres. valentino rossi has won a motogp race for the first time in a year after claiming victory at the dutch grand prix earlier. the seven time world champion started from fourth on the grid and fought off fellow italian danilo petrucci to take the chequered flag in assen. marc marquezjust edged out britain's cal crutchlow to take third. the other british riders scott redding, sam lowes and bradley smith all crashed out. england's men have come third in the hockey world league, after beating malaysia 4—1
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at the lee valley centre in london. the win also means they qualify for december‘s world league final in india. england dominated the match, going 3—0 up by half time... before phil roper rounded off the victory in the last 90 seconds. england had already secured their place at the 2018 world cup by reaching the semi—finals of this event. in today's final, between the world's number one side argentina and the netherlands, it's the dutch who are on course for victory — they're leading 5—0 heading into the final couple of minutes in london. today sees the end of women in sport week and when it comes to sailing at least, britain has no shortage of female stars. only last year in rio, saskia clarke and hannah mills took gold in the women's 470 class. but with the america's cup due to finish soon in bermuda, there is still a distinct lack of women at the peak of professional yacht racing. our sports correspondent natalie pirks has more. give mea
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give me a little more! skill, endurance, strength and vision, just some of the attributes needed to make it to the top. but for women it seems that talent alone is not enough. i have a gold and silver medal, the same as the guys in the cup at the moment. no doubt about it. it would be good to have the same opportunities to learn. these women are part of the magenta project, a group of accomplished sailors striving to create pathways for females sailors striving to create pathways forfemales in the sailors striving to create pathways for females in the sport. experience is key to sales leads high—performance catamarans, the formula 1 cars of the sea, but the opportunities for women at least are not there. we see women struggling to get onto these boats to get the opportunity to be good enough. we don't want to be given places. the girls want to earn it but they need the chance to get out there to earn it. their hard work it is paying off. the rules for this year's prestigious around the world race has been changed to incentivise
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teams to employ women. the more mixed gender the crew is, the more sailors they will be allowed to help navigate the toughest sees on the planet. at least one team, though, still plans take a smaller male crew. i? one of the main reasons given by women are not as involved as men is because the sheer physical strength needed power these faster boats. but does that argument really hold up? is sailingjust boats. but does that argument really hold up? is sailing just too boats. but does that argument really hold up? is sailingjust too much a boys' club? for people who have never sailed with girls on board their initial reaction is they will not be as strong, as fast, and it is ourjob as female sailors to show thatis ourjob as female sailors to show that is not the case, that we can be proactively involved in the crew. there are signs the tide is turning. british team land rover ber won the youth americas cup last week with a female sailor on board and that shows it can be done. the challenge now to ensure the dream of mixed
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teams now to ensure the dream of mixed tea ms stays now to ensure the dream of mixed teams stays on course. that is all the sport for now. you can keep up—to—date with all the stories i have mentioned on the bbc sport website, bbc.co.uk/sport. have mentioned on the bbc sport website, bbc. co. uk/sport. you have mentioned on the bbc sport website, bbc.co.uk/sport. you can see england on course for a series win against south africa. and i will be back with more in sportsday papa sex. he always gets to end with good news! not always the case here. —— sports sportsday at half past six. the headlines on bbc news: cladding on 34 tower blocks in 17 local authorities fail fire safety tests. that a 100% failure rate according
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to the government. the brexit secretary, david davis, says he's ‘pretty sure' the uk will be able to reach a suitable deal with brussels on leaving the eu. officials in pakistan say at least 140 people have died after an oil tanker overturned and caught fire in punjab province. let's return to our top story. that is the cladding test or otherwise for cladding on residential buildings. residential buildings are being tested in the wake of course of the grenfell tower fire last week, when the cladding that had been added externally appears to have actually exacerbated the spread of the fire up the outside of the building. now, we have been giving figures in the last couple of days and we have had the latest set of figures from the department for communities and local government in whitehall, which came outjust after five o'clock this afternoon. let me bring you those figures in detail. the government says the number of
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buildings were cladding samples have failed a combustibility test that has been carried out by the building research establishment is 60, and thatis research establishment is 60, and that is 60 out of 60, so every single one of the samples that has been submitted for test has failed, has not proven to be of a sufficient standard when it comes to the risk of fire. there are 25 local authority areas affected in the course of the tests carried out so far. they are from buildings across england. let me just far. they are from buildings across england. let mejust break far. they are from buildings across england. let me just break them down for you. a number of london boroughs feature prominently. that is the buildings in barnet, one in brent, five in camden, where we have of course been hearing from on the chalcots estate they are. one from hounslow, one from islington, one from lambeth, two from wandsworth, and other local authority areas outside of london affected, four in
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manchester, one in doncaster, one in norwich, three in plymouth and we heard about those a few days ago, two in portsmouth, three in stockton on tees and i believe one of those is in billingham because i was speaking to a resident there on bbc radio yesterday. five of them are in sunderland. so that is 60 buildings across 25 local authority areas in england. one of the problems that camden council is having at the moment is it says it needs complete access to the building in order to be able to speedily complete the urgent renovation works and corrections needed after the fire service they're told them the buildings on the chalcots estate are not safe for people to live in. it is not just not safe for people to live in. it is notjust cladding in that case, but also some of the other internal things, for example where the gas pipes run. however, a number of the people living there are refusing to get out. they say they will not leave. georgia gould is the labour leader of camden council. speaking to my colleague
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simonjones, she said there are still 200 residents in the tower blocks on the chalcots estate who are refusing to leave. she explained efforts they are making to get people to go. so we have people knocking on those doors, talking to people about the safety risks. but we've also dispatched social workers to have individual conversations with those families, with those individuals, about what will help them to move out. i've been talking to many of those people overnight, and some of them do want to leave, but they don't want to come and spend a night here, which of course i completely understand. so what we want to do is get those people directly into appropriate accommodation. you know, there are some specific issues, some people with agoraphobia, particular medication. they want to be sure they've got the right accommodation. so after i've spoken and given this update, i'm going myself back to the blocks, to knock on doors and have those conversations. you're talking about persuasion, but if people are stubborn and say they will not leave, they don't think they want to leave, are you going to force them out? so we're really clear that those buildings are not safe. and that's what the fire services have told us. on that we're now going to have to work very closely with the fire services.
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we're in constant communication with them. it's really their advice that counts on this. if it comes to the point where people really, really won't leave, that is last resort — the last thing i want to do is force people out of their homes. and the conversations i've been having the resident in the building is they are willing to work with us, and i'm going to have those conversations again tonight. i think the most important thing is we were with them. if those buildings aren't safe, if it comes to that, we will work with the fire services on it. is there a deadline? it's an emerging picture. the most important thing is we also have people awake on those blocks going up and down. and when i first had the conversation with the fire services, when they said to me that it wasn't safe, they were clear that it wasn't safe to spend a night there, when the whole block was sleeping. where we have residents, we are making sure we are continuing to knock on their doors — i'm sure it is deeply disruptive for them, having the conversation again and again, keeping people wake, making sure there are people on the block.
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the fire services are saying it's not safe to stay, and they need to go. we've also started work, and for us to complete that work as quickly as possible, and get people back, we want those buildings to be empty. you're saying to people, try and stay with friends and family for as long as possible. but if this takes a month, that is a big ask. no, absolutely. and we already have people who have been staying with friends and family for a couple of days, and they're coming back now to the rest centre. we expected that, with loads of people. we said to everyone, you know, if you stayed for a couple of days and you now need accommodation, come back here and register here, and we will look for a more permanent solution for you for the next couple of weeks. can you guarantee that everyone who needs a hotel room tonight will get one? we think that the rest centre will still have to be open tonight, so some people will have to spend the night here. we had 60 people here, 23 families, last night. we think that because people are coming back from friends and family it will still have to be open tonight. we'll keep reviewing that every day. the priority is obviously to get
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people into hotel accommodation, somewhere where they can have a good night's sleep, and we are just putting every effort into doing that. how much have you spent so far on this? well, the last count was £500,000 on hotel rooms, and an £80,000 fund for emergency expenses. we're giving everyone £100 just in the interim, and people at hotels have £20 food allowance for each day so, you know, we are putting our resources into this. i've been all day here talking to residents. they're exhausted, they want somewhere to stay. that has to be the priority. you're dealing with some 3000 people who've been evacuated. it is a huge operation, but various people we've been speaking to today have said there is a lot of confusion, there's a lot of chaos. they are told a hotel room is available, then suddenly it's not available — they actually go to the hotel and find the room has been
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given to someone else. yes, i've been having a lot of the same conversations, as you can imagine. i mean, this is a fast moving picture. we didn't have a lot of time to plan. as i've said, we found out those buildings were and safe at 5pm on a friday night and we have moved as quickly as possible. we think we now have processes in place. really improving things. we are putting every bit of effort that we can and every resource we have into getting those processes right. we're working with local authorities and i think things are moving, people are flowing into hotels. i've gone to visit people in hotels who are feeling much better about things but, you know, as you say, it is a lot of people and we are absolutely doing the best we can. obviously things are seen differently in the light of what happened at grenfell tower, but just answer the question of residents who say they've lived there for years, they haven't had a problem and then suddenly overnight they're told it wasn't safe. have you let these people down in the past? well, those are exactly the questions that i'm asking. you know, what has happened — to allow these buildings,
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to have this cladding and have these issues that make them unsafe? of course we need to have a thorough review of what went on here, with every aspect of it, and i'm committed to doing that and answering those questions, but at the moment my number one priority is to move people into secure accommodation, to get people through this rest centre and somewhere safe and secure to stay for the next couple of weeks, and then we're just going to have to be looking at all of our processes and making sure we have the best possible fire safety because, you know, these people's lives are so important. that was georgia gould, the labour leader of camden council, talking to our correspondent. that was just underan hourorso our correspondent. that was just under an hour or so ago. let me remind you that the update on the number of samples that have tested positive, rather, have failed, i should say, the combustibility test, in 25 local authority areas in england. a 100% failure rate. more tests are being carried out. time
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now for a look at the weather with matt taylor. last week we may have seen some of the hottest weather conditions experienced in 50 years. the peak in temperatures across the uk, heightand the peak in temperatures across the uk, height and 20s, low and 30s. this is close to where they should be at this time of year but does represent a big change from what we have seen. —— hi to mid—20s. overnight becomes dry, clear and substantially fresher weather than we have seen. parts of scotland in rural areas are down to low single figures and nothing unusual there but in the south we could see temperatures down to single figures in the countryside instead of the mid—teens overnight, high pressure in charge and in the west we will see low—pressure start to develop. a slow process eventually bringing more cloud. isolated light showers in the north—east. with winds light,
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sung—joon overhead, it will warm up quite nicely. temperatures probably higher than we have seen through this weekend. —— some overhead. for northern ireland we finished the afternoon with rain which could speu afternoon with rain which could spell quite a damp rush—hour particularly through fermanagh, downing —— down in armagh. turning to wet weather as well in north—west england. and also in western parts of wales. this is the low—pressure system into tuesday. cold front with fresh air behind it but that means we dragging slightly humid in again for tuesday bringing storms across france. most of the day will be brighter good part of england and wales. the exception being in the far west of wales, cornwall, and northern england with rain here as well. late in the day, the storms will push in and we could see some heavy rain push into tuesday night in wednesday across many parts of england and eastern wales. into
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wednesday that could not into southern parts of scotland. a chilly breeze to go with it, temperatures down from what was excused in the week. certainly, west we see something prior towards the west, it will still not feel like anything special. all us through the weekend, cool special. all us through the weekend, cool, wet weather at times and perhaps drier conditions in shetland. by that time as well it will be fairly cloudy as well. this is bbc news. the headlines at six o'clock. the number of high rise buildings which have failed fire safety tests rises to 60 across 25 councils areas as residents refusing to leave four of the affected tower blocks in north london are
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told they must leave. the last thing i want to do is force people out of their homes. from the conversations i have had with people in these buildings they are willing to work with us, i will have that conversation again tonight. the brexit secretary, david davis, says he's ‘pretty sure' the uk will be able to reach a suitable deal with brussels on leaving the eu. at least 140 people are feared to have been killed in eastern pakistan after a lorry transporting oil burst into flames. two children are in intensive care after a car ploughed into a group of pedestrians outside a sports centre in newcastle.
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