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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 26, 2017 9:30pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. part of donald trump's travel ban will come into force. the supreme court has ruled that a 90—day ban on people travelling from six muslim majority countries can apply in some circumstances. iraqi forces are closing in on so called islamic state in the heart of mosul — one commander has said the battle could be over in days. the bbc has been on the front line. the fight here is that extremely close quarters. this is the most forward position the iraqi troops have. they tell us the nearest is emplacement isjust have. they tell us the nearest is emplacement is just 50 metres away. two and a half weeks after the uk general election, theresa may finally has a deal that will allow her to get laws through parliament. her conservative party will be supported by northern ireland's democratic unionist party. the nobel peace laureate, liu xiaobo, has been released from prison by the chinese authorities. but that's only after he was diagnosed with terminal liver cancer. we will also update you on what
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north korea has been saying in response to a south korean invitation to co—host the 2018 winter olympics. let's go to mosul, in iraq, now. we have covered the story many times in the last three years. back in 2014 the islamic state group seized the whole city. in october iraqi forces mounted an offensive to retake it. these are the maps we have been collecting along the way. you can see how the territory marked in red controlled by is has got smaller and smaller and smaller as the months have gone by. now we have this map,
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provided by the iraqi military i should say, this area is still controlled by is, we estimate it to be 2.5 square kilometres in the centre of mosul. the bbc‘s team of 0rla guerin, nico hameon, bader catty and rich stacey, have exclusive access to the battle area. here's their report. gunfire heading to the front line in mosul. you have to run. and beware of snipers, troops from iraq's emergency response division are advancing every day. the target here, the hospital complex. we move deeper into the battle, getting a chance to see how the fight is being taken to the so—called islamic state. urban warfare at its most intimate. near enough to throw a
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hand grenade. then this. well, the fight here is that extremely close quarters. this is the most forward position the iraqi troops have. they tell us the nearest is position isjust 15 metres away and when they are firing here at the distance is so small that sometimes they can see the faces of the is militants. the troops here, mostly young, determined to end a reign of terror. daesh came and killed civilians, says harley. they destroyed life in the city. 0ur duty is to bring mosul back to life —— ali. here is the
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hospital building where commanders say about 200 foreign militants are holed up, including some britons. "that's what our intelligence tells us," "that's what our intelligence tells us," says the kernel. "we also heard them speaking on the radio, we can tell their nationality from that." iraqi drones monitor their movements if they dare to move at all. here militants run from building to building in the vast medical complex looking for a cover. commanders tell us looking for a cover. commanders tell us there are french, russians and chechens here as well as the british. they say there are three senior is leaders along with them trapped below ground. now that the caliphate is turning to ash their positions, being pounded from above, with a series of air strikes. we counted three in an hour. it's the
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final push against an enemy that once controlled the third of iraq. 0 rla once controlled the third of iraq. 0rla guerin, bbc news, mosul. 0ften 0rla guerin, bbc news, mosul. often when the islamic state group is under pressure it launches counterattacks. that's also been seen counterattacks. that's also been seenin counterattacks. that's also been seen in mosul in recent days. for more on this i spoke with rasha qandeel from bbc arabic. she has been taking me through the latest counteroffensive is that we have seen. this tactic has been used before, the counterattacks by the what is called islamic state, it has been used before, the highest scale in 2016. the tactic is as follows. when they feel really surrounded and targeted and they don't know where to go they go underground, use tunnels and appear somewhere else. this has been used before. the only problem about this with islamic state is they have lots of foreign fighters amongst them and these people cannot mingle with civilians because they will look different. so most of those are trying to escape through those tunnels to go to
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syria, and probably this is the point where they will have to do this. if they do that, the number remaining of the fighters will be very limited and then they can be targeted more easily. are there are civilians in the area still controlled by is? a lot of them and this number, whether it's the 800 metres or one kilometre to 1.5 kilometres, have tens of thousands of syrians according to the un in iraq, and this will mean that if the same weapons have been used by the coalition, which is basically heavy weapons, airforce coalition, which is basically heavy weapons, air force coverage, coalition, which is basically heavy weapons, airforce coverage, this is non—selective weapons so basically they will target everyone, destroy they will target everyone, destroy the whole area and this will have a huge risk on the civilians there in the region. what is the iraqi government saying about its tactics, bearing in mind all of these people that are in the middle of it? what they said before in east mosul that was much easier to fight than in west mosul, they say they will
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differentiate between civilians and fighters and open safe passages for civilians but if you look at it it's very difficult to do that, given that everywhere else is basically like it's under siege. even if civilians managed to try and get out of the passages there is no guarantee there will not be fighters amongst them, there is no guarantee they will not be used by any side of they will not be used by any side of the fighting. what the iraqi government is saying is wishful thinking but on the ground it is difficult to achieve. some of the civilians caught up in the fighting in iraq. we know that the fighting in iraq. we know that the fighting in iraq. we know that the fighting in iraq and neighbouring syria has led to millions of people fleeing into neighbouring countries like lebanon. we are going to look at the experience of one family which has had to do that and look at the issue of medical care. the un says covering all of the costs of medical ca re covering all of the costs of medical care that refugees need is proving incredibly hard. the bbc‘s lina sinjab spoke with one family of syrian refugees, whose son is being treated for cancer. it is playtime for ammash ammash,
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but his playground is a hospital ward. at four years old, he has been receiving chemotherapy for most of his life for leukaemia. the doctor tries to cheer him up, while doing a regular checkup. but it is still too painful. ammash and his family come from minbij, in war—torn aleppo. his father works as a handyman and hardly makes enough to feed his family. he tells me that the un doesn't cover cancer treatment and he has been seeking ngos‘ help for the last two weeks. making only $500 a month, he says that having to pay $330 each week for his son's chemo just isn't possible. ammash‘s treatment so far has
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been provided by a small charity, karma, forfree. relying on donations from individuals, they are often faced with tough financial decisions, like having to stop treating a child. dr layal issa is one of the volunteers who established karma. actually, we are their only hope for having the chance to live, to survive their battle with this cancer. you have lost children you have treated? yes, the last one was a little girl, farah, she was two years old. she had neuroblastoma, we covered her treatment, but she relapsed and, at some point, we ran out of funds for her so we had to stop her treatment, so she had to get back to syria to get treatment
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there but unfortunately, she passed away. going back to syria would be the last resort for ammash, and the odds are not good. there are almost no cancer medication left in the country. ammash, although born in syria, has no memory of his own country and has never seen the war that has torn it apart. if money can be found, if he survives cancer, he will still face the uncertain future of every syrian — waiting for the day they can return home. lina sinjab, bbc news, beirut. background information on the conflicts in syria and iraq available whenever you want to access it on the bbc news website. earlier in the programme we spoke to anthony in our washington newsroom
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and we will go back to him shortly because we have breaking news. the congressional budget office is estimating that 22 million americans will be uninsured in 2026 under the health care bill that is being proposed by the republicans, considered by the senate as a replacement for 0bamacare. let's bringing anthony who is digesting all of this in washington. this is similar to be estimates we saw with the last version of the health care rebels, isn't it? exactly, the bill in the house of representatives you mentioned, the estimate on that bill said there would be 23 million additional uninsured as of 2026, difference of only1 million uninsured as of 2026, difference of only 1 million americans, uninsured as of 2026, difference of only1 million americans, and if you remember donald trump in a meeting with republicans reportedly called that house bill too mean, and here we have a senate bill that will result in an equal number, or a close to equal number of uninsured.
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it does have greater financial savings than the house bill. the estimate says 202 billion more than the house bill estimated in net savings, the total savings over the next nine years in the senate bill would be $321 billion, primarily from significant cuts in medicaid, the health insurance programme for the health insurance programme for the poor. there is a 26% reduction according to the cbo in medicated spending, a fairly significant decrease when you consider the fact that the american population is growing and health care costs are rising. does this change the arithmetic in the senate as we go towards a vote? it's going to make it very difficult for some of the senators who have a large number of residents of their estates on the medicaid rolls to support this bill, people like susan collins of maine, alaska, nevada,
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those are all considered if the votes, and i don't think this will help them at all. the cbo estimates said they would be 50 million additional americans in 2018 who don't have health insurance but lots of those americans will not be forced to buy americans stomach insurance. 0bama force all americans to have health care, have health insurance. the senate is already changing their bill to create an incentive for americans to buy health insurance, if they cannot get back onto the health insurance market for six months if they let it lapse. these changes might affect these numbers somewhat. it is a moving target, you'll hear from republicans that they are not done and they will take into consideration the plan and hopefully get the moderate senators back on board. anthony, on the face of it, making the case for millions of americans losing health care is not an easy case to make that the republicans will believe this is the best thing
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for americans and america so what is the argument? the argument republicans are making is that there isa republicans are making is that there is a famous of waste in the medicaid programme for the poor and they would rather take the money and give it to states and do with it as they see fit and not have it be a federal government programme that is setup, the guidelines by the federal government, where it could not be suited for individual populations. the reason why there is such a steep decrease in medicaid funding over the next ten years in the republican plan is because they want to hand off this obligation to the states to manage, they say that is a much better way to go about it and they wa nt to better way to go about it and they want to decrease taxes which they say will help the economy and get americans back to work. they have a different perspective from the democrats and certainly a different perspective from the democrats who instituted 0bamaca re who perspective from the democrats who instituted 0bamacare who were looking at driving up the total number of americans who had health insurance. i don't think we will get you back in the next hour but you never know. thank you forjoining us. never know. thank you forjoining us. just to reiterate what anthony was talking about, the breaking news
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that the congressional budget office has estimated that 22 million americans would be uninsured for health care by 2026 under the senate health care by 2026 under the senate health bill being considered. it would replace 0bamaca re health bill being considered. it would replace 0bamacare where it to be voted through. it hasn't been voted through yet, as anthony explained, and the numbers are tight but this estimate from the congressional budget office says 22 million americans by 2026 without insurance because of these reforms being brought in. in a few minutes on 0utside source we will talk to you about a story from china, nobel peace prize winner liu xiaobo, has been released from a chinese prison, but only after he was diagnosed with terminal cancer. the former mp who called for an inquiry after a fire in his constituency in 1999 has said authorities in england didn't take his recommendations into consideration. brian donohoe represented an area in ayrshire
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where a man was killed in a high—rise fire. the fire in this 1a story high—rise in irving in1999 the fire in this 1a story high—rise in irving in 1999 left one man dead and five others injured. the blaze started on the fourth floor of the cladding caught fire. the local mp called for a parliamentary inquiry. i had surgeries that woeful afterwards by people who wanted to get out of these flats as soon as was possible. it was understood there were a number of properties of a similar nature in other parts of scotland, i will not name them, but they were changed as well, the cladding taken away that was causing the problem. after the fire in 1999 the problem. after the fire in 1999 the inquiry was held by the environment committee at westminster and reported in the year 2000. the building scotland act received royal assentin building scotland act received royal assent in 2003 and regulations published in 2004 and came into force the next year. in 1999 when there was a very tragic fire in
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ferri it led to a revisiting of regulations that meant that all cladding in high—rise dwellings had to be noncombustible. it became mandatory that every building must be designed and constructed in such a way that the spread of fire on the external walls of the building is inhibited. the scottish government has said no local authority or housing association high—rise flats in scotland used the cladding installed on grenfell tower. brian donohoe believes that english authorities failed the people who lived there. it really does stick in my cruel, having done the inquiry, there was one in 1995 that was exactly the same situation and there has been others since, and yet government, i think, has been others since, and yet government, ithink, were has been others since, and yet government, i think, were remiss in their responsibilities and duties to their responsibilities and duties to the people that were there in these properties. we're not going to have a situation where there is any blame
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put on my shoulders, i have a clear conscience but there must be people going to bed at night without that, i have to say that. there will be further investigations into the safety of all aspects of scottish high—rises and a holyrood committee will take evidence in september after the parliamentary recess. katrina renton, bbc news. this is 0utside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is: donald trump is hailing the us supreme court's decision to implement parts of his travel ban as a victory for national security. new zealand have won this america's cup. they beat the reigning champions 0racle team usa — 7—1 in the finals series.
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iam not i am not mystic meg but i thought i worked this one out, team 0racle looked far too strong. going back for yea rs looked far too strong. going back for years they were not too strong, at the time the same teams went up against each other and it was 8— wa nted against each other and it was 8— wanted emirates team new zealand and they lost 9—8, in 2013, jimmy spit hill who was the captain of team 0 ra cle hill who was the captain of team 0racle usa, he became the youngest ever skipper of an america's cup team. vizier pieter bulling, 26 yea rs of team. vizier pieter bulling, 26 years of age, he has won an olympic gold medal as well. there he is on the left. —— pieter bulling. the most interesting thing to come out of this, instead of using grinders as initially stomach normally in sailing, they have cyclers, something brand—new that came into the sport with emirates team new zealand. it is remarkable when you look at what happened. the man who came in, simon van pelt hoven who won an olympic medal in 2012 in
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london, all of a sudden becomes a track cyclist medallist and all of a sudden he has won the america's cup. this is the oldest event in sporting history going back to 1857 and the trophy is ever so slightly bigger than the nhl stanley cup, so what a trophy to lift. interesting to hear you mention the fact cyclists are getting involved because there was discussion before this about whether the system would work. you would suspect that that will cross over to being the norm. yougov act in 1983 when australia won it with the winged keel, something quite remarkable. that was taken on board by teams further on. it is transitional when you look at what is happening in sailing and you would expect people will look at this in the future because clearly it has worked. they have won it ever so it has worked. they have won it ever so easily. thank you forjoining us. i will speak to you during the week. john mcenroe has claimed serena williams would be ranked 700 in the world if she played on the men's circuit. mcenroe had said serena was the best women's player ever
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but when asked why he felt the need to say best "female player ever" — this is what he had to say. if she played the men's circuit she would be like 700 in the world. that doesn't mean i think i don't think serena williams is an incredible player, i do, serena williams is an incredible player, ido, but serena williams is an incredible player, i do, but the reality of what happened on a given day as serena williams competes, i believe, because she is so incredibly strong mentally. if she had tojust because she is so incredibly strong mentally. if she had to just play the men's circuit that would be an entirely different story. maybe at some point a women's tennis player can be better than anybody. ijust haven't seen it in any other sport andi haven't seen it in any other sport and i haven't seen it in tennis. i'm not sure what point he is trying to make but there you go, i will let you make your own mind up. north korea has refused an offerfrom south korea, to co—host the 2018 winter olympics. here's the head of the north's olympic committee. translation: people keep asking
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about co—hosting the pyeongchang winter olympics as we have the ski resort, however, as an expert of the olympic games i think it is a little bit too late. that's easier said than done. the practical problems are not that simple. let's talk about the nobel peace laureate liu xiaobo. in 2009 he was sentenced to 11 years in prison for organising a petition calling for an end to one—party rule in china. today he was released from a prison hospital — only after being diagnosed with terminal liver cancer. stephen mcdonell. the release from jail of china's winner of the nobel peace prize is absolutely huge news for this country, not that most people here will hear about it, though, because discussion about this world—famous activist is blocked in the state—run media. liu xiaobo has been allowed to leave prison following a diagnosis of late stage terminal
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liver cancer. in fact, diagnosis of late stage terminal liver cancer. infact, he's diagnosis of late stage terminal liver cancer. in fact, he's been in a hospital in the north—east of the country for five weeks now. liu xiaobo has been a constant thorn in the side of the chinese communist party since his involvement in the student movement in 1989 in and around tiananmen square. but when he and others got together and put together a manifesto called charter 08, with a specific plan to overhaul the government this was too much for the government this was too much for the authorities here and they put him behind bars for attempting to subvert him behind bars for attempting to su bvert state him behind bars for attempting to subvert state power. translation: as an honest intellectual with self—respect it was inevitable that i would write something which is antiestablishment. following the tiananmen square crackdown liu xiaobo was offered asylum inside the australian embassy, but when he got to the front gate he didn't go in. deciding instead to stay in his country and try and change it from
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within. for this he's paid a terrible price. that'sjust about within. for this he's paid a terrible price. that's just about it for this edition of outside source. we've been covering the new deal between the conservative party and democratic unionist party in the uk. this is an arrangement which means the dup will support theresa may and her government on key pieces of legislation like the budget and on multiple bills relating to brexit. we have also had some breaking news in the last few minutes, a significant announcement in the us from the congressional budget office saying if the proposed republican health—care reform comes in, we could be looking at 22 million americans becoming uninsured by 2026. that will intensify the debate around the health care reform before some of the key hills. thank you for watching and i will see you tomorrow at the same time. bye bye. hello. this time last week we were
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talking about record—breaking temperatures possibly across the uk, and infact temperatures possibly across the uk, and in fact we saw the hottest day since 1976. in the middle of last week we had 35 celsius. this week temperatures will be down considerably, the maximum high expected to be 25 celsius and guess what, we had it already on monday. in fact the rest of the week looks pretty changeable. some spells of heavy rain moving in, breezy, if not windy at times, and it will feel noticeably fresher. the first culprit, the area of low pressure moving in as we speak, gradually drifting north and east steadily through scotland through the early morning. it could bring heavy rain in the central belt during the early morning rush—hour. behind, some sharp, heavy and thundery downpours in northern ireland and maybe as thundery downpours in the south—east andi thundery downpours in the south—east and i suspect it will be humid through tuesday, 22 degrees is the height already feeling fresher,
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11-17d height already feeling fresher, 11—17d likely further north. as we move out of tuesday into wednesday we see a rash of showers, plenty of water to keep the gardeners and growers happy, breathing a sigh of relief as we see rain pushing across england and wales and into northern ireland, it stays predominantly dry in the night—time period in the far north of scotland. we start wednesday with a pretty unsettled picture again, as low pressure sits close to the uk and the north sea and it will continue pushing the rain across england and will see in particular. that is where the heaviest of the rain is likely to be, may be infringing northern ireland, scotland seeing the best of the dry weather but the wind will swing round to a north—easterly, fresher, 13 degrees on the east coast, highest values of 20 in the south—east corner. as we move through wednesday towards thursday, the low pressure sits in the north sea still influencing the story and the weather front will be with us for quite some time, again the wind direction will make it feel cooler
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coming from the north, and a band of cloud and rain in the northern ireland and scotland, in the south some sunshine and some showers and highs of 21. the weather front sinks south again and the wind direction changes subtly, but that could play its part during the day on friday as the rain continues to drift steadily south, we could see temperatures starting to climb insulted areas of scotland, and if you want more details you can find it on the website. we could see 19 and maybe 19 in the south—east corner. that front finally clears on friday into saturday and we see more of a north westerly flow, brief reach for a time before the next area of low pressure comes in, so you time before the next area of low pressure comes in, so you get the general theme and pattern for the rest of next week. not a bad day potentially on saturday before more wet weather moves in from the west. so, what is happening? thejet strea m so, what is happening? thejet stream has ta ken so, what is happening? thejet stream has taken quite in dive to the south of the uk, and that is allowing more of a northerly flow,
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cooler and fresher feel across the uk, and it is also allowing for these low pressures to move in from these low pressures to move in from the atlantic. as we move towards the weekend it evens out, the lows in the north and maybe something a little warmer and drier in the south. but for the longer term period it does look likely to stay pretty changeable for the early half ofjuly with some rain at times and temperatures about average for where they should be this time of year. more from me at the same time tomorrow. tonight at ten, a deal is done, the dup agrees to support theresa may's government, but it comes at a cost. it's taken 18 days for the parties to agree as the prime minister agrees an extra £1 billion of investment for the province. today we have reached an outcome that is good for the united kingdom, good for northern ireland and allows our nation to move forward to tackle the challenges ahead. but critics say it hinders the search for a power—sharing deal
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at stormont where the executive was suspended six months ago. and there's been strong criticism from the first ministers of scotland and wales who say it's a case of cash for votes. also tonight... the number of high—rise buildings failing fire safety tests rises to 75, and in camden there are new concerns about fire doors.
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