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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 26, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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lam i am ross aitken is what outside source. part of donald trump's travel ban will come into force. the supreme court has ruled that a 90 day ban on people travelling from six muslim majority countries can apply in some circumstances. we will explain what they are in a moment. more details in the uk's plans for eu citizens after brexit. more details in the uk's plans for eu citizens after brexitlj more details in the uk's plans for eu citizens after brexit. i want to com pletely eu citizens after brexit. i want to completely reassure people that under these plans now eu citizen currently in the uk lawfully will be asked to leave at the point the uk we see you. we want you to stay. the conservative party has cut a deal with northern ireland's democratic unionist party, that means theresa may will have the votes to get laws through parliament as long as all of the mps stay in line. and donald trump welcomes the indian prime minister to the white house, we will take you through what is on the agenda and as usual if you're watching if you have issues you want me to pick up on any of the stories we are covering, abc os is to reach
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us. -- bbc us. —— bbc ors us. —— bbc or s is how to retailers. let's begin with a major political story here in the uk. theresa may has a deal in place to help her government get a parliamentary majority. he's it is being signed by the prime minister's conservative party along with the democratic changes party for northern ireland. this is not a coalition, the dup is not in government in that way. it has agreed to support the government on key votes in parliament such as those on the national budget and multiple times on brexit. needless to say the dup will be getting plenty in return, you can read the entire agreement online. it has been posted by the government but the
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headline figure getting the attention is that northern ireland will get around £1 billion in extra funding over the next two years. that is. $1.3 billion. that has had a mixed response. the other devolved nations are not impress —— impressed. use the welsh first minister saying that they still represent a straight bunk to keep the week prime minister and a faltering government in office. nicola sturgeon said any sense of fairness sacrificed on the altar of gobain eu p deal to let the pm cling to power and scots tories influence in numberten to power and scots tories influence in number ten shown to be zero. it is there to say the government would have predicted that this criticism would have come its way, i haven't talking to eleanor guiney. br insisting that they can afford to make this deal because they are investing elsewhere, for example in the nhs but the criticism has been
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strong from some politicians, in other areas of the letters came in, for example the leader of the welsh assembly calling this cash for votes saying it was a bunker and it wasn't fair, and bitterly the dup have the conservatives over a barrel and they will come back a couple of years' time asking for more money. in scotla nd time asking for more money. in scotland politicians saying we don't mind investment and extra cash for northern ireland, but we need to get some, too, as they get extra money we wa nt some, too, as they get extra money we want some, too. where has the money come from? well the conservatives were determined to get the deal done so they have promised an extra £1 billion for not the dup to spend specifically but for the northern ireland executive to spend andi northern ireland executive to spend and i think the conservatives were pretty keen to make that clear. this money will be spent on infrastructure, education projects, things like that but also there has been some extra flexibility given to
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£500 million of money that was already pledged to northern ireland. yes this money has been promised but it has some criticism, clearly it is a price conservatives were willing to pay because they desperately needed this deal in order to be able to govern. that is one important element today, here is another because the government has released this document in which it gives us a lot of detail on how the uk proposes for eu citizens to live in the uk once brexit has happened. remember once brexit has happened. remember on thursday outside source was live from the eu in brussels before we read an heard the news cube out that theresa may had leased the basics of this proposal. this is her giving is much detail on it. there has been some anxiety about what would happen to eu citizens at the point we leave the eu. todayl to eu citizens at the point we leave the eu. today i want to put that anxiety to rest. i want to
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completely be assure people that under these plans now eu citizen currently in the uk lawfully would be asked to leave at the point the uk leave the eu. we want you to stay. jeremy corbyn from the labour party. the prime minister has dragged the issue of citizens and families deeply into the complex and delicate negotiations of our future trade relations with the eu. she herself has been willing to say this may result in failure. this is not a generous offer. this is confirmation the government is prepared to use people as bargaining chips. we already have some details of this, theresa may on thursday told eu leaders that if anyone from the eu had been in the uk forfive leaders that if anyone from the eu had been in the uk for five years they would get settled status, and that those who have been in the uk for two years would be able to apply for two years would be able to apply for that status but the would not be any guarantees. we wanted to the
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difference between what we were told of 30 and what we have been told today, he was eleanor. there are still some questions that remain u na nswered still some questions that remain unanswered and that is because some of the issues associated with these reciprocal rights are going to have to be sorted out in the negotiations between the uk government and those in brussels but we do know from what the prime minister said in the commons today that eu citizens who have been living here in the uk lawfully for at least five years, they will get this settled status and they will also be able to bring over their children and spouses as well. they will be able to work, live and also have access to certain benefits like health care and pensions, so quite similar rights the government is claiming to what british citizens get. but there is already a row brewing over who's going to apply the rules for this new system. will it be british laws as the government here once? will it bejudges in the european court
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as the government here once? will it be judges in the european court of justice? or perhaps could it be a combination of the two? some sort of international jurisdiction. combination of the two? some sort of internationaljurisdiction. the -- it is interesting how cool the reaction was in the eu. now we have the lead negotiator on brexit for the lead negotiator on brexit for the eu tweeting today, the eu goal of citizens rights, same level protection as an eu law, one ambition clarity and guarantees needed than in today's uk position. this is not a done deal at all. that right, there was a pretty lukewarm response last week when theresa may was in brussels setting out the broad outline, then we have had this treat today which shows i think that things have not gone down quite that much better, the —— the european parliament will vote on this final deal and it's brexit coordinator said today that the document contained limitations that were worrisome and he thinks eu citizens staying in the uk should have a state is above that of immigrants from non—european countries. state is above that of immigrants from non-european countries. alan
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watson as in yorkshire asking other any circumstances and which this money in the dup conservative deal go straight to the dup? far as i can see that no circumstances under which happens. the government and conservative party are saying the money will go to the executive in northern ireland, and be spent on northern ireland, and be spent on northern ireland, and be spent on northern ireland as a whole, it will not in any point be funnelled through any one party. we will learn about the practicalities as a deal plays out. and to a big announcement in the us because part of donald trump's travel ban will now take effect, this is because of an intervention by the us supreme court, they have also confirmed it will rule on the band's overall legality in october. he made a member when the ban was announced that was a 90 day ban from people coming from six muslim countries, and on top of that there was a
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proposed 120 day ban on refugee applications. the supreme court today has said that foreign nationals with a relationship through personal identity in the us can come in, but if you do not have a connection to the us you will not be coming in as goal of the lightest, he is saying that the unanimous decision is a clear victory for national security. that is ruling allows me an important tool for protecting our nation ‘s homeland. let's find out exactly what this means. on the refugee issue, as the supreme court supported that 120 bad? the supreme court talked about the refugee issue as well and the details of this lifting of the stay on the ban applied to the refugee issue as well s0 applied to the refugee issue as well so refugees who are coming into the united states who have existing relatives in the us or have jobs
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lined up coming in with some sort of student die, as coming in with those connections they can come in but otherwise the supreme court said that donald trump can suspend the refugee programme for that set period of time. the also endorsed the trump administration loading the total ca p the trump administration loading the total cap on refugees coming into the us down to a 50,000 refugees although they said the cap could be exceeded if the number includes refugees who have these won a fight, the template, ties the united states. along this battle has gone on the more politically valuable outcome became. absolutely, this had been pointed to since the beginning of donald trump's presidency as a key political battle. donald trump was criticised for what was seen as someone “— was criticised for what was seen as someone —— for a ham—handed roll—out of his immigration policy, there was chaos in the airport if you remember because the immigration officials
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did not quite know how to implement the details of this policy. he second immigration travel ban as he template was somewhat more ordered ina template was somewhat more ordered in a trivial but it got suspended by the court fairly quickly. now the man security department say they will be the ban in a professional manner, and they will try to inform airlines and the immigration officials on how to do it in a prompt and professional manner.m the odd situation where it is likely to come in, will pass through in 90 days and then the supreme court will decide if it was legal all along? exactly, and the courtjustice has made a specific provision in this order they have released saying that they want to consider whether the whole challenge was moot and i assume that is because the 90 day rule would have expired so they could take a look at this, the lawyers could make arguments and they could decide that the trump
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administration has had plenty of time to permit changes in immigration law so the original order should have expired and then you might get a brand—new legal battle on whatever the trump administration comes up with in the meantime. the court said they should go ahead with the executive review and implement the policies would have decided on them. thank you. we have decided on them. thank you. we have wired reports now from washington and westminster, we are going to turn in the next few minutes to mosul the of iraq. senior commanders have been telling bbc news that the fight for the city is entering its final stages. nationwide safety checks are being undertaken on high—rise buildings after the grenfell tower fire. the government has said all samples of cladding received from the high—rise buildings and 26 local authority areas have failed fire safety tests.
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in an update to mps following the fire this is sided janet with more details. the cladding from 75 high—rise buildings and 26 local authorities has filled the combustibility test. i know members will rightly want to know if the residents are affected and my department will publish regular updates on the government website. the fact that all samples have so far failed underlines the value of the testing programme and the vital importance of submitting samples urgently. i am concerned about the speed at which samples are being submitted. i would urge all landlords to submit the samples immediately. on thursday we were live from brussels but today we are back in our usual spot. our lead story is
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that donald trump is hailing the supreme court decision to implement pa rt supreme court decision to implement part of his travel ban, he says it isa part of his travel ban, he says it is a victory for national security. to pick up some of the main stories from the world service, in china more than 90 people are still missing after a landslide at the weekend in the sichuan province. at least ten bodies have been recovered but rescuers do not expect to find anyone else alive. bbc burmese report that police in me and mark and thailand have found more than $800 million worth of illegal drugs. it was burnished to tie in with the un's the against drug abuse. the court of madrid has ordered that the body of salvador dali be exchanged to get the any samples for a paternity suit, a spanish woman claims that she is his daughter and that her mother had an affair with him. let's go back to washington because the indian prime minister has arrived at the white house to meet donald trump in the past few
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minutes. here's the moment the two men met. you can see mullaly at camp getting ready to beat the indian prime minister as well. some would say that you have any as they both portray themselves as outsiders, outside of the political elite, both campaigns to bring jobs back into the economy, both have huge followings on social media, too, with over 30 million followers each. this is what donald trump said a few months ago. it is a great honour to have a minister modi, who has been such a great prime minister. i had been speaking with him and reading about you and you have done a great job. economically. india is doing very well. i would like to congratulate you. i would like to congratulate you. i would like to congratulate you. i would like to congratulate you very much. let's bring in our correspondent from bbc
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hindi who is live from washington. in the indian prime minister looked very relaxed as he got out of the car. he was received very warmly by the president and first lady and that would have gone down as a good start for the indian officials, and also the kind of praise that the two leaders lavished on each other seems to be fine. what i did sense was it was a very formal sort of meeting compare to the great prime minister modi and president obama used to meet, it had taken a while but they we re meet, it had taken a while but they were on first terror —— first name terms and the way a minister modi was addressing president trump, it is difficult to translate what he said in hindi to english but it was almost very close to honourable president, but again so far so good. donald trump mentioned the indian economy because mr trump has been critical of free trade, has been protectionist in his approach to
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americanjobs protectionist in his approach to american jobs and american industry, does that pose a threat to the indian economy? that has been a concern for the indian economy and particularly president trump has been talking about the trade surplus, with several other countries and that includes india. prime minister modi, one of his challenges is to ensure president —— to assure president trump that india isa to assure president trump that india is a partner, andy nicol needled for the wall streetjournal today there we re the wall streetjournal today there were hints of how the two countries can work together increasing jobs and he gave examples of how india is importing $40 billion worth of gas and this is for its energy needs and the defence still being signed, the state department issued a statement that a helicopter deal was worth more than $300 million and had just been signed. these are the things
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that would go down well as far as president trump is concerned and he also mentioned that indian companies are investing big time, in at least 35 states in the us so one has to see how that plays in the trump white house. what are they up to through the day? after about an hour or so through the day? after about an hour or so the issued a joint statement for the reporters and then there is a working dinner at around six o'clock local time at the white house, which the white house officials say is a special thing that in fact the first official dinner that has been thrown for a visiting foreign dignitary and even the indians have really appreciated that and then prime minister outside source leaves for the netherlands this evening. we appreciate the update, thank you. often broadcasting from here in london i talk about the advantages of being
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so talk about the advantages of being so close to my colleagues from bbc world service, those advantages extend around the world because along with anthony and other collea g u es along with anthony and other colleagues in the washington newsroom there are lots of representatives from the bbc world service like rajesh from bbc hindi. talking about yesterday matter mash, reported reaction to a study that has been going for a couple of days now. the demand that saudi arabia and its allies are making of qatar, you may well have saw them, strong demand, the us secretary of state rex tillotson says some of these demands will be difficult to meet. that is not putting it mildly. there are 13 of them in total and they include entirely closing the al jazeera tv network, funded by qatar, and saudi arabia and others want a turkish military base in doha to be close, talking of qatar are very close, talking of qatar are very close and that is a huge ask. and they want relations between qatar and iran to be cooled. when you better mind that iran and qatar share huge natural resources that
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also would be very difficult and all love that comes off the back of diplomatic ties been cut with qatar area number of diplomatic ties been cut with qatar are a number of gulf countries. they claim qatar is funding terrorism, qatar says that is not true. earlier i spoke to a correspondent to get help in working out what the american position is. there is a difference in approach between the white house and the state department, you had president trump coming down firmly on the side of the saudis and the welfare of allies against qatar, seeing this as a way to fade against financing to terrorism and this would be a way to fight terrorism effectively and then you have the state department would have tried to take a much more neutral nuanced position and the secretary of state has been involved, not in a formal mediation but certainly a lot of contacts with the gulf arab states on both sides trying to get this resolution, this
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crisis resolved and you had some quite strongly worded statements from him last week saying to the saudis and allies, come up with your demands, why are you waiting around? we are beginning to think it is not about terrorism, it is about a long—standing political disputes that you're trying to air, and whether the mad committee said some of those look quite difficult for qatar to meet but at the same time there is some basis for you to start talking in june and there is some basis for you to start talking injune and the dialogue and a complete inclusion here. so it is something that the state department wishes was resolved and is trying to press the different parties to do so, you have the qatari foreign minister in town and he will be meeting with secretary tillotson tomorrow. but at the moment the state department is not really putting forward a formal mediation, they are not organising a joint meeting of the parties to try to bang some heads together. they're seeing you guys need to do this but
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we are monitoring it closely. there is another thing i would like to run value, copied from the reuters news agency, saying the us chairman of the senate foreign affairs related midi said he would withhold consent for us arms sales to members of the gulf cooperation council until the path forward to resolving the discipline —— the dispute in the region. if that were to happen that would hurt some of those countries you are trying to pressure qatar. —— who are trying to pressure qatar.m would also act qatar because he did not say which gulf countries they would withhold weapons from. it is interesting the way you are seeing congress a more activist under this administration, taking stands and pressing issues if they feel the white house is straying from traditionalforeign policy white house is straying from traditional foreign policy or if they feel the state department is being ineffectual. in this case mr corcora n being ineffectual. in this case mr corcoran said he strongly supported resident on's reserves to saudi arabia in which there been a unifying statement about fighting terrorism, but now we hear there was
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a dispute and things were not happening as they should and until the dead then congress would withhold consent on the weapons sales which is quite a strong tool of leverage that they have and it would be something that people in the region would take notice of. let's talk about jakarta, and japanese company that is behind the biggest recall in the car industry's yesterday. it has filed for ba n kru ptcy yesterday. it has filed for bankruptcy and that is because it is facing billions of dollars in liabilities because of defective airbags. these airbags have been linked to at least 17 deaths worldwide. let's bring in a correspondent from europe. my first thought when i was reading about the story was to those people making claims because of injuries or death relating to these airbags, do they now lose the chance of getting any money? elmer that is definitely not the case, what is happening as the company has set aside $850 million. this is all part of an agreement
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with the us department ofjustice. the problem was that the sum was not good to cover the scale of this event, of this recall, and that was pa rt event, of this recall, and that was part of what was the issue. in going forward with this bankruptcy process and it is a process involving court in delaware in the us and also in japan, they are selling some of the assets to an american firm that is chinese owned but the rest of the assets relating to these airbags they will continue to make those so that they can issue replacements forecasters are still on the road and still affected. to be clear for those watching, the airbags have been a lot of different manufacturers cars? yes, you're talking multiple car companies, not just one manufacturer, so the likes
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of honda amongst others who have been affected by this and that is why they have very little support, if you like, or allies, feeling much synergy if you like, or allies, feeling much synergy for them, bmw and toyota, they have all been involved in the three calls and it has been a huge black eye, really, forjapan's an industry, once they were wanted for the technical agility and now of course that has all come under question and you're seeing as i mentioned this us rival key safety systems buying them up. the chinese owned american company now buying a gaining a foothold in the japanese car industry. thank you. that ends this first half of outside source, i'll be back with you in a couple of minutes time. welcome along to the latest update ona number of
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welcome along to the latest update on a number of stories from motocross world that have caught the eye of late. let's get into the south—western corner of the states where the story has been one of searing heat with temperatures in excess of 40 degrees. tuesday offers a little bit of relief as the beautiful back by two or three degrees. by the middle part of the week we are looking a little bit further away towards the north—east because that figures any of low pressure will come to respond quite a bit of thunderstorm activity. some of those really quite violent so we could see damaging hail and gusty wind. some of those elements are offer as the monsoon cloth this time offer as the monsoon cloth this time of year works across asia. at the top end of the arabian sea it may have the effect of enhancing the seed pods —— the seasonal rains across the south—eastern quarter of pakistan and into the north—western india. again the ring totals can mount up, couple of hundred litres per day. it is distinctly possible and brings the danger of flooding and brings the danger of flooding and landslides. it is that sort of combination that has caused such
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devastation, you may well have seen the images from sichuan. that came about because this monsoon trough here sits at this time all over central and southern parts of china andjapan. central and southern parts of china and japan. these latest pictures coming in from unam, and japan. these latest pictures coming infrom unam, extraordinary amount of rain falling over a prolonged period and it is the amountand prolonged period and it is the amount and persistence that has caused such problems across the central and southern parts of china. and through tuesday you will notice that one front pushes into the very first side of japan that one front pushes into the very first side ofjapan as well. that one front pushes into the very first side of japan as well. because that system is such a barrier between cooler air of the north and the warm moist air to the south we can see up the warm moist air to the south we can see up to 300 litres per day following, that is why flooding and landslides had such a persistent problem. by comparison things look fairly quiet across europe, this chart looks rather benign and even when i put in the territory profile none of those temperatures really
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catch the eye. but i take you from tuesday, 22 for example in warsaw, so tuesday, 22 for example in warsaw, so you had as far as wednesday and we're so you had as far as wednesday and we're up to 29 degrees or something is going on and those are billed widely across central and eastern parts of europe at this stage in the plymouth heat extends towards the agm. when i had in the greater rainfall as well even on this scale you can sense something is going on with these very livid colours indeed. all over the alpine region. at the extent to lombardy as well. they could be on wednesday we say up to 200 millimetres of rain falling, that will be a problem because it followed that market falls on heavy ground so fast flooding is problem. —— flash flooding is a problem. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. part of donald trump's travel ban will come into force. the supreme court has ruled that a 90—day ban on people travelling from six muslim majority countries
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can apply in some circumstances. iraqi forces are closing in on so called islamic state in the heart of mosul — one commander has said the battle could be over in days. the bbc has been on the front line. the fight here is that extremely close quarters. this is the most forward position the iraqi troops have. they tell us the nearest is emplacement isjust have. they tell us the nearest is emplacement is just 50 metres away. two and a half weeks after the uk general election, theresa may finally has a deal that will allow her to get laws through parliament. her conservative party will be supported by northern ireland's
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