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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 26, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and mega munchetty. a 100% failure rate — not a single tower block checked since the grenfell fire has passed safety tests. 60 buildings across england are deemed not safe — hundreds more are due to have their cladding inspected, but it's still not clear when. good morning, it's monday the 26th ofjune. also this morning: therese resume will today give more details about how eu citizens living in the uk will be treated after brexit —— theresa may. setting sail at last — the royal navy's new £3 billion aircraft carrier starts sea trials seven years after the ark royal was scrapped. two different studies today show very different forecasts for the economy. one good, one bad.
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so who's right? i'll speak to one firm that says things are looking up, but it's tough out there. in sport — lewis hamilton labels sebastian vettel a disgrace after the two collide in an action packed azerbaijan grand prix. coming of age — he made his debut just six years ago, now ed sheeran has closed the glastonbury festival on the main pyramid stage. and carol has the weather. for many of us today, it will be a fine and dry day with a fair bit of sunshine. however, the cloud will build from the west and we will see some rain in northern ireland later this afternoon, heralding an u nsettled this afternoon, heralding an unsettled week ahead. first, our main story. every single tower block which has had its cladding tested since the grenfell disaster has failed fire safety inspections. 60 high—rises in 25 areas of england have been examined so far. local councils are being urged
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to send samples in more quickly for testing. there are still more than 500 other buildings nationwide that need to be checked. nick quraishi reports. it's a list that keeps on growing, the number of buildings that have now failed fire safety checks following the grenfell tower disaster stands at 60 in england across 25 local authorities. and of those examined so far, every single sample has failed. it was concerns over exte rn sample has failed. it was concerns over extern or cladding, combined with issues concerning fire doors, gas pipes and installation which are triggered the mass evacuation of four tower blocks in camden. where we have read it —— residence, we are continuing to knock on their door, i'm sure it is deeply disruptive for them but keeping people wake and having the conversation and making sure there are people on the block but the fire services are saying it's not safe to stay and they need to go. in scotland, holyrood is to
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carry out their own investigation into the safety of high—rise tower blocks. it is thought up to 600 buildings in total are to be tested in england with councils being told to prioritise the ones that are most worried about. just how long this process will take is still unclear. theresa may is due to share a meeting of the grenfell tower task force later today —— chair and meeting. it could take many weeks, if not months. more inquests are still expected to be opened and adjourned this afternoon into the deaths of the victims. nick quraishi joins us now from camden where some residents have spent a third night sleeping on airbeds in a leisure centre. nick, how long before they will be able to return home? nobody knows. we know that four blocks have been evacuated over the weekend. some 200 residents in 120
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flats are refusing to leave. some say they don't want to be in the leisure centre behind me and others say they can't afford to pay for temporary accommodation even though they know they will be reimbursed. camden council is still trying to get them to come out. it's not clear what legal steps the council has got to actually forced out. patients seems to be running out. the council says they can't get into do these remedial work which should take up to four weeks. this would prolong it. in regards to the other 60 high—rise blocks around england that have failed cladding tests, we know that 14 councils have been named, seven in london and others include manchester, stockton and sunderland. 600 are said to be tested is england but the question now turned to when this will happen and what do we know. we will get some more details later went theresa may chairs a meeting of the grenfell tower
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recovery committee. days on from that disaster, there are still many u na nswered that disaster, there are still many unanswered questions. thank you, nick. we will be trying to answer some of those questions later with the housing minister. theresa may will set out more details this afternoon of how the government plans to treat european union citizens living in the uk after brexit. last week, she outlined proposals to offer eu nationals "settled status" as long as british people elsewhere in europe were given similar rights. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us now. iain, how much more detail will we get today? we will get 15 pages outlining their settled status scheme applying to eu citizens. what we know already because theresa may told leaders in brussels last week, she is proposing that after brexit is eu citizens are here for five years, they will get
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right is very similar to those of british citizens from welfare to healthcare to pensions. what is not clear yet is when it will be the cut—off date for the settle scheme to get under way. will it be when she triggered the article 50 letter beginning the process of leaving the eu in march will be the accepted date itself which is what the eu would like to see. that is unlikely to be in these 15 pages because she says that is something that is up for negotiation. we might see some more detail on other questions on eu nationals here. for example, if they are allowed to stay here after five yea rs, are allowed to stay here after five years, what will happen to family members who are currently abroad? that is something to eu wants but so far theresa may has not committed herself to that. these 15 pages will be closely scrutinised. what we know so be closely scrutinised. what we know so far is the eu leaders don't seem to be impressed and they don't think this is sufficient. they would like to see more guarantees of the rights of citizens already here and the
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rights of uk nationals are brought as well. six people are known to have died and 16 others are missing after a crowded passenger boat sank in a reservoir in colombia. around a 170 passengers are thought to have been on board. the vessel, which had four decks, began taking on water during a cruise on an artificial lake outside the popular resort of guatape. there are no details yet on why the boat sank. a 16—year—old boy has been charged with the rape of an eight—year—old girl in a park in manchester. the attack is alleged to have happened on saturday evening in the moston area of the city. the boy is due to appear at manchester youth court today. scotland yard says six of its officers were injured last night during a protest in east london about the death of a man last week, six days after he'd been stopped by police. bricks were thrown and bins set on fire near forest gate police station. the independent police complaints commission has said a postmortem examination on edir frederico da costa showed that, contrary to some claims, he had no spinal injuries caused
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by officers. yousaf saed, a receptionist at a local hotel, witnessed the protest. they were therefore like to hours and then the police around 930 and they came over here and took them and then they were burning car, burning bins out the back. they were burning bins out the back. they were burning some bins over there and they were damaging the wall over there and throwing bricks everywhere. ben was mentioning this at the headlines at six o'clock. the uk's economic growth will remain anaemic until the end of the decade, according to the british chambers of commerce. it doesn't sound nice, does it? the group, which represents small and medium—sized businesses, doesn't expect growth to be more than 1.5% by 2020. it also says that inflation may end up higher than expected, peaking at 3.4% this year. despite some predictions, britain's
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economy grew robustly after the referendum last year but it has slowed down a lot this year and now it's the weakest in europe. the british chambers of commerce which represents thousands of small and medium—sized companies said the gdp will remain anaemic for another few yea rs. will remain anaemic for another few years. it says growth this year will be1.5% years. it says growth this year will be 1.5% but it dipped to 1.3% next year before rising slightly back to 1.5% in 2019. it expects inflation to peak at 3.4% this year and hold back company investment. but it thinks it broke —— growth in exports and the construction centre will be higher than previously thought. the biggest changes to a forecast are around changes to the economy which we think will be flat in the next three years and also around inflation which we think it still will spike a little bit higher before we start to see some relief. exports will do well this year but then less well in the years to come so we then less well in the years to come so we do face a situation where our
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growth is pretty anaemic, it is not as good at —— not as good as it could be and certainly not as good as other countries around the world. dell limit the bcc is asking people to spend more on infrastructure, especially mobile phone connectivity and can —— described our road network as congestion. ed sheeran‘s rise has been meteoric. let's get more on the glastonbury festival. for many, glastonbury‘s final day was disco day. there were bee gees classics from barry gibb... # staying alive. watching from the sidelines, nile rodgers, who later took to the stage with chic with disco hit after disco hit. # i want the world to know. # clap your hands. a huge crowd watching them
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in the somerset sunshine. # upside down. # oh, boy, you turn me. it's notjust people famous from the world of music who have been performing at this year's festival. yes, that's american film and tv star kiefer sutherland, playing country music with his band. # drag your feet. # across the floor. he said performing at glastonbury was particularly special. it is almost like being invited into a part of history. # come on, set the tone. closing this year, ed sheeran. his headline set an emotional climax to a festival that won't be back until 2019. # and they say... whatever you think of his music, one
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quy whatever you think of his music, one guy entertaining that many people with his loop pedal is amazing. guy entertaining that many people with his loop pedal is amazinglj love him. people say he is a lucky busker on one sand and other people say he's a musical genius —— on one hand. i think you have belied way you stand on it. no, i think he is brilliant. i stayed up way too late watching that last night and i should have been preparing for this programme. here is your quirky for the day. it is normally rained that stops cricket play but this time it was our bullocks. ——a bullock. the animal interrupted a match in bollington, cheshire, over the weekend. nobody was hurt.
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the umpire wasn't going to run at all. the other cricketer ran com pletely all. the other cricketer ran completely away. did you like that, sally? that badtempered bullock was a reflection of the grand prix. my goodness me, some badtempered driving. red bullock! we like to see exciting racing but it really got nasty. strong words from lewis hamilton about sebastian vettel. he says, "sebastian vettel‘s driving yesterday was disgusting." no love lost their between those two. a remarkable race that featured three safety cars and several crashes was won by red bull's daniel ricciardo. england have won their t20 series against south africa. it was winner takes all in cardiff —
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with england victorious by 19 runs to take the series 2—1. feliciano lopez caused a shock and beat marin cilic to win a thrilling final of the queen's tournament in west london. lopez came from a set down to win 2—1. and petra kvitova wins the aegon classic in birmingham — her first title since being injured in a knife attack last year. she beat australia's ashleigh barty in three sets. and i think of all the sports stories are reporting on this morning, that's my favourite. that was her second tournament she has played since coming back and there was our lovely atmosphere and rant. people were saying, "isn't it marvellous to see her". at that point, nobody thought she could come back and win. what a pretty trophy that was. all trophies are pretty, that was. all trophies are pretty, that one was. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. week, the weather is changing in
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stark contrast to what we had last week. once settled with spells of brain. there is a lot of sunshine on offer. 0ne brain. there is a lot of sunshine on offer. one of our weather watchers are sent in this beautiful picture from east sussex. a lot of dry weather. not a lot in the way of wind. this low pressure will be coming in from the atlantic. not at seven o'clock in the morning. a lot of dry weather. 0ne seven o'clock in the morning. a lot of dry weather. one or two showers picking away at the far north of scotland. temperatures at eight o'clock, if you are just stepping out, would be around 12 degrees. as become further south, a bit of wispy cloud. hardly a breath of wind. variable amounts of cloud as you push down towards the south—west but
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still, a lot of sunshine. as we have gone through the course of the day, you can see how the cloud builds in northern ireland. a bit more cloud in the west and the rain and then arrives. temperature—wise, still very warm. we do have this rain moving across northern ireland. also northern england and parts of wales. as we head into tomorrow morning, we have got that low pressure still very much with us. it will track northwards and eastwards. that's coming up from france and through the day, that one can prove to be quite thundery in nature. kim fischer wise, quite muggy if you are in the south—east, with highs of 21.
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tomorrow, quite messy picture. as we had from tuesday into wednesday, some rain around, some showers. some of this is likely to be bunbury as well. we also have an onshore flow. along the shoreline, a little bit cooler. highs of up to 19 degrees in the south. carroll, thank you. that is bring you up—to—date with the main stories. a 100% failure rate as all buildings inspected so far fail fire safety tests, but hundreds more still need to be examined. the prime minister will set out the terms of her plan to protect the rights of eu citizens living in britain after brexit. taking a look at a front pages. the front page of the times but first
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up. a picture of the royal couple, the duke of edinburgh appearing for the duke of edinburgh appearing for the first time since leaving hospital. at the polo cup. the main story, foreign criminals to be thrown out after brexit. plenty more through the course of the day. much focus on the fallout after the g re nfell tower focus on the fallout after the grenfell tower block. now it is being revealed that 60 high—rises are unsafe. the daily mail, also taking a look and the labour party calling it the tower fire murder. have a look at this picture. the water in majorca looks scarier than it oughta. british tourists sprint from the sea as a shark brings
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terror to a spanish holiday beach. you want to find out what sort of shock that was? you put a tea in there. it should be ough'a. it was still too posh. doing some shark research, are you? this story in the express. we are getting used to paying different prices when things are busy, such as taxis, and apparently supermarkets could be getting in on the act. electronic labels on the sides of shelves could mean the price you pay for everyday groceries, the bread, the milk, could change according to how busy the supermarket is. they say it would be a way to get you to go in earlier when it is quieter and at lunchtime, when everybody is tried to buy their sandwich at lunch, it could cost more. it seems to work overseas but they could fight here but it depends whether we would.
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off—peak and peak shopping times. i can't see that going down well. off—peak and peak shopping times. i can't see that going down weltm was a blue shark. they normally feed on little fish but they have been known to attack people. they circle shipwreck survivors and occasionally divers. and that is in majorca? nobody was hurt. i impressed with your research in that 90 seconds. ron gatlin has been concerned after the match on saturday. he is saying the match on saturday. he is saying the all blacks could have wrapped, murraycareer. 's i think putting down a marker after that match to
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stay ahead of the second test, he wants the referee to keep an eye on it. the scrum halves get a lot of attention. i imagine connor is aware thatis attention. i imagine connor is aware that is going to happen. he has already decided he is going to have already decided he is going to have a chat with the referee. sally, ben, thank you very much. tony and eddie are both in special hospitals and are being that the many years. six years ago, the bbc highlighted abuse in the winter borne view unit and the government promised to bring people with learning disabilities to be supported in their own communities. we will be looking at the progress made since then. we went to meet the families. they told us he would be there for nine months but he is still bare 16 yea rs nine months but he is still bare 16 years on, he is still there. pam 's
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son tony is 120 miles from home in a secure hospital. he is autistic and has learning disabilities. his room has learning disabilities. his room has stayed the same ever since he was admitted and later sectioned 16 yea rs was admitted and later sectioned 16 years ago. i think we died that day. when panorama exposed the abuse of patients with learning disabilities in winter borne view, the government made a promise. homes, not hospitals. they said people should be supported in their own communities, not locked in institutions far from family. much time has passed since that promise was made, longer since pam ‘s son tony left button. if he killed somebody, he'd be out now. he's done 16 years. it is a long sentence. he went there are 23, he will be a0 in august, a0. went there are 23, he will be a0 in august, 40. in 2014, the government was criticised for failing to take enough action after winterbourne
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view. in 2015, transforming care partnership areas were set up in england with access to £a0 million to help build the right community support needed to bring people home. but one third of those areas haven't seen any but one third of those areas haven't seen any of that money yet. in fact, published nhs data shows that the number of people in one of these institutions today is roughly the same as it was back in 201a, that's back when the government was told it must take urgent action to get numbers down. that is taken from published nhs data which also shows a third of inpatients like tony at being ina a third of inpatients like tony at being in a unit for more than five yea rs. being in a unit for more than five years. the man originally behind the change says he is appalled. this is a disgrace and something this country should be shamed by. we are not unique in this regard but in this day and age, to abuse people p0p " this day and age, to abuse people pop —— people's humans rights in this way is utterly shocking. tony
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scout provider and local authority both agree he should be back in brighton. both agree he should be back in brighton. am afraid how is going to go out there. like tony, eddie is on the autistic spectrum. he went into a unit after a crisis. he was 12. he was ina unit after a crisis. he was 12. he was in a solitary block called the extra ca re was in a solitary block called the extra care unit. there has been a 26% increase in young people with learning disabilities, referred to a secure unit in the last 12 months. why? the national audit office says there is not enough support to families like this to avoid a crisis. we were told he would be there between 12 weeks and nine months. we are over a.5 years down the line. and he ended up miles down the line. and he ended up miles down the road at st andrews, two years
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after winterbourne view, not an u psta rt, after winterbourne view, not an upstart, not enough training, not enough care. we had an emailto say he dedicated a seclusion room. discovered he had been in the seclusion room for 21 hours and there is no access to a toilet in there is no access to a toilet in the seclusion room. in a saint andrews say: the saint andrews unit is now rated good by the sea 0c. eddie, though, has moved on to another unit where dell says he is doing better but it is in newcastle. his family lived 300 miles away in bristol. they want him back. we wished we —— we wish we had never asked for any help. i don't want to —— i don't want this to happen to any more autistic young people. nhs england told is clear, hospitals should not be seen as homes. new
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high—quality community services are essential and are being created. the department of health tell us £25 million is being spent to improve outcomes but the national audit 0ffice warns this is all happening far too slowly. do let us know what you think. we will speak on to jane after eight o'clock. still to come on the programme. it is ripped when we come to the muscle department. that is why the terminator is coming. the boysin why the terminator is coming. the boys in blue are back in new series of the observational documentary 2a hours in custody. i love the programme. the amount of work that goes into it. the diskettes and news, travel and weather wherever you are watching. —— let us get some
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news. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. 1a tower blocks across london have now failed fire safety tests following the grenfell tower fire, and that number is expected to rise. tests on tower block cladding across the capital continues today. the department for communities and local government says safety measures are being taken for each individual building. it says evacuations won't be carried out in every case. in camden, the council says around 200 residents are still refusing to leave. two people have been left with life—changing injuries after an a substance, believed to be acid was thrown on them, through their car windows. resham khan was with her cousin celebrating her 21st birthday when they were attacked on wednesday at traffic lights in becton, east london. ms khan has damage to her left eye and required two skin grafts. no arrests have been made.
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one of the country's newest airambulance begins a week—long tour today. the essex and hertfordshire air ambulance has bought the augusta westland helicopter, the first one it's owned outright in its 20 year history. it cost six million pounds. we be showing the aircraft off to the good people, showing what they fundraising for. it is not impacting our normal service, still being provided. there are landings all over and it would be great to see people supporting us. all lines on the tube are running a good service. the woolwich ferry only has one service. the police have closed the m3 london bound atjunction 3 lightwater. and chislehurst, the eight 2—2 summer hill is closed between the station and old hill. and that takes us to the weather. time to us to acclimatise to some
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lower temperatures and we have wet weather to come but not for today, a largely dry day with some sunny spells. a bit of mr merk first thing but that should clear earlier on. a very light breeze, temperatures getting up to about 2a, possibly 25 celsius. staying diaper the bulk of the night. a few showers in the early hours of the morning. the temperatures getting down to about 14 temperatures getting down to about 1a or 15 celsius. that sets the tone for tomorrow. some showers and prolonged spells of rain. we may even have the odd spot of thunder. some spots not making it above the teams. we start off on a wet note on wednesday. it does dry up later on in the day. really, for friday, even
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though it's looking brighter and drier, that northerly wind is going to make things a bit chilly. wet and windy on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as yet more high rise buildings fail fire safety checks, we'll ask the housing minister whether safety regulations are up to scratch. also this morning, is it checkmate for digital devices in schools? we'll hear how chess could help children's maths skills and get them to put down their smart phones.
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i don't know if you have heard of the millions. i am familiar with them. and, hollywood stars steve carell and kristen wiig give charlie a masterclass on how to speak to minions ahead of the release of the latest film in the ‘despicable me 3‘ franchise. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news: that you do that masterclass? it's a masterclass. every single tower block which has had its cladding tested since the grenfell disaster has failed fire safety inspections. 60 high—rises in 25 areas of england have been examined so far. local councils are being urged to send samples in more quickly for testing. there are still more than 500 other buildings nationwide that need to be checked. theresa may will set out more details today of how the government plans to treat more than 3—million eu citizens living in the uk after brexit.
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last week, she outlined proposals to offer eu nationals "settled status" — which would give those who have spent five years in the uk equal rights on healthca re, education and benefits — but only if british people living in the european union were given similar entitlements. 60 people are known to have died and around 170 passengers are thought to have been on board the ship with —— which sunk in colombia. it began taking on water in a cruise in an artificial lake outside the popular resort of guatape. there are no details yet on why the boat sank. a 16—year—old boy has been charged with the rape of an eight—year—old girl in a park in manchester. the attack is alleged to have happened on saturday evening in the moston area of the city. the boy is due to appear at manchester youth court today. scotland yard says six of its officers were injured last night during a protest in east london over the death
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of a man last week, six days after he'd been stopped by police. bricks were thrown — and bins set on fire — near forest gate police station. the independent police complaints commission has said a postmortem examination on edir frederico da costa showed that, contrary to some claims, he had no spinal injuries caused by officers. the royal navy's new aircraft carrier is due leave her dock at rosyth in scotland for the first time today to begin sea trials. hms queen elizabeth, which cost more than three—billion—pounds, is the navy's first carrier since ark royal was scrapped in 2010 — but it will be several years before the vessel is fully operational with jets. the sound of a blaring car horn can drive most of us up the wall. but now scientists have discovered a more effective noise for warning other road users of danger without getting them in a flap. take a listen. ducks quack researchers in south korea asked volunteers to evaluate a range
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of noises and found that a synthesised "quack" successfully alerted pedestrians to potential hazards without raising stress levels. i have been abroad where they have different sounds at pedestrian crossings, you can hear bells and quacks but that noise winds me up no end on the golf course. i'm one of those here everything people. —— hear. they don't echo, do they? there is a theory that they don't echo. put them in a hollow room or something like that. sally? a science programme,
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brilliant, watch it with your kids. let's change the subject. port ducks, ducks on the golf course, surely that's not a problem. don't annoy naga on the golf course. do you know what happened at the f1? when you are driving along and the person in front of you slows down on purpose just shoot kind of slightly wind you up. a rake testing being. —— brake. what hamilton was doing is, he had to slow down because there was a safety car involved more than once. it got really nasty and
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hamilton called sebastian vettel‘s driving disgusting. after the two clashed in an incident packed azerbaijan grand prix. the race included three safety cars and lots of crashes. it was won by red bull's daniel ricciardo. but heres what everyone is talking about — vettel was penalised for hitting hamilton's mercedes as they prepared for a re—start. hamilton was ahead with 19 laps to go, but his head rest came loose. he ended up fifth, behind vettel who's extended his championship lead over the briton to fourteen points. we heard obviously the problems with lewis and sebastian and it was just a crazy race. i made an unplanned pitstop. we have summit to breed in the breaks. did i think i would win today? absolutely not. i would have put all my money on it that this was very unlikely.
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after a disappointing champions trophy exit, england's cricketers bounced back to win their t20 series against south africa 2—1. dawid malan starred with the bat on debut for england, top scoring with 78 to set south africa 182 to win. they were always struggling — especially when dangerman ab de villiers was out. england won by 19 runs and will now turn their focus to the four match test series that starts in a couple of weeks. feliciano lopez caused a big shock and beat marin cilic in a thrilling final at the queen's club in london. number four seed cilic took the first set without much fuss but the spaniard fought back and won the second on the tie—break. that was followed by another compelling set which again depended on a tie—break. and it was won by the world number 32. leigh i cannot believe that i finally won this trophy. leigh i cannot believe that i finally won this trophylj leigh i cannot believe that i finally won this trophy. i have been waiting, 15 or 16 years to hold this trophy. i thought by the end of the
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tiebreak after losing a few match points that i wasn't going to be able to make it but i was a little bit lucky at the end and i won today. jamie murray ensured at least one murray brother won a queen's title as he and partner bruno soares beat frenchmenjulien benneteau and edouard roger—vasselin in the final of the doubles. the pair won in straight sets 6—2, 6—3. roger federer looks in great shape for wimbledon after winning a ninth halle open in germany. he beat alexander zverev in straight sets to win the title. federer sat out the entire clay court season to target a record eighth wimbledon title. from a seven time wimbledon champion to a two—time one and petra kvitova has won her first tournament since being injured in a knife attack in december. she came from behind to beat australia's ashleigh barty in three sets to win the aegon classic in birmingham. she said it is something very special — like a fairytale i couldn't imagine to come back. to
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wina i couldn't imagine to come back. to win a trophy. that's why i was fighting to play tennis again and thatis fighting to play tennis again and that is why i was still able to, you know, have great motivation. it's a big week for the british and irish lions. they face the hurricanes tomorrow before a must win second test on saturday with the all blacks. lions coach criticised their tactics after the first test defeat — and all blacks coach steve hansen hit back, live on new zealand radio. these predictable comments. two weeks ago, we cheated in the scrums and it was blocking after that and now this. it's disappointing because what he is implying is we are intentionally going out to injure somebody and that's not the case, we have never been like that. i would expect him to know the new zealand
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psyche that it's not about intentionally tried to hurt anybody but it's about playing hard and fierce. you just call a radio but it's about playing hard and fierce. youjust call a radio phone in if you want to get your message across. that makes it even more exciting to watch. it was an amazing game, wasn't it? there was quite a lot of pressure on gatlin tomorrow. they have got to win tomorrow in order to feel like they are succeeding while they are out there. it gets better. valentino rossi has won a moto gp race for the first time in more than a year after claiming victory at the dutch grand prix. the seven time world champion started from fourth on the grid and fought off fellow italian danilo petrucci to take the chequered flag in assen. britain's cal crutchlowjust missed out on third place. his compatriots scott redding, sam lowes and bradley smith all crashed out. finally we're going to bring you the opening round of the 2017 diving world series that took place in ireland over the weekend. britain's gary hunt won
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but we particularly like the patriotic swimwear fashioned by blake aldridge — who finished second. the dives took place from nearly three times the height of an olympic platform. that is a place called serpent‘s lair. it is a really tight space. not getting involved with that at all. it isa19 it is a 19 minute to seven. 12 days ago few would have known what cladding meant or where grenfell tower was, but the impact of the fire there continues to impact the lives of thousands of people. 600 buildings across the country are being tested in the wake of the tragedy. of the 60 examined so far, the failure rate is 100—percent. tony bird is an expert in social housing and joins us
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from camden, where the council is still in the process of evacuating residents from the chalcots estate. they differ talking to this morning. as an independent expert, tell me what you think in terms of how the building industry has been treated or has been treating safety in social housing. well, they have obviously not been treating it very seriously otherwise we wouldn't have these tragedies. they have been plenty of warnings out there come up most notably, the period after that black will fire in 2009 but it also predates that. —— the warnings from the coroner are that they should be
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talking about sprinklers. sprinklers would have stopped the very worst of the fire at grenfell. there has never been any deaths since sprinklers have been installed. people in social housing don't have a lot of money. they are willing to have furniture that are not necessarily fire retardant. they will have old washing machines and white goods and cookers. you are more likely to get fires starting in flats of social housing because of that matter. you have brought up a fair number of issues there. you have highlighted the risk perhaps because of older appliances in the home. there are elements, different elements, in terms of grenfell in
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the sense that how much was the cladding the main driver of this fire and would sprinklers have made that much of a difference in this tower block fire in particular? that much of a difference in this tower block fire in particular7m may not have been the whole solution, actually, ithink may not have been the whole solution, actually, i think it would have actually... probably protected the people in the flats for a longer period but it wasn't their and there is an requirement to fit sprinklers into retrofitted properties —— there is no requirement. where it has been done, it has been successful and i a lwa ys done, it has been successful and i always make the point that the cost of putting sprinklers in, you can offset it by negotiating better property insurance rates. property insurance rates are huge for tower blocks and you make the savings they are. apologies are interrupting.
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who's guidelines do building contractors have to follow? there are building regulations and therapies to be government guidance and also insurance companies want certain standards met. who do they follow? well, they have to follow the current building regulations which, as everyone it knows, are very flexible. i think what has happened is the contractors doing the large refurbishment, they have had almost complete freedom to choose what materials they make. the government minister in 2011 said not to put burdens on the contractors and let them bring the local expertise in. of course, they respond by putting in the cheapest materials they can get away with. tony, thank you for your time this morning. an independent expert in
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social housing. we will speak to the housing minister later. with me with a moody sky. this week, we can expect a more changeable week the last week. it will be unsettled. there will be spells of rain and it will turn cooler. today, what we've got is low pressure coming in from the atlantic. later on, that will introduce some rain. things fairly quiet. we'll also got a few showers just picking at the far north of scotland. with this as we go through the course of the morning. the temperatures are indicative of towns and cities. quite unusualfor this stage in june. and cities. quite unusualfor this stage injune. a lot of sunshine as
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we go further south. possibly the odd spot of rain first thing. we've also got some sea fog lapping around the shores of south—west england. we will see more cloud build in the rest. still a few showers knocking around. the rain is something we are keeping a close eye on. it pushes up in the direction of aberdeenshire. there will be a lot of surface moisture on the roads. tomorrow, that low pressure will continue its journey. meanwhile, we have another one coming up from france. this one is likely to introduce some thundery downpours. it's not going to be raining all the time. there will be
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drier weather. it will come in through the english channel across parts of england. the other band of rain pushes up into scotland, leaving some skies behind it. temperatures tomorrow, 12 degrees in the north, 21 in the south. a bit of brea kfast the north, 21 in the south. a bit of breakfast in sight. naga has had a massive bite of toast. she won't be able to talk about 30 seconds. massive bite of toast. she won't be able to talk about 30 secondslj massive bite of toast. she won't be able to talk about 30 seconds. i was hoping you would get to wednesday. able to talk about 30 seconds. i was hoping you would get to wednesdaylj hoping you would get to wednesday.” would have but my time was cut. there is a toast conspiracy catching us. there is a toast conspiracy catching us. toast is finished. the wonderful face of naga. it was and kurds. thank you so much. thankfully ben
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had his breakfast ages ago. the consummate professional.” had his breakfast ages ago. the consummate professional. i am lucky, i get consummate professional. i am lucky, igeta consummate professional. i am lucky, i get a bit of downtime. i get to eat my breakfast in peace. two conflicting reports today show different forecasts for the economy with one pretty positive, the other less so. so which is right? yep — one is from the british chambers of commerce — it says economic growth will be anaemic over the next few years. but a separate report from lloyd's bank says businesses are more confident than they've been for 18 months. uncertainty is something businesses never like, much less in the context of brexit and the brexit transition so of brexit and the brexit transition so they do want to see government taking some firm action to support business and support the domestic business and support the domestic business environment. we heard almost nothing about business during the general election campaign. it's got to come back on the agenda in a big way. that was adam marshall from the bcc. let's get the view of one business. stephen eskowitz is from
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what everyone wants in bolton — a clearance company that sells discounted cookware and imports lots of its stock from china. we were talking about confidence in business. businesses are more confident than they have been in 18 months. you are confident businessperson? we have grown year—on—year. we have to sustain that growth and go even further. letters that confidence come from? we are constantly told things are uncertain. we hear about brexit, we hear about government policy but things are looking up for business. with our business, it's more about consumers, the end user, whatever retailer people going to, they purchase a product, are looking for value for money rather than imported cheap products we are looking for. at the end of the day, people want
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to buy a product that lasts and is sustainable, they will spend a little bit more. they are buying a product that lasts. that is where we come in. it's interesting, because your business purchases end of line stock, discount stock and you sell it on. batting is —— that is in itself an interesting business model. you are able to select a bit more cheaply. 10096. model. you are able to select a bit more cheaply. 100%. but model. you are able to select a bit more cheaply. 10096. but by the distressed stock from the major brands. we sell it back to the retailers. therefore, the consumer goesin retailers. therefore, the consumer goes in and they compare like for like. they compare to what the discounted prices now. as far as confidence is concerned, what you need to see from maybe the government or the economy to keep things ticking over? i don't really see a change. we are a unique
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business in what we do. we just carry on as normal. it is nice to hear some success stories. after seven o'clock, i will talk about how we are spending millions of pounds too much when we go on holidays with our credit cards. that sounds like dan, actually. i pay £20, we went to venice to the day without kids, and it is1.5 euros venice to the day without kids, and it is 1.5 euros every time you take the kids to the toilet so 20 quid just on toilets. you are in venice. it isa just on toilets. you are in venice. it is a beautiful city but you pay through the nose for it. spending more than a penny, won't you? he's the big hearted super—villain with many minion friends and now gru's returning to the big screen in despicable me 3. stars, steve carell and kristen wiig spoke to charlie about the fun they had making the film and even gave him a masterclass on how to imitate the characters' voices.
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there is so much excitement about this film, a lot of affection for despicable me, now despicable me three. it's nice to promote a movie like that, which has a lot of affection, because not all movies have that affection. just silly, ridiculous minions. can you be in a bad mood after? they are the little yellow things. i don't know if you have heard of the minions.” yellow things. i don't know if you have heard of the minions. i am familiar with them. i don't understand them. do you understand them by now, the way they speak? bellow and banana i understand. bellow and banana i understand. bellow means to load and banana means. . . bellow means to load and banana means... i didn't even know they had a full on language. 0h, means... i didn't even know they had a full on language. oh, it is a real... apparently there is a
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translator thing on line, i swear, you can put in sentences and it translates it into minionese. they would know if that's true? that's true. but there are probably people... i am going in. i'm 0k! the gru voice is one that people, it's so are part of this film. what do you want to be to say? that is the voice. have you heard a lot of people doing really bad effo rts lot of people doing really bad efforts at gru? do they do it to you? yes. efforts at gru? do they do it to you ? yes. it's efforts at gru? do they do it to you? yes. it's not that hard to do. i set the bar really like myself because it doesn't really apply to any country and it's not an accent, it's just sort of a weird, funny sounding voice. can you do it? i've not... can we do a master class? in
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gru? you got to kind of talk like this. you push it down. you think of stella mccarthy and ricardo montalban and had a baby, that is gru. is that too much? that wasn't gru. is that too much? that wasn't gru. you talk like this. i love it. you are the godfather. i've gone very red. you are the godfather gru. happy happy birthday to you, happy birthday dear dan, happy birthday to you! are and talking to use some
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yea rs you! are and talking to use some years ago how you came by the voice and you said you use your roan kids and you said you use your roan kids and you said you use your roan kids and you tried out on them. are they just say in, shut up, dad? enough the funny stuff. don't do it any more. we have had enough. we'll reach that point. it's so much fun to embarrass your kids. go to a supermarket, any grocery store, you can do anything there, sing, dance, dance down the aisles holding two bags of fruit. you do that? my daughter is 16, can you imagine? 0r picking up at school. hi, honey! dad, what are you doing? does it. do you do it? embarrass your kids? even though i was embarrassed by my dad regularly, i am turning into that person. it is inevitable. that is c
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speaking to steve carell and kristen wiig. he needs to work in his voice a little bit. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. 1a tower blocks across london have now failed fire safety tests following the grenfell tower fire, and that number is expected to rise. tests on tower block cladding across the capital continues today. the department for communities and local government says safety measures are being taken for each individual building. it says evacuations won't be carried out in every case. in camden, the council says around 200 residents are still refusing to leave. two people have been left with life—changing injuries after an a substance, believed to be acid was thrown on them, through their car windows. resham khan was with her cousin celebrating her 21st birthday when they were attacked on wednesday at traffic lights
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in becton, east london. ms khan has damage to her left eye and required two skin grafts. no arrests have been made. one of the country's newest airambulance begins a week—long tour today. the essex and hertfordshire air ambulance has bought the augusta westland helicopter, the first one it's owned outright in its 20 year history. it cost six million pounds. we will be showing the aircraft off to the good people, showing what they are fundraising for. it is not impacting our normal service, still being provided. there are landings all over and it would be great to see people supporting us. all lines on the tube are running a good service. the woolwich ferry is expected to have one boat service because of technical problems. the police have closed the three london bound junction 3a lightwater. and it
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chislehurst a222 summer hill is closed between the station and old hill. time to us to acclimatise to some lower temperatures and we have wet weather to come but not for today, a largely dry day with some sunny spells. a bit of mr merk first thing but that should clear earlier on. —— mist and murk. a very light breeze, temperatures getting up to about 2a, possibly 25 celsius. staying dry for the bulk of the night. a few showers in the early hours of the morning. the temperatures getting down to about 1a or 15 celsius. that sets the tone for tomorrow. some showers and prolonged spells of rain. we may even have the odd spot of thunder. some spots not making it above the teams. —— teens.
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we start off on a wet note on wednesday. it does dry up later on in the day. really, for friday, even though it's looking brighter and drier, that northerly wind is going to make things a bit chilly. wet and windy on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and naga munchetty. a 100% failure rate — not a single tower block checked since the grenfell fire has passed safety tests. 60 buildings across england are deemed not safe — hundreds more are due to have their cladding inspected, but it's still not clear when. good morning, it's monday the 26th ofjune. also this morning.
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theresa may will today give more details of how eu citizens living in the uk will be treated after brexit. setting sail at last — the royal navy's new three—billion pound aircraft carrier starts sea trials seven years after the ark royal was scrapped. we are spending billions of pounds too much when using debit cards or credit cards went overseas. why? i will have the details later. in sport — lewis hamilton labels sebastian vettel a disgrace after the two collide in an action packed azerbaijan grand prix. coming of age. he made his debut six yea rs coming of age. he made his debut six years ago and now ed sheeran has closed the glastonbury festival on the main pyramid stage. and carol has the weather.
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good morning. for many of us, a dry and sunny start of the day. however, cloud will build on the west and later we will see some rain in northern ireland. all have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. every single tower block which has had its cladding tested since the grenfell disaster has failed fire safety inspections. 60 high—rises in 25 areas of england have been examined so far. local councils are being urged to send samples in more quickly for testing. there are still more than 500 other buildings nationwide that need to be checked. nick quraishi reports. it's a list that keeps on growing. the number of buildings that have now failed fire safety checks following the grenfell tower disaster stands at 60 in england across 25 local authorities. and of those examined so far, every single sample has failed. it was concerns over external cladding, combined with issues concerning fire doors, gas pipes and insulation which triggered the mass evacuation
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of four tower blocks in camden. where we have residents, we are making sure that we're continuing to knock on their door, i'm sure it is deeply disruptive for them, just keep having the conversation again and again, keeping people awake, making sure there are people on the block but the fire services are saying it's not safe to stay and they need to go. and in scotland, holyrood is to carry out its own investigation into the safety of high—rise tower blocks. it is thought up to 600 buildings in total are to be tested in england with councils being told to prioritise the ones they're most worried about. butjust how long this process will take is still unclear. theresa may is due to chair a meeting of the grenfell tower recovery task force later today where she will be updated on the recovery effort that could take many weeks, if not months. more inquests are also expected to be opened and adjourned this afternoon into the deaths of the victims. nick quraishi, bbc news. and nickjoins us now from camden
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where some residents have spent a third night sleeping on airbeds in a leisure centre. nick, how long before they will be able to return home? no one knows full the ideal timeframe as discussed on friday night was between two and four weeks. what we have this morning if people out of for tower block here. we estimate 200 people are refusing to leave some 120 flats. why? because they don't want to come to the leisure centre behind me or they say they can't afford to pay for temporary accommodation even though they will be refunded. camden council says it is still trying to encourage them to come out of the buildings and it's not clear what their legal steps can be to force
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them out. at this age, patience does seem them out. at this age, patience does seem to be running out because the council says, look, we have got to get the workers in to do this remedial work. —— at this stage. it could take longer than the planned four weeks if these people do not come out. we know that 25 local authorities are affected and 1a have been named. 0thers include manchester, stockton and sunderland. we know as well that the government we re we know as well that the government were promising to check 600 high—rise blocks across england. what is happening with those test? we might get an update from to may when she chairs this type force today. one thing is clear, 12 days on from grenfell tower, there are still many unanswered questions. we will ask the housing minister a bit later. theresa may will set out more details this afternoon of how the government plans to treat european union citizens living in the uk after brexit.
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last week, she outlined proposals to offer eu nationals "settled status" as long as british people were given similar rights. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us now. iain, how much more detail will we get today? i think the devil is in the details. when it comes to eu citizens‘ rights. it will be a 15 page document alongside theresa may‘s statement today going through some of the proposals for eu citizens after brexit. if people are here for over five years, they will get a similar rights to british citizens from welfare to pensions. there are still unanswered questions, for example, what happens to their family members? if they brought them m, family members? if they brought them in, could they settle here as well? that may well be answered and there is likely to be exclusions from this
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five—year settled status if people have admitted serious criminal offences, for example. it is still unclear as to when the cut—off date will be and when did you have to be in britain to apply for this scheme? that is unlikely to be settled today because theresa may want to make that the subject of negotiation. there has also been speculation that she might bite it difficult to get her vision of brexit through westminster here because she lacks an overall majority. as i understand it, she will meet the dup leader from ireland and if they can get the ten mps on board then she will be a lot more comfortable when it comes to the brexit negotiations and so far, the noise is sounding pretty positive. negotiations all round. thank you very much. six people are known to have died and 16 others are missing after a crowded passenger boat sank in a reservoir in colombia. around 170 passengers are thought to have been on board. the vessel, which had four decks, began taking on water during a cruise on an artificial lake outside the popular resort of guatape.
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there are no details yet on why the boat sank. a 16—year—old boy has been charged with the rape of an eight—year—old girl in a park in manchester. —— scotland yard says six of its officers were injured last night during a protest in east london over the death of a man last week, six days after he‘d been stopped by police. bricks were thrown — and bins set on fire — near forest gate police station. the independent police complaints commission has said a postmortem examination on edir frederico da costa showed that, contrary to some claims, he had no spinal injuries caused by officers. ed sheeran closed the glastonbury music festival last night — just six years after his debut performance to a crowd ofjust 500. but while his rise has been meteoric, other artists on yesterday‘s bill have been in the business for more than half a century. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. for many, glastonbury‘s final day was disco day.
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there were bee gees classics from barry gibb... # stayin‘ alive. watching from the sidelines, nile rodgers, who later took to the stage with chic with disco hit after disco hit. # i want the world to know. # everybody dance, clap your hands. a huge crowd watching them in the somerset sunshine. # upside down. # oh, boy, you turn me. it‘s notjust people famous from the world of music who have been performing at this year‘s festival. yes, that‘s american film and tv star kiefer sutherland, playing country music with his band. # drag your feet. # across the floor. he said performing at glastonbury was particularly special. it is almost like being invited into a part of history. # come on, set the tone.
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closing this year, ed sheeran. his headline set an emotional climax to a festival that won‘t be back until 2019. # and they say... it‘s normally rain that stops play during the cricket season let‘s get more on our main story this morning. it‘s a list that keeps on growing — the number of buildings that have now failed fire safety checks following the grenfell tower tragedy stands at 60. that‘s across 25 local authority areas in england. 1a of those have been named, including barnet, manchester and sunderland. the government‘s confirmed that of those tested — so far — every single sample has failed. it‘s thought up to 600 buildings in total are to be examined. meanwhile, camden council is evacuating residents from four of its tower blocks but 200 people in 120 flats are still refusing to move out.
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joining us now from our studio in westminster is the housing minister alok sharma. thank you for your time this morning. every single tower block so far has failed the safety test. this isa far has failed the safety test. this is a national scandal. how have we got to this point? can ijust firstly say that last week i had an opportunity to meet some of those who were affected by the grenfell fire and! who were affected by the grenfell fire and i have nothing but admiration for the dignity and bravery they have showed. what is clear is when you to make sure they get the help they need right now and thatis get the help they need right now and that is happening. also to make sure that, i can understand people are worried live in similar high—rise
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blocks, we need to make sure they also feel safe. that is why we have put in place a very clear process to make sure that buildings that are identified with a particular type of aluminium cladding, we are able to test hundreds of samples as day. we‘re ensure that as soon as we find out that a building has failed and has got cladding which is non—compliant, the local fire service is informed and they go to the building and do the right checks. clearly, as you said in the case of camden, where it wasn‘tjust cladding that other failures when it came to fire safety, people had to be evacuated and i have nothing more than admiration for the way that people have dealt with that who have been affected. 0ur priority is to keep people safe and that is why we need to keep this as quick as possible. you say the keep priority is to keep people safe. i will read you the quote from john mcdonnell,"
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79 of those who are dead from g re nfell 79 of those who are dead from grenfell and there will be more,..." the voices are heard when sharing this committee meeting, we need to try and make sure this never, ever happens again. i willjust point out that the buildings we are discovering with this cladding are of varying ages. the cladding was put in over varying periods of time, not just put in over varying periods of time, notjust in the past seven years. of course, in council areas which have different political leaderships. it is understanding that people want to turnit is understanding that people want to turn it into a political issue but what i am sensing is that what the nation demands is that we work together and make sure we keep people safe and that‘s why we are making sure these safety checks are happening. on that point, you say it‘s important and yet there are still 600 buildings that, in total, at least 500 still need to be
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checked. the former head of the civil service who now work with a housing association mps body, he said over the weekend, there is no reason why 100 said over the weekend, there is no reason why100 buildings can be tested per day. why have we only set —— tested a certain amount and why is there people crossed the uk who still don‘t know whether they‘re building is safe and we are still 12 days after grenfell. that testing process is happening around the clock. we are urgently making sure that samples are sent to us and that is why we are updating on a very regular basis. of course, as soon as the local authorities have informed resident in those blocks and the fire safety checks are carried out asa fire safety checks are carried out as a matter of urgency, that is when we are also making clear to the general public where those areas are. put yourself in the position of some of those people living in some
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of those blocks where they don‘t know whether they‘re building is u nsafe, know whether they‘re building is unsafe, they go to sleep every night and we have been speaking to people over the weekend you are genuinely concerned and worried about their health, worried about their future, worried every single time they put their head on the pillow. why is there no central base where they can find out? why aren‘t these tests, i will come back to this question again, why aren‘t these tests happening quickly?” again, why aren‘t these tests happening quickly? i completely understand why people should be worried and that is absolutely why we are making sure these tests are happening as quickly as possible. i wa nt to happening as quickly as possible. i want to be clear, on the day that this dreadful tragedy at grenfell occurred, at that point, in government, we had already started contacting local authorities and housing associations and we know that these associations were in turn contacting residents in their blocks. this process has been ongoing in terms of providing assurance and checking buildings for quite some days but you are right, we wa nt quite some days but you are right, we want to make sure that we check these buildings as quickly as
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possible and that is why i would say to all landlords out there, you know, if you have any concerns about buildings, please, send the cladding in protesting as soon as possible. —— for testing. mention testing but from camden, we heard from eileen, you might be having a heart attack because of the stress that is happening, rosie, with a nine week old baby who was told at 8:30pm that she had to sleep on in their bed in a local leisure centre. these people need leadership from the government, people like you. i understand that. i know it can be very traumatic when at short notice, you are asked to leave your home. i absolutely understand that in what is paramount, we have to be led by the experts, when they go into the building and they say mitigation measures are not enough in that building has to be evacuated, that is what is happening and we are trying to make sure this
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happens in an orderly fashion, from what i have heard. that has been happening in camden. i have nothing but admiration for those individuals who have had to cope with this move and live in temporary accommodation. with respect, they don‘t want your admiration, they want their homes back and they want to know they are safe. i understand that we want to make sure they themselves are safe and that is why in four out of the 60 buildings, people have been evacuated and there are plans in place to immediately make sure the cladding is fixed. would you talk about the number of people being evacuated, there are 60 buildings. we have made and given very clear advice to housing associations as to what they need to do for mitigation measures to put in place to make sure that people don‘t have to be evacuated but clearly, as is in the case of camden, there were multiple failures and that is why people had
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to be evacuated. residents want reassurance. how long is this going to take? we are literally working around the clock on this. it is not an issue of capacity. we need to expand the number of items which are tested. we can do that. this is a question of working through the samples that are coming in. each test ta kes samples that are coming in. each test takes several hours and we‘ve got to get that right but i absolutely understand people want assurances and i absolutely understand people want assurances and i can assure you we are working around the clock to provide that assurance. thank you for talking to us. hopefully that provided some of the answers many of you have been looking for. a 100% failure rate as all buildings inspected so far fail fire safety tests, but hundreds more still need to be examined. the prime minister will set out the terms of her plan to protect the rights of eu citizens living
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in britain after brexit. what is happening with the weather this week? carol is with us this morning. it‘s not a bad start of the day. chile in northern ireland. —— cold in northern ireland. it will pick up in the sunshine. this week, rather unsettled, spells the brain and it will be cooler. what is happening is low pressure will produce some rain into northern ireland and move north eastwards. but the high pressure is keeping things fairly settled. this morning, there are a few showers over the north of scotland. a lot of dry and sunny weather. for northern ireland, chilly start. it comes into northern
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england, the midlands, east anglia. we do have a weak weather front in the south, not producing much more than a band of cloud and there is some sea than a band of cloud and there is some sea fog. as we go through the day, that will disperse, leaving us with a lot of dry weather bar the odd shower here and now. through the day, the cloud will begin in the west as our area of low pressure produces rain into northern ireland. quite muddy in the south—east. pressure conditions as we push further north. through this evening, weise —— we could see a spell of heavy rain across northern ireland. into scotland, especially dumfries & galloway, pushing up in the project —— internet the direction of aberdeenshire. through the rest of
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the evening and overnight into tomorrow, but low pressure continues tomorrow, but low pressure continues to drift steadily to the north—east. that is likely to introduce some showery outbreaks of rain. some of those woolly thundery. the other low pressure area pushing steadily towards the north—east, pushing brain with it. temperatures in northern ireland in belfast, 19. 12 as we push up to scotland. still feeling quite muddy in the south—east with highs of 21 degrees. as we head on, tuesday and wednesday, we carry on with a lot of rain across england and wales. a few showers across scotland and northern ireland. that rain extends further north as we go through the day during wednesday. behind it, the temperature is coming down. we are
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looking at highs up to about 19. the rest of the reek still looks fairly u nsettled. rest of the reek still looks fairly unsettled. i have found out there is a horse called carol running in the 230 at chepstow today. is there? it's 230 at chepstow today. is there? it‘s not me, dan. 230 at chepstow today. is there? it's not me, dan. carol, iwas 230 at chepstow today. is there? it's not me, dan. carol, i was not going to suggest that.” it's not me, dan. carol, i was not going to suggest that. i am merely stating a fact. i feel like i going to suggest that. i am merely stating a fact. ifeel like i have got myself into all sorts of bother. looks. thank you, carol. it‘s an ancient game which was once used to teach young knights and princes about military strategy but could chess benefit children today? 800 primary schools in the uk have added it to their curriculum as a way to improve maths and problem solving skills and some say it could even encourage pupils to put down their smart phones. naga‘s popped downstairs to meet some budding young grand masters. you good at chess? i wouldn't say
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good. iam you good at chess? i wouldn't say good. i am aware of how it works. that is a start. i used to love chess when i was younger. it‘s great to see children getting involved in chess again. there are some thoughts about why it is so important and how it can help them. i can talk to david hardy was the manchester co—ordinator for chess in schools and communities. how are you encouraging chess? it has benefits to the children. we feel it helps with self—esteem. they can concentrate on the task at hand. it gives them discipline. you didn't start to play chess till you are much older. you teach people to play chess. how do you teach teachers to teach chess and what else are they
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teaching children? how will it benefit children? how teachers, we get them to come to a course and explain the way the process works, the teaching curriculum and time. we go through a few small games with them and when we go into the school, lots of our teachers work with their teachers. one of the suggestions is it helps children be better at maths or with concentration levels. it doesn‘t sound like an lot of fun, playing chess one hour. some people find it fun. there some educational benefits but it is a bit overstated but it‘s the intangibles, which are more important. for examples, people might bea more important. for examples, people might be a little quiet in lessons but when they play chess, they come out of their shells. you say they come out of their shells, or david did, but these guys have been playing this morning. good morning.
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who is winning? black is winning on points but whiteposition‘s as a bit better. you have been playing as well? it is something to focus my brain on. it'sjust something to put my mind into. what is your favourite piece on the board? probably the queen because it move allotted different spaces and it‘s the key piece for checkmate. how long have you been playing? two years. are you good? a bit. we will talk to you quys good? a bit. we will talk to you guys a little later because dan, you‘ve got to come down and play and i think we actually will be learning from these children. they are very smart. that is it from me. a lovely morning. it is time to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m victoria hollins. 1a tower blocks across london have now failed fire safety tests following the grenfell tower fire, and that number is expected to rise. tests on tower block cladding across the capital continues today. the department for communities and local government says safety measures are being taken for each individual building. it says evacuations won‘t be carried out in every case. two people have been left with life—changing injuries after an a substance, believed to be acid was thrown on them, through their car windows. resham khan was with her cousin celebrating her 21st birthday when they were attacked on wednesday at traffic lights in becton, east london. ms khan has damage to her left eye and required two skin grafts. no arrests have been made. an inquest into the death of five
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men in london who died will start today. lifeguards are stationed at the beach for the first time this summer after a review by the local council. an exhibition of perfume has opened at somerset house, showcasing the perfume pioneers of the last century. the multi—sensory display also sees some of the most famous perfumers experimenting with unusual smells. visitors are asked to guess what they can smell. amongst some of the creations are a catholic confessional and a water theme park. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. london 0verground london 0verg round has london 0verground has minor delays. the woolwich ferry is expected to have one vote today because of ongoing technical problems. the police have closed the m3 london bound atjunction 3 lightwater. let‘s have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett.
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time to us to acclimatise to some lower temperatures and we have wet weather to come but not for today, a largely dry day with some sunny spells. a bit of mist and murk first thing but that should clear earlier on. a very light breeze, temperatures getting up to about 2a, possibly 25 celsius. staying dry for the bulk of the night. a few showers in the early hours of the morning. the temperatures getting down to about 1a or 15 celsius. that sets the tone for tomorrow. some showers and prolonged spells of rain. we may even have the odd spot of thunder. some spots not making it above the teens. we start off on a wet note on wednesday. it does dry up later on in the day. really, for friday, even though it‘s looking brighter and drier, that northerly wind is going to make
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things a bit chilly. wet and windy on sunday. in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. every single tower block which has had its cladding tested since the grenfell disaster has failed fire safety inspections. 60 high—rises in 25 areas of england have been examined so far. local councils are being urged to send samples in more quickly for testing. there are still more than 500 other buildings nationwide that need to be checked. this is a question of working
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through the samples that are coming in. each test takes several hours. i absolutely understand that people wa nt absolutely understand that people want assurance as soon as absolutely understand that people want assurance as soon as possible and we are working, i assure you, we are working around the clock to provide insurance. theresa may will set out more details today of how the government plans to treat more than 3—million eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. last week, she outlined proposals to offer eu nationals "settled status" — which would give those who have spent five years in the uk equal rights on healthca re, education and benefits — but only if british people living in the european union were given similar entitlements. the leader of the democratic unionist party, arlene foster, has returned to london in the hope of finalising a deal with theresa may. it‘s more than two weeks since mrs may announced her intention to form a partnership with the northern irish party‘s ten mps after losing her parliamentary majority in the snap general election. the dup has previously denied claims
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they are seeking an extra billion. the understand a meeting will be taking place between arlene foster and to resonate at around 930. six people are known to have died and 16 others are missing after a crowded passenger boat sank in a reservoir in colombia. around 170 passengers are thought to have been on board. the vessel, which had four decks, began taking on water during a cruise on an artificial lake outside the popular resort of guatape. there are no details yet on why the boat sank. the royal navy‘s biggest ever warship is due to set sail scotland yard says six of its officers were injured last night during a protest in east london over the death of a man last week, six days after he‘d been stopped by police. bricks were thrown — and bins set on fire — near forest gate police station. the independent police complaints commission has said a postmortem examination on edir frederico da costa showed that, contrary to some claims, he had no spinal injuries caused by officers. the uk‘s economic growth will remain
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anaemic until the end of the decade, according to the british chambers of commerce. the group of business leaders says it doesn‘t expect growth to be more than 1.5% by 2020 and that inflation may end up higher than expected. the sound of a blaring car horn can drive most of us up the wall. but now scientists have discovered a more effective noise for warning other road users of danger without getting them in a flap. take a listen. ducks quack researchers in south korea asked volunteers to evaluate a range of noises and found that a synthesised "quack" successfully alerted pedestrians to potential hazards without raising stress levels. if you just look at naga‘s body
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language... ijust wonder if you just look at naga‘s body language... i just wonder if you have gone to university and become a scientist and you have studied really ha rd scientist and you have studied really hard and a new study the quack. but then in 20 years time and you press the horn and a quack comes out, it is research and well used. put that in your pipe and smoke it. can you imagine if sebastian vettel pressed the honda and a quack came out? he might not be so badtempered. quacking and grand prix. formula 1, perfect. lewis hamilton called sebastian vettel‘s driving "disgusting" after the two clashed
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in an incident packed azerbaijan grand prix. the race included three safety cars and lots of crashes. it was won by red bull‘s daniel ricciardo. but heres what everyone is talking about — vettel was penalised for hitting hamilton‘s mercedes as they prepared for a re—start. hamilton was ahead with 19 laps to go, but his head rest came loose. he ended up fifth, behind vettel who‘s extended his championship lead over the briton to fourteen points. we heard obviously the problems with lewis and seb and it was just a crazy race. i made an unplanned pitstop at the beginning. after a few laps we had some debris in the breaks so we had to stop and clean it and we dropped back to, i think, 17th place. so did i think then i would win today? absolutely not. i would have put all my money on it that this was very unlikely. after a disappointing champions trophy exit, england‘s cricketers bounced back to win their t20 series against south africa 2—1. dawid malan starred with the bat
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on debut for england, top scoring with 78 to set south africa 182 to win. they were always struggling — especially when dangerman ab de villiers was out. england won by 19 runs and will now turn their focus to the four match test series that starts in a couple of weeks. feliciano lopez caused a big shock and beat marin cilic in a thrilling final at the queen‘s club in london. number four seed cilic took the first set without much fuss but the spaniard fought back and won the second on the tie—break. that was followed by another compelling set which again depended on a tie—break. and it was won by the world number 32. i cannot believe that i finally won this trophy. i have been waiting so long, 15 or 16 years, to be here holding this trophy. i thought by the end of the tiebreak after losing a few match points that i wasn‘t going to be able to make it but i was a little bit lucky at the end that i won today. jamie murray ensured at least one
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murray brother won a queen‘s title as he and partner bruno soares beat frenchmenjulien benneteau and edouard roger—vasselin in the final of the doubles. the pair won in straight sets 6—2, 6—3. roger federer looks in great shape for wimbledon after winning a ninth halle open in germany. he beat alexander zverev in straight sets to win the title. federer sat out the entire clay court season to target a record eighth wimbledon title. from a seven time wimbledon champion to a two—time one and petra kvitova has won her first tournament since being injured in a knife attack in december. she came from behind to beat australia‘s ashleigh barty in three sets to win the aegon classic in birmingham. she said it is something very special — like a fairytale. i couldn‘t imagine to come back for sure, my second event, i won a trophy. that‘s why i really was fighting to play tennis again and that is why i was still able to, you know, have a great motivation to win
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a title for example here in birmingham. it‘s a big week for the british and irish lions. they face the hurricanes tomorrow before a must win second test on saturday with the all blacks. lions coach criticised their tactics after the first test defeat — and all blacks coach steve hansen hit back, live on new zealand radio. well, it‘s predictable comments from gatland, isn‘t it? two weeks ago, it was we cheated in the scrums, last week it was blocking and now he‘s saying this. but, it‘s really disappointing because what he‘s implying is we‘re intentionally going out to injure somebody. that‘s not the case, we‘ve never been like that. and as a new zealander, i would expect him to know the new zealand psyche that it‘s not about intentionally trying to hurt anybody, it‘s about playing hard and fair. and how about this from jordan spieth. the world number six won his 10th pga title in some style. it went down to a play—off at the travellers championship
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in connecticut. spieth, the 2015 masters and us open champion, chipping infrom the bunker to seal the title. at 23, he‘s now the second youngest player after tiger woods to reach ten pga for 72 years. a new take on the double chest mark. finally we‘re going to bring you the opening round of the 2017 diving world series that took place in ireland over the weekend. britain‘s gary hunt won but we particularly like the patriotic swimwear fashioned by blake aldridge — who finished second. the dives took place from nearly three times the height of an olympic platform. whenever i watch something like that, the soles of my feet tingle. it is the size of the cereal bowl. i
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heard you mention carol earlier. 0ur carol? think that she was thinking i was referring to her as a horse but there is a horse called carol. sure everybody‘s money is on it now but i have done some research and they have done some research and they have some background about carol. which carol? 230 carol. has been beginning to look a bit exposed but in decent form, a player. she is beginning to look a bit exposed mr mark in decent form. i think she is second favourite. you know she will be the favourite by the end of this. it has been a cause of tension between the government and the european union ever since the referendum — what will happen to eu nationals living the uk after brexit? today the government will published its plans so what can
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we expect and what do people make of it? 0ur correspondentjohn maguire is in north london this morning finding out. we send john out and all he makes sure he does is get his croissant and cup of coffee and a cake, already! nicejob if you kent get it, john. lubricate. -- if you can get it. —— blueberry cake. we are in north london and will speak to some eu national ‘s. a big day in the brexit negotiations. was this one of theissues brexit negotiations. was this one of the issues people were thinking about when they went into the polling booth just over one year ago? there are 3.2 million eu citizens currently living in the uk. what theresa may have said so far is that those that have been here for
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more than five years should be entitled to stay and they will receive access to health, education and welfare benefits. the government also wants those benefits to be reciprocated with the almost 1 million people who live elsewhere in the european union. this morning, we are joined the european union. this morning, we arejoined with the european union. this morning, we are joined with people from greece, bog area and italy. good morning to you all. —— bulgaria. you have been here for 15 years from greece. what do you want to hear today from the negotiations? i want guaranteed for our rights. these are the terms and conditions that we had when we entered this country. you can'tjust change the rules of the game in the middle of the game. we want her to say that the european court of justice is the custodian of our political stature in our country ——
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this country. they are what we have had as long as we have been here. anything less is simply not giving us anything less is simply not giving us the respect that we deserve and she said the other day aboutjeremy corbyn's idea of giving houses to 6 re nfell tower corbyn's idea of giving houses to grenfell tower victims. corbyn's idea of giving houses to grenfelltowervictims. she corbyn's idea of giving houses to grenfell tower victims. she said we can't take private property are way from people to give to victims and she is absolutely right, i agree with her, at how can she take all legal and political status of way from us and change it to something new? you came here as a student five yea rs new? you came here as a student five years ago from bog area. when the brexit vote happened just over one year ago “— brexit vote happened just over one year ago —— bulgaria. what are your thoughts? initially, iwas very angry and disappointed because i
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still have a belief in the eu idea, the idea of the european union has —— and i was very angry about that point. not scared about what will happen to me, personally because i work here, i pay my taxes, i think i contribute to society to a dead think i will be deported or something like that. i'm not worried about that in particular. salvador, you are an interesting case because you are an interesting case because you came here injanuary, after the brexit vote, from italy. for me, brexit vote, from italy. for me, brexit was not a concern. i decided tojoin london after the referendum. it was an opportunity to me because this country is the best for premier league. it is the best talent of the world. it is not only local talent. ifa world. it is not only local talent. if a here to contribute to this country, to give my skills and talent, to improve this country,
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give something back. why should i be worried? sure give something back. why should i be worried ? sure everybody give something back. why should i be worried? sure everybody think like this. in the government. this country is growing because there is a lot of people working for it and no matter where they are from, just because they are the best talent and they are here to help, to grow this city. so premier league trumps syria, i guess you are saying. as you are saying, christine, do you think generally people have come around, what about the detail? people concerned the detail? i think it could depend on the negotiations. we should be worried about maintaining our existing rights. we shouldn't be worried about things
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that are in a first world country like britain. the shift of the conversation to this extreme point of view is i believe very, very worrying for the uk and for europe. thinking about some of the detail, what are some of the things you would like to hear? what would make you feel more settled and secure? would like to hear? what would make you feel more settled and secure7m terms of the ideas settled status, i wonder how this is going to be different from, for example, applying for person —— permanent residency? we have the loophole with private medical insurance that we had to have in order to get permanent residency so theresa may did say there is going to be a certain dream streamlining —— streamlining. we don't know what's
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going to happen in the weeks and months ahead. what is your long—term plans? i'm very new here in london but i love this city and i'm very happy here and i'm not planning to move at this point because all the conditions are safe, can't see anything, ican conditions are safe, can't see anything, i can stay here. i would like to stay like this. in this moment, i then see a big problem. thank you, all. good coffee and ca kes. thank you, all. good coffee and cakes. we will be back later on this morning with some other people with some different perspectives. make sure you join us then. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. a 100% failure rate as all buildings inspected so far fail fire safety tests, but hundreds more still need to be examined. the prime minister will set out
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the terms of her plan to protect the rights of eu citizens living in britain after brexit. has been a bit exposed but looking good for the 230 at chepstow. carol has the weather for others. i think you have dug yourself a bit further into the hole. you are in such big trouble. moving on. this morning is a fine start to the day but it‘s going to be fairly unsettled. it‘s going to be fairly unsettled. it‘s going to be fairly unsettled. it‘s going to turn cooler through the week. we have some sunshine. high pressure dominating the weather. the low pressure coming in later will
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usurp it and produce some rain. the far north of scotland, let‘s get a few showers this morning. chilly start in northern ireland. it‘s a bright start. as we move across england and wales, a fair bit of sunshine there were times across the midlands, a wee bit of cloud. a similar scenario. the sea fog now starting to lift. as we go through the day, there will be a lot of sunshine. quite muddy in the south—east. towards the west, we will see more cloud build as this low pressure comes in. temperatures in glasgow, 17 degrees. as we head through the rest of the afternoon and into the evening, the rain will be persistent and heavy as it moves in across scotland, northern england and north wales but especially
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across cumbria and dumfries & galloway. there is likely to be a lot of surface water and spray. that low pressure continues. meanwhile, another area of low pressure from the continent —— continent comes our way. showery outbreaks of rain. meanwhile, the other band of low pressure m oves meanwhile, the other band of low pressure moves to the north—west of scotland. temperature—wise, 19 degrees in belfast. 21 degrees in london. tuesday evening into wednesday, you can see how the brain develops. in the north, one of two showers around and that rain continues to migrate northwards into northern ireland and northern
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england. most of scotland staying dry. coming down as we push further south. highs between 16 and 19 into the rest of the week, it does remain u nsettled the rest of the week, it does remain unsettled with rain at times and also windy at times as well. good to the garden of least. absolutely. also windy at times as well. good to the garden of least. absolutelym saves you watering your plants. see you a bit later on. you just got back from holiday. i use savvy with your money in the way you pay with things? am i getting asked if, you know when you use your credit card, i would always say currency because it saves you the charges. not many people know that. you just get caught by these little things. you get to the front of the queue and you don't know what to press. it's worth knowing. lots of people prefer to pay in
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pounds. but new figures show holidaymakers are spending £380 million in extra fees because they choose to pay it that way rather than choosing the local currency. they found that on average, those who pay in pounds for card transactions spend £60 more than people who don‘t every time they go away. joining me now is pippa jacks, the editor of travel industry trade magazine travel trade gazette. we have all been there, that dilemma when we get to the front of the queue. you should choose to pay in the local currency. if it is sterling, the rate of exchange will not be done a relieved. it is done by the payment services provider so it‘s not a great exchange rate and there can be be included so always choose the local currency. so they are cashing in on the fact we don‘t know, they can set their own
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exchange rate. exactly. there is nothing on the screen to show you which exchange rate is being used so u nless which exchange rate is being used so unless you are up on it, you will not know. and that is just one of many issues, isn‘t it? not know. and that is just one of many issues, isn't it? we all know, or the message is getting through about not buying your currency at the airport. it will be a terrible exchange rate. you also need to be thinking about every time you withdraw cash from an atm, there are going to be transaction fees, it really does add up. it can be wise to try and take cash. 0r really does add up. it can be wise to try and take cash. or if you can‘t use cash, order it on line and get a good rate. never at the airport. it doesn‘t have any transaction fees. several on the market now. that can really mean you can buy an ice cream here, a newspaper that, a copy there. at the
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moment, those costs racked up because you might be spending £12 on an ice cream but you pay more in fees. those credit cards are the way to go. and prepaid cards which you load up with cash. some of those have these as well. cash for smaller purchases is a good thing. the important thing is all the cards are different and you need to know what you got before you go. holidays, your money is not going as far this year. you don‘t want to be wasting a0, 50 quid on fees you could have avoided. the cost of a holiday is what we think we are paying for. u nless what we think we are paying for. unless you pay for it, you‘re not logged in the current rate. it can be hard to know so it‘s really important to do everything you will is -- important to do everything you will is —— everything you can. important to do everything you will is -- everything you can. good advice. thank you very much. always
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choose local currency, not pounds when you get to the front of the queue. that is a good tip.l when you get to the front of the queue. that is a good tip. a lot of money can be wasted. saving an average 60 quid. she is longer than the houses of parliament, taller than nelson‘s column and today, the royal navy‘s new aircraft carrier is due to set sailfor the first time. hms queen elizabeth will leave her dock at rosyth in scotland, where she‘s been built, to begin sea trials. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale has been to see the preparations. the biggest warship ever built in britain is about to go to see the very first time. it‘s been one of the largest most complex engineering projects in the uk and has taken yea rs projects in the uk and has taken years and cost more than £3 billion. but hms queen elizabeth is now ready to set sail. this is a significant
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moment the royal navy. it will have been without an aircraft carrier for almost a decade. i think there are very few capabilities by any country that are as symbolic and is totemic as it carrier strike capability. some things you can‘t see but these are very some things you can‘t see but these are very visible symbols of national power and power projection. but first they will have to carefully manoeuvre this massive ship out of a dock with the help of 11 barges. just to give you a sense of scale, from one end of the deck to the other is about 300m. that is the length of the houses of parliament. as far as height, from the keel right up to the top of that mast, thatis right up to the top of that mast, that is taller than nelson ‘s column. in fact, they are going to have to lower that mast as they slide through these docs in some very narrow slide through these docs in some very narrow spaces slide through these docs in some very narrow spaces and eventually having to take under the bridges out
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there. that will be the beginning of there. that will be the beginning of the first sea trials. by tonight, hms queen elizabeth should be heading out to sea under her own power. and later this year, but it all goes according to plan, she will be sailing into her new home of portsmouth. she is impressive. a big old beast. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m victoria hollins. 1a tower blocks across london have now failed fire safety tests following the grenfell tower fire, and that number is expected to rise. tests on tower block cladding across the capital continues today. the department for communities and local government says safety measures are being taken for each individual building. it says evacuations won‘t be carried out in every case. in camden, the council says around 200 residents are still refusing to leave. several tower blocks
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that have been judged by the fire services to be too dangerous to live in. two people have been left with life—changing injuries after an a substance, believed to be acid was thrown on them, through their car windows. resham khan was with her cousin celebrating her 21st birthday when they were attacked on wednesday at traffic lights in becton, east london. ms khan has damage to her left eye and required two skin grafts. no arrests have been made. an inquest into the death of five men in london who died will start today. lifeguards are stationed at the beach for the first time this summer after a review by the local council. an exhibition of perfume has opened at somerset house, showcasing the perfume pioneers of the last century. the multi—sensory display also sees some of the most famous perfumers experimenting with unusual smells. visitors are asked to guess what they can smell. amongst some of the creations are a catholic confessional and a water theme park. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. london 0verground has minor delays.
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the woolwich ferry is expected to have one boat today because of ongoing technical problems. the police have closed the m3 london bound atjunction 3 lightwater. and that takes us to the weather. time to us to acclimatise to some lower temperatures and we have wet weather to come but not for today, a largely dry day with some sunny spells. a bit of mist and murk first thing but that should clear earlier on. a very light breeze, temperatures getting up to about 2a, possibly 25 celsius. staying dry for the bulk of the night. a few showers in the early hours of the morning. the temperatures getting down to about 1a or 15 celsius. that sets the tone for tomorrow. some showers and prolonged
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spells of rain. we may even have the odd spot of thunder. some spots not making it above the teens. we start off on a wet note on wednesday. it does dry up later on in the day. thursday, fairly wet. really, for friday, even though it‘s looking brighter and drier, that northerly wind is going to make things a bit chilly. saturday, bright. wet and windy on sunday. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello. this is breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. a 100% failure rate. not a single tower block checked since the grenfell fire has passed safety tests. 60 buildings across england are deemed not safe. hundreds more are due to have their cladding inspected, but it‘s still not clear when. good morning.
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it‘s monday 26th june. also on the programme: the dup leader has flown into london for talks with the prime minister. arlene foster says her party is close to agreeing a deal to support a minority conservative government. coming of age. he made his debut just six years ago and now ed sheeran has closed the glastonbury festival on the main pyramid stage. two different studies show different forecasts for the economy. who is right? in sport: lewis hamilton labels sebastian vettel a disgrace after the two collide in an action packed azerbaijan grand prix.
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hello means hello and banana means. . . hello means hello and banana means... banana? can you speak minion? the stars of despicable me 3 give charlie a lesson in communicating with the mischievous ones. and carol has the weather. we always understand what she had to say. it has been quite chilly start for some parts of uk this morning but there is sunshine and showers around. the sunshine turns hazy from the west heralding the arrival of some rain initially into northern ireland. more details in 15 minutes. we will see you at 8:15. thank you. first, our main story. every single tower block which has had its cladding tested since the grenfell disaster has failed fire safety inspections. 60 high rises in 25 areas of england have been examined so far. local councils are being urged to send samples in more quickly for testing. there are still more than 500 other buildings across the country that need to be checked. nick quraishi reports. it isa
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it is a list that keeps on growing. the number of buildings that have now failed fire safety checks following the grenfell tower disaster stands at 60 in england across 25 local authorities. of those examined so far, every single sample has failed. it was concerns over external cladding combined with issues surrounding fire doors, gas pipes and installation which triggered the mass evacuation of four tower blocks in camden. where we have residents, we are making sure we continue to knock on their door. it is deeply disruptive for them. just keep having the conversation again and again, keeping people away, making sure there are people on the block. the fire service says it is not safe to stay and they need to go. and in scotla nd stay and they need to go. and in scotland holyrood will carry out its own investigation into the safety of high—rise tower blocks. it is thought up to 600 buildings in total are to be tested in england with councils being told to prioritise
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the ones they are most worried about. but just how long the ones they are most worried about. butjust how long this process will take is still not clear. theresa may is due to chair a meeting of the grenfell tower recovery task force later today where she will be updated on the recovery effort that could take many weeks if not months. more inquests are also expected to be opened and adjourned this afternoon into the deaths of the victims. nick quraishi, bbc news. and nickjoins us now from camden where some residents have spent a third night sleeping on airbeds in a leisure centre. nick, how long before they will be able to return home? nobody knows. that is the big question. initially they were told they would be out between two and four weeks. what we have got this morning, we know that 200 people are refusing to leave some 120 flats. they say that they feel safe. camden council says until they leave, they cannot get in to do the necessary work. i must be that has been disputed this morning by one resident who came over to tell me
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that workers are already in, starting the work. some kind of disparity there. what about the rest of the country? we know that 60 blocks have failed cladding tests. 25 local authorities and 1a have been named. seven in london, others in manchester, stockton and sunderland. 600 high—rise blocks are supposed to be tested according to the government in england. when all that is going to be completed nobody knows. maybe theresa may will update people when she chairs the grenfell tower recovery task force today. one thing is clear, 12 days on from the g re nfell tower is clear, 12 days on from the grenfell tower fire, there are still many unanswered questions. thank you. good to talk to you. the leader of the democratic unionist party will hold talks with the prime minister in downing street injust over an hour. arlene foster believes her party is close to a deal with the government. writing in the belfast telegraph, arlene foster says progress had been painfully slow at time but she was working to agree
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a confidence and supply agreement to support a minority conservative government. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. this has taken quite some time. we heard the proposal and we pretty much assumed, rightly or wrongly, that talks would continue and a firm deal would be made. being timely is of course what the government needs to be. that is absolutely right. the government would have preferred to close the deal last week when the queen‘s speech was put to parliament. the proposed legislation for the next two years. but there is no vote on it until wednesday at westminster, crucial vote. the government is keen to conclude a deal with the dup before then. it looks very positive this morning for the government. the mood music is certainly sounding good and soothing for theresa may. arlene foster saying they are close to reaching an appropriate agreement with the government, although dup socialists say there are still issues to be worked through. we are expecting them to meet for an hour this
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morning and at the end of that they could sign that agreement today, which would give theresa may more security before that crucial vote on wednesday. of course she no longer has an overall majority. we should be very clear about what this deal will cover. first of all it is called a confidence and supply deal. although theresa may will get the queen‘s speech through my legislation, she will not have to give way and allowjeremy corbyn to become prime minister, which the dup are not keen on. she also get support for the budget when it comes. but in every other area of policy she will have to negotiate that line by line with the dup, or indeed with her own backbench mps to be sure of winning those votes. it is a limited deal that will be put in place. the government also say they
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will publish details of that deal and people are keen to see elsewhere in the ukjust how much money might be injected into northern ireland as a result of that deal. if it is a substantial sum, expect more demands on the government from the scottish and welsh governments as well. theresa may will set out more details today of how the government plans to treat more than 3 million eu citizens living in the uk after brexit. last week, she outlined proposals to offer eu nationals settled status, which would give those who have spent five years in the uk equal rights on healthca re, education and benefits but only if british people living in the european union were given similar entitlements. six people are known to have died and 16 others are missing after a crowded passenger boat sank in a reservoir in colombia. around 170 passengers are thought to have been on board. the vessel, which had four decks, began taking on water during a cruise on an artificial lake outside the popular resort of guatape. there are no details yet on why the boat sank. scotland yard says six of its officers were injured last night during a protest in east london over the death of a man last week, six days after he‘d been stopped by police. bricks were thrown and bins set on fire near forest gate police station.
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the independent police complaints commission has said a post—mortem examination of edir frederico da costa showed that, contrary to some claims, he had no spinal injuries caused by officers. ed sheeran closed the glastonbury music festival last night just six years after his debut performance to a crowd ofjust 500. but while his rise has been meteoric, other artists on yesterday‘s bill have been in the business for more than half a century. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. for many, glastonbury‘s final day was disco day. there were bee gees classics from barry gibb. # stayin‘ alive, stayin‘ alive! watching from the sidelines, nile rodgers, who later took to the stage with chic, for disco hit after disco hit. # i‘m coming up. # i want the world to know. # clap your hands. a huge crowd watching them
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in the somerset sunshine. # upside down. # boy, you turn me... it‘s not just people famous from the world of music who have been performing at this year‘s festival. yes, that‘s american film and tv star kiefer sutherland playing country music with his band. he said performing at glastonbury was particularly special. it is almost like being invited into a part of history. closing this year, ed sheeran. his headline set an emotional climax to a festival that won‘t be back until 2019. # they say... crowd sings along. he is brave to be up there. i know
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he is good at what he does, butjust a guitarand a he is good at what he does, butjust a guitar and a pedal. the royal navy‘s biggest ever warship is due to set sail for the first time later today. the 65,000 tonne hms queen elizabeth will leave her dock at rosyth in scotland, where she‘s been built, to begin six weeks of sea trials. it will be some time until she is fully operational with jets. it‘s normally rain that stops play during the cricket season but a village match was interrupted by a charging bullock. the animal interrupted a match in bollington, cheshire, over the weekend. look at the umpire. i don‘t know if he knows. that is very close! i am not sure on the advice on bullock charging. but the umpire did quite well. he just stood there while eve ryo ne well. he just stood there while everyone was running away. aren‘t you told not to run to stop them chasing you? you told not to run to stop them chasing you ? it
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you told not to run to stop them chasing you? it is hard to remember safety advice when something like thatis safety advice when something like that is happening. i am glad that the bullock took up that crucial position at the end! nobody was injured. tony and eddie both have autism. they‘re both in special hospitals farfrom home and have been for many years. six years ago, when the bbc highlighted abuse of vulnerable patients in the winterbourne view unit, the government promised to bring people with learning disabilities out of hospitals to be supported in their own communities. over the next two days we‘ll look into the progress made since then. jayne mccubbin went to meet the families of tony and eddie. they told us that he would be there for nine months. he is still there, 16 years on. he is still there. pam‘s santoni is 120 miles from home ina pam‘s santoni is 120 miles from home in a secure hospital. he is autistic and he has learning disabilities. his room has stayed the same ever
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since he was admitted and later section 16 years ago. i think we died that day. when panorama expose to the abuse of patients with learning disabilities in winterbourne view, the government made a promise. homes not hospitals. they said people should be supported in their own communities, not locked in institutions far from family. much time has passed since that promise was made, longer since pam‘s son tony left brighton. if he had killed somebody he would be out by now. he has done 16 years, life sentence. he went there is a young man, 23. he will be a0 in august, a0. man, 23. he will be a0 in august, 40. the department of health promise to get people out of institutions. in 201a they were criticised for failing to do that. in 2015, transforming care partnership areas we re transforming care partnership areas were created in england with £a0
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million of investment. they were to build the right community support needed to help bring people home. but one third of those areas haven‘t seen any but one third of those areas haven‘t seen any of that money yet. published nhs data shows that the number of people in one of these institutions today is roughly the same as it was back in 201a. the data also shows a third of inpatients like tony have been in a unit for more than five years. the man originally behind the call for change says he is appalled. this is a disgrace and something that this country should be shamed by. we are not unique in this regard. but in this day and age, to abuse people‘s human rights in this way, i think is utterly shocking. tony's care provider and local authority both agree he should be back in brighton. we agree long stays are not desirable and we are working with the local authority as they try to source a placement. we appreciate challenges in providing the right services and the timescales to
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achieve this can be frustrating for families. i thought he was going to die there. like tony, eddie is on the autistic spectrum. he also went into a the autistic spectrum. he also went intoa unit the autistic spectrum. he also went into a unit after crisis. he was 12. he was in a solitary blog that they called the extra care unit. in fact there has been a 26% increase in young people with learning disabilities referred to a secure unit in the last 12 months. why? the national audit office says there is not enough support for families like this to help them avoid a crisis. we we re this to help them avoid a crisis. we were told that he would be there between 12 weeks to nine months. it is over four between 12 weeks to nine months. it is overfour and between 12 weeks to nine months. it is over four and a between 12 weeks to nine months. it is overfour and a half between 12 weeks to nine months. it is over four and a half years down the line. eddie ended up 120 miles from home in st andrew‘s. eddie ended up 120 miles from home in st andrew's. we had an e-mail to say he had defecated a seclusion room. we discovered that he been in this seclusion room for 2a hours and
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there is no access to a toilet. st andrew‘s say there are objective criteria set out in the mental health act which determine whether or not a patient is detained. no patient would continue to be detained if the criteria were not satisfied. the st andrew‘s unit is rated good by the cqc, eddie has moved on to another unit where he is doing better, but it is in newcastle. his family live 300 miles away in bristol. they want him back. we wish we never asked for any help. i don't want this to happen to anyone who is autistic young people. nhs england told us they are clear, hospitals should not be seen as homes. new high quality community services are essential and are being created. the department of health tell us £25 million is being spent on this to improve outcomes, but the national audit office warns this is all happening far too slowly.
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jayne joins us now. how many people are we talking about? different parts of the nhs have given us different figures. the published data shows a a% drop to 2500 still locked up inside. nhs england though say they think the figures are better. they think there has been a 13% drop since 2015. nhs digital, a different part of the nhs, say no, don‘t use those figures, use a different data set. those figures show there are more than 1,000 extra people inside these units today and they say there has been a significant increase in the last 12 months. it‘s a mess. the national audit office have twice criticised the department of health for not getting the numbers right and of course, we‘re not talking about numbers, we‘re talking about
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people. today, a campaign starts. it's people. today, a campaign starts. it‘s called seven days of action. it is being led by families whose children have experience of these units, being taken farfrom home and families who live in fear of their child, needing help in a crisis and being taken away from home. these are sons and daughters who might have very challenging behaviour. they might at times be aggressive. they might at times be aggressive. they need a lot of support and they need a lot of stability, but these families say why can‘t that happen in their own community? the right support? the government agrees. that if you do that, if you get the care model right in the community it has much better outcomes for these children and it costs less. tomorrow, we‘re going to be looking at this again. we will be looking at the huge growth of the private sector in this area and the cost of that to the nhs and to lives. so much more to talk about on this. thank you very much. it‘s 8.18am and you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news.
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the main stories: a 100% failure rate as all buildings inspected so far fail fire safety tests, but hundreds more still need to be examined. the dup leader has flown into london for talks with the prime minister. arlene foster says her praerpt is close to doing a deal to support a minority government. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. ah, but you have umbrellas? yes, today you could use them as parasols, but sadly not for the rest of the week. some of us, of course, are crying out for rain. the week ahead is looking unsettled with spells of rain. if you like it drier, then today is your day. high pressure is in charge of our weather. hardly a breath of wind. that‘s until this area of low pressure comes in bringing rain into northern ireland. so, uv levels
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today are high, or very high across england and wales and also north—east scotland and if you have an alshlgy to pollen, well, this is the pollen chart. you can see high across the pollen chart. you can see high a cross m ost the pollen chart. you can see high across most of england and wales. including the channel islands. this morning we have showers across the far north of scotland. they are around the north and the moray firth. move further north, it is large dry dry. a sunny start in northern ireland. as we head across england and wales we are back into the sunshine as naga rightly said with temperatures picking up. already we are looking at 1as and 155. by already we are looking at 1a5 and 155. by 10al we are more likely to 5ee 155. by 10al we are more likely to see 165 155. by 10al we are more likely to 5ee16s and 1s. 155. by 10al we are more likely to 5ee16s and 15. through the course of the day, the sunshine prevails, however as our atlantic set of fro nts however as our atlantic set of front5 come in from the west the cloud in the west will also build so the sunshine will turn hazier. temperature wise, we are in good 5hape, temperature wise, we are in good shape, 21 celsius in cardiff and 1a
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celsius in aberdeen and 2a celsius in london and under the rain we are looking at the mid—teens in northern ireland. the rain will gatherforce getting into scotland, northern england and wales. the heaviest rain i5 england and wales. the heaviest rain is likely to be acro55 cumbria and dumfries and galloway. you may find there will be a lot of surface water and spray on the roads if you‘re out and spray on the roads if you‘re out and about early on. tomorrow the low pressure and about early on. tomorrow the low pre55ure continues and about early on. tomorrow the low pressure continues to move north—east wards. we have got low pressure in the near continent. that‘5 pressure in the near continent. that‘s going to bring us muggy conditions and it is going to bring us conditions and it is going to bring u5 thundery shower5, but not all of us u5 thundery shower5, but not all of us will see they will and they won‘t be on all the time, but they will be migrating northwards. here is that trailing front connected to the area of low pressure pushing north—east wards with its rain. but for northern ireland, things brighten up for you with sub shine and showers and highs of 19 celsius. 12 celsius in abdaornings 21 celsius and feeling muggy in london. and then as we head on through tuesday evening
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and overnight into wednesday, you can see how the rain gather5 a5 and overnight into wednesday, you can see how the rain gather5 as it continues to push northwards. a few showers ju5t continues to push northwards. a few showers just ahead of it across scotla nd showers just ahead of it across scotland and northern ireland and it will continue its journey northwards during the course of wednesday of the so temperatures are coming down and with an on shore flow, it will feel cooler. highs of 19 celsius in london the ahead of it across scotla nd london the ahead of it across scotland it is where we will have the driest conditions, but here there will be a few showers with highs up to 13 celsius. dan and naga. thank you very much, carol. what‘s that then? naga. thank you very much, carol. what's that then? there is nothing to see! there is you to see. that's what there is to see. thank you very much. see you later! two conflicting reports today show different forecasts for the economy. ben has more on that and the other main business stories. good morning.
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mixed message about business today. a separate report, this one from lloyds says busine55e5 a separate report, this one from lloyds says businesses are more confident than they have ever been certainly over the last 18 months despite uncertainty about the politics in westminster and of course, the start of the brexit negotiations. so watch this space! two italian bank5 are being bailed out by the country‘s government after warnings they were set to fail. it‘s costing more than four and a half billion pounds to rescue the two venice—based banks which the italian prime minister said would protect savers and the italian banking system. new research says uk holiday—makers are spending millions of pounds too much in fees by choosing to pay in pounds on their cards when abroad.
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it is that bit when you get to the till and you have got to choose. the figures from fairfx found that those who pay in pounds for card transactions spend up to £60 more than people who don‘t, every time they go away. so make sure you choose local currency not pounds when you get to the till and you have got to choose how you want to pay. you‘re up—to—date. how you want to pay. you‘re up-to-date. that's one of the most surprising facts i‘ve heard today. it is always confusing because there is pressure when you get to the till and it is which one do you choose? the retailer chooses the exchange rate rather than your bank. if you choose the local currency then it is your bank that will make the fee. there is a space here! all i'm there is a space here! all i‘m left with is a cushion for his back. let‘s see what he‘s up to. we have got some chess news for you.
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you can see our beautiful make—shift chessboard being you can see our beautiful make—shift chessboa rd being rearranged you can see our beautiful make—shift chessboard being rearranged by a until of children. the reason we‘re doing this, it is an ancient game and used to be taught to kings to help with military strategy, now it‘s about maths and problem solving and 800 primary schools added chess to the curriculum. we have got a game of boys against girls going on here. who won that game? the boys managed to win that one. let me introduce you to this young gentleman, mr david hardy, who is the manchester co—ordinator for chessin the manchester co—ordinator for chess in schools. 800 schools then have added chess to the curriculum. primary schools. did you expect it to be quite so popular? well, not really, no. we started off with a low—tar get and we have had to increase the targets. it has grown incredibly. it hes with maths and with problem solving. what have you seen with problem solving. what have you seen about the difference it makes to children in terms of ta learning experience? i mean learning is great. don‘t get me wrok, but
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educational, the most important thing is we see life skill development. we see them learn how to lose, how to win, how to respect the opponent, discipline, concentration, all those things that we ta ke concentration, all those things that we take as adults as a given.” concentration, all those things that we take as adults as a given. i can imagine people watching are saying it is fine to say let‘s teach chess in schools, it is for children who go to in schools, it is for children who gotoa in schools, it is for children who go to a certain school and have a certain academic level? there are some schools that do that, however in the inner city schools there are children that don‘t achieve academically, but when they play chess they suddenly switch on and they really take to the game. let's have a word with po teches grand masters. you had a massive chess argument about who won. did you decide the boys won. do you enjoy it? yes, we enjoy it. when you have your lessons, is it one on one or
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together or learn as a group? sometimes it's tournaments and sometimes you do one on one with whoever you want to. from your prospective, do you enjoy doing it? do you enjoy playing chess with your friends? we play one or two games because we have an hour. ok. thank you very much for coming down and demonstrating chess. i‘ve got a chess joke to demonstrating chess. i‘ve got a chessjoke to finish. demonstrating chess. i‘ve got a chess joke to finish. i used to work ina chess joke to finish. i used to work in a chesspiece making factory. i did the knight shift. the knight shift. there you go. that went down well, didn‘t it. the knight shift! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. the heat and sunshine of last week will soon seem like a distant
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memory. very unsettled week ahead. all of us will see rain at times. heavy and persistent for some and from next week onwards it will be cooler and fresh across the country. for many today is probably the best day of the week thanks to the high pressure. the weather system in the far west is approaching bringing rain into northern ireland. most of the country having a largely dry day with sunshine but cloud increases from the west later and rain settles into northern ireland. temperatures not much higher than 15 or 16. maybe up to 25 in south—eastern parts of england. this rain could bring a pretty difficult rush hour into northern ireland. it spreads into north west england, wales and scotla nd north west england, wales and scotland overnight. it stays fairly chilly in the northern isles but mild and muggy in southern and central england and parts of wales as well. tomorrow is still complicated. the frontal systems in the west bringing rain to northern
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england and scotland, clearing in northern ireland. low pressure in the continent could bring showers which could merge to bring thundery rain into england and wales. a fairly wet day across much of scotland and some parts of northern england. further south in between the showers we could see sunshine, so the showers we could see sunshine, so holding onto the warmth and humidity, but across scotland are brisk north—easterly wind and it will feel fairly chilly. if you have outdoor plans on wednesday, don‘t make this the last weather forecast that you see. it is a very complex picture with low pressure firmly in charge. current thoughts are for rain on wednesday across england and wales but possibly not into scotland. everywhere will start to feel a bit fresher. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and jamie robertson. the tale of takata. the biggest recall in automotive history leads to the bankruptcy courts. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday 26thjune. japan‘s auto supplier takata has had
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to recall more than 100 million airbags across the world. they‘ve been linked to more than a dozen deaths globally. and forging closer business ties between the world‘s biggest and the world‘s fastest growing economies as the us president welcomes india‘s narendra modi to washington.
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