Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 27, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and dan walker. anger over the one billion pound deal between the dup and the conservatives. the agreement is condemned as a bribe — but the government says it could help restore power sharing in northern ireland. good morning, it's tuesday, 27th june. also this morning: the blunder that meant thousands of medical documents were put into storage instead of being sent to hospitals and gps. a bumper pay rise for the queen — a six million pound boost from the taxpayer to help pay for repairs to buckingham palace. are we spending too much on our credit cards and racking up too much debt? the bank of england is expected to say we're borrowing at levels not seen since the financial crisis.
6:01 am
but why? i'll have the details. in sport, with less than a week until wimbledon, heather watson looks in great form. she beat the defending champion dominika cibulkova to reach the last 16 at eastbourne. and we meet the couple on a journey to every single train station across britain. what is it? it's the cutest train i have ever seen! and carol has the weather. showers on the way, some of which will be heavy and boundary but i will be heavy and boundary but i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the government and the democratic unionists insist that the deal agreed at westminster yesterday, makes the restoration
6:02 am
of power—sharing in northern ireland more likely. but other parties say the arrangement — under which northern ireland will receive more than one—billion pounds of extra funding — is nothing more than a bribe. we're joined now by our political correspondent john campbell at stormont, but first let's speak to leila nathoo who's at westminster for us. accusations on most of the front pages of the newspapers today, describing this deal as a £1 billion ride. well, that was the price agreed by theresa may for the support of those ten dup mps. it was the deal 18 days in the making to get theresa may a working majority that she needs to get anything done. that will be spent on things like health, infrastructure, education. yes, it has led to accusations,
6:03 am
especially from wales and scotland that this is simply buying votes with cash. theresa may and the government are saying, look, this is a really good dealfor the uk. it gives the conservatives are working majority in the commons. the deal is supposed to last the majority of parliament but will be subject to review in two years time. it does, for now, give theresa may the authority that she needs to get on with government. how does this affect or how was the consequence of this when it comes to storm on‘s agreement? this is another crucial aspect of this deal has been done with the d p. —— stormont. the power sharing executive has broken down and currently, there was a deal about getting a power—sharing agreement over in stormont. the uk government in westminster is
6:04 am
supposed to be at impartial broker in these talks and there have been accusations and certain fears that because the government here in westminster is doing a deal with the dup to support them on a case—by—case basis on those big votes like brexit, security, things that the government really needs the support of the dup on, then that will affect its brokering of this deal in stormont. we have thursday as the deadline for these talks to get under way. of course, both parties are happy they will be more money for northern ireland but it remains to be seen whether this delicate balancing act will pay off. thank you for the moment. we'll be talking to some conservatives later about this deal, what it means and perhaps the they could pose. just after seven o'clock this morning we'll be speaking to the former work and pensions secretary iain duncan smith. 700,000 medical documents including test results for cancer,
6:05 am
were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1,700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. for every bit of correspondence, they were looking through to see whether there was any harm. they are letting the location know and getting experts to look at it. 1700 odd cases they have identified potential harm. for those cases, they are looking at it more deeply to see if there has been actual harm caused by the delay. the white house has accused the syrian government of preparing for a chemical weapons attack — similar to one in april, in which dozens of people died. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian airbase. in a statement issued last night, the us state department said president assad and his military would pay a heavy price if chemical weapons were used again. 75 high rise buildings, in 26 local authority areas
6:06 am
in england, have now failed fire safety tests ordered after the grenfell tower disaster. of those examined — so far — every single sample has failed. urgent fire testing is continuing on buildings. concerns over external cladding — combined with issues surrounding fire doors, gas pipes and insulation triggered the evacuation of five tower blocks in camden — north london. a following grenfell, we need to ta ke a following grenfell, we need to take a look, nationally, at a whole building regulations, at a fire safety message. —— net —— measures. we have too swiftly encounter to get the information. right now, my priority is i have residents who need somewhere to sleep and i am all—out tried to make sure they are safe and secure. the amount of public money the queen receives to carry out her work as head of state is to increase next year by around eight %, to 82 million. it will help to pay for repairs costing 369—million pounds being carried out at buckingham palace over the next decade.
6:07 am
0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. buckingham palace announced last november it was setting in motion a huge refurbishment programme. it would cost about £369 million over 10 years, and among other things, it will replace wiring, pipework and boilers, which in some cases, haven't been touched for 60 years. according to the palace, they are potentially catastrophic to the building. the palace has given more details about how the extra money will be paid. next year, the soverign grant, money that the palace receives to run buckingham palace, will rise by just over 8%, to £82 million. the refurbishment work on the palace has not started yet. officials say they are still at the planning stage. they hope some preparation work will begin later this summer. the purpose is to secure the future of what they describe as a cherished national asset. critics say it is a waste of money
6:08 am
at a time of austerity. 0ne republican group says royal funding will have risen by 150% since 2012. homophobic bullying at secondary schools and colleges in britain has fallen by a third over the past decade, according to new research. a study by the university of cambridge — commissioned by the gay rights charity, stonewall — says insulting language is less frequent and most schools have policies to prevent attacks. almost half of gay pupils who were questioned said they were bullied. 50 years ago today, the world's first cash machine was installed outside a branch of barclays in enfield, london. now there are 70,000 in the uk, and three million worldwide. the traditional ‘hole in the wall‘ has come a long way in half a century, as simon gompertz reports. 1967, a revolution. the first money from a hole in the wall. you put in a voucher and a code and you got ten
6:09 am
£1 notes. a celebrity at the time had a go and the cash machine was born. this is what we have come to. now, a mini bank. 0n born. this is what we have come to. now, a mini bank. on these once, you can even open a bank account. signing your name, it will take my photo as well. just to prove it is me. this one shows you if someone is looking over your shoulder to steal your pin code, reassurance you might wa nt your pin code, reassurance you might want if they close your branch to replace it with a machine. we only into wards and no bank branch. we used to have about 20,000 bank branches in the uk and soon we will have 4000. smart atms in the future will provide 99% of all the services that people can get from bank branches today. that is not a world eve ryo ne branches today. that is not a world everyone will welcome but the technology unleashed back in the 60s is still transforming the way we
6:10 am
bank half a century later. simon gompertz, bbc news. i'm interested to see how much cash people carry around these days. i'm interested to see how much cash people carry around these dayslj will keep my personal hidden from view, anyway. —— my purse. airport security staff in boston got a bit of a shock when they investigated a suspicious bag — because they came face to face with this nine kilo lobster! the crustacean was very much alive and an airport spokesman confirmed that as the lobster was travelling in a cooler in checked luggage, he was allowed to continue to his final destination — after a quick photo was taken of course! now you have got me wondering about the difference between male and female lobsters which i will check out. i'm sure somebody will tell us as well, our viewers know everything. it so obvious! you look under the right claw! that is a lobster news. should we
6:11 am
get sports news? should we get some heather watson news? we want our good old—fashioned heather watson news? we want our good old —fashioned british heather watson news? we want our good old—fashioned british tennis players to do well in wimbledon. with wimbledon now less than a week away, heather watson looks in great form. she beat a top ten player for only the second time in her career to make it through to the last 16 at eastbourne, knocking out the defending champion dominika cibulkova in straight sets. remember marcus willis? 0h, oh, i 0h, ido. he enjoyed a fairytale run last year at wimbledon, which ended against roger federer on centre court. he won his first round of qualifying for this year's tournament and set up a match against fellow brit liam broady. the pressure's on the british and irish lions this morning as they face new zealand side the hurricanes in wellington this morning.
6:12 am
it's their last tour match before the second test on saturday against the all blacks. and england's women cricketers will hope to bounce back from their shock defeat to india when they play pakistan in the women's world cup today. they are strong favourites after comfortably winning their one—day series last summer. much more on the lions coming up this morning. we will be ahead of their warmup game, their midweek game, it is starting in a couple of hours' time. you are talking about cash and who carries cash. i use my ca rd cash and who carries cash. i use my card for everything, really lazy, a lwa ys card for everything, really lazy, always use my card, always doing that. lately, i have really, useful friend who also has —— alway has cash on them. you know who that use? carol. always has an emergency
6:13 am
fiver. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning! it looks a bit soggy. as we go through today, there will be further rain at times. in the south, we are also looking at some showers coming up, some of which will be thundery. if you were just stepping out, ran across northern ireland, scotland and northern england and parts of wales. 0f ireland, scotland and northern england and parts of wales. of this has been heavy a little bit of surface water and spray on the roads and could have some local issues, something certainly worth bearing in mind. forthe something certainly worth bearing in mind. for the north of scotland, brighter and chilly start. the rain continuing to move out of northern ireland and into northern england. heavy rain across cumbria this morning. as we come into wales, we have the other end of that range and we have another band of light rain stretching across part of the midlands and into southern counties.
6:14 am
quite a lot of clout in places here. equally, some of us are starting off with a bit of sunshine. —— cloud. the sunshine won't necessarily laughed. we have an area of low pressure and its front moving eastwards. here is the other end of it which will bring lack —— rain later into parts of wales and south—west england and then we have another is system coming up from the near continent that, too, will introduce showers which will be heavy and thundery and it will feel quite sticky today with highs of around 20 celsius. not the 25 we had yesterday. as the rain moves away from northern ireland, it will brighten up and we will see a return to sunshine and showers. through this evening and overnight, we still have all of these rain. we have the other band in the west and they shall merge. with the onshore flow, it will feel chilly if you are out early on. generally speaking, temperatures will remain in double
6:15 am
figures overnight more or less across the board. that leads us into tomorrow. if you remember, two areas of low pressure, one from the south and the one going north today will retreat back towards the west with its front amalgamating to produce rain across england and wales and northern ireland. as the rain rotates around the low pressure, you mightfind it rotates around the low pressure, you might find it drier spot in the south—east and also to the north of that in scotland. 0nce south—east and also to the north of that in scotland. once again, along the shoreline, down the north sea coast, it will feel particularly cold, especially if you couple that with the rain. temperatures tomorrow will range between 12 and 13 in the north to highs of 19 in the south. here thursday's picture. we still have the rain extending across scotland, northern england, northern ireland, wales and down across the south—west, not far away from the channel islands and either side of that, something dry and brighter. the bridges are a wee bit disappointing for this stage in the june. —— temperatures. would you like some lobster news
6:16 am
before we do the headlines?m would you like some lobster news before we do the headlines? if you think it is appropriate. before we do the headlines? if you think it is appropriatelj before we do the headlines? if you think it is appropriate. i think it is interesting people are desperate to know how you tell the difference between a mail and female lobster. females are preferred because you can get the roe, the eggs. where the tale meets the thorax there are two antenna like features. the mail features are thicker and harder. the female features are softer and almost feathery. and that area is softer as well. what is that it? that is where the roe is.|j softer as well. what is that it? that is where the roe is. i am trying to decide which lobster toothpick. you asked the difference, thatis toothpick. you asked the difference, that is the difference!” toothpick. you asked the difference, that is the difference! i did not ask the difference, you wanted to know the difference. —— which
6:17 am
lobster to pick. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: northern ireland will receive an extra £1 billion, after theresa may reached a deal with the democratic union party to secure her minority government. it has been revealed that an administrative blunder meant 700,000 nhs documents were sent to a warehouse rather than patients. 0ne one of the things we will be talking a lot about this morning is the deal between the dup and the conservatives, and theresa may. the prime minister has promised extra funding for northern ireland, which has been described as a £1 billion bride on many front pages. the daily telegraph saying the £1 billion for the dup is just telegraph saying the £1 billion for the dup isjust the telegraph saying the £1 billion for the dup is just the start of theresa may has warned the unionists will be back for more money. the front page of the daily mirror, the pm's handshake of shame, they say. the
6:18 am
billion pound bride to crackpots. the front page of the daily express has a little bit on the dup deal but the new way to be diabetes as their main story, and a picture of the queen and prince charles, why royal visitors is booming for the queen and prince charles. we havejust spoken about £6 million increase to help repairs to buckingham palace for the taxpayer. the daily mail talking about schools was bid to sway the general election by attacking tory policies. the way this has happened, according to the daily mail, is in the run—up to the general election on the eighth of june families were sent a series of m essa 9 es june families were sent a series of messages on social media and post by head teachers. looking at the inside pages... i don't know if you noticed this, england play germany today in football. what could possibly go wrong? i am talking about the
6:19 am
england under 21 side playing in poland later this afternoon, at 5pm, andi poland later this afternoon, at 5pm, and i love nothing more than a bit of good old—fashioned exercise. this is the squad filmed at training yesterday with broomsticks doing a bit of twisting and squatting and all sorts of old—fashioned, good old—fashioned exercises. all sorts of old—fashioned, good old-fashioned exercises. classic exercises. classic exercises. they are also practising penalties. they have practised penalties every day from month, apparently. let's hope it is not needed. no big deal to them, they are just doing it. it is not needed. no big deal to them, they arejust doing it. we it is not needed. no big deal to them, they are just doing it. we are starting to see at st george ‘s park the benefits of all the work which has been put in there. google facing a huge fines as part of a long—running investigation by the european commission. it is related to whether google has abused its position, that when you search for something online invariably you use
6:20 am
google, and if it is something you wa nt to google, and if it is something you want to buy it will tend to direct you to its own shopping services. the european commission says that as an unfairabuse of the european commission says that as an unfair abuse of its position and it could find them up to 10% of their revenues. that could be a staggering fine, up to £7 billion. would that hurt google?” staggering fine, up to £7 billion. would that hurt google? i think if you start getting to 10% of someone's revenues it will make a difference but the biggest difference but the biggest difference in the future would be that they had to stop doing it, and that they had to stop doing it, and thatis that they had to stop doing it, and that is making money at the moment. that is one to watch. staying with technology, facebook is getting into online videogames as far as things like netflix and amazon prime, creating its own content. it will spend $3 million an episode producing higher end shows to watch exclusively on facebook, trying to get more and more of us glued to the small screen. do you remember danny
6:21 am
on who do you think you are was related to royalty? everyone is related to royalty? everyone is related to royalty if you go back far enough. there must be some royal blood on this sofa. we talked to you yesterday about a horse called carol running at chepstow, and many of you put a few quid on it, and she won. she won the 2:30pm at chepstow and thank you to everyone who has got in contact. thank you to everyone who has got in co nta ct. we thank you to everyone who has got in contact. we made her the 7—4 favourite, and they are going to give that money to charity, some of oui’ give that money to charity, some of our viewers. thank you very much. six years ago, when the bbc highlighted abuse of vulnerable patients at a hospital for people with learning disabilities in south gloucestershire called winterbourne view, the government promised to bring people with learning disabilities out of hospitals, to be supported in their own communities. so what progress has been made since? a new study by lancaster university
6:22 am
claims that private, in—patient care for vulnerable people is now worth more than £240 million. and, while the nhs continues to commission care in private units, the report warns people with learning difficulties have become commodities. in this special report in our two—part series, breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to meet elizabeth bincliffe. here is her story. this is where stefanie ended up. stephanie beckert had a learning disability and autism. she lived with herfamily disability and autism. she lived with her family at weekends but was supported in the community during the week but when her behaviour grew increasingly challenging and she became a danger to herself and others, she was sectioned. —— bincliffe. for seven years she lived in this room and private hospital. she also died here. she couldn't look out the window. no. she didn't really venture outside no. there was a period of time from about 12 months to 18 months stefanie was com pletely months to 18 months stefanie was
6:23 am
completely locked in that room. she did not access a bathroom, she had her meals in that, and she washed with wet wipes. this was expert care. which cost how much? just over £4.5 million. that works out roughly at about £13,000 a week. a report out today says there has been a significant increase in the number of people with learning disabilities in private, inpatient beds. up 46% between 2006 and 2015, private inpatient care is now worth more than £250 million. just over half of all inpatient services are now provided by the private sector. in 2006 it wasjust provided by the private sector. in 2006 it was just 20%. this provided by the private sector. in 2006 it wasjust 20%. this report is pa rt 2006 it wasjust 20%. this report is part of a campaign to bring people with learning disabilities and autism out of hospitals, into their communities, something the
6:24 am
government supports. but the number of private beds is increasing. report authors say this is an alarming trend. whenever there has been research comparing nhs and private sector services, private sector services come off worse. they tend to use more seclusion, where people are kind of stuck in solitary confinement for a period of time, physical restraint, where people are pinned down or restrained in some other way, people are more likely to experience the assaults as well. there is no umbrella organisation representing private providers, so we asked a number of them for their thoughts on this report. 0ne told us that they provided a level of expertise that is clearly appreciated by the nhs. another said they often look after more complex individuals, with more complex needs, and that might require more staff to help look after them, at a higher cost. and the third said restraint was only ever used as a last resort. winterbourne died when
6:25 am
she was 25. during seven years in hospital she had gained ten stone. her death was caused by sleep apnoea connected to her obesity. the hospital was operated by the hunter cohen group, who told us... —— huntercombe group. he did, however, say there was no ca re he did, however, say there was no care plan to manage her weight. but he added... but this behaviour, her mother believes, was exacerbated by her very confinement. they can't hurt her now. but if i can stop this, that's why i'm here. we have two stop this. society is known by
6:26 am
how they treat the most vulnerable people, challenging or not. and this is how our society cares for our most vulnerable people. the department for health refused repeated requests for an interview. instead, ina repeated requests for an interview. instead, in a statement, they said by investing £25 million in technology and housing to support people with a learning disability to live independently, we are giving people more choice. as a result, we are reducing inequality and improving outcomes. this report, however, says there is now a trade in people with learning disabilities. those people, they say, have become commodities. we will have more of that later on, talking with other people who have had experience of this. and thank
6:27 am
you for your response not only to what we are doing today but what we rang yesterday. so many people getting in contact, including paul, who has a 13—year—old daughter. he says i have great sympathy with the people in your story. my daughter has been in hospitals which were run like prisons. if she is sectioned you lose all rights. you're not even told when she has to be restrained 01’ told when she has to be restrained or when she has been taken to hospital due to self—harm. thank you for getting in contact, and do send us an for getting in contact, and do send us an e—mailand for getting in contact, and do send us an e—mail and get in contact social facebook and twitter, and we will explore that later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a new attempt to tackle youth knife crime in the capital will be launched later by the met commissioner and the mayor of london. nine teenagers have been stabbed to death in london this year. later today, sadiq khan will be joined by the commissioner, cressida dick, to reveal how
6:28 am
they plan to stop youngsters from carrying weapons. more than 1,000 train services will be suspended this week, as drivers resume an indefinite overtime ban. southern says some routes will have no service at all, and others will operate a limited timetable during morning and evening peak periods. the overtime ban, ordered by the aslef union, is in protest against the implementation of driver—only operated trains. five london boroughs are falling below the national average when it comes to broadband. southwark, westminster, lambeth, hackney and the city of london are all lagging behind the rest of the uk, with slower speeds, according to a new survey by which. other authorities, like broxbourne, reading and enfield, have some of the fastest broadband in the country. a mother has given her baby the name bobby after he was born outside chiswick police station. rebecca fox was on her way home from hospital last thursday when she started having pains. she pulled up at the police station and called for help. police staff memberjacky brosnan and pc holly foran, who you can see, were on hand to help deliver the newborn. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
6:29 am
there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, major roadworks continue in parliament square. there is no access from whitehall to westminster bridge. local roads around grenfell tower remain closed, including barmley road. in tulse hill, norwood road is closed between the south circular and elmcourt road until 2july, for watermain work. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, following all the sunny and warm weather we have had recently, today it is all change. it is a rather cloudy morning, with rain on the way. now, we have already got one or two showers around here and there some drives spells that this morning. gradually that rain is going to arrive, moving on from the west through the course of the afternoon, affecting the latter stage of the afternoon in the rush hour this evening especially. now, the maximum temperatures still managing to reach
6:30 am
20 celsius. now, some really heavy burst of rain through this evening and through much of the night as well. the minimum temperature staying in the mid—teens, 15 or 16 celsius. it is going to be a rather damp start tomorrow, but gradually that rain will start to move away north and west. still going to see some showers, but some dry spells around. could feel a little bit humid through tomorrow. the maximum temperatures again 19, maybe 20 celsius. now, it stays rather changeable this week thanks to this low pressure. now we have always got one 01’ low pressure. now we have always got one or two spells of rain, potentially some heavy showers around, but the still quite humid so it could feel sticky as we had through thursday and through friday. so it is a rather unsettled week. we have got spells of rain. some of that could be quite heavy. temperatures much cooler than last week, but still saying around 18, 19 celsius. —— staying. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. you are watching breakfast. coming
6:31 am
up you are watching breakfast. coming up on the programme, we are taking a look at a warning from nhs england that says some parents have a worrying relaxed attitude around allowing their children to get a suntan. we will talk to a gp about the long—term effects. we will also bejoined by five—time the long—term effects. we will also be joined by five—time paralympic gold—medallist hannah cockroft who is preparing for the world paralympic championships in london which is now just paralympic championships in london which is nowjust a few weeks away. i know someone which is nowjust a few weeks away. i know someone once which is nowjust a few weeks away. i know someone once famously said do not travel with someone you don't know. fortunately, we are ok. after 9am, we are meeting the couple who is travelling to every single railway station in great britain. there is 2563 of them to visit. i would love to hear railway stories you have as well. maybe you have
6:32 am
visited them all as well some favourite ones. keep it clean. downing street and the democratic unionists have said their deal to secure support for theresa may's minority conservative government makes the restoration of power sharing in northern ireland more likely. the prime minister has been accused by sinn fein ofjeopardising the good friday peace agreement — by promising the dup a billion pounds of extra funding for northern ireland. a deal to revive power sharing at the stormont assembly has to be agreed by thursday. 0ur political correspondent john campbell is in belfast for us this morning. it looks a bit rainy day but nevermind. let's talk about this means in terms of the stormont agreement. clearly, it is a big amount of money. all the parties here have welcomed this deal to one extent or another. they want the
6:33 am
money but in terms of whether they will mix power—sharing, that is unclear. we need to understand the issue. if there is to be money in northern island and there is to be power—sharing between the unionists and nationalists, sinn fein said they can't share power with the dup. the public enquiry doesn't start hearing evidence yet. if there is to bea hearing evidence yet. if there is to be a deal here in the next couple of days, two things need to happen. sinn fein would need to change their position on arlene foster and the dup will have two of our sinn fein something in return, might —— most likely the irish language act which will be an act to protect the irish language much like the welsh language much like the welsh language in wales. for the moment,
6:34 am
john, we will say thanks very much. 20 more on that throughout the morning. —— plenty more. 700,000 medical documents including test results for cancer, were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1,700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. the white house has accused the syrian government of preparing for a chemical weapons attack — similar to one in april, in which dozens of people died. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian airbase. in a statement issued last night, the us state department said president assad and his military would pay a heavy price if chemical weapons were used again. 75 high rise buildings, in 26 local authority areas in england, have now failed fire safety tests ordered after the grenfell tower disaster. of those examined — so far — every single sample has failed. urgent fire testing is continuing on buildings. concerns over external cladding — combined with issues surrounding fire doors, gas pipes and insulation triggered the evacuation of five tower blocks in camden —
6:35 am
north london. the queen is to receive an 8% increase in her income from public funds. it will rise to 82 million from the next financial year. the money will help pay for repairs at buckingham palace costing 369—million pounds, replacing wiring, pipework and boilers. do they have an atm in buckingham palace,? do they have an atm in buckingham palace, ? does the queen carry cash? 50 years ago today, the world's first cash machine was installed. it was installed outside a branch of barclays in enfield, london. now there are 70,000 in the uk, and three million worldwide. why is sally giggling? that's what i'm like every time the money comes out! yes! it worked! that lady
6:36 am
celebrating is me. oh, you've gone. give mea celebrating is me. oh, you've gone. give me a second, i'll bring it back. saw heather watson last week in birmingham and was looking in great form, very confident. warming up on grass. it looks like her training plan is all working. with wimbledon now less than a week away, heather watson looks in promising form. she beat a top ten player for only the second time in her career, stunning the defending champion dominika cibulkova, to make it through to the third round at eastbourne. the win is a great confidence boost for the brit, who ranked at 126 in the world, needs a wildcard for the wimbledon main draw. i'm very thankful for the wildcard. i felt like i have i'm very thankful for the wildcard. ifelt like i have been playing great tennis and i love playing on
6:37 am
grass and i'm glad i've had the opportunity these last few weeks. british number two naomi broady is out though — beaten by kristina pliskova. she also has a wildcard to the main draw of wimbledon next week. the british men's number two kyle edmund also suffered defeat. after losing in the first round at queens last week, he was beaten at eastbourne by the american donald young. fellow brit cameron norrie did make it through though. marcus willis' ambitions of another memorable run at wimbledon remain on course after making it through the first round of qualifying. next up though — is the british number ten liam broady — brother of naomi. there's a big name at eastbourne, novak djokovic will play a grasscourt warm up tournament for the first time in seven years. he'll face canadian vasek pospisil in the second round. the three—time wimbledon champion has slipped to number four in the world and is hoping to kick start his wimbledon preparations in new surroundings and with his new coach andre agassi. i'm excited to be in a new place.
6:38 am
you know, i don't get to do that often. you know, we have quite, pretty much the same schedule every single year, over and over again. it's great to visit new places and it's a small town but everybody is excited to come out on the courts and support the tennis players. the british and irish lions will kick off the first of two matches in wellington in around two hours time in what could be a pivotal week. they face a tough task against the super rugby champions the hurricanes, with the players in this midweek game hoping to push for a start for that second must—win test on saturday. the environment we are in, you play well and you will be looked at and may be chosen. yeah, i suppose it is
6:39 am
good confidence. everyone is eager to put in a good performance tomorrow as a collective, mainly, and hopefully get the result. england's under 21s will be hoping to continue a successful summer for their representative sides when they face germany in the semi finals of the european championship. after the under 20s won the world cup and the under 17s reached the euro finals, victory tonight would put the u205 in contention for another trophy. manager aidy boothroyd is evoking memories of euro 96. 0bviously, obviously, it wasn't the ending that we had wanted but i think a lot of people of that generation have a real affinity with england — germany games. they are always big games, exciting games. both teams have got exciting games. both teams have got exciting players and i hope that the buildup to the game, i hope the game is as good as the buildup. after a shock defeat to india in their first match, england's cricketers face pakistan in leicester today
6:40 am
in the women's world cup. 0pener lauren winfield is unlikely to be fit despite completing light training yesterday. england are strong favourites after comfortably beating pakistan in a one day series here last summer. 12 months is a long time in cricket. we have come into the game with a lot of confidence knowing we didn't perform well against them but we showed against south africa, they have got a real fight and they have come back and look a lot stronger than they were that 12 months ago. like i said, we are definitely not taking anything likely. we know we have to come out here and perform at our best to get a win. new zealand have won the 35th america's cup with a crushing 7—1 win over team usa. four year ago, usa — led by sir ben ainslie, overhauled a huge deficit to win, but there was no repeat in bermuda as the kiwi crew dominated the race. ainslie said new zealand had made it look easy. and we know that that is not easy. disappointing for sir ben ainslie
6:41 am
this time around but when he started this time around but when he started this project he said it would be yea rs this project he said it would be years until it came through. he is prepared to keep working and keep working to win the america's cup. a lot of money involved, as well. a lot of money involved, as well. a lot of money involved, as well. a lot of cash. we are told about suntans and kids and whether or not it is sensible to allow kids to sunbathe and how much attention you pay. i can't imagine children sitting still enough to sunbathe but they want to play out on holiday when it is hot. it is about keeping a hat on them and keeping a t—shirt on them. about keeping a hat on them and keeping a t-shirt on them. some pa rents, keeping a t-shirt on them. some parents, a small minority, have told their children to take their tops off so they don't get a tan line. some parents have what's being called a "worryingly relaxed attitude" when it comes to their children being in the sun. that's according to a joint report by the met office and nhs england. it found more than a third
6:42 am
of parents think sun tans are a sign of good health. while more than a fifth of parents wait until their kids are visibly burning before applying sun screen. 7% of parents have never applied lotion to their children and 7% of parents have let their children aged 11 and under use a sun bed. joining us now is gp fari ahmed. good morning. 7% is quite a small number. let's not generalise and say that parents are neglecting their children or even those who perhaps have let their children use a sunbed or haven't applied suntan lotion are simplyjust not or haven't applied suntan lotion are simply just not aware or haven't applied suntan lotion are simplyjust not aware of how dangerous the sun can be. simplyjust not aware of how dangerous the sun can belj simplyjust not aware of how dangerous the sun can be. i think any suntan, so when your body tans, your skin is protecting itself. it can't handle the sunlight it is exposed to so it is planning to
6:43 am
protect itself. so actually, any suntan is a sign of your skin struggling to protect itself from damage. why do we have to discuss this every single year? why is the message not getting through? is it because people like a certain colour of skin? that is part of it. there isa of skin? that is part of it. there is a perception that if you look at little bit tanned, you look healthy, you look better. i think that is changing slowly. the other thing that happens is it is confusing. there is so many different types of sun protection, you have uva, uvb. people do get confused. it's not a bad idea to talk about it every so often to remind people. so when you are tanning, are you burning? when you are tanning, your skin is starting to protect itself. when you get sunburnt, you feel it. by the time you are aware you are sunburnt, it's too late. how do you then, as a
6:44 am
parent, observe your child in the sun? it depends where you are. it's between midday, so a roundabout from 11- between midday, so a roundabout from 11— three is when the sun is at its hottest. cover up with clothes. no child wants, when it is 25 degrees outside, we don't want to be out in longsleeved tops, we are just as bad. you mentioned the uva and uvb thing. that is slightly confusing because evenif that is slightly confusing because even if you can't see the sun in the sky... that is what makes you more prone to getting skin cancer. some days you think, oh well, it is cloudy, it will be all right. still, there is a uv coming through to
6:45 am
cause damage. what is your final tip for parents? when you are going to the supermarket or the pharmacy, what should you look for? with little babies, don't put them out directly in the sun. you need an spf of plus 30. you need to make sure that you are applying it generously all the time. just make it alike, brush your teeth, put your sunscreen on. it has got to be standard. it is an unseen thing that we need to prioritise it. i wonder if you will need much factor creamy stuff today. that wasn't the best... factor creamy stuff? carroll, can you help me out of my small hole? the uv levels a moderate across the uk. we have a lot of cloud cover and also a lot of
6:46 am
rain. as we were just hearing, you can still get burnt when there is cloud around. we have rain across scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales through the course of the last night and it will be with us for a while yet. some of thatis with us for a while yet. some of that is heavy, particularly across northern england and at the moment northern ireland and southern scotla nd northern ireland and southern scotland but for the north of scotla nd scotland but for the north of scotland it is dry and chilly and all the time rain will be pushing out of northern ireland, leaving showers behind but later we could see some heavy ones as well. where we have the heaviest rain, up until about noon, we could see another 40 millimetres so if we are travelling we can expect a lot of surface water and spray on the road, possibly some localised flooding. a secondary band across the midlands is not as heavy and as we come further south there is cloud and limited sunshine. through the course of the day we lose the rain from northern ireland. there will be some showers, some of them heavy and thundery in the west and equally we import some more thundery showers coming from the
6:47 am
near continent into southern england. we have showers coming across south—west england and west wales. temperature—wise will feel cool wales. temperature—wise will feel cool, particularly if you are along the shoreline, particularly eastern scotla nd the shoreline, particularly eastern scotland where we have an easterly flow. it will feel quite muggy down in the south, with highs of 20 celsius. you can see it as quite a messy picture and that mess continues as we head through the course of the night with further rain across england and wales. some showers across scotland, and eventually the rain sweeps up into northern ireland. it is not going to bea northern ireland. it is not going to be a particular cold night, most places staying in double figures. so we start tomorrow with two areas of low pressure merging, with their attendant fronts producing a fair bit of rain once again across england, wales, and also northern ireland. the whole lot is rotating around the areas of low pressure, which means that you could see some holes in the south—east where we have some drier interludes but equally we have an easterly and north—easterly flow coming in from
6:48 am
the north sea so again feeling cool down the east coast of scotland and also the north—east of england. drier weather across scotland means that we are going to see highs of maybe 13 or 14 and in the south temperatures coming down a touch. we are looking at about 19 stop then, as we head—on into thursday. there is more rain on the cards, rotating around an area of low pressure which is anchored here, so the rain coming in across scotland, northern england, northern ireland, clipping west wales and south—west england. either side of something drier and brighter, so you are more likely to rust this week than to tan. so no suntan rust this week than to tan. so no su nta n stuff rust this week than to tan. so no suntan stuff needed. well, in temperatures like this, in the sunshine you would but it is always better to be safe than sorry. we are borrowing at levels not seen since before the financial crisis, and the bank of england is concerned.
6:49 am
ben has been looking at why. yes, this is all about the debt that people are building up on things like mortgages, car loans and credit cards. the bank of england has already said it is concerned about how much people are borrowing, and later, when it publishes its report on the stability of the uk's financial system, it is expected to say more about why it could be a problem. and that is because the latest figures show we have got £68 billion worth of debt on credit cards alone. if you add in other debts, like mortgages and car loans, the average household now has debts of £13,200. that is just below the £13,300 we had racked up in debts at the end of 2008, on the eve of the credit crunch and subsequent financial crisis. ismail erturk is an economist from the university of manchester. nice to see you, good morning. let's
6:50 am
talk about this stability report, because it looks at all sorts of things, doesn't it? this time, as i have touched on, they are going to be looking at debt. why are we borrowing so much? well, because people are encouraged to borrow at low interest rates, and there is a history to it. after the crisis, by keeping the interest rates low, the bank of england tried to keep the economy afloat. but then the second stage came last year after the brexit referendum. in august last year the bank of england increased the interest rates further and allow banks to have access to cheap liquidity. —— decreased. we have seen a second stage since the brexit referendum in august when people we re referendum in august when people were encouraged to borrow money. on the one hand, now is a good time to borrow as it is cheap to borrow money but of course the danger is as
6:51 am
interest rates start going up whether people can afford to pay that money back. exactly, and we have seen recently, about two years ago, in the united states, they started to increase their interest rates up because they are concerned about the inflation. and also in the uk as well, with the devaluation of the sterling after the brexit referendum, the inflation is going up referendum, the inflation is going up because of the lower value of the pound and the higher cost of imports. and we have seen in the monetary policy committee at the bank of england there are some views that the interest rates should go up soi that the interest rates should go up so i think we are in an environment where the interest rates are likely to go up in the us. and in the uk there is pressure as well and if you have higher levels of debt, increasing interest rates are not good news. where is the debt? we touched on credit cards and loans, but mortgages are a big part of this
6:52 am
as well? exactly, and the kind of mortgages people have in the uk are variable so if the interest rates go up variable so if the interest rates go upa large variable so if the interest rates go up a large percentage of people start paying a higher interest rate. and even a very small increase like 0.5% and 1% can have a big impact on people's ability to pay the mortgage back. and briefly, when we hear from the bank of england later there are limited things they can do. they have cut interest rates so low that they are encouraging people to borrow. is there anything they can do to rein it in? i think we have to look beyond the bank of england. after the crisis around the world, the us, europe and the uk central banks were given the task to keep the economy moving. i think we have to look at other issues. if the wages are not growing, real income is not growing and people are borrowing to consume and the gdp grows. this is notjust the task of the bank of england. it is more fiscal policy, industrial policy. so we need to look at a broader set of
6:53 am
economic policies. really good to talk to you, thank you for explaining that. more from me after 7am, when we are talking about the 50th birthday of the cash machine. and why wouldn't we? thank you very much. railways and romance — that is the perfect combination for geoff marshall and vicki pipe, who have decided to spend their summer visiting every single train station in britain. it will take them 14 weeks to travel to all 2,563 stations. 0ur correspondent david sillito went to spend a day with them. is good morning. good morning. what are you doing? we are travelling the world 2563 railway stations in great britain. this is kingsbury. it is
6:54 am
the cutest rain i have ever seen. that is not a trained! geoff and vicki, in star bridge, on a class 139 people mover. this looks fun, so i asked if i canjoin them. sure, they said. need us at westbury. am i on the wrong platform here? geoff, vicki, i feel as though on the wrong platform here? geoff, vicki, ifeel as though i know you already. the question is, why? so we both have an interest in railways, from coming from very different sorts of perspectives. but really, why? how are you enjoying skegness
6:55 am
and the weather so far?|j why? how are you enjoying skegness and the weather so far? i can't really blame skegness for the weather, can i? life is short, you should have an adventure. this is britain's least use the station, and there is no one here. no wonder. except for these guys. 12 people used should be request stop last year. geoff and vicki managed together 19 for their visit. hello. we have got victoria sponge cake, which is amazing. and some tea. and, as you can see, they have already acquired some fans. i don't really like tea! shall we talk about the peterbrough incident? we can talk about the peterbrough incident. i lost track of time at the cathedral.
6:56 am
mrtrained. lost track of time at the cathedral. mr trained. geoff takes it very seriously. are you having doubts now? everyday i edged towards the line of doubt. as ernest hemingway once famously said, do not travel with those who do not love. fortunately... that sweet. david sillito, bbc news, at a railway station somewhere in britain. thank you for all of you who have got in contact. there is a lot of love for a station in the peaks district with a very nice cafe. i had lasagne and chips and it was excellent. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a new attempt to tackle youth knife
6:57 am
crime in the capital will be launched later by the met commissioner and the mayor of london. later today, sadiq khan will be joined by the commissioner, cressida dick, to reveal how they plan to stop youngsters from carrying weapons. nine teenagers have been stabbed to death in london this year. more than 1,000 train services will be suspended this week, as drivers resume an indefinite overtime ban. southern says some routes will have no service at all, and others will operate a limited timetable during morning and evening peak periods. the overtime ban, ordered by the aslef union, is in protest against the implementation of driver—only operated trains. five london boroughs are falling below the national average when it comes to broadband. southwark, westminster, lambeth, hackney and the city of london are all lagging behind the rest of the uk, with slower speeds, according to a new survey by which. other authorities, like broxbourne, reading and enfield, have some of the fastest broadband in the country. a mother has given her baby the name
6:58 am
bobby after he was born outside chiswick police station. rebecca fox was on her way home from hospital last thursday when she started having pains. she pulled up at the police station and called for help. police staff memberjacky brosnan and pc holly foran, who you can see, were on hand to help deliver the newborn. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, major roadworks continue in parliament square. there is no access from whitehall to westminster bridge. local roads around grenfell tower remain closed, including barmley road. in tulse hill, norwood road is closed between the south circular and elmcourt road until 2 july for watermain work. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, following all the sunny and warm weather we have had recently, today it is all—change. it is a rather cloudy morning, with rain on the way. now, we've already got one or two showers around here and there,
6:59 am
but some dry spells at first this morning. gradually that rain is going to arrive, moving in from the west through the course of the afternoon, affecting the latter stage of the afternoon, into rush hour this evening especially. now, the maximum temperatures still managing to reach 20 celsius. now, some really heavy bursts of rain through this evening, and through much of the night as well. the minimum temperature staying in the mid—teens, 15 or 16 celsius. now, it is going to be a rather damp start tomorrow, but gradually that rain will start to move away north and west. still going to see some showers, but some dry spells around. could feel a little bit humid through tomorrow. the maximum temperatures again 19, maybe 20 celsius. now, it stays rather changeable this week, thanks to this low pressure. now, we've always got one or two spells of rain, potentially some heavy showers around, but the air is still quite humid, so it could feel sticky as we head through thursday and through friday. so it is a rather unsettled week. we've got spells of rain,
7:00 am
some of that could be quite heavy. temperatures much cooler than last week, but still staying around 18, 19 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and dan walker. anger over the one billion pound deal between the dup and the conservatives. the agreement is condemned as a bribe — but the government says it could help restore power sharing in northern ireland. good morning, it's tuesday, 27th june. also this morning: the blunder that meant thousands of medical documents were put into storage instead of being sent to hospitals and gps. a bumper pay rise for the queen — a six million pound boost from the taxpayer to help pay for repairs to buckingham palace. it's 50 years ago today that the first cash machine
7:01 am
revolutionised banking — but will it be around for another 50? with credit cards, contactless payments and online shopping, are the days of notes and coins now numbered? in sport, the pressure's on the british and irish lions this morning as they face new zealand side the hurricanes in wellington. it's their last tour match before the second test on saturday against the all blacks. and carol has the weather. if you are just stepping out, pack your brolly because at the moment, we have some rain which is pretty heavy across the northern half of the country through the course of the country through the course of the day, we will see heavy showers which will be thundery coming in across the southern half. not much in the way of sunshine but i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the government and the democratic unionists insist that the deal agreed at westminster yesterday, makes the restoration of power—sharing in northern ireland more likely. but other parties say the arrangement —
7:02 am
under which northern ireland will receive more than one—billion pounds of extra funding — is nothing more than a bribe. 0ur political correspondent john campbell joins us from stormont, but first let's speak to leila nathoo who's at westminster for us. a bribe, strong words. i suppose the prime minister knew there would be a fallout from this deal? £1 billion for ten votes in the commons. that is what is being criticised very strongly by the opposition parties as basically buying votes in order to the prime minister ‘s to cling on to the prime minister ‘s to cling on to power. remember, she needed the ten votes in order to get a working majority in the commons but it has come as a price of £1 billion. where has this money come from? and scotla nd has this money come from? and scotland and wales in particular are asking this question, if there is money for northern ireland, why
7:03 am
isn't there extra money for them, too? this is a fragile arrangement and it does leave theresa may in power for now with numbers. but it's going to be reviewed in two years' time. certainly, anger are going to be reviewed in two years' time. certainly, angerare among going to be reviewed in two years' time. certainly, anger are among the opposition parties that this is the price it has taken for theresa may to form her majority government, albeit a small one. certainly not going to go away. 0ur political correspondent john campbell is in belfast for us this morning. john, the of and's argument is that this won't destroy powersharing in northern ireland. now there is extra money for the northern irish executive, sinn fein will be rushing to do executive, sinn fein will be rushing todoa executive, sinn fein will be rushing to do a deal with the dup so they have say in how the money will be spent. sinn fein want out of the power—sharing because they say they have lost faith in arlene foster, that it passionate leader of the
7:04 am
dup. that is because she was the minister at a time that a badly designed and expensive green energy scheme was introduced in northern ireland. sinn fein said they couldn't work with miss foster again until they had been a public enquiry. that public enquiry isn't going to start until autumn. if there is going to be at stake here at stormont in the next few days, a few things need to happen. sinn fein needs to change their view on arlene foster and as a result, the dup will have two offer something to sinn fein. that is something like an irish language act which will offer promotion and protection of the irish language much like the welsh lutwyche is protected in wales will stop the time is short and the deadline is thursday. realistically, the two parties will have to kneel down most of the details by the end of the day —— nailed down. michael fallon will be talking to us in about 15 minutes and then we will
7:05 am
be talking to iain duncan smith. 700,000 medical documents including test results for cancer, were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1,700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. for every bit of correspondence, they were looking through it to see whether there was any harm. they're letting the patient know and getting experts to look at it. 1,700 odd cases they have identified potential harm. for those cases, they are looking into it more deeply to find out if there has been actual harm caused by the delay. the white house has accused the syrian government of preparing for a chemical weapons attack — similar to one in april, in which dozens of people died, including many children. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian airbase. in a statement issued last night, the us state department said president assad and his military would pay a heavy price if chemical weapons were used again.
7:06 am
i think in terms of the economy it will get us on the map. backin back in april, missiles will find —— fired at a searing airbase that america said had the launch of datuk —— deadly chemical weapons attack. several syrian soldiers are said to have died at the airbase and president assad denied any involvement. it was the first direct military action against forces commanded by syria's president. tonight, i ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched. it was these images that provoked donald trump to act. previously, his administration had said it had little interest in getting involved in syria. the use
7:07 am
ofan urge getting involved in syria. the use of an urge —— nerve agent believed to be sarin, changed his mind. many children died in the town of idlib. now the white house has issued a warning that mr assad and his military will pay a heavy price if they bought another chemical attack. given president trump's previous attack, he may stick to his word. 75 high rise buildings, in 26 local authority areas in england, have now failed fire safety tests ordered after the grenfell tower disaster. of those examined, so far, every single sample has failed. urgent fire testing is continuing on buildings. concerns over external cladding — combined with issues surrounding fire doors, gas pipes and insulation triggered the evacuation of five tower blocks in camden — north london. following grenfell, we need to take a look, nationally, at our whole building regulations, at our fire safety measures. we've seen, across the country, people failing these test. we acted really swiftly in camden to get the information.
7:08 am
right now, my priority is i've got residents who need somewhere to sleep tonight and i'm all—out trying to make sure they're safe and secure. the amount of public money the queen receives to carry out her work as head of state is to increase next year by around 8%, to 82 million. it will help to pay for repairs costing 369—million pounds being carried out at buckingham palace over the next decade. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. buckingham palace announced last november that it was setting in motion a huge refurbishment programme. it will cost some £369 million over 10 years, and among other things, it will replace wiring, pipework and boilers, which in some cases, haven't been touched for more than 60 years. according to the palace, they pose a potentially catastrophic risk to the building. now the palace has given more details about how the extra money will be paid. next year, the sovereign grant, the money the palace receives to fund the official duties
7:09 am
of the queen and to run buckingham palace, will rise byjust over 8%, to £82 million. the refurbishment work on the palace hasn't started yet. officials say they're still at the planning stage, though it's hoped some preparatory work will begin later this summer. the purpose, say officials, is to secure the future of what they describe as a cherished national asset. critics say it's a waste of public money at a time of austerity. 0ne republican group claims royal funding will have risen by nearly 150% since 2012. nicholas witchell, bbc news. homophobic bullying at secondary schools and colleges in britain has fallen by a third over the past decade, according to new research. a study by the university of cambridge — which was commissioned by the gay rights charity, stonewall — says insulting language is less frequent and most schools have policies to prevent attacks. but almost half of gay pupils who were questioned said they were bullied. 50 years ago today, the world's first cash machine was installed outside a branch of barclays in enfield, london.
7:10 am
now there are 70,000 in the uk, and three million worldwide. the traditional ‘hole in the wall‘ has come a long way in half a century, as simon gompertz reports. 1967, a revolution. the first money from a hole in the wall. you put in a voucher and a code and you got ten £1 notes. reg varney, a tv celebrity of the time had a go and the cash machine was born. and this is what we've come to. less a cash machine than a mini bank. on these ones, you can even open a bank account. signing your name, it will take my photo as welljust to prove that it's me. this one shows you if someone's looking over your shoulder to steal your pin code, reassurance you might want if they close your branch to replace it with a machine. we're moving towards and no bank branch era.
7:11 am
we used to have about 20,000 bank branches in the uk and soon we will have 4000. smart atms, as we're calling them, in the future will provide 99% of all the services that people can get from bank branches today. that is not a world everyone will welcome but the technology unleashed back in the ‘60s is still transforming the way we bank half a century later. simon gompertz, bbc news. thank you for it all your atm stories. i have two facts for you. apparently, we have a four digit code but the inventor‘s wife called caroline couldn't remember six digits so they made it four. in lapland, atms push out hot air so that snow doesn't get into the
7:12 am
mechanics. thank you for all your comments. tracy says she never carries cash and hasn't had any issues yet. at the heart of the deal struck between the dup and the government is this extra one billion pounds — 400 million of which will be spent on infrastructure alone over two years. but this pact has prompted calls for matching public investment in wales and scotland. is his passion for votes. in two yea rs' is his passion for votes. in two years' time, they will come back and asked the even more money. what's happened here, taxpayers in england, wales and scotland will continue to suffer austerity and northern ireland won't. if you do the calculation based on what is being invested in northern ireland. i welcome it, but not the issue but it has to be done under the rules. it would mean in this case that if
7:13 am
scotland was to get its fair share, we would be talking about spending in scotland of up to an additional 2.9 billion. the reaction from people in belfast has been mixed. i think in terms of the economy it will get us on the map. it is a fantastic deal for the people of northern ireland, there's no question about it. how it goes down elsewhere we'll have to wait and see. i think it is a waste, you need to get the executive working again at the minute, before you start giving more money, it's going to be just wasted. we can now speak to the former work and pensions secretary iain duncan smith. thank you for taking the time to talk to us this morning. let me put a quote to you." "there isn't a magic money tree that everybody wants further spending, everybody wants further spending, everybody wants." that is what theresa may said in a run at the general election. how do you find £1 billion in order to make sure that
7:14 am
you get what you want in government? the first thing about the money i think is worth looking at if you delve into it, certainly over half of it is money that was already guaranteed to the northern irish government. for example, the northern irish government, quite rightly, for some time, before all these problems, complained that the southern irish have got a much more impressive corporation tax position and they wanted to be able to lower their corporation tax to meet them. there are also other issues are around the wealth they will form bill. the extra money really comes down to infrastructure spending and it is worth reminding ourselves and i served over there many years ago, that northern ireland is always and is particularly a special case because of the troubles that took place and it led to a massive falloff of investment in northern ireland and the huge backlog of requirements for things like investment in buildings and roads et cetera. this is all part of that process. the interviews with others,
7:15 am
that's all nonsense. there has been huge direct investment into places like scotland and wales which wasn't mirrored in ireland. i don't remember them saying that this all had to be replicated in northern ireland not just two years had to be replicated in northern ireland notjust two years ago. there is constantly a process of investment in particular pro -- projects relevant to that area and this is very reasonable. the government at the end of the day has elected a majority with a majority party and therefore needs to get its business straight. can you clarify, how much of this is extra money? are you saying everyone has it wrong when they say it is a £1 billion deal? i am not in government, so i don't have the exact details... the money is there and what i am saying is a chunk of that was already earmarked. when i
7:16 am
was in government i remember that this money was earmarked if they did certain things, and that this was originally pencilled into the margins for this kind of spending so not all of this is in any way of new money, the new money is going into infrastructure spending which has been a debate going on forever and asi been a debate going on forever and as i say that kind of spending on infrastructure has gone into the city deals like alaska and cardiff and others which is money not replicated in northern ireland and other parts of england. this is a co nsta nt other parts of england. this is a constant process so the barnett formula is not relevant here at all. so from the backbenches how much does this taste when the prime minister preaches austerity and tells us there is no money for unnecessary causes and all of a sudden find extra money, the figure of this is disputable as you have made clear, to get extra votes? well, i have to tell you that the figures themselves are, on the scale of the uk economy, very, very small indeed but they are also relevant in this one regard. but the government
7:17 am
already has a big infrastructure increased spending plan to go across the united kingdom. so there is in the united kingdom. so there is in the case that we don't want to invest in the structure spending, there is huge infrastructure spending, in hs2 and upgrading the railways, boldly totalling more than £100 billion that, huge railway schemes which have been invested in in the last tee years. there has been a big increase in infrastructure spending across the board. the idea of the austerity programme was to get the deficit down to zero so that we don't increase our borrowing and that is the key target of what they are trying to do with infrastructure spending. infrastructure spending is beyond that deficit, and was planned separately. how much can you guarantee that this is not going to affect the stormont agreement? my general view, actually, listening to what sinn fein said about this, to be quite frank with you, is it is properly quite likely to help the agreement because it means that one of the areas of dispute which was going on between national government
7:18 am
and the others, about the needs of northern ireland, the peculiar and particular needs of northern ireland en route to forming that agreement, or rather that shared government, some of that has been taken off the table, it appears from this. i am not privy to the discussions and not in government but my sense about this is that all sides now know they need to have settled administration up need to have settled administration up there, in the last thing they wa nt up there, in the last thing they want is direct rule. i therefore hope that on the balance of this agreement this will allow them to say some of that is taken off the table, let's get down and thrash out what we need to do with each other. and that will be the commonsense thing, after all, we want this to go ahead. if it helps in that regard, i think that will be a good thing. iain duncan smith, thank you for joining us from westminster. we will have more on that later on, speaking to sir michael fallon at 8:30am this morning. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. it isa it is a little bit soggy for some of us. you can say that again. good
7:19 am
morning to you. we have rain across the northern half of the country, a little bit in the south but there is more yet to come. if you are just stepping out, make sure you pack your brolly. 0vernight we have had rain across northern ireland, scotland, northern england and wales. some of that is heavy in the next three or four hours we could see 40 millimetres of rainfall so a lot of surface water and spray on the roads, possibly some localised flooding. at this stage, at 8am, the rain not yet across northern scotland. a chilly start with rain arriving later. for northern ireland rain continuing to push away but you will see a return to sunshine and showers and through the afternoon some of the showers will be heavy and thundery. heavy rain moving across northern england, especially around cumbria, and that rain extends into wales. a secondary band across the midlands over in the
7:20 am
direction of the wash, and as he comes out, quite a bit of cloud with a little bit of sunshine. through the day the rain continues to drift north eastwards, heading across all of scotland. it turns more patchy nature and a little bit lighter across northern england. sunshine and showers for northern ireland, some of those heady and thundery and we import from the near continent are the showers across southern counties of england. some of those will be heavy and thundery as well. but as is the way with showers not all of us will see them. we will also see a weather front bringing in further showers across south—west england and wales. you see what i mean. you will need your brolly, it is messy picture, and it will feel quite soggy in the south—east, currently across scotland. as we head through the evening and overnight period the weather front coming in from the west and all this rain in the east merge, and we will have a wet night across england and wales. travelling northwards into the far north of england, southern scotla nd the far north of england, southern scotland and northern ireland. dry with a few showers across scotland. the rest of scotland, that is, and temperatures well in double figures so it is not going to be a cold
7:21 am
night. and that is how we start tomorrow. it is complicated. we have tee areas of low pressure merging, one of them is heading north westwards. —— two. they will give quite a lot of rain. parts of the south—east could well mist out in this rain and we will see something dry but a fair bit of cloud. to the north of it we are looking at something dry and bright but bright rather than sunny across scotland. down the east coast with an onshore flow it will feel quite cold, especially if you are in the rain. at best our temperatures range 12 to 19. this is disappointing if you remember that last wednesday we hit dizzy heights of 34.5dc. tomorrow the best we are going to do is 19, so quite a change. thank you very much for that. we will see in a few minutes was time. there is some good news this morning for this bird you can see behind us. this is the bittern, which was endangered here in the uk, but conservationists say it is making a return in england and wales.
7:22 am
breakfast‘s john maguire is at a wildlife reserve that has been designed to help nurture birds like this one. we are actually a little bit away from that reserve which has been worked on over the last couple of yea rs. we worked on over the last couple of years. we will give you a birds eye view of where we are standing at moment. just coming up to high tide now. on the other side of the peninsula is the bristol channel, and what has happened in last couple of years is that a relief channel has been dug into the land here. we we re has been dug into the land here. we were here a couple of years ago, and it has been returned to what it might have been many hundreds of yea rs might have been many hundreds of years ago and it has benefited lots of the wading birds and different
7:23 am
wildlife, some of which, thinking about species such as the bittern, have not been seen for a very long time or have not done well in this pa rt time or have not done well in this part of the world for a long time. time or have not done well in this part of the world for a long timelj have been birding and looking at the landscape for 30 odd years and it has been transformed by conservation efforts, by people like the wildlife trust and the somerset wildlife trust, where they have made incredible strides in recreating habitat that used to be here in mediaeval times. what has made the difference? the work you have done, asi difference? the work you have done, as i say, we were here for the last few years and there were enormous diggers digging the channels, what have they actually done? they have com pletely have they actually done? they have completely transformed the landscape. we are standing on the old fence here, and that is flooding of the low—lying fields, recreating
7:24 am
this habitat behind us. we have seen big changes in the amount of birds, and peak numbers of 25,000 birds, which is absolutely fantastic in just two years. so build it and they will come. as someone once famously said. that is the point, people such as yourselves have had to step into of get these species back, i suppose. they were lost in the first place because of man's intervention but now we are bringing them back. in particular heroes we are standing whether somerset levels hit the sea, the drainage of the levels which the romans started during the 30s and 40s and 50s wrapped up, because of new pubs and it got dryer and dry and drier, and the bird started to disappear —— new pumps. it is not
7:25 am
just about birds but about wildlife. this is now one of the most amazing places in the south—west of england, to have a true wildlife, almost wilderness at, experience. you do feel as if you are a long way away from civilisation. in fact we are not that far away. the m5 is just the other side of these powerlines, which are going down to hinkley point nuclear power station just behind the camera mander. as nigel was saying, what have the romans ever done for us? they start of the agriculture in this part of the world. it is now in certain places being reclaimed for wildlife just as it was all those centuries ago. thank you very much, and it looks beautiful down there, absolutely stunning. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: we will meet the couple travelling to every single railway station in great britain. that is all 2,563 of them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
7:26 am
good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a new attempt to tackle youth knife crime in the capital will be launched later by the met commissioner and the mayor of london. later today, sadiq khan will be joined by the commissioner, cressida dick, to reveal how they plan to stop youngsters from carrying weapons. nine teenagers have been stabbed to death in london this year. more than 1,000 train services will be suspended this week, as drivers resume an indefinite overtime ban. southern says some routes will have no service at all, and others will operate a limited timetable during morning and evening peak periods. the overtime ban, ordered by the aslef union, is in protest against the implementation of driver—only operated trains.
7:27 am
five london boroughs are falling below the national average when it comes to broadband. southwark, westminster, lambeth, hackney and the city of london are all lagging behind the rest of the uk, with slower speeds, according to a new survey by which. other authorities, like broxbourne, reading and enfield, have some of the fastest broadband in the country. a mother has given her baby the name bobby after he was born outside chiswick police station. rebecca fox was on her way home from hospital last thursday when she started having pains. she pulled up at the police station and called for help. pc holly foran, who you can see on the left, was on hand to help deliver the newborn. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, major roadworks continue in parliament square. there is no access from whitehall to westminster bridge. local roads around grenfell tower remain closed, including barmley road. in tulse hill, norwood road is closed between the south circular and elmcourt road until 2 july for watermain work. let's have a check on the weather
7:28 am
now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, following all the sunny and warm weather we have had recently, today it is all—change. it is a rather cloudy morning, with rain on the way. now, we've already got one or two showers around here and there, but some dryer spells at first this morning. gradually that rain is going to arrive, moving in from the west through the course of the afternoon, affecting the latter stage of the afternoon, into rush hour this evening especially. now, the maximum temperature still managing to reach 20 celsius. now, some really heavy bursts of rain through this evening, and through much of the night as well. the minimum temperature staying in the mid—teens, 15 or 16 celsius. now, it is going to be a rather damp start tomorrow, but gradually that rain will start to move away north and west. still going to see some showers, but some dryer spells around. could feel a little bit humid through tomorrow. the maximum temperatures again 19, maybe 20 celsius. now, it stays rather changeable this week, thanks to this low pressure.
7:29 am
now, we've always got one or two spells of rain, potentially some heavy showers around, but the air is still quite humid, so it could feel sticky as we head through thursday and through friday. so it is a rather unsettled week. we've got spells of rain, some of that could be quite heavy. temperatures much cooler than last week, but still staying around 18, 19 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and dan walker. downing street and the democratic unionists have said their deal to secure support for theresa may's minority conservative government makes the restoration of power sharing in northern ireland more likely. (tx 00v) the prime minister has been accused by sinn fein ofjeopardising the prime minister has been accused by sinn fein ofjeopardising the good friday peace agreement — by promising the dup a billion pounds of extra funding for northern ireland.
7:30 am
a deal to revive power sharing at the stormont assembly has to be agreed by thursday. 700,000 medical documents including test results for cancer, were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1,700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. the white house has accused the syrian government of preparing for a chemical weapons attack — similar to one in april, in which dozens of people died, including many children. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian airbase. in a statement issued last night, the us state department said president assad and his military would pay a heavy price if chemical weapons were used again. 75 high rise buildings, in 26 local authority areas in england, have now failed fire safety tests ordered after the grenfell tower disaster.
7:31 am
of those examined — so far — every single sample has failed. urgent fire testing is continuing on buildings. concerns over external cladding — combined with issues surrounding fire doors, gas pipes and insulation triggered the evacuation of five tower blocks in camden — north london. the queen is to receive an 8% increase in her income from public funds. it will rise to 82 million from the next financial year. the money will help pay for repairs at buckingham palace costing 369—million pounds, replacing wiring, pipework and boilers. homophobic bullying at secondary schools and colleges in britain has fallen by a third over the past decade, according to new research. a study by the university of cambridge — commissioned by the gay rights charity, stonewall — says insulting language is less frequent and most schools have policies to prevent attacks. almost half of gay pupils who were questioned said they were bullied. airport security staff in boston got a bit of a shock when they investigated a suspicious bag — because they came face to face with this nine kilo lobster! the crustacean was very much alive and an airport spokesman confirmed that as the lobster was travelling in a cooler in checked luggage, he was allowed to continue to his final destination —
7:32 am
after a quick photo was taken of course! now you have got me wondering about the difference between male and female lobsters which i will check out. the way to find out the sex of a lobster is to wear you look where the tale meets the thorax. a attention everybody. you will see too little ten a like features pointing towards the top —— thorax. the mail‘s is the antipathy mouth is soft, almost feathery. —— male. —— female. quite a dangerous morning for the alliance.
7:33 am
—— lions. it's a big week for the british and irish lions who will kick off in their match against new zealand side the hurricanes in less than an hour's time. for some, this will be the last time they wear the lions jersey, for others, it is a chance to play their way into the test side. 0ur sports correspondent katie gornalljoins us from wellington. the environment we are in, you stand out, you play well and you will be looked at and may be chosen. yeah, i suppose it will give everyone good confidence. everyone's eager to put in a good performance tomorrow as a collective, mainly, and hopefully get the result. with wimbledon now less than a week away, heather watson looks in promising form. she beat a top ten player for only the second time in her career, stunning the defending champion dominika cibulkova, to make it through to the third round at eastbourne. the win is a great confidence boost
7:34 am
for the brit, who ranked at 126 in the world, needs a wildcard for the wimbledon main draw. i'm very thankful for the wildcard. ifelt that i have been playing great tennis and i love playing on grass and i'm glad i've had the opportunity these last few weeks. british number two naomi broady is out, she lost to pliskova. fellow brit kamran norrie did make it through. marcus willis' hopes for an unbeaten run is coming up. liam broady, brother to naomi. there's a big name at eastbourne, novak djokovic will play a grasscourt warm up tournament for the first time in seven years. he'll face canadian vasek pospisil
7:35 am
in the second round. the three—time wimbledon champion has slipped to number four in the world and is hoping to kick start his wimbledon preparations in new surroundings and with his new coach andre agassi. i'm excited to be in a new place, you know, i don't get to do that often. you know, we have pretty much the same schedule every single year, over and over again so it's great to visit new places and it's a small town but everybody is excited to come out on the courts and support the tennis players. england's under 21s will be hoping to continue the success of the other youngsters when they face germany in the semi finals of the european championship. after the under 20s won the world cup and the under 17s reached the euro finals, victory tonight would put the u21s in contention for another trophy. manager aidy boothroyd is evoking memories of euro 96. obviously, it wasn't the ending that we wanted but i think a lot
7:36 am
of people of that generation have a real affinity with england—germany games. they are always big games, always exciting games. both teams have got good players and i hope that the game is as good as the buildup. after a shock defeat to india in their first match, england's cricketers face pakistan in leicester today in the women's world cup. 0pener lauren winfield is unlikely to be fit despite completing light training yesterday. england are strong favourites after comfortably beating pakistan in a one day series here last summer. 12 months is a long time in cricket. we obviously can come into the game with a lot of confidence knowing that we did perform well against them but they showed yesterday against south africa that they have a real fight. they have gone away and come back and look a lot stronger
7:37 am
than they were those 12 months ago. like i said, we are definitely not taking anything likely. we know we have to come out here and perform at our best to get a win. new zealand have won the 35th america's cup with a crushing 7—1 win over team usa. four years ago, usa — led by sir ben ainslie, staged a huge comeback to win, but there was no repeat in bermuda as the kiwi crew dominated the race. ainslie said new zealand had made it look easy how is it going to go with novak djokovic and andre agassi? they are two big personalities. all that he is seriously try to work hard for wimbledon. andre agassi is going to coach him. they will probably have
7:38 am
one session before the tournament starts. you have to question how much work they can put in that one session that will help novak djokovic. i find the session that will help novak djokovic. ifind the partnerships fascinating. andre agassi is that king of combat is so maybe novak djokovic needs that. —— comebacks. let's return to one of the big stories of the last few days and the continuing fallout from the grenfell tower fire. since the disaster urgent checks on buildings across the country have been taking place. the number that have now failed fire safety checks stands at 75. that's across 26 local authority areas in england. in camden in north london — residents have been evacuated from five tower blocks — but some including roger evans are refusing to leave. of of never thought about it for. i assumed everything was safe. if a council property, it's meant to be maintained well. evidently, we have been living in a potential death trap. the us firm that supplied cladding used on grenfell tower say it has ended global sales of the product for use
7:39 am
in high—rise blocks. the government testing facility can analyse 100 samples a day and runs around the clock but ministers say they are concerned at the speed at which samples are being submitted. joining us now from our tunbridge wells studio is niall rowan — chief operations officer at the association for specialist fire protection. why are these samples failing? the samples are failing because they are not limited combustibility which is a requirement of the approved document to the building regulations. we know 75% of document to the building regulations. we know 7596 of these have failed. 75. we are trying to test up to 600 building. if the timescale... people are frustrated. it takes a while to prepare the samples for the tests because of the type of test they use involves
7:40 am
grinding up the material. i think also the comment about tidiness is that they are not receiving the samples from the local authorities. it is just samples from the local authorities. it isjust a samples from the local authorities. it is just a logistical thing. samples from the local authorities. it isjust a logistical thing. you say they felt those test. is it because the test is more rigourous than the regulations and if that's the case, why is that the case? the testis the case, why is that the case? the test is designed to determine whether or not the cladding is of limited combustibility. it is used in one of the series of tests. it is the requirement of the regulation in approved document be. the reason they are all failing is because many of these panels have been put onto the building by means of a desktop study rather than testing. what does that mean? so people are not actually practically testing the material in terms of looking at what it can do? a desktop study will look at the available evidence which may be some of these and it could be
7:41 am
other types of test. assessing it against another document. if this is done properly by a properfire safety engineer and a proper assessment is undertaken, and there is nothing wrong with a desktop study. i have heard expressions of doubt over the rigour of some of these assessments and i think that might be also the area. there is also guidance published which allows also guidance published which allows a slightly lower caste immaterial. a more flammable cast. suited the regulations need to change? -- so, do the regulations need to change? we have been calling for the regulations to change for some time for a variety of reasons. other things that aren't to do with cladding as well. it would help if the regulation was a bit more robust
7:42 am
in terms of that kind of assessment. 0r, in terms of that kind of assessment. or, they might just in terms of that kind of assessment. or, they mightjust say you must test it in a series of rigourous full—scale tests. the tightening up of the assessment process would help enormously. you know this subject inside out. i wonder if you could help with some of the questions being asked. should people living in the other blocks be worried and why was the camden lock evacuated and should that have happened. —— block. whether or not the block is evacuated, i believe kamdyn took their advice from a local fire and rescue service. —— camden. people will be careful in their flats with respect of fire. also, just have people in the building watching and looking. the work has to be done,
7:43 am
there is no doubt about that but to suddenly have defined —— to find housing for thousands of people, it isa housing for thousands of people, it is a tall order. carol is here to look at the weather. it is about time we had a good downpourfor the gardens, isn't it? we certainly do have that on the cards today. it is raining heavily at the moment in parts of the uk. it is raining across northern england, wales, southern and central scotland. we have weak band of rain a little bit south. the rain will continue to journey north eastwards for the course of the morning. we could see up to 40 millimetres falling by the time we get to noon so that is quite a deluge. a lot of surface spray on the roads and at the same time, another band coming up the same time, another band coming up from the near continent across the ink which channel and the channel islands into southern counties. this band is going to be a
7:44 am
showery ones with some thunder embedded in it. the nature of the showers means we will all not see it and they will be on and off. then we have a weather front affecting south—west england and wales, introducing more showers that in between, a fair bit of clout and dry weather. the rain is turning more patchy and clearing northern ireland and leaving some of the showers. some of them in the west could be heavy and bunbury. for scotland, the rain continues to push up and eventually getting into northern scotland. something bright and showery coming into the west. the north—east england, we do have an onshore flow so that means if you are right on the shoreline, it will feel chilly. through this evening and overnight, we carry on with the rain pumping up from the near continent and it joins forces with the rain out in the west. it will be a wet night across england, wales and northern ireland. whereas for scotland, something drier but still a few showers. temperature wise, good shape. it won't be cold and it
7:45 am
won't be as muggy as it has been. tomorrow, we start off with our two areas of low pressure. they tend to merge so again, we will see a band of heavy rain across england, wales and northern ireland that we could well get away with some dry deluge in the south—east. you have dry picture in scotland. look at the wind arrows, though. they are coming in from the north sea down across scotla nd in from the north sea down across scotland and northern england. if you are on the shoreline once again, it will feel a bit nippy on a particularly if you are stuck under the band of rain. temperatures, have to say, a bit disappointing for this time injune. we looking at 19 as we sweep down to the south. as we head into thursday, more rain, still rotating around the area of low pressure, coming across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wales and into the south—west and the channel islands. we will see a few showers coming into southern counties that here, too, we are expected some sunshine. the crowd
7:46 am
breaking at a go through the course of the day and we will have further sunny spells developing and temperatures up a bit, 21. as we moved to the other side of that rain, breezy in the north with a few showers across north—west scotland. pack your tom bell is is my advice for the next few days. —— brollies. congratulations to the victory in the chepstow at 2:30 p.m.. we recommended a horse named carol, and she won the race. lots of people saying they have a little flutter. and says —— anne says she won £4.70. it is exactly 50 years since the world's first cash machine opened in the uk.
7:47 am
but do you still carry cash, or do you prefer cards and contactless? ben has been looking our changing habits. you can pay for everything on your phone. i usually have a tatty tenner in the wallet which never gets used. yep, 50 years ago today, the world's first cash machine doled out its first banknotes, at a barclays branch in enfield. it was 27 june 1967. now, there are more than 70,000 atms across the country. but with cards, contactless and online payments, we are using less and less cash. less than half of all the payments we make now are in notes and coins. it is great to have a contactless
7:48 am
society. 0ur sons and daughters do not have cash in their pocket at all. i love contactless cards. when we first started we didn't know what they were. when the lady said you just tap this thing, i couldn't believe it. it is not very efficient because you don't know how much you spend. when you have cash you know when your wallet is empty.” spend. when you have cash you know when your wallet is empty. i use a ca rd when your wallet is empty. i use a card but never contactless, because i don't trust it. even if we are going to the pub, contactless is definitely the way forward. well, joining me now is adrian buckle from payments uk, the trade body that records how payments are made, and ross brown, a cafe owner who made his business completely
7:49 am
cashless six months ago. good morning to you both. i will start with you. you made your cafe totally cashless, so i can't go in and pay with a fiver to get a cup of tea. why not? we decided it was the way to go. we went on holiday last year, sweden are pushing the cashless economy and we came back and research that and we have some great, loyal customers. italked and research that and we have some great, loyal customers. i talked to them and our staff, did some more research and thought let's go for it. it has been fantastic. what benefits do you get from not using cash? it is a big fat for a small business. it makes life very easy. we can spend our time doing things we wa nt we can spend our time doing things we want to do. we are a hospitality business, we are there to host you, andi business, we are there to host you, and i would rather be doing that than counting can be. that is a point, cash takes time, money and effort to look after. while
7:50 am
businesses might not want to use it, customers still love it. absolutely, and the vast majority use cash all the time. there are relatively few, around 3 million are almost cashless but at the same time 2.7 million people use only cash, so there is a great variety in the way people like to pay, and most of businesses find themselves more successful if they give people the choice. we have long predicted the death of cash and therefore the cash machine, which is why we are talking about it today. it will be around for a good while yet. absolutely. 4096 of payments last year were made with cash. although that is changing, ten years ago it is to those of payments, one in five payments are still expected to be made with cash. i think it will still be around for the foreseeable future. and i imagine it isa foreseeable future. and i imagine it is a certain type of customer, maybe
7:51 am
the younger customer, who have smartphones and contactless payments, and contactless cards. if they do want to use cash, what do they do want to use cash, what do they have to do? unfortunately they can't be our customers, but that is a tiny proportion of people. we were already we made the shift. to the pros outweigh the cons? i imagine you have to turn some customers away. if someone comes in and they don't have a card, you can have one on the house, but the vast majority of people are so happy to use their cards, it is easierfor them. they are happy to do it, especially with co nta ctless. are happy to do it, especially with contactless. what sort of transactions are you still seeing cashews? cash is very much used in retail, travel, entertainment, and to the glee among some small businesses who don't have the ability to accept a card payment. although we are seeing a lot of change in that area. i think the one thing is that people of all ages do like to use cash, but for those who are dependent on cash, it tends to
7:52 am
be people on lower incomes. and that is something that businesses need to bearin is something that businesses need to bear in mind, that there are people out there who prefer not to use other payment methods, and other people who don't feel able or confident to use those methods and they still need ways to pay. they still need to be able to buy things. if other businesses want to do the same as you have done, any advice?” had a call last week, friend of mine who wanted to know how it was going and whether he could do the same thing. i have a lot of people asked me how it is going, howard going. they sort of say at i can't do it, but i would say go for it. i think it has made our business a lot better. it is really nice to hear both sides of that, i would say both sides of the coin, but excuse the pun. keep your comments coming in. i have had loads of messages about whether you trust it, thomas says i use my kin, but others say it all
7:53 am
their cards are contactless. and julie is exactly the same age as the cash machine, so happy birthday, julie, the same age as the atm. railways and romance — that is the perfect combination for geoff marshall and vicki pipe, who have decided to spend their summer visiting every single train station in britain. it will take them 14 weeks to travel to all 2,563 stations. 0ur correspondent david sillito went to spend a day with them. good morning. what are you doing? we are travelling to all 2,563 railway stations in great britain. this is kingsbury. rolleston.
7:54 am
it is the cutest rain i have ever seen. that is not a train! geoff and vicki, in star bridge, on a class—139 people mover. this looks fun, so i asked if i canjoin them. sure, they said. meet us at westbury. am i on the wrong platform here? geoff, vicki, i feel as though i know you already. the question is — why? so we both have an interest in railways, from coming from very different sorts of perspectives. but really — why? how are you enjoying skegness and the weather so far? i can't really blame skegness for the weather, can i? life is short, you should
7:55 am
have an adventure. shippea hill is britain's least—used station, and there is no—one here. no—one. 0h, except for these guys. 12 people used shippea hill request stop last year. geoff and vicki managed to get 19 for their visit. hello. we have got victoria sponge cake, which is amazing. and some tea. and, as you can see, they have already acquired some fans. i don't really like tea! shall we talk about the peterbrough incident? we can talk about the peterbrough incident. i lost track of time at the cathedral. missed a train. geoff takes it very seriously. are you having doubts now? every day, i edge
7:56 am
towards the line of doubt. as ernest hemingway once famously said, do not travel with those you do not love. fortunately we're 0k. that's sweet. david sillito, bbc news, at a railway station somewhere in britain. i sort of admire them. i wish them luck. they are spending... what is it, or 14 days? 14 weeks. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. a new attempt to tackle youth knife crime in the capital will be launched later by the met commissioner and the mayor of london. later today, sadiq khan will be
7:57 am
joined by the commissioner, cressida dick, to reveal how they plan to stop youngsters from carrying weapons. nine teenagers have been stabbed to death in london this year. more than 1,000 train services will be suspended this week, as drivers resume an indefinite overtime ban. southern says some routes will have no service at all, and others will operate a limited timetable during morning and evening peak periods. the overtime ban, ordered by the aslef union, is in protest against the implementation of driver—only operated trains. five london boroughs are falling below the national average when it comes to broadband. southwark, westminster, lambeth, hackney and the city of london are all lagging behind the rest of the uk, with slower speeds, according to a new survey by which. other authorities, like broxbourne, reading and enfield, have some of the fastest broadband in the country. a mother has given her baby the name bobby, after he was born outside chiswick police station. rebecca fox was on her way home from hospital last thursday when she started having pains. she pulled up at the police station
7:58 am
and called for help. pc holly foran was on hand to help deliver the newborn. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning, but severe delays on tfl rail due to a faulty train in the stratford area. 0n the roads, major roadworks continue in parliament square. there is no access from whitehall to westminster bridge. local roads around grenfell tower remain closed, including barmley road. in tulse hill, norwood road is closed between the south circular and elmcourt road until 2 july for watermain work. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, following all the sunny and warm weather we've had recently, today it is all—change. it is a rather cloudy morning, with rain on the way. now, we've already got one or two showers around here and there, but some dryer spells at first this morning. gradually that rain is going to arrive, moving in from the west through the course of the afternoon, affecting the latter stage of the afternoon, into rush hour
7:59 am
this evening especially. now, the maximum temperature still managing to reach 20 celsius. now, some really heavy bursts of rain through this evening, and through much of the night as well. the minimum temperature staying in the mid—teens, 15 or 16 celsius. now, it is going to be a rather damp start tomorrow, but gradually that rain will start to move away north and west. still going to see some showers, but some dryer spells around. could feel a little bit humid through tomorrow. the maximum temperature again 19, maybe 20 celsius. now, it stays rather changeable this week, thanks to this low pressure. now, we've always got one or two spells of rain, potentially some heavy showers around, but the air is still quite humid, so it could feel sticky as we head through thursday and through friday. so it is a rather unsettled week. we've got spells of rain, some of that could be quite heavy. temperatures much cooler than last week, but still staying around 18, 19 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
8:00 am
hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and dan walker. anger over the £1 billion deal between the dup and the conservatives. the agreement is condemned as a bribe, but the government says it could help restore power sharing in northern ireland. good morning. it's tuesday, 27thjune. also this morning: the blunder that meant thousands of medical documents were put into storage instead of being sent to hospitals and gps. a bumper pay rise for the queen, a six million pound boost from the taxpayer to help pay for repairs to buckingham palace. the story of one woman with learning disabilities who died in a secure unit — we have a second special report. it is 50 years together the —— today
8:01 am
that the first cash machine appeared on the streets of britain. are the days of notes and coins now numbered? in sport, the pressure's on the british and irish lions this morning as they face new zealand side the hurricanes in wellington. it's their last tour match before the second test on saturday against the all blacks. and carol has the weather. some heavy rain in the north, and some thundery showers to come across parts of the cell. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the government and the democratic unionists insist that the deal agreed at westminster yesterday makes the restoration of power—sharing in northern ireland more likely. but other parties say the arrangement, under which northern ireland will receive more than £1 billion
8:02 am
of extra funding, is nothing more than a bribe. 0ur political correspondent john campbell joins us from stormont, but first let's speak to leila nathoo, who's at westminster for us. the money that has been found is certainly causing some consternation? £1 billion apparently found down the back of a sofa in return for the support of those ten dup mps, and not a formal coalition, just backing on key votes such as the budget and then on an issue by issue basis. this money will go to northern ireland over two years and will be spent on education, health, infrastructure, roads, broadband and so on. a lot of criticism from the first ministers of scotland and wales saying if northern ireland is getting this money, why can't they getting this money, why can't they get some too. a lot of criticism that this is basicallyjust the
8:03 am
government buying votes. theresa may had to do this, had to secure the backing of those ten dup mps in order to get herself a majority in the commons to be able to get anything done, so she does have the numbers for now, and as slim majority still of just 13, and numbers for now, and as slim majority still ofjust13, and at the price of £1 billion and a lot of angerfrom the the price of £1 billion and a lot of anger from the opposition parties. thank you very much. 0ur political correspondent john campbell is in belfast for us this morning. many taking a look at how this deal will affect the deal at stormont. we don't have the bold government at stormont at the moment because sinn fein and the dup fell out over a green energy scheme. the big idea from the government side is that because this money is now available, is sinn fein will want to get back into government with the dup to decide how to spend it. i think it is more complex than that. sinn fein said they could not work with arlene foster of the dup because she was
8:04 am
involved in that green energy scheme and they would need a public enquiry before they could work with her again. that enquiry won't happen until the autumn. if there is to be a deal year there will have to be two things happen: sinn fein will have to change its opinion on arlene foster, and the dup will have to give something else in return, at the very least an irish language act to protect the irish language in the way that welsh is protected. there are only two days to get a deal over the line. 700,000 medical documents including test results for cancer, were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. for every bit of correspondence, they were looking through it to see whether there was any harm. they're letting the patient know and getting experts to look at it. 1700—odd cases they have identified potential harm.
8:05 am
for those cases, they are looking into it more deeply to find out if there has been actual harm caused by the delay. the white house has accused the syrian government of preparing for a chemical weapons attack, similar to one in april, in which dozens of people died. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian airbase. in a statement issued last night, the us state department said president assad and his military would pay a heavy price if chemical weapons were used again. 75 high rise buildings, in 26 local authority areas in england, have now failed fire safety tests ordered after the grenfell tower disaster. of those examined, so far, every single sample has failed. urgent fire testing is continuing on buildings. concerns over external cladding, combined with issues surrounding fire doors, gas pipes and insulation triggered the evacuation of five tower blocks in camden, north london. following grenfell, we need to take a look, nationally, at our whole building regulations, at our fire safety measures. we've seen, across the country,
8:06 am
people failing these test. we acted really swiftly in camden to get the information. right now, my priority is, i've got residents who need somewhere to sleep tonight and i'm all—out trying to make sure they're safe and secure. the amount of public money the queen receives to carry out her work as head of state is to increase next year by around eight per cent, to £82 million. it will help to pay for repairs costing 369—million pounds being carried out at buckingham palace over the next decade. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. buckingham palace announced last november that it was setting in motion a huge refurbishment programme. it will cost some £369 million over ten years, and among other things, it will replace wiring, pipework and boilers, which in some cases haven't been touched for more than 60 years. according to the palace, they pose a potentially catastrophic risk to the building. now the palace has given more details about how the extra money will be paid.
8:07 am
next year, the sovereign grant, the money the palace receives to fund the official duties of the queen and to run buckingham palace, will rise byjust over 8% to £82 million. the refurbishment work on the palace hasn't started yet. officials say they're still at the planning stage, though it's hoped some preparatory work will begin later this summer. the purpose, say officials, is to secure the future of what they describe as a cherished national asset. critics say it's a waste of public money at a time of austerity. 0ne republican group claims royal funding will have risen by nearly 150% since 2012. nicholas witchell, bbc news. homophobic bullying at secondary schools and colleges in britain has fallen by a third over the past decade, according to new research. a study by the university of cambridge, which was commissioned by the gay rights charity, stonewall, says insulting language is less frequent and most schools have policies to prevent attacks. but almost half of gay pupils who were questioned
8:08 am
said they were bullied. 50 years ago today, the world's first cash machine was installed outside a branch of barclays in enfield, london. now there are 70,000 in the uk, and three million worldwide. the traditional ‘hole in the wall‘ has come a long way in half a century, as simon gompertz reports. 1967, a revolution. the first money from a hole in the wall. you put in a voucher and a code and you got ten £1 notes. reg varney, a tv celebrity of the time, had a go and the cash machine was born. and this is what we‘ve come to. less a cash machine than a mini bank. on these ones, you can even open a bank account. signing your name, it will take my photo as welljust to prove that it‘s me. this one shows you if someone‘s looking over your shoulder to steal your pin code,
8:09 am
reassurance you might want if they close your branch to replace it with a machine. we‘re moving towards and no bank branch era. we used to have about 20,000 bank branches in the uk and soon we will have 4000. smart atms, as we‘re calling them, in the future will provide 99% of all the services that people can get from bank branches today. that is not a world everyone will welcome but the technology unleashed back in the ‘60s is still transforming the way we bank half a century later. simon gompertz, bbc news. thank you for all the cash machine statistics and facts you have sent in this morning. at the peak of their powers, there was one installed in the world every three minutes. it used to be the case that when you put your card in the machine, it would swallow your card and you would have to go into the bank to collect it or it would be
8:10 am
sent back to you in the post. why would it swallow? don‘t ask a supplementary question! did you know that in dubai you can get gold bars and coins out of an atm? different class. what might you can pay bills in some countries. religious donations, all sorts of things. at the time is 11 minutes past eight. carroll will have the weather in about five minutes. six years ago, when the bbc highlighted abuse of vulnerable patients in winterbourne view in south gloucestershire, the government promised to bring people with learning disabilities out of hospitals, to be supported in their own communities. so, what progress has been made since? today, in the second of our two part series, a new report suggests more in—patient beds are being filled in a growing private sector, now worth more than a quarter of a billion pounds. a study by lancaster university says people with learning
8:11 am
difficulties have become commodities. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin joins us. might make you have been taking a look at this. many providers will say this is a cynical view, that patients are commodities, when they are doing such a toughjob patients are commodities, when they are doing such a tough job looking after individuals with complicated needs. yellow like they probably will, but everybody agrees, including the government, that people with autism, with learning disabilities, they do much better and cope much better, live a better life, if they are supported in the community. they are closing in patient beds. but we‘re looking at the growth of the private sector. private beds have closed in the last 12 months but many more are coming up 12 months but many more are coming up in the private sector. the challenging behaviour foundation
8:12 am
tell us that this comes at a huge price. this is where stephanie ended up. stephanie bincliffe had a learning disability and autism. she lived with her family at weekends, but was supported in the community during the week. but when her behaviour grew increasingly challenging, and she became a danger to herself and others, she was sectioned. for seven years she lived in this room in a private hospital. she also died here. she couldn‘t look out the window. no. she didn‘t really venture outside, no. there was a period of time from about 12 months to 18 months stephanie was completely locked in that room. she did not access a bathroom, she had her meals in there, and she washed with wet wipes. this was "expert care." which cost how much? just over £4.5 million. that works out roughly at about £13,000 a week. a report out today says there has
8:13 am
been a significant increase in the number of people with learning disabilities in private, in—patient beds. up 46% between 2006 and 2015, private, in—patient care is now worth more than £250 million. just over half of all in—patient services are now provided by the private sector. in 2006, it was just 20%. this report is part of a campaign to bring people with learning disabilities and autism out of hospitals, into their communities, something the government supports. but the number of private beds is increasing. report authors say this is an alarming trend. whenever there has been research comparing nhs and private sector services, private sector services come off worse. they tend to use more seclusion, where people are kind of stuck in solitary confinement for a period of time, physical restraint, where people are pinned down or restrained in some other way, people are more likely
8:14 am
to experience assaults as well. there is no umbrella organisation representing private providers, so we asked a number of them for their thoughts on this report. 0ne told us that they provided a level of expertise that is clearly appreciated by the nhs. another said they often look after more complex individuals, with more complex needs, and that might require more staff to help look after them, at a higher cost. and a third said restraint was only ever used as a last resort. stephanie died when she was 25. during seven years in hospital, she had gained ten stone. her death was caused by sleep apnoea connected to her obesity. the hospital was operated by the huntercombe group, who told us: he did, however, say there was no
8:15 am
care plan to manage her weight. but he added: but that is behaviour, her mother believes, was exacerbated by her very confinement. they can‘t hurt her now. but if i can stop this, that‘s why i‘m here. we have to stop this. society is known by how they treat their most vulnerable people, challenging or not, and this is how our society cares for our most vulnerable people. the department for health refused repeated requests for an interview. instead, in a statement, they said, "by investing £25 million
8:16 am
in technology and housing to support people with a learning disability to live independently, we are giving people more choice. as a result, we are reducing inequality and improving outcomes." this report, however, says there is now a trade in people with learning disabilities. those people, they say, have become commodities. there is cynicism that they have become commodities by those who are providing the work. it is tough and there are vulnerable people who need good care and in their own communities? there might be people who work in these units who think it is an outrage. the government says there is a lot of good work going on in some of these units. however, it‘s the wrong model of care. the government says this. it‘s just the wrong model of care. the private
8:17 am
sector though, it‘s in growth and the guy who did the report there said to me that kevin costner, the field of dreams principle is at play. if you build it, they will come and they do come. some of the areas with the highest inpatient rates are the areas where they happen to have the most of these units, of these hospitals. the argument is this, we know who these people are from birth. if society, if government, if we heap support on these people from birth throughout their teens, into their adulthoods their teens, into their adulthoods the ideal would be if they can avoid the ideal would be if they can avoid the need for this crisis intervention in hospital because the argument is if you‘ve got challenging needs and suddenly you pick that person up and you put them away from their family, everything they know and love and care about, you take them to that strange environment that challenging behaviour is going to get worse. campaigners tell me they‘re going to stay in longer. it‘s difficult to get out. let‘s avoid getting in there in the first place. we have
8:18 am
had a massive reaction to your report. huge. there are so many people feel they are marginalised. i wish i could share more stories with you. i want to say hello to ryan, hello ryan. he is an incredible young man with autism. i spoke to him and his mum yesterday. they are side by side 24/7, his mum tells me they can‘t get the care in the community to help him live independently. they don‘t go out. he is very much aware that his mood swings are volatile. he is being scared of being scared and lashing out because he doesn‘t know what‘s going to happen. they can‘t get the ca re going to happen. they can‘t get the care they need. i have an e—mail from a mum and dad who are both gps. dad had to quit hisjob as a gp, to look after his son. he‘s shocked by the lack of support out there. campaigners say this is about human rights and people who don‘t have a voice. more needs to be done. thank you very much.
8:19 am
thank you. for doing that report and talking to us about that this morning. thank you for your e—mails and messages. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. if you like rain, well you‘re in for a treat. some of it is heavy and some of us have yet to see it. you can see how the rain has been moving through northern ireland, wales and southern and central scotland and some of the rain has been heavy. if you‘re travelling expect a lot of surface water and spray on the roads. it‘s drifting north—east wards and across northern england it will turn more patchy. northern ireland, you will see a return to sunshine and showers, but some of the showers will be heavy and thundery in the west and in the south of the country, we‘ve got another system coming up introducing further showers, some of which will be heavy and thundery too. from the midlands and east anglia and southern counties and the isle of wight and the channel islands. as we drift towards the south—west of england, here we have got a weather
8:20 am
front. so we will see further showery outbreaks of rain. it is the same too for western parts of wales, but there will be some drier interludes, but quite a lot of cloud around. so bright, ratherthan sunny. for northern ireland, sunshine and showers, but some of the showers will be heavy in the west and potentially thundery. some showers across western scotland as all this rain continues to veer towards the north—east. along the east coast of scotland and the north—east of england we have an on shore flow so here it will feel chilly. as we head through the evening and overnight the weather front in the west and the low pressure bringing all the showery rain in the east will merge. so, it is going to be quite a wet night for england and wales, and then northern ireland. for scotland, you will see a few showers, but equally there will be a lot of dry weather around and temperature wise, well all of us staying in double figures in towns and cities. so tomorrow, you can see how the two systems meet and merge. further north, it will be breezy,
8:21 am
but we‘re looking at some brighter conditions. so, here is the rain coming in across england and wales. down the east coast once again with the on shore wind. it will feel cold. for scotland, drier and brighter particularly so in the west. for northern ireland, you‘ve got the rain not too far away and you will see it on and off through the course of the day. temperatures, a bit disappointing for this stage injune. a bit disappointing for this stage in june. we‘re looking a bit disappointing for this stage injune. we‘re looking at 12 celsius in the north to a high of 19 celsius in the north to a high of 19 celsius in the south. that 19 celsius is lower than it‘s going to be today. so as we head on into thursday, low pressure still very much driving our weather. so we still have all this rain moving around it. now, in the centre of the low pressure, we will see drier conditions. there will be quite a b52 cloud at tiles, but it will break up. we will see sunshine coming through, temperatures up a little bit, 21 celsius. but we can‘t rule out some showers. as we head further north, the north—west of scotla nd further north, the north—west of scotland favoured for some brighter skies. so all in all, as we go through this week, it is looking a
8:22 am
tad unsettled and wet and windy at times too, dan and naga. thank you. a few hours ago, we didn‘t know what that was. it‘s a bittern. there‘s some good news for this little bird here. it‘s called the bittern and it‘s one of the uk‘s most threatened birds. conservationists say it‘s now making a return to the marshes and wetlands of england and wales. breakfast‘s john maguire is at a wildlife reserve for us near bridgewater. and isn‘t it beautiful there. good morning, john. yes, good morning, naga. it is, you know. we are close to civilisation. talk about england and wales, we are on the somerset coast so we are the england side of the bristol channel, wales just across behind england side of the bristol channel, walesjust across behind us england side of the bristol channel, wales just across behind us there. if we take you on a bird‘s eye flight if we take you on a bird‘s eye flight along the river parrett in smet, starting up at the village of
8:23 am
cummage, the water level has come up, well several feet since we were here this morning. we were getting on to high tide. and down to the peninsula and somerset coast line just behind it and the bristol channel back there. things have changed here just this channel back there. things have changed herejust this morning. things have changed here over the last couple of years. alice is from the wildlife and wetlands trust. what has changed in the last few yea rs what has changed in the last few years and what species are we seeing that perhaps we‘d lost in the not too distant past? well, the changes have been massive. the area behind us now have been massive. the area behind us now has the sea coming on to it which it didn‘t a couple of years ago. we have seen mud building up. we have seen salt marsh plants coming in and with that you have got the food in the mud and we have seen thousands of wintering waders to come in and feed off it. we brought the breakfast cameras down two years ago when it was being dug by diggers. tell haus they have done?
8:24 am
we‘re stood on the old river parrett banks and they have built a new sea wall which is higher so they have improved flood defences and they have realigned the coastline so it is called managed realignment and you create a massive area where new habitat can be created. it is a habitat can be created. it is a habitat creation scheme but at the same time you have got the flood protection and you have got the grazing by local farmers and all the benefits that go with it. what's excited you about the changes that you have seen? the big thing is the way the birds have come in, the habitat has been created and suddenly, we've got these breeding birds. they have been winter visitors to the mouth of the river parrett for 30 or 40 years, but if the summertime parrett for 30 or 40 years, but if the summer time they would disappear, but we have got 12 pairs. seven pairs. seven pairs, sorry. what a change in a short space of time and the birds that breed over on the somerset levels and moors
8:25 am
over that way are finding their way over that way are finding their way over here. i believe one bittern appeared already. so bitterns here and bitterns further inland as well. that‘s been exciting. and a real sea change. there is other 40 pairs of bitterns breeding on the levels and moors. but they're going to find their way here as the habitat matures and becomes available for them. it'sjust matures and becomes available for them. it's just very, matures and becomes available for them. it'sjust very, very matures and becomes available for them. it's just very, very exciting them. it's just very, very exciting the way you can see things move in if you give them a chance. folks, thank you very much indeed for talking to us this morning. a glorious morning as we say. carol sent me a tweet to say not the best skies as we have had in the last couple of weeks, but that‘s pretty nice with the sun coming up looking across the river parrett. so real changes here. a quiet, a very special place, i think, we have seen a couple of dog walkers and people riding their bikes, getting away from it all.
8:26 am
studio: it looks so peaceful. even the pylons look peaceful! you know what i mean! we will bejoined we will be joined by hannah cockroft who is preparing for the world para athletics championships in london in athletics championships in london in a few weeks. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. a rather wet start to the day across the north of the uk. south, a little brighter and drier, but there will be rain at times in the south. we are being invaded by two areas of low pressure, one in the south—east, and one to the north—west, and one in the north—west is providing the rain to scotland, northern ireland and of northern ireland. rain will spread into the south by the afternoon. things will dry out a touch in north—western scotland. eastern scotland cool and rainy. northern ireland will have some
8:27 am
slow—moving showers in the afternoon. in england and wales, cloudy this afternoon, thundery rain spreading into central and southern england, pushing north and east. across wales in south—west england, showers developing in the afternoon. the rain will become more expensive if anything across england and wales, quite a cloudy and wet night for many. showers in scotland and northern ireland by the early part of wednesday morning. temperatures in 11-14dc. a of wednesday morning. temperatures in 11—14dc. a chilly start the day for some. 0n in 11—14dc. a chilly start the day for some. on wednesday, we are being dominated by this low pressure. a messy picture across the uk on wednesday, lots of rain around the morning. something a bit drier than scotland, brighter skies towards the north west of scotland, but even for northern ireland, some showers here at times. south—eastern england will become drier later in the day,
8:28 am
temperatures 14—19dc. it will be u nsettled temperatures 14—19dc. it will be unsettled this week, low pressure dominating much of the time. spells of rain and it will be cooler. more details online. this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and ben bland. china‘s premier hails the opportunties of economic globalisation but warns against the dangers of unfair growth leaving some behind. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday the 27th ofjune. china‘s premier says the country
8:29 am
will meet its full—year target.
8:30 am

57 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on