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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 27, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello. it's tuesday, it's nine o'clock — i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. this morning: in an exclusive interview, the mother of murdered soldier lee rigby tells this programme the ministry of defence have failed to support her family and how recent terror attacks have affected them. i was so heartbroken, especially it being his anniversary and it being children. there are so many parents who are left without their children and will be feeling how we feel. we will be speaking live to lyn rigby and lee's sister. how is it possible that no one yet knows whether the cladding used on g re nfell towler was knows whether the cladding used on grenfell towler was legal or not? knows whether the cladding used on
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grenfell towler was legal or nowm is happening now. it is not happening enough —— quickly enough. the testing is going on. we will try and find out. and the legend that is ronnie o'sullivan. commentator: i don't believe this. applause what a fantastic maximum break! he will talk to us about his career, politics, the novel he has written and anything else you fancy talking to him about. if you have a question, get in touch. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until i! this morning. throughout the morning we'll bring you the latest breaking news and developing stories.
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and, as always, really keen to hear from you. a little later in the programme we'll hear from a sikh couple say they were told they couldn't adopt a white child because of their cultural heritage. it's legal for adoption agencies to give preference to parents from the same ethnic group — but government guidelines say different racial backgrounds should not prevent a couple from adopting. really keen to hear your experience of inter racial adoption this morning — use the hashtag victoria live, and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. hello and welcome to the programme. we're live until iiam. throughout the morning we'll bring you the latest breaking news our top story today. the white house has accused the syrian government of preparing for a chemical weapons attack — similar to one in april, in which dozens of people died. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian airbase.
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the us state department said president assad and his military would ‘pay a heavy price' if chemical weapons were used again. jane frances kelly reports. back in april, 59 tomahawk cruise missiles were fired from two us navy ships in the mediterranean. they were being targeted at a syrian airbase that in western homs for his province that america said had launched a deadly chemical weapons attack. several syrian soldiers are thought to have died at the airbase and president assad denied any involvement. it was the first direct us military action against forces commanded by syria's president. tonight, i ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched. it was these images that provoked president trump to act, demonstrating a break in his foreign policy. previously, his administration had said it had little interest in getting involved in syria. but the use of a nerve agent believed to be sarin or a substance like it, changed everything. over 80 people are thought to have died in the attack, many of them children, in the rebel—held town in idlib province.
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now the white house has issued a statement, warning president assad that he and his military will pay a heavy price if they launch another chemical attack. given president trump's previous action, there is little doubt he will be as good as his word. more reaction to come on that story later in the programme. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. it's emerged that 700,000 medical documents, including test results for cancer, were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1,700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. for every bit of correspondence, they were looking through it to see whether there was any harm. they're letting the patient know and getting experts to look at it. i700—odd cases they have identified potential harm. for those cases, they are looking into it more deeply to find out if there has been actual harm caused
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by the delay. downing street and the democratic unionists have said their deal to secure support for theresa may's minority conservative government makes the restoration of power sharing in northern ireland more likely. the prime minister has been accused by sinn fein ofjeopardising the good friday peace agreement by promising the dup £1 billion of extra funding for northern ireland. a deal to revive power sharing at the stormont assembly has to be agreed by thursday. the mother of murdered soldier lee rigby has told this programme the ministry of defence has failed to support her family. lyn rigby says only her son's next of kin — his partner — received help, and "the main charities didn't want to know". lee rigby was killed outside woolwich barracks in south—east london in may 2013, by michael adebolajo and michael adebowale. she said the recent attacks in london and manchester had "brought everything back", but she had received no
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contact from the mod to check that they were 0k. a former senior intelligence adviser to the government has warned that mi5‘s estimate that there are 23,500 people in the uk with links to violent extremism is just "the tip of the iceberg." colonel richard kemp has told the bbc that — despite warnings — the uk had failed to deal adequately with the now—banned extremist network, al—muhajiroun. the amount of public money the queen receives to carry out her work as head of state is to increase next year by around eight per cent, to £82 million. it will help to pay for repairs costing £369 million being carried out at buckingham palace over the next decade. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. buckingham palace announced last november that it was setting in motion a huge refurbishment programme. it will cost some £369 million over ten years, and among other things, it will replace wiring, pipework and boilers, which in some cases haven't been touched for more than 60 years.
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according to the palace, they pose a potentially catastrophic risk to the building. now the palace has given more details about how the extra money will be paid. next year, the sovereign grant, the money the palace receives to fund the official duties of the queen and to run buckingham palace, will rise byjust over 8% to £82 million. the refurbishment work on the palace hasn't started yet. officials say they're still at the planning stage, though it's hoped some preparatory work will begin later this summer. the purpose, say officials, is to secure the future of what they describe as a cherished national asset. critics say it's a waste of public money at a time of austerity. 0ne republican group claims royal funding will have risen by nearly 150% since 2012. nicholas witchell, bbc news. every sample
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every sa m ple tested every sample tested after the g re nfell towler fire every sample tested after the grenfell towler fire has failed. concerns over external cladding combined with issues surrounding fire doors, gas pipes and insulation triggered the evacuation of five tower blocks in candid in north london. we need to take a look nationally at our building regulations and fire safety measures. we have seen across the country people failing these tests and we have to swiftly —— we acted swiftly in camden. i have residents who need somewhere to sleep tonight andi who need somewhere to sleep tonight and i am trying to make sure they are safe and secure. 50 years ago today, the world's first cash machine was installed outside a branch of barclays in enfield, london. now there are 70—thousand in the uk, and three million worldwide. the traditional ‘hole in the wall‘ has come a long way in half a century, as simon gompertz reports. 1967, a revolution.
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the first money from a hole in the wall. you put in a voucher and a code and you got ten £1 notes. reg varney, a tv celebrity of the time, had a go and the cash machine was born. and this is what we've come to. less a cash machine than a mini bank. on these ones, you can even open a bank account. signing your name, it will take my photo as welljust to prove that it's me. this one shows you if someone's looking over your shoulder to steal your pin code, reassurance you might want if they close your branch to replace it with a machine. we're moving towards a no bank branch era. we used to have about 20,000 bank branches in the uk and soon we will have 4000. smart atms, as we're calling them, in the future will provide 99% of all the services that people can get from bank branches today. that is not a world everyone will welcome but the technology unleashed back in the ‘60s is still transforming the way
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we bank half a century later. simon gompertz, bbc news. the moment a 14—year—old girl was caught after falling off a theme park ride in the us has been captured on camera. matthew howard senior was at the six flags theme park in new york state with his daughter, when hejoined the effort to save her. the girl suffered no serious injuries. the ride has been closed while investigations are carried out. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. ronnie 0'sullivan is here, and we will be talking to him at around 9:30am. are you happy to talk about anything? yes. i already have questions coming in. one viewer says, when is he getting married? we
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haven't set a date yet. we're both pretty ha p py haven't set a date yet. we're both pretty happy with how things are. sometime soon. talk to you later. very much looking forward to that. if you have a question, send a message. sport now, and john is here. the grass court warm up tournament for wimbledon is under way, and there is a big—name featuring this week at eastbourne. surprisingly, novak djokovic, who doesn't usually play a grass court tournament and is doing so for the first time in seven years. it shows how far he has fallen. he is world numberfour. how far he has fallen. he is world number four. he plays how far he has fallen. he is world numberfour. he plays at how far he has fallen. he is world number four. he plays at eastbourne today and he is one of —— he is the only top 15 player who is playing there at the moment. he is a big draw. he is desperate to find form. he held all four majors as he headed into wimbledon last year, and this
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year he holds none. he has split with his coaching team. his new spanish coach is something of a guru. andy murray is working with... it will be interesting to see how he gets on. john mcenroe says that the amount of time that they spent together is not long enough to have the desired effect. we will see when wimbledon starts next week. what aboutjohn wimbledon starts next week. what about john mcenroe's wimbledon starts next week. what aboutjohn mcenroe's comments about serena williams? interesting — he was asked whether or not she would go down as one of the all—time greats, if not the greatest player, irrelevant of gender, in tennis. in response, he said that were serena williams to be playing on the men's tour, she would be ranked just out the tops just
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mightjust —— be ranked just out the tops just might just —— just outside be ranked just out the tops just mightjust —— just outside the top 700. she has 23 grand slam titles to her name, 35 years old, a couple of months away from giving birth. interesting that he would choose to say this when she is not playing at the moment. in response, serena williams said: a strong response from serena williams. as well as being very polite. when we get back to the football season, there could be some changes coming in regarding safe standing, couldn't the? yes, shrewsbury town are seeking to become the first all—seater club to apply for safe standing. they want a
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space where around 400 spectators will be able to stand safely. remember, standing was abolished backin remember, standing was abolished back in 1990 following the hillsborough disaster, but there have been moves afoot and premier league clubs have asked about safe standing. celtic have done it and have safe standing for over 2000 supporters. a deal has been struck to try to try this out. not only does it improve the atmosphere, as more people are encouraged to sing and get behind the team, but i think it isa and get behind the team, but i think it is a safer environment. our safety officer has been to celtic to see how it works and was very pleased with how it works. i think it is only a matter of time before more clubs get into the safe standing. ryan caldwell there. the
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clu b standing. ryan caldwell there. the club should find out in the coming weeks whether that has been granted. more from john throughout the morning. in an exclusive interview the mother of murdered soldier lee rigby tells this programme the ministry of defence have failed to support her family. lyn rigby says only her son's next of kin — his partner — received help, and "the main charities didn't want to know". she says the recent terror attacks in london and manchester have "brought everything back" of the horror of her son's murder. the manchester attack, in which 22 people were killed by a suicide bomber, happened on the fourth anniversary of lee rigby‘s death. lee, a soldier, had been walking near to his barracks in south london when he was brutally attacked and murdered by two extremists. it was an attack that shocked the nation. after the death of their son, lyn and ian, lee's step—father set up a charity in their son's name. they're now in the process of renovating a house on the grounds of a country estate
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in staffordshire which will be a retreat for the families of soldiers who are killed serving their country. we'll be hearing from lyn in a moment, but first our reporter dan clark—neal went and had a look around the retreat. it's so peaceful here. you've got the sound of water, you know, in the fountains and everything. the grounds are just amazing. it's so relaxing. 0n 22nd may, 2013, a british soldier was attacked and killed by extremists on the streets of london. his name was lee rigby. he was 25. four years on, lee rigby‘s mum lynn runs a charity set up in her son's memory. the lee rigby foundation has been given this house on the grounds of a country estate.
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lee rigby house will provide an escape for families whose loved ones have been killed while serving their country. lynn says she wants to offer more support for the families of bereaved soldiers because of the lack of support on offer for her own family when lee died. well, this is the kitchen. we have a few of the veterans working on it at the minute. military veterans and friends have been giving up their spare time to get the house ready. so how much of a help have the veterans been? they have been absolutely amazing. i can't thank them enough. they'll be using this as well. they're just trying to give something back i think. lee rigby house will have the space for two families to stay at the same time and there are plans to open another house for veterans too. this is another living room... what would it have meant for you to have had somewhere like this to come after what happened with lee? it would have meant
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the world really. we had so much press, media, you know, outside the door and we couldn't get together as a family. we couldn't grieve together as a family. none of the charities really wanted to get involved with us and get us away to somewhere quiet where we can grieve as a family together. there's a lot of parents and siblings out there that are going through the same as us that are struggling. we are all ex—vets and we were in the exact same battalion as lee. i'm in the regimental association and that's how it all came about. they were asking would anyone like to volunteer and i thought, why not, because it's a brotherhood at the end of the day and we decided yes, i'll try and do what i can when i can. how would you describe lyn as a person and her work in the project?
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she's fantastic. the way she's coped. when we first started it seemed like nothing was getting done but she just thought, i think it will get there, i think it will get there. the bereaved families will also have full use of the estate's beautiful grounds. lee wouldn't want me to sit at home, you know, crying gets you know, crying getting upset and doing nothing. he always said he wanted to be famous. he was famous for the wrong reason. i'll be so proud and i hope lee will be proud up there at what we're doing as well. i'm sure he will be lyn, i really am. thank you. you all right? what are you thinking? 0h... it's just losing lee, isn't it, you know. i think the reality sets in that he's not actually going to come back, you know, we're doing this for lee
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to help the vulnerable and those who need it. because we miss him so much every single day. 0n the fourth anniversary of lee's death, terror struck again. this time it was manchester where lyn and herfamily live. we'd been out as a family. we'd been to the grave, set balloons off, we went for a meal and we sat at home and were having a drink to celebrate lee's life. my daughter courtney came and told us that there'd been a bombing in manchester and ijust fell on to the settee. i was so heartbroken. especially it being on lee's anniversary and it being children, you know, there is so mnay parents that are left now without their children and are feeling how
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we feel and having to go through what we have been through. all i can do is send our sincere condolences to all the families and all the victims and hope them a speedy recovery. and all the victims and hope they have a speedy recovery. i can't wait to get the house open now. i want to get them families in here and feel how i feel now and i'll be proud. once it's open and i can actually see people using the lee rigby house, you know, that will be my dream, to keep lee's legacy alive. lyn rigby is here with one of lee's sister's, 16—year—old courtney, in her first tv interview. good morning to you both. i will read this straightaway. this is from julie who was watching the film. "it is fabulous that the lee rigby retreat is happening. what a
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fantastic memorial to him." so there is real support out there which is amazing. i think many people will be surprised to hear you say you don't feel you have had the support from the ministry of defence? no, we never got the support. we were classed as a non dependant family of lee's so we weren't classed as lee's family. the next of kin get looked after. they get the support and everything else. there is not only us there, there is a lot of military bereaved families and the siblings, you know that don't receive the help. what kind of support might you have been expecting? well, you know, imean, have been expecting? well, you know, i mean, it's just, have been expecting? well, you know, i mean, it'sjust, make a phone call, making sure we're 0k, i mean, it'sjust, make a phone call, making sure we're ok, you know, counselling side of it, we never got the counselling, we got that from actually victim support. and as like you say with the bombings and everything and you know, the terror attacks that have gone on, it's horrific and itjust
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brings it all back, you know. so as the mum and as the minister of lee rigby, none of you were offered counselling via the ministry of defence? no. no. it was all done through victim support. what do you think of that? i think it's pretty disgusting. i mean there is a lot of mums and dads and the siblings that are still out there, that have lost loved ones in iraq, or afghanistan that still don't get the support and they still don't get counselling. i mean we were lucky in a way because we did get a little bit of support up we did get a little bit of support up to lee's funeral. from the mod? yeah, but after the funeral, you know, we got nothing. no phone calls after that. and how courtney? 0k. 0k. yeah. i know when the manchester terrorist attack happened, that was on the fourth anniversary of lee's killing. that had a real impact on you all, didn't it? with me, it
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brought us straight back down to the first day lee had died. did it? it's just all the horrific circumstances, you know, it was children at the end of the day. the target was on children. i've lost my child. so my heart just went out to all the children. i've lost my child. so my heartjust went out to all the other pa rents heartjust went out to all the other parents and you know looking for their children and partners and it was horrific, you know, it was a callus attack. people may not have realised it was something like 12 or 13 hours before you realised that your son was the victim of that... yes, there is mums out there appealing after the bombings for, you know, help finding their children. hoping that they were safe and we were in that situation as well where it was 12 hours after lee had been murdered before we even found out it was actually lee. even though we knew deep down it was lee, you know, to be actually told and have that knock on the door that it
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was lee, you know, wejust... it was horrific. i know you've made contact and actually with one of the mums who lost a daughter, haven't you? charlotte campbell who lost her daughter, 0livia in the manchester attack and in fact you were at her funeral? yeah, we got, when i saw charlotte on tv, you know, pleading to help find her, daughter, my heart just went for her. i could understand the situation she was in then, you know, to when we was with lee, you know, having to wait and it was 12, 13 hours afterwards before she found out, you know that 0livia had actually passed away and been killed and my heartjust melted for her. ijust killed and my heartjust melted for her. i just wanted killed and my heartjust melted for her. ijust wanted to give her a hug just to say, "i'm here for you. i know what you're going through." people don't know what you're going
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through unless they have been through unless they have been through the same, you know. so on a mutual friend knew charlotte and paul and i asked them to contact them and we went up and met them. i took them some flowers and some gifts for the children, well, they are not children, they are adults, you know, just something to show that we know and the girls bought something for their children and then she inviteds to the funeral. it was heartbreaking to see another mother going through, you know, what you're going through, having to lose a child. what did you think courtney when you heard about the manchester attack? because you might have been attack? because you might have been at the arena. you were been there to gigs. a lot of those children were at their first concert and knowing that 22 came out and it was their la st that 22 came out and it was their last concert, it's terrible because i have left so many times without a worry and they tried doing the same
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and it didn't happen. what impact has that had on you in recent weeks? it has made me a lot more aware of things and made me more wroried about going out and doing things thanl about going out and doing things than i would have been because now i know there is the threat and it could happen to anyone because that's what happened there. have you been able to have some counselling? i had it after lee died because i struggled with my anger a lot and i needed help with it because i couldn't cope with it, but after that, i felt like after the counselling she had given me ways that i could handle it myself so i didn't necessarily need it anymore because even after those attacks i knew how to handle it because she helped me with it. what about financial support, again from the ministry of defence since lee's murder? we don't get any financial support from them and the mod or anybody. all we live on is my husband's wages which is not a lot, you know, we still have to pay
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bills, but as i said again, the next of kin gets the support, you know. i asked for a t—shirt and i never got one because i wasn't next of kin. 0ne one because i wasn't next of kin. one of his t—shirts? one because i wasn't next of kin. one of his t-shirts? out of his barracks, out of the room. no, we don't get any support. we do struggle from day—to—day, you know, to food in the kids mouths, you know, ian is not on a great amount of money. that's your partner and lee's step dad? yes. no, we don't get no support at all. we struggle from day it day, don't we? sometimes i won't eat, and i make sure that the girls, and ian eat, you know. people just don't realise, people think because lee was murdered, you know, we're millionaires and we have got thousands in the bank and we've not got a penny. we're overdrawn like everybody else, you know, we eat from day—to—day what we can. it's a long, hard struggle and this
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is where i think they're letting us down, you know, because we have to try and carry on with our lives and it's struggling through it as well. and sometimes you just, you have the beans on toast because there is not much else? the beans or toast or the sandwiches for sunday dinner the it is whatever we can get in, isn't it, and what's left. because ian is on a monthly pay. he has been off the last three weeks because of the manchester bombings, it took its toll on me again and on ian, you know. really? his health deteriorated a bit so the doctor signed him off. he is on monthly pay and he only got half his wage which went straight out on bills because you still have to pay your rent. you have got to keep a roof over your head, you know and at the end of the day you have got to borrow off family to survive. did you get a call from the mod on
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the, after the manchester attacks which was the fourth anniversary of lee? no, we have had nothing. we really do think we would get a phone call just to make really do think we would get a phone calljust to make sure that really do think we would get a phone call just to make sure that we really do think we would get a phone calljust to make sure that we were 0k, calljust to make sure that we were ok, you know, but no, we had no contact with the mod really for well, since after the funeral. 0nly if we have ever phoned them for anything which is not very often. i have a statement from the mod. a spokesman said: we do our best to support the families who have lost loved ones, offering guidance on accessing help, as well as a range of support from individual regiments, including financial aid. 0ur regiments, including financial aid. our thoughts remain with the family and friends of drummer lee rigby. we had an army liaison officer for
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three months after lee died, but after the funeral, we have had no support since. we don't get any financial support from anybody. what do you think about that?|j financial support from anybody. what do you think about that? i think they should support everyone instead ofjust focusing on the next of kin. there are other people, notjust the family. we are still here and we we re family. we are still here and we were with him for all his life, so to be left like we never knew him and weren't related... it's heartbreaking. to be classed... to be told directly that we are not lead's family... all the parents wa nt lead's family... all the parents want is the respect that they were our sons and daughters who have been lost. we have a lady, caroljones, who has been fighting for the victoria cross, which the next of
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kin get when they lose their partners in circumstances. yet again, the parents don't. and they don't cost much to make, its pennies, but why not give respect to the parents as well and offer us something? we get a scroll with lee's name on, that's all. a lot of people will be taken aback. you may have seen reports that one of the men responsible for your son's murder is now considered to be one of the most dangerous men in a britishjail and is of the most dangerous men in a british jail and is said to of the most dangerous men in a britishjail and is said to be radicalising inmates at frankland prison in durham. prison staff say they lack the resources to adequately monitor the situation. what do you think of that? not only has he already caused pain to people, but now that he has been put away for it and didn't get it the way he wanted it, he is trying to cause further pain to more people in
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the country. it's not right. let me read to messages from people watching. dan says, well done to lee rigby‘s family for setting up a place for veterans and families to visit. gone but not forgotten. rip, brother. another viewer says, lee rigby will never be forgotten. roger watts says: my 30—year—old son took his own life. everyone must let pa rents his own life. everyone must let parents talk, cry and even scream about the loss of their child. if the mod gave mrs rigby little help, thatis the mod gave mrs rigby little help, that is unforgivable. elliott says: very true that veterans are left by the wayside a lot, ending up homeless and unable to maintain family and personal life. another says, someone start a fund for lee rigby‘s mum and family. she has had no support. simon says, how can the
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families of heroes be treated so shabbily? i can assure you that this nation supports you. lee rigby will never be forgotten. we have seen the film of the house, the retreat, that you are offering for the relatives of those who lose someone serving for their country. but i think you have bigger ambitions than that? mainly, the houses for the bereaved pa rents mainly, the houses for the bereaved parents and siblings, because people don't involve the siblings. —— the houseis don't involve the siblings. —— the house is for. we have had veterans down there because we want them involved, we want them to design it how they want it laying out, and then the project is a massive one, which again, is on the estate. the building has been empty for 12 yea rs. building has been empty for 12 years. the outside is fine, but the inside... we need their help. there
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was a message went out this weekend and it went viral, and we have been inundated with calls. it has been overwhelming and we can't thank people enough. people to offer their support to help us do and finished this for lee as a legacy... we will get back to them all. we have had over 4000 messages. we do thank them, but we do need their help. keep coming forward to help us get this going. and obviously, online donations. if they go to the lee rigby foundation, there is a donate button there. we run on donated funds. iam button there. we run on donated funds. i am quite excited. i am just waiting for it to get opened now. and that will be a remarkable achievement. testament to you as a family, you know. a lasting legacy. thank you very much, both of you. still to come:
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almost two weeks on from the devastating fire at grenfell tower, how is it possible that still no—one knows whether or not the cladding used on the block is illegal or not? we'll try and find out. and we'll talk to snooker legend ronnie 0'sullivan about his career, politics and anything else you want to talk about — if you've got a question for him — do get in touch in the usual ways ? e—mail victoria@bbc.co.uk or text 61124. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the white house has accused the syrian government are preparing for a chemical weapons attack similar to one in april in which dozens of people died. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian air base. the state department said president assad and
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his military would pay a heavy price if chemical weapons were used again. it's emerged that 700,000 medical documents, including test results for cancer, were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1,700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. downing street and the democratic unionists have said their deal to secure support for theresa may's minority conservative government makes the restoration of power sharing in northern ireland more likely. the prime minister has been accused by sinn fein ofjeopardising the good friday peace agreement by promising the dup £1 billion of extra funding for northern ireland. a deal to revive power sharing at the stormont assembly has to be agreed by thursday. the mother of murdered soldier lee rigby has told this programme the ministry of defence has failed to support her family. lyn rigby says only her son's next of kin — his partner — received help, and "the main charities didn't want to know". lee rigby was killed outside woolwich barracks in south—east london in may 2013, by michael adebolajo
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and michael adebowale. she said the recent attacks in london and manchester had "brought everything back", but she had received no contact from the mod to check that they were 0k. i think it is pretty disgusting. there are a lot of mums, dads and siblings out there to have lost loved ones in iraq or afghanistan who still don't get the support, and they still don't get counselling. we we re they still don't get counselling. we were lucky, in a way, because we got a little support up to lead's funeral. after the funeral, we got nothing. —— lee's funeral. the moment a 14—year—old girl was caught after falling off a theme park ride in the us has been captured on camera. matthew howard senior was at the six flags theme park
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in new york state with his daughter, when hejoined the effort to save her. the girl suffered no serious injuries. the ride has been closed while investigations are carried out. moore at ten o'clock. i cannot believe that footage. thank god she is all right! john is back and he has the sport. the british and irish lions continue their campaign. the lions continue their campaign. the lions got a 23—14 lead. the warm up for wimbledon continues at eastbourne today. johanna konta is in action. the former world number one novak djokovic is also in action as he looks to try to build form ahead of the third major of the year. england's women's cricketers play pakistan in the women's world cup today. they are strong favourites after winning their one—day series last summer.
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and shrewsbury town have applied to become the first english club to have safe standing at their stadium. they intend to have it before the end of the upcoming season. that is all for now. back to you, victoria. next, an interview with one of the greatest snooker players of all time. commentator: the rocket, ronnie 0'sullivan! when he gets his cue out of the case... hejust made it look
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he just made it look so easy, hejust made it look so easy, and thatis hejust made it look so easy, and that is what the greats do. this speed was phenomenal. what a fantastic maximum break that is! ronnie 0'sullivan is delighted, and the crowd is delighted. what did you make of your own performance? you seemed to take a while to get going. you are laughing at yourself there. it is crazy. what is going on? sometimes, when you come off a
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match, your emotions are high, and i am not the best at not saying what i feel. you get letters in the post, which is infuriating, because it can distract you from the tournament. i thought, rather than getting into any more trouble, i might as well just cut the answer is down to one word answers. i thought i was doing all right, then i got another letter saying they would find me for using monosyllabic answers. —— they would impose a fine on me. ijust need some media training, i think!|j impose a fine on me. ijust need some media training, i think! i will just bring this political news to the audience, and i know you're interested in politics. it is from nicola sturgeon, the first minister of scotland, who says colon i will be seeking the agreement of the scottish parliament to make a statement today on the way forward for scotland after the general election. that will no doubt be
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about a second independence referendum for scotland. to repeat, nicola sturgeon has said in the last couple of minutes, i will seek the agreement of the scottish parliament to make a statement later today on the way forward for scotland after the way forward for scotland after the general election. we will talk about the general election a bit later, that's all right. let's talk about your fantastic career, which is amazing. five world championships. 0thers have won more, but everybody says you are the best, the way you play, the flare the style, all the rest, and you feel like you are playing more now than ever, is that right? yeah, i have always enjoyed playing, but i have always had a love— hate relationship with the game. in the last five or six years i have addressed the mental side rather than the playing side, and i think i am able to handle the pressure better. a lot of the big tournaments, it is pressure that can make you cave in sometimes. i am better at handling that and my game
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is coming out more. i love playing more than i have ever done, really. so, tell our audience a bit more about how you are handling the pressure better, what sort of techniques, what help, what insight. is it growing up? definitely not that, because i was 35. i know what you are saying, but i think a lot of it was stage fright with me. i would get so nervous before giving out, or in the build—up to a big tournament, my behaviour would start changing just because i was scared, basically. with the help of steve peters, i have learned not to panic. he isa peters, i have learned not to panic. he is a legendary psychiatrist who has helped all sorts of sports people and has been on this programme. he has allowed me to be in the right frame of mind to allow my ability to come out. i think learning not to panic, even if it is going really bad. just not to be
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stuck in the moment and sometimes look outside yourself. you can think, iam look outside yourself. you can think, i am just having a bad day. it is part of being a human being. i couldn't accept being a human i wa nted couldn't accept being a human i wanted to be perfect all the time. u nfortu nately, wanted to be perfect all the time. unfortunately, that can weigh you down sometimes. we have been playing some of your amazing snooker. five minutes and how long? five minutes 20. that was in 1997. that was the first one. do you think anyone will come close to beating that? probably not. but that's not one of the records i'm more proud of really because it is just one frame and a lot of the reasons why it was so quick was because i was so reasons why it was so quick was because i was so nervous reasons why it was so quick was because i was so nervous and i tried to get it over and done with quickly. now i am a much more confident player and i take my time more and i'm able to enjoy the process. i have had better 147s, but not as quick. everybody goes on about the five minutes and 20 because it's so fast, but as a professional, i have made a lot
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better 70 breaks really. there is a question about the money. players used to get 147 k for that break. now the prize is on average i think £5,000. yes. as you know you have been criticised for not capitalising on the breaks and not trying to score the maximum break because the same money isn't on offer? yeah, i mean, at the end of the day, ijust kind of, it was, that's my little mischievous side coming out in me. some people protest by saying the prize money should be higher. i thought i'd have a laugh and make a 146 instead of a 147. if they want a 147 they have got to up the prize money to what it used. i'm having a laugh and the authorities look it serious and i like to lighten things up. a viewer says, "please can him why he missed a maximum break. why not give the money to charity?"|j
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did. you have missed a few that you could have got the money for?|j did. you have missed a few that you could have got the money for? i have had a couple of 146s, one of them, i could have got a 147, but i went for the highest break prize. at the time when you're out there playing you're not really thinking about charities and stuff, you're out there doing yourjob and having fun. you get lost in the moment. 0n second thoughts that would have been a good idea. next time i get one, i will have to give it all to charity. how important do you think it is for somebody like you, high—profile, in the public eye, very successful to talk about your mental health? yeah, i think it's, i mean, talk about your mental health? yeah, ithink it's, i mean, i never looked at it like that years ago. i wasn't very good at hiding being down. i show it more than others. for me, it was easier to talk about it because i felt it was written over my face, but there is a lot of people coming out and speaking about it and i
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think it's good because a problem shared is a problem halved and you're not on your own and i think that sometimes when you do feel like you're on your own i can isolate yourself. just encouraging people to not be ashamed about it really. was steve peters able to help you manage the depression as well? in a way. i always, i still maintain it that i had snooker depression. what does that mean? if! didn't had snooker depression. what does that mean? if i didn't play good, it affected my well—being. so even after a game i'd come off and i would be thinking about the game rather than just relaxing and enjoying my time of a. it was just consuming me night and day. i would wa ke consuming me night and day. i would wake up and think, "am i going to play well today?" that put me in a bad frame of mind. i have a lot less bad frame of mind. i have a lot less bad days on the table so i'm happier. so, you know, i mean, everybody knows what it is that is bugging them and i always knew it was that, but everybody used to think i was going off me head and i probably ain't, i probably do have
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an up and down type of behaviour, but it's probably no worse than most of the general public really. is it true that in 2016, the world snooker championships, you smashed up snooker championships, you smashed up that dressing room? laughter no, ididn't laughter no, i didn't intentionally smash it up. i mean, not many people know, but i was suffering, i had a massive workload, probably too much, i worked myself to the bone and again, the pressure of the tournament was a lot and straight after that match, i don't know if i mention it had to anyone, but i was driven straight down to london. i was in a hospital forfour down to london. i was in a hospital for four or five days because down to london. i was in a hospital forfour orfive days because i down to london. i was in a hospital for four or five days because i was physically exhausted and on a low. was it a breakdown?” physically exhausted and on a low. was it a breakdown? i think so, yeah. yeah, ithink was it a breakdown? i think so, yeah. yeah, i think it was and they kind of helped me out. i a few days in there and medication to try and just get me going and it was touch and go whether i was going to play in the second round match. 0ne and go whether i was going to play in the second round match. one of the doctors said, "try and take this
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medicationjust to the doctors said, "try and take this medication just to slow your mind down." it worked and i came out there friday. so it was nothing to do with anything else other than i was feeling like, like you say, a breakdown. right. but i do love a breakdown. right. but i do love a breakdown. it is what spurs me on. what do you mean you love a breakdown? i'm so used to dragging myself up from a low, i've done it all my life. right. i kind of sometimes i know that once i get to the bottom i will fly up again. right. a lot less so over the last six years because i balanced it that out. that's the ideal of ups and downs? i have been so low and i know ican downs? i have been so low and i know i can come out of it so i don't worry so much, but sometimes i feel yeah, it is like a chance to respond ina yeah, it is like a chance to respond in a way. it has always been the way with me. i don't worry about it probably the way most people would. did you take it out on the dressing room because you were in the breakdown? i smshd my cue on the walls. is that needed repairing. my
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mate took it down tojohn paris and isaidi mate took it down tojohn paris and i said i couldn't go through with the whole, i think it was more pressure as well. if it was an exhibition i would be been fine, but the world championships is so intense and i just felt like the world championships is so intense and ijust felt like i wasn't in a good place, you know. and that was it really. so, i have beenin and that was it really. so, i have been in worse places though. have you? yeah. yeah. that was mild. well, that's interesting. you have got the experience and you know. you have clearly, you wear your heart on your sleeve. you made that clear. you're sort of comfortable with that. there are so many people who are in the world of sport and other fields who will never say anything controversial or you know or they have gone through the media training because they don't want to have a bad headline. why does that sort of stuff not bother you ?
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bad headline. why does that sort of stuff not bother you? what being... normal, honest, open, wearing your heart on your sleeve?” normal, honest, open, wearing your heart on your sleeve? i don't think i'm actually hurting anybody. i haven't really said anything bad. i mean, i don't think, i don't know, some of the things i say i don't think are that bad. i think some people are too precious about what you say and how it affects the sport and this and that. ijust think, i don't know, it is just heat of the moment stuff. what about your criticism of the way snooker is run? is that heat of the moment? do you believe the rules are too prohibitive, restrictive?” believe the rules are too prohibitive, restrictive? i probably came along at a time when snooker at its prime and the 80s and 90s were the prime. 0nce its prime and the 80s and 90s were the prime. once the snooker sponsorship went snooker never got back to where it was. i was spoilt at how it was run and the money is not there that used to be in snooker and they are doing their best, but
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in the back of your mind you can't help but crave the days of when snooker was in its high and i'd love to see it back there. and sometimes, you know, when you criticise an event or a tournament, there is stuff they put in the player's contract because they don't want people to know about that kind of stuff. you feel like you can't say what you want to say, so you have to kind of, it is a fine line, but if it got too bad then i probably would just walk away and find something else to do because i don't really need the aggravation, i love playing and i'm sure i'd find another place to play snooker because i'm not bothered about winning anymore turnments, ijust enjoying playing. when you say if things got too bad and i'd walk away. give me a scenario. if i was forced into saying stuff and having to toe the line too much, i would think, there is not a long lasting relationship with me because i'm probably going it to fall short so i'd probably
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have to find somewhere elsewhere i could play and ijust play for the fun of it and as long as there is a few tournaments to motivate me to practise, that's enough for me. how long will you go on playing for? sometimes i think 50 would be a nice number. how old are you now? 41. so another nine years. i hate to put numbers and times on how long i'm going to play, but i think when i'm 50, you know, it's a nice number to maybe think about doing something else. a viewer says, "does he hope that ronniejunior will pick a viewer says, "does he hope that ronnie junior will pick up the snooker cue?" i hope not. i don't wa nt snooker cue?" i hope not. i don't want him to play snooker. they make their own choices, i would rather he play golf, tennis. why? i think it is an outdoor sport. it is more healthier. i think being in snooker halls can be a little bit, it's not good for the skin tone!
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laughter rob, "who would have been the best out of ronnie, hendry davis?" john higgins or alex. i think it is alex. hendry and followed byjohn higgins. if they were to have a match, it would be a flick of a coin. hendry was more aggressive, but i'd give them a good run for their money. how many cues do you think you've used throughout your career?” many cues do you think you've used throughout your career? i probably used about five accuse in my whole career. 0ne cue i had more about 12 yea rs, career. 0ne cue i had more about 12 years, i think. career. 0ne cue i had more about 12 years, ithink. so career. 0ne cue i had more about 12 years, i think. so i career. 0ne cue i had more about 12 years, ithink. so i have career. 0ne cue i had more about 12 years, i think. so i have had a few since then. martin, "away from snooker is there anything ronnie wishes he could excel at but hasn't or can't?" not really. everything, i a lwa ys or can't?" not really. everything, i always believe you can't be brilliant at lots of things, you
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know, my focus has been on snooker. i got into a run 13 or 14 years ago andi i got into a run 13 or 14 years ago and i tried to get to county level. icame and i tried to get to county level. i came short with that. i'm happy with what i've done and i am a realist as well. so writing books, how does that fit into your life and what motivates you? this is a novel. there are bits clearly based on your life? most of it is based on my life and the beauty being doing an aob and the beauty being doing an aob and a novel i could play around with ita and a novel i could play around with it a bit more. i've had great fun doing that and you know obviously that's something i can do, you know, it's just drawing on past experiences and stuff like that. so yeah, out of all the things that i've done away from snooker doing the books has been the best thing i've ever done. really? yeah. yeah, absolutely. i much prefer being away from the camera than in front of it. so this is, you know, i'm able to just get a bit of solitude and do
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some writing and share it with some friends and kind of do a bit of research and stuff like that and that's something that i enjoy, you know, so, you know, it has been great fun and i've loved doing it and it's yeah, yeah it has been good. any plans to turn into a film, someone is asking? the rights of my film have already been bought so that's out of my hands now. but possibly if there is like a six book series on this and there is the appetite from people and a lot of people have already read it said they have loved it and there is another one coming out in november called double—kiss. there is a continuation of the we want to do a series of books. i have had so much fun, isaid series of books. i have had so much fun, i said let's keep it going, and keep it open—ended, the story doesn't have to end. as long as frankie is around, there is always a story. there is always trouble. the idea was to keep going with it, and i've had fun and i loved every minute of it. good. let me read you this message from alice wright, "it is so helpful to me when celebs like
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ronnie talk about mental health. it definitely makes me feel less alone. you are a star, ronnie."john on e—mail, "thank you for being such a breath of fresh air to the sport and carry on doing what you do." you joined the labour party this year and backed jeremy corbyn. what did you think about the election result? yeah, i thought, you think about the election result? yeah, ithought, it you think about the election result? yeah, i thought, it didn't go the way the tories thought it would go. jeremy did a fantastic campaign. i am no professional on politics. i am aware of what's going on around me though and how things affect people andi though and how things affect people and ijust though and how things affect people and i just think at least there is a contest now. at least there is an alternative for people and he tapped into the younger voter and ijust think he brought everything alive again, you know. why do you think so many people wrote him off including people in his own party? because we live in this thing like you have to have this, present yourself in a certain way and this and that and i just think sometimes it is more important you know the substance,
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what's the substance behind that person? with the election campaign, people got to see that he was a real decent, honourable and meant what he said sort of person and i think a lot of people, you know, bought into that and they thought, you know what, i can relate to him. he's talking to me, whereas some of these other politicians they avoid the question and hide behind stuff like theresa may not wanting to do the debates. that shut her off from a lot of people. he just kind of got a massive surge of people supporting him really. a lot of people that probably wouldn't normally have supported him, did support him, because they felt he was talking to them. i know you've talked been twitter about the grenfell tower fire and the fact that clearly people need a nswe rs. the fact that clearly people need answers. yeah, ijust, and at the ebbed of the day, you know, when you have time to think, no one should really, you know, blaming someone for a situation like this. it's really ha rd. i for a situation like this. it's really hard. i mean everyone is getting on theresa may's back. i
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mean, you know, we all feel awful the stories we heard and when i said, it was one of the most horrible things that i have ever seenin horrible things that i have ever seen in my life, the stories that you hear from the families, what it must have been like for them to be in there and to be hearing it on tv, it really was, it was awful. the most awful stories and you know and ijust think that most awful stories and you know and i just think that sometimes, you know, this should be a lesson to never let this happen again, you know, and you know, it wasjust never let this happen again, you know, and you know, it was just sort of like, whether it was the cladding or not, but for the sake of whatever it was, the money difference, you know to put a price on people's lives like that, you shouldn't really. lives matter and ijust think it was a sad, sad, really horrible thing to happen. thank you forjoining us. ronnie's
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book, framed, is out now. now, the weather. quite a wet day in prospect ahead. this picture from fraser brown looks quite ominous. the rain is already here, steadily pouring over the last few hours, progressing towards the north—east, so a lot of surface water and spray on the roads if you are heading out. through the cause of the day, the rain will continue to get into the north of scotland. in northern england, it will get lighter, more patchy, and for northern ireland, back into sunshine and showers, though some of the showers will be heavy and thundery. meanwhile, more rain coming across the english channel, through southern california, into east anglia, the midlands, and some of that will be thundery this afternoon. in the south west, a
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weather front is producing showery rain. in wales, rain on the coast and dry inland. in northern ireland, sunshine and showers, most of the thundery showers in the west. in north—west scotland, the rain pushes through, and the rain continues to edge up towards the northern isles. the east coast of scotland and the north east coast of england will have showers. it will feel pretty chilly forjune. temperatures around 14 celsius. 0vernight, the bands of rain will merge, so it will be our wet night for england, wales and eventually northern ireland, and a few showers across the far north of scotland. temperatures still in double figures in towns and cities. tomorrow, both areas of low pressure will merge, so we're looking at rain again. everything rotates around low pressure in an anticlockwise
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direction, so the rain comes in a circular form, direction, so the rain comes in a circularform, to direction, so the rain comes in a circular form, to put direction, so the rain comes in a circularform, to put it direction, so the rain comes in a circular form, to put it crudely. for england and wales, the wind around that low pressure as well will make it feel cold on the east coast. for scotland, something brighter. there will be some sunshine come through. for the southeast, again, we could see dry weather, but temperatures down, and a bit disappointing for this stage injune. 0n a bit disappointing for this stage in june. on thursday, a bit disappointing for this stage injune. on thursday, low pressure still dominates, so the rain will move right the way around it. some dry interludes, high temperatures of 21 celsius. and then the rain starts to pull away to the southeast, high—pressure building behind, and things will settle down for a time at least. hello. it's tuesday, it's 10 o clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. the mother of murdered solider lee rigby tells us how the family is struggling to cope.
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she says the ministry of defence has failed to support them— both emotionally and financially in the aftermath of his death. we were classed as a non—dependent family, so we were not classed as lee's family. there is notjust us, there are a lot of other military bereaved families and siblings that don't receive help. you can see the full interview on our programme page. we'll be looking at the cost of a "strong and stable government" now that the deal between the conservative party and the dup has finally been done. but what does it all mean? we'll be looking at the fine print. and a sikh couple tell us they were
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refused the right to adopt a child because of their cultural heritage. first, the latest news withjoanna. the white house has accused the syrian government of preparing for a chemical weapons attack similar to one in april in which dozens of people died. that attack led to an american missile strike against a syrian air base. the state department said president assad and his military would pay a heavy price if chemical weapons were used again. it's emerged that 700,000 medical documents, including test results for cancer, were put in storage instead of being sent to hospitals or gps. a report by the national audit office says that more than 1,700 nhs patients may have been harmed by the administrative blunder. downing street and the democratic unionists have said their deal to secure support for theresa may's minority conservative government makes the restoration of power sharing in northern ireland more likely. the prime minister has been accused by sinn fein ofjeopardising the good friday peace agreement by promising the dup £1 billion of extra funding for northern ireland. a deal to revive power sharing at the stormont assembly has
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to be agreed by thursday. the mother of murdered soldier lee rigby has told this programme the ministry of defence has failed to support her family. lyn rigby says only her son's next of kin — his partner — received help, and "the main charities didn't want to know". lee rigby was killed outside woolwich barracks in south—east london in may 2013, by michael adebolajo and michael adebowale. she said the recent attacks in london and manchester had "brought everything back", but she had received no contact from the mod to check that they were 0k. i think it is pretty disgusting. there are a lot of mums, dads and siblings out there to have lost loved ones in iraq or afghanistan who still don't get the support, and they still don't get counselling. we were lucky, in a way, because we got a little support up to lee's funeral. after the funeral, we got nothing. the queen is to receive
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an eight percent increase in her income from public funds. it will rise to £82 million from the next financial year. the money will help pay for repairs at buckingham palace, costing £369 million. the moment a 14—year—old girl was caught after falling off a theme park ride in the us has been captured on camera. matthew howard senior was at the six flags theme park in new york state with his daughter, when hejoined the effort to save her. the girl suffered no serious injuries. the ride has been closed while investigations are carried out. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. just in, the number of fires in high—rise tower blocks in england fell to its lowest level for at least seven years in the 12 months to april. home office figures show there were 714 fires in purpose—built blocks of ten stories
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or more, compared with over 1200 fires in 2009 — ten. the figures do not include the grenfell tower fire. tomorrow, we will dedicate the whole programme to grenfell tower, two weeks on from the tragedy. we will be back in kensington talking to survivors and others. dojoin us tomorrow for that. sport now, and john is back. the british and irish lions are playing hurricanes in new zealand. warren gatland ‘s side are looking for a morale boosting win for the two tests to come. tommy seymour got the first try of the game. hurricanes answered back. they had a 23-7 hurricanes answered back. they had a
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23—7 lead. seymour claimed his second try of the match to become the top scorer on the tour so far, with three to his neck. it is 31—17 to the lions currently, with less than 17 minutes remaining. johanna konta is in action at eastbourne today. she is the only british woman to reach the main draw, which means she will be shouldering british upset this yea r‘s shouldering british upset this year's tournament. coverage starts on bbc two at 1pm today. novak djokovic is in action there too. he has done a warm up tournament on grass for the first time in seven years, desperately seeking form. the three—time wimbledon champion has slipped to numberfour in the wimbledon champion has slipped to number four in the world. he wimbledon champion has slipped to numberfour in the world. he is hoping to kick—start his grass court
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surroundings with new coach andre agassi by his side. i am excited to be in agassi by his side. i am excited to beina agassi by his side. i am excited to be in a new place and i don't get to do that often. we have pretty much the same schedule every single year, over and over again, so it is great to visit new places, and it is a small town, but everybody is excited to come out on the courts and support the tennis players. the biggest name to feature there. serena williams has responded to john mcenroe's claims that she wouldn't be good enough to beat the men's player ranked 700th in the world. he was asked if she could be considered the greatest ever player, regardless of gender, and he said he felt she would not fare well on the men's tour. the champion has responded, saying: quite a strong response to his
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comments. after a shock defeat to india in the first match, inward's cricketers face pakistan in the women's world cup. england are strong favourites after co mforta bly cup. england are strong favourites after comfortably beating pakistan ina after comfortably beating pakistan in a one—day series here last summer. and new zealand have won the 35th america's cup. four years ago, usa, led by sir ben ainslie, staged a huge comeback to win. new zealand made it look easy. nice weather, as you can see. not so much here today. more cats and dogs in salford than catamarans today. what price a strong and stable government? the bill for ensuring that theresa may can rely on the 10 votes
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of northern ireland's dup is a billion pounds — that's over £500 for each citizen of northern ireland. ..or one hundred million pounds for each of the ten mps' votes. that's the economics but what about the political price of spending a sum that could have paid for, say, a 2% pay rise for nhs staff? something theresa may made clear wasn't possible before the election: remember when she spoke to that nurse on question time and said there was no magic money tree? in return for dup support, the government has found that magic money tree and promised to spend around a billion pounds extra on projects in northern ireland, upgrading roads, installing broadband, tackling deprivation and giving extra cash to schools and hospitals. but many want to know, if the money can be found for buying votes in n ireland, why can't it be found elsewhere? let's speak now to snp mp kirsty blackman, the snp described it
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as a grubby, shameless deal... rebecca webster who is a student nurse, nurses haven't had a pay rise since 2009. and elliott, who doesn't want us to use his surname, who has mental health issues, and says he's been affected by cuts. steve rotheram, metro mayor of the liverpool city region, he says if money can be found for n ireland it should go to the rest of the uk too. downing street said diary commitments prevented any ministers joining our discussion, so instead they put up the conservative mpjames cleverly. good morning to all of you and thank you for talking to us. where did theresa may find that magic money tree, then? the amount of money associated with the confidence and supply arrangement with the dup will come from the same place that all public expenditure comes from — from taxation. of course, at the last general election we had a hung parliament, and when you have that,
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you come to agreements with other political parties, and there are policy implications of that. 0bviously, policy implications of that. obviously, the mps from northern ireland wanted to see expenditure in northern ireland increase, to go on things like infrastructure, schools, health, etc. how is itjustified to find £1 billion to keep theresa may in power but no money for example, to give nurses pay rise? nurses have had a pay rise. there has been pay freeze for years. there has been a cap, and! freeze for years. there has been a cap, and i know that has put financial pressure on a lot of public service professionals, but the amount of expenditure that has been going into the nhs from the government is still at a record high and has been increasing, and will continue to increase throughout this parliament. i think it is understandable that when you enter a hung parliament negotiation, the parties you are negotiating with,
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you know, fight their cornerfor their part of the country. that's understandable and acceptable, and natural by—product of a hung parliament. not necessarily. you could have run the country as a minority government and you didn't have to spend £1 billion in order to keep mrs may in power. what is best for the uk keep mrs may in power. what is best forthe uk are keep mrs may in power. what is best for the uk are particularly as we go through the brexit negotiations, is to have a government which has that ability to govern properly, that is not on a knife edge on every vote, and actually, if we get the brexit negotiations right, that £1 billion of expenditure will be more than repaid by the increased economic activity, the increased tax take. you've worked that out, have you? we had a frankly chaotic —— if we had a frankly chaotic situation of a labour led government, i think the economy would suffer, and the damage
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to the uk economy would eclipse that £1 billion of extra expenditure going into northern ireland. will the dup only get the money if a northern ireland power—sharing deal goes ahead? the dup are not getting the money. northern ireland is getting the money. will northern ireland only get the money if a northern ireland power sharing deal goes ahead? my understanding is the money is committed to, but we want the northern ireland executive to choose how to spend the money and the best thing. sure. sure. so you're saying they will get the money even if there is no power sharing deal between the parties in northern ireland? my understanding and i haven't seen the full details, i haven't seen the full details, i have seen the public document that was released is that the money is for the northern ireland executive to spend and the best way for that to spend and the best way for that to happen is for all the political parties in northern ireland to get back to stormont and take over
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devolved government because what we wa nt devolved government because what we want here in westminster is for the northern ireland executive to run those devolved issues in northern ireland. that's our desire. that's what we're ailing for. ok. ok, but you are not clear on that so that does need clarification. let me bring in our other guests who have questions for you. we have an snp mp and the metro mayor of liverpool and rebecca webster and elliot who has mental health issues and has been affected by austerity. who would like to talk to james first as a representative of the conservative government? you say it is best for the uk going into brexit negotiations. i don't that i that brexit is not whatjust makes the uk and asa brexit is not whatjust makes the uk and as a student nurse working within the nhs at the momentks there are other priorities. how can you say that allocating, should this £1 billion not be distributed according to the issues of the uk and other
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areas. the nhs isn'tjust suffering in northern ireland, it is suffering across the uk. it was called a hult crisis during winter. so how can we justify putting it in one place when it is needed throughout the whole of the united kingdom? i'm glad you brought that up because actually, nhs expenditure right across the uk has been increasing and is going to continue to increase. that was a commitment that the government made and abshutly will honour and you also say about targeting areas of need. without a shadow of a daushghts northern ireland has suffered enormously over previous decades. it has significant pockets of deprivation. it has significant areas of need and so, i completely understand the dup wanting to see an enhanced level of public expenditure in northern ireland because northern ireland does have enhanced needs and so, ithink ireland does have enhanced needs and so, i think it is entirely reasonable and practical for the government to do that. you are saying that the money is being put
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there, oufr i can tell you i'm working on the wards and i'm working with the community and i am working with the community and i am working with nurses who have been in the job for 30 years and they are saying they're doing more with less. if you're saying the money is there, why can't i see it? why am i seeing the revolving doors of mental health patients being brought in and then sent home without the tools or the resources to keep in their community. i need to see it. it's not working. whatever is happening at the moment is not working. well, imean, at the moment is not working. well, i mean, unfortunately, i can't comment on the circumstances of the wards that you work on, but i know the nhs is under pressure. we have a growing population. we have an ageing population. the government has recognised that and that's why it committed to an on going increase in nhs expenditure to try and meet those increased demands. i know that you know, at the front line in the wards, in the hospitals, public service professionals are under pressure. we can completely recognise that and that's why that extra expenditure is going into the
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nhs. let me bring in steve rotherham. do talk to mr cleverley. i thinkjames has drawn the short straw really and it is hardly the most sophisticated argument, is it, to say that we have come up with a formula for northern ireland and basically that's to buy off ten votes. let's face the fact that, and not kid ourselves that the whole deal with the dup is to try and dig the government out of a very deep hole and out of doohdoo and i wonder ifjames deep hole and out of doohdoo and i wonder if james regrets deep hole and out of doohdoo and i wonder ifjames regrets the statements that were made before the general election given the state of his party currently. what statement, steve ? his party currently. what statement, steve? well, such as a coalition of chaos for instance, james, isn't that exactly what you're creating now with this shoddy and grubby deal with the dup? no, i think the point we made about the chaotic nature of
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ajeremy corbyn—led we made about the chaotic nature of a jeremy corbyn—led coalition is justified. so, forjeremy corbyn to even attempt to form a government, he would need to create some kind of rainbow coalition which would numerically have to include the dup as well. it is legitimate to say that trying to bind together... you knew the outcome of the general election, did you? you already did the maths on what was going to be, this coalition, post general election thatjeremy this coalition, post general election that jeremy corbyn was going to enter into? i hope if that's the case that you had a bet on it because you would be a very, very rich man. irony is lost on you. you said before about infrastructure and investment for northern ireland. it's exactly whatjohn and investment for northern ireland. it's exactly what john mcdonnell has been asking for for years with the tory government. so are you saying that tory investment in northern ireland is good, but labour investment in the rest of the uk would have been bad for the economy? no, what we said isjeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell‘s maths didn't
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even start to add up. where did you get the £1 million from? the level of expenditure that was embedded in the labour manifesto was just com pletely the labour manifesto was just completely uncredible. it was incredible. it was... they don't like your manifesto. can i answer the question? it was at levels that would be unsustainable. in terms of infrastructure the conservative government has committed to significant ats of infrastructure in the north of england and in the north—west of england. we have been committed to major infrastructure projects like hs2 which will bind fantastic cities like your own with the other major cities around the uk, share that prosperity. so i'm very proud of the commitment that the government has made to infrastructure, expenditure around the uk, but we also recognise that northern ireland has, because of its history, because of the history of the troubles, it had a unique
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history which has held it back economically for a very long time andi economically for a very long time and i completely understand the dup wanting to see plans put in place that will help lift the northern irish economy. well, let's bring in ki rsty irish economy. well, let's bring in kirsty who is an snp mp. do talk to james cleverley, kirsty. kirsty who is an snp mp. do talk to james cleve rley, kirsty.” kirsty who is an snp mp. do talk to james cleverley, kirsty. i don't understand how the government can justify this deal. it's £1 billion for northern ireland. it's investment in things like health and education which the government decide is necessary in northern ireland, but not anywhere else in the uk and we are not seeing the same amount of money going into health and education services elsewhere in the uk. our manifesto that we stewed on had an increase for the nhs that we stewed on had an increase forthe nhs in that we stewed on had an increase for the nhs in england because we wa nted for the nhs in england because we wanted to see the nhs in england get more money and we want to see that come to wales, northern ireland and scotland. how can the tories justify giving this extra money to northern ireland and excluding the rest of the parts of the uk that are in need
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of this cash? well, kirsty, i'm surprised to hear you say that. you know, as well as i do, that government expenditure per capita in scotland is higher than it is in england and! scotland is higher than it is in england and i think it is a bit unfair that begrudge a higher per capita expenditure in northern ireland. we recognise... james, it is already significantly higher in northern ireland than it is in scotland. so, you know, you need to be careful with this argument. scotland. so, you know, you need to be careful with this argumentm scotland, it's significantly higher thanit scotland, it's significantly higher than it is in england and we recognise that devolved governments and certain parts of the country have greater need than others and public expenditure is counterbalanced to take that into consideration. but, you know, you know, that health and education is a devolved issue in scotland and if the snp government in holyrood wants to see more money in those areas of public ex—opinioned ture, they can raise taxes. they have the power to
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do that and spend money on what we both know to be health and education outcomes are lower than in england. do you think it is justifiable for a westminster government to give money to the northern ireland executive to spend on health and education, but you wouldn't do so for scotland. why is ita you wouldn't do so for scotland. why is it a different case? we already do so in scotland. you are not giving £2.9 billion for scotland to spend on health and education? expenditure in scotland, just like in the rest of the uk... is lower than per head than in northern ireland. there are different levels, the government spends money in different levels across across the united kingdom uk and northern ireland per head of population receives more than scotland, but scotland receives more than england. that's the way it is and actually, asa that's the way it is and actually, as a unionist party, as a government for the whole of the uk, we feel it is entirely appropriate to distribute money from some of the
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wealthier parts of the uk to some of the parts of the uk who need a boost to build their economy and public services. if you want to speak to your government, if you're talking about an area of the country that needs some additional help, well, we can very easily help our area by for instance some of the infrastructure projects that we have online, hs 3, as it was called, northern powerhouse rail or crossrail for the north, the government should start that as soon as possible and if we start from liverpool and work towards manchester we can link the whole northern corridor, but you can't say that president government specifically looks at areas with deprivation and helps them areas out. we have had £1.5 billion cut from the six districts in the liverpool city region, £1.5 billion and you have just given £1 billion to northern ireland. how is that justifiable? the government invested
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a huge amount in northern powerhouse projects. i mean your own city has seena projects. i mean your own city has seen a transformation... yeah, that's because we have got a good council and we have had a labour government and european funding in the past that has helped us to pick ourselves up by our own boot straps. iam going ourselves up by our own boot straps. i am going to bring in elliot if i may. elliot has been very patient.” live in liverpool currently. i moved from the south up to liverpool for university and to see a conservative mp stand there and have the audacity to say that you have put money into liverpool. liverpool is a world —class liverpool. liverpool is a world—class city. it is nothing to do with you and everything to do with european finances and projects. that city was built from ruins. if we're being honest, liverpool was in ruins especially after the end of the thatcher government. margaret thatcher wanted to leave the city to decline. she wanted to leave that city to the point where it was in such position that was
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uninhabitable. do not dare stand on national tv and praise yourself for that city because you have nothing, nothing, to be proud of in that city. let me make my second point, the deprivation in ireland has not happened overnight. ireland has not collapsed. northern ireland has not become deprived overnight. it has been deprived for the entire time you have been in government. so why is it suddenly now when theresa may wa nts to is it suddenly now when theresa may wants to cling on to power, ins your interests, why after seven years of power are you so interested in injecting £1 billion of public money, it is not conservative money, it is public money that could be distributed to mental health nurses, to schools, to public second fors, but no, because you want to cling to power, because you have got a woman who does not understand the electorate and does not the understand the message she has been given by the public, she has bribed the northern irish assembly with £1 billion to keep her in power,
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justify that now for me now, please. you mentioned mental health services. northern ireland still has the... services. northern ireland still has the. . . what services. northern ireland still has the... what i've asked you to do is justify... i'm answering your questions. you're deflecting to other points. it is a simple question. justify in simple terms why you think after seven years in government, after seven years of austerity, now is the time to give northern ireland and nobody else in the country, £1 billion at a point where your government, by your own d by your own making is in crisis? justify that now without saying tories sound bites, lay it out in simple lay man terms, please. because it is an affront. the government has increased spending right across the country including scotland, wales, england, government expenditure has increased. we have been increasing expenditure in northern ireland. and northern ireland has some of the most significant issues because of it's
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history. you mentioned mental health services, it has the highest suicide rate per capita in the whole of the kand rate per capita in the whole of the k and it's appropriate that we recognise the unique circumstances of northern ireland. we are in a coalition, not a coalition, we are ina hung coalition, not a coalition, we are in a hung parliament situation that means we have to negotiate with other parties and that means the policies that the government put forward get adapted and amended in negotiation with those parties. that's what happens in hung parliament situations. that's what we've done. that is all very admirable, but if you had won the election in turn round and said, northern ireland needs investment immediately because it is terrible, but that is not what has happened. it just it is terrible, but that is not what has happened. itjust wouldn't be happening because it wouldn't be your priority. your priority is clinging to power to the detriment of the country. you are an affront to this country. let him respond.
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0ur priority is doing what is right that the uk, and i have absolutely no doubt that a government led by jeremy corbyn would have been a catastrophe for this country. and thatis catastrophe for this country. and that is why we have entered into an agreement with another political party in the uk to form a stable government. that is what happens when you have a hung parliament situation. those negotiations have meant that in addition to the additional spending that we are putting into health and public services around the rest of the uk, we are also putting additional spending into northern ireland, above that which was already planned for, of course, but that is a by—product of a hung parliament agreement. ok, thank you, all of you, very much. thank you to james cleverly, who gave up his time at the last minute to talk on behalf of
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the last minute to talk on behalf of the conservative government. we appreciate your time, all of you. the now notorious cladding on the outside of grenfell tower is widely believed to have been partly responsible for the rapid spread of the fire. but almost two weeks on, no one knows whether it complied with building safety regulations or not. was the cladding legal or wasn't it — and are people living in tower blocks with similar cladding safe? 75 high rise buildings, in 26 local authority areas in england, have now failed fire safety tests ordered after grenfell. of those examined — so far — every single sample has failed. urgent fire testing is continuing on buildings. 0ur reporterjim reed has been looking into this. are the cladding panels illegal or not,jim? are the cladding panels illegal or not, jim? it is really frustrating for everyone, but we still cannot a nswer for everyone, but we still cannot answer that question. we put in calls left right and centre yesterday. the government cannot
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a nswer yesterday. the government cannot answer either. the housing minister was asked repeatedly whether the cladding panels, the stuff on the outside of grenfell tower, was it illegal? repeatedly asked but could not answer, saying it was noncompliant with building regulations. what does that mean? the regulations are so one clear. someone described them as about as clear as mud, so it depends how you interpret the language in the regulations. 0ne interpret the language in the regulations. one person says one thing, another person says another. another thing is that the police have said they are considering criminal charges in this case. there isa criminal charges in this case. there is a long—standing arrangement in british politics that politicians do not like to interfere or influence a police investigation, so as soon as the police said that, it made it quite difficult for the government to come out on television and say, yes, this was definitely illegal. 0k, yes, this was definitely illegal. ok, so what would a case come down to? who could potentially be
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prosecuted? it is complicated. the cladding was attached by a contractor, who then gave the work toa contractor, who then gave the work to a subcontractor. there is a whole chain of people. at the same time, it was signed off by the council. lawyers we spoke to yesterday say that signing off in that way is key. key, as in, liability. potentially. there was another case in 2009 the lakanal house, and in that case, southwark council were fined for signing off something they should not have done. that was part of the case against them. in this case, we do not know yet who was responsible, and the investigation is ongoing, but that is one route that prosecutors could potentially take. there is also the option of corporate manslaughter, quite a new law, only brought in in 2008, and there could be an unlimited fine for
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any of the organisation is involved. —— organisations involved. they would have to prove that senior managers in organisations were aware of what was going on, so it is harder to get to that stage of proof. in terms of the testing of cladding, what is the latest? 75 buildings in 26 council areas across england, every single sample sent in so far, coming back unsafe. the big question is, what are they testing for? we asked the government again and again yesterday and didn't get a response. we think they are testing the combustibility of the panels. people in the industry say that is one way of looking at it, but to get an idea of how safe the outside of the building is, you need to look at everything — the installation, windows, the way it is fixed. this could be confusing because the test does not get at the overall level of fire safety, so how worthwhile
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visit? thank you for the moment, jim. arnold tarling is a chartered surveyor and a fire safety expert. evildoer quick swap with jim. evildoer quick swap withjim. good morning. good morning. are you shocked that we do not have clarity yet on whether the cladding was illegal or not on grenfell tower? no, because the building regulations are such a complete and utter tangle, it's incredibly confusing. it's convoluted. you go from close to clause, and based on my reading and that of many other people, those panels do comply. really? yes. you cannot possibly get 75 blocks with 75 test all failing if people knew what the building regulations were meant to say, if they were meant to be fire resistant. that is very interesting. do you happen to know
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who wrote the building regulations pa rt who wrote the building regulations part b was max the glc and other advisers, but that was before my time. civil servants and experts? yes. and when were they brought in? the first set was in 2000. in 2006, it is word for word the same. there we re it is word for word the same. there were revisions in 2010 and 2013, none of which dealt with sorting out the mess on external cladding. ok, so is your understanding that people have been interpreting it in any way they want, effectively, so that you think the cladding is complied, legal, safe, but others might interpret it different make when they look at —— differently when they look at —— differently when they look at the regulations? they look at —— differently when they look at the regulations7m they look at the regulations7m they interpret it differently, i would like to show —— i would like them to show me how. some people are
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claiming that the external cladding was actually installation. it isn't. who was claiming that?” was actually installation. it isn't. who was claiming that? i have seen that coming up from government, that two sheets of metal with a polyethylene call was the installation, and it isn't. if you go to installation, and it isn't. if you gotoa installation, and it isn't. if you go to a building research establishment document, they will refer —— they are referred to as experts by the government, it is good building guide number 31, all about external cladding and insulation for buildings. they clearly differentiates the installation which is stuck to the building, saying there is often an airgap, and down building, saying there is often an air gap, and down the outside, you have the cladding. they differentiate installation from cladding, so it is humpty dumpty interpretation to say that this metal cladding is now insulation, it is what i say it is, because i think
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it is. it is crazy. ok, thank you very much. tomorrow, we will be dedicating the programme to grenfell tower, two weeks on from the tragedy, speaking to local residents and survivors. do join us at 9am on bbc two, the bbc news channel and online. the level of homophobic bullying in britain's secondary schools has fallen by a third in a decade, according to a study from the university of cambridge. the study, commissioned by the gay rights charity stonewall, says the use of insulting language is less frequent and schools are more likely to prevent attacks on gay pupils. but the report says 45% of gay pupils still face bullying. we can speak now to david braniff—herbert, who was bullied at school over his sexuality, he's now a lgbt activist and to jake jones,
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a secondary school pe teacher in east london who can tell us how his school is tackling bullying of lgbt pupils. welcome to both of you. thank you for talking to us. david, hello. bullying started to you when you went to secondary school when you're about 13, 14 years of age. tell our audience about that. it was a terrifying experience for me, school. it started with name—calling, and i think it is because i wasn't the sort of usual masculine type. i think my voice was different. as soon as they picked up on that, they homed in on it and did that continually. it started with name—calling, but it continually escalated. and the impact on you? i mean, ithink escalated. and the impact on you? i mean, i think i was about 14 when my hair started to fall out. and the stress was getting to me so substantially that i started to consider self harm, started to have thoughts about killing myself. and
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that was a really tough time. my mother could see that there was something going on, and she took me to the doctor, and the doctor diagnosed me with depression. i was given antidepressants. so, it was a really tough time, walking round the school was pretty tough, terrifying. let me bring inj, a pe teacher. —— jake. you teach pupils in years 7-11. what jake. you teach pupils in years 7—11. what do you cover in lessons that may have contributed to the drop in the rate of bullying of lgbt students? in terms of the classes, there is huge scope for a lot of content that could be covered. my
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school has a cutback pride youth network, and this is a group of young people —— my school has a pride youth network. we will talk about lg bt history pride youth network. we will talk about lgbt history at assembly, we will talk about issues around homophobic and transfer big bullying, and it isjust about having role models outside of school. when you have young people who identify as lgbt, they can kind of see that there are aspirations and ever is somewhere for them to go. there is some great organisations out there, and i think in terms of resource, there was a plethora, and it is about showing other schools and teachers where to go. i have been lucky enough to be privy to this information through the work i have done in the lgbt community, so there are great
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organisations such as diversity role models, who will bring in people from the community, people who will do training, pride youth networks, and mermaid, a charity for trans—youth and their families. i think it is definitely going in the right direction. we are going in the right direction. we are going in the right direction, but there are practical policies that will move us in the right direction, such as gender neutral toilets, cubicles in changing rooms. the classes bring up quite a lot of different issues for pupils in that remit, and there is definitely work to be done, but it is not all bad. there is some great stuff going on out there. and we have definitely had some positive experience here at my school. thank you, jake. and thank you, david, for coming on the programme. £46,000 for a two—day train journey for prince charles.
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£1.2 million to replace doors at the orangery at windsor castle. £1.5 million spending on food and drink hospitality in the queen's households, the latest royal accounts make forfascinating reading. they show that the queen is to receive an 8% increase in her income from public funds after the crown estate posted a £24 million rise in profits. robert haigh is director of the consultancy brand finance who, for the last four years have been valuing the monarchy as a business. is that right, robert? yes. what do you think of the royal household expenditure? if you look at it in the context of expenditure that would be happening in a political context, the numbers are not that high. obviously, very different - one lot is elected, one lot definitely not. but if you look at
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the value the queen can deliver for the value the queen can deliver for the country, it is certainly justified. we calculated that the monarchy makes a net contribution to the uk annually of over £1.1 billion. it is value for money. that's interesting. how have you worked out that net contribution? we look at the value from uplift to tourism through the additional appeal of having the monarchy, to heritage sites and international tourism. we also look at the equivalent value of the pr generated by the royal family, equivalent value of the pr generated by the royalfamily, which may sound spurious, but it is genuinely beneficial to the uk to have that additionalfocus on the beneficial to the uk to have that additional focus on the country through the activities of the younger royals and the queen herself. the next point, you know, would we not still have that net contribution without the personnel, if we just contribution without the personnel, if wejust add contribution without the personnel, if we just add buckingham palace, contribution without the personnel, if wejust add buckingham palace, if we just at windsor castle? would we not still have that uplift? there is certainly value in the assets
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themselves. there is a big heritage tourism industry in france, for example. but there is no doubt that the reality of having a living monarchy increases the appeal, and just the fact that the are these living characters the international media can focus on makes that appeal much more significant for the tourism market. thank you very much. a sikh couple say they were told they couldn't adopt a white child because of their cultural heritage. the couple told an adoption agency they were happy to take a child from any ethnic background, but say they were advised instead to adopt a child from india. it's legal for adoption agencies to give preference to parents from the same ethnic group, but government guidelines say different racial backgrounds should not prevent a couple from adopting. let's talk to the couple, reena and sandeep mander, from their home in maidenhead and with us in the studio is their solicitor, georgina calvert—lee. hello all of you.
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let me talk to you both about your experience before we bring in your solicitor. how did you react when you were told that? oh, we were shocked. upset, angry, all the words that you can think of, yes. and what did you say? very hurt. what did you say? sorry, what was the question. there is a delay on the question. there is a delay on the line so forgive me. what did you say when you were told that? well, we we re say when you were told that? well, we were just very shocked and we, when we were told that we couldn't adopt because of things like cultural heritage and that was one of the sole factors really we were quite shocked so we challenged and said why don't you come and understand who we are as people rather than just looking at one factorment we're british born. we're born and bred and we're like any other british couple and whilst
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things like cultural heritage, we believe is important, we think a number of factors need to be looked at, you know, your cultural heritage, yourfinancial at, you know, your cultural heritage, your financial stability, the couple, that you are, how young you are, where you live, all sorts of things need to be looked at and the fact that they looked at this one particular area of cultural heritage and didn't proceed our application because of that made us feel angry. well, our next steps are actually going through the international adoption route, but for this case itself, we rant to raise awareness. we want this not to happen to other couples. we want to make sure it is changed. going through the international adoption route is a costly affair and you know, anyone would struggle to go through that route. but it's really about changing this policy now so it doesn't affect other couples. ok. well, let's bring in your solicitor then.
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so just then. sojust remind then. so just remind people what the rules are then, what the guidelines are? well, the cultural heart ableg is clearly an important factor along with many other things and the problem in this case is that it has been prioritised as a threshold consideration. so whereas they want to register their interest in adopting, as you might register to participate in a race, they are not asking to win the race, they are register. they were not allowed to register. they were not allowed to register and told that it was principally bass the adoption agency thought that they couldn't win. well, that's not how the law is meant to work. what is meant to happen is that the considerations of cultural heritage and the many other factors are considered on a case by case basis in relation to the child, but anyone who wants to adopt and is over 18, but anyone who wants to adopt and is over18, can but anyone who wants to adopt and is over 18, can register, but anyone who wants to adopt and is over18, can register, ought but anyone who wants to adopt and is over 18, can register, ought to be able under the law to register to
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adopt and then when children come up and become available for adoption it is at that point that a specific child factors relate to go a specific child are considered and the best match is sought. so, we don't think that adopt berkshire in this case or any other agency are correct as prir advertising as a threshold matter. that would, that isa ban threshold matter. that would, that is a ban on interracial adoption?m is a ban on interracial adoption?m is almost like a form of segregation which seems wrong. we have a statement from the adopt berkshire agency. they said they don't comment on individual cases. what do you intend to do next? we are going down the
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intercou ntry to do next? we are going down the intercountry adoption route. we have had a nine or ten month gruelling process. we have had the training for that and we are so excited about it. we have been approved by the department for education for that now, so we are in the process of appointing our lawyers in the usa to manage our usa affairs. that's where our focus is right manage our usa affairs. that's where ourfocus is right now manage our usa affairs. that's where our focus is right now and we are 100% committed to that and really excited about it. could you not go elsewhere in great britain, use another agency or is it to do with where you live? well, we could have gone else. i looked at a different adoption agency at the time, i think maybe barnardo's, they weren't taking domestic adoption at the time and there is other places we could have gone as well, but the very first communication we got from adopt berk painted a bleak picture that we wouldn't have much chance in the uk which is why we decided to go
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oun the intercountry route. how do you feel about the way you have been forced to proceed ? you feel about the way you have been forced to proceed? i think it's been quite hurtful in the way that it has been pushed forward from a cultural heritage prospective. what makes a good parent and i think that the fa ct good parent and i think that the fact that we've gone through the international adoption centre and actually been successful and been signed off by the department for education to a adopt from the usa, that would have been the same process that we would have gone through through the domestic route. it is quite hurtful that, we were, i suppose, written off at the first hurdle. as georgina said, we weren't looking to win the race, we didn't get to the application stage and you know all we're saying is, look at us
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asa know all we're saying is, look at us as a whole, don'tjust look at cultural heritage. we are a british couple. cultural heritage can mean a number of things, we may not be suitable, but look at the holistic picture. thank you for your time. the president trump ordered missile strikes gebs syria in april after civilians were killed by chemical weapons. with me now is a middle east cultural expert who lived in syria before and during the revolution. she is the author of my house in damascus, an inside view of the crisis. with us is a syrian
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doctor who lives in the uk. his nephew was injured in a chemical weapons attack in 2013. he lives there along with his family. 0k, let's talk to them both now. good morning to you. first of all, what do you think of the intelligence that donald trump is receiving that suggest that is a chemical weapons attack is being prepared. thank you very much. well, actually, i think the west don't take the appropriate measures to stop president assad and his aides from using these lethal weapons. what do you believe the appropriate measures are? when we go back to april time, the american response was attacking an airport which didn't leave major impact on the syrian regime or its attitude or
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behaviour. so whenever the... the syrian regime or its attitude or behaviour. so whenever the. .. you think they should have attacked something else? they have to be more determined that chemical weapons should not be used. can i be really specific about what you are saying? are you saying the americans should bombt are you saying the americans should bomb t chemical weapons facilities or assad's home or his palace, what are you saying? of course. all of those? all of those. if you look at the attacks that took place in details, what did the regime lose? he lost almost nothing. he's preparing for more attacks on the idlib area and the rebel—held areas around syria what do you think of president trump's warning? well, i agree with mohamed that here we are
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seventh year of the war, in ersha of the west and the previous american administration and look where we've ended up. president obama said use this is a red line and then nothing happened. so that was like giving assad a green light to carry on using barrel bombs and all the other methods of killing. people forget the figures range between 75% and 90% of the people killed in this war are killed by the assad regime and it's allies. a tiny proportion are killed by isis. something like 3% to 5 percent and yet we in the west all we do is focus on isis. isis is the symptom of assad and somehow we have got this completely skewed. the media is so locked in on isis. got this completely skewed. the media is so locked in on isism the us did what mohamed would like them to do, what do you think the russians would do in response who are backing president assad of
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syria? this is interesting, of course, because russia entered the syrian stage if you like with 30 aeroplanes, you know, less than two years ago and has taken the agenda. have ta ken the years ago and has taken the agenda. have taken the agenda completely because of the vacuum. what do you think they would do? they have to think they would do? they have to think seriously because the americans can completely out gun them. they know trump is serious. trump has shown that he is not a man to be messed with. he doesn't make idle threats and so i think at the moment they're stilljust pushing to see how far trump really will go. this is why there have been so many incidents in recent weeks, there has been this constant tiny escalations which ended with the us shooting down the syrian plane for the first time. so, it's kind of inching up and each one putin and trump are kind of feeling each other out to see how far this is going to go. so, yes, i mean, it's going to come to a head and of course, the reason it's so head and of course, the reason it's so key is because of what's going to
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happen when raqqa falls. everyone is fighting for the geopolitical area now that used to be a back water, but now it has become so important. thank you very much. the european competition watchdog fined google over 2 billion euros for abusing its dominance as a search engine. that news is just in. we are back tomorrow from 9am from kenning sing tonne. —— kensington. there is no consolation if you have been stuck under the rain this morning. heavy rain across northern parts of wales and northern england and into scotland. this is the recent radar image. we are being attacked by two areas of low pressure. 0ne attacked by two areas of low pressure. one is bringing us the rain across northern parts of the uk. the other down towards france will give us thundery rain towards the south east of england during this afternoon. now, for northern
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ireland, things brightening up a little bit later on. there will be heavy and thundery showers developing here, but elsewhere, it stays cloudy. rain at times through the afternoon and temperatures in the afternoon and temperatures in the mid to high teens. through this evening and tonight, well that rain becomes more extensive across england and wales. it remains cloudy into wednesday morning. temperatures down to about 12 to 14 celsius. but more rain expected during wednesday. pretty soggy actually for many parts of england and wales. showers into northern ireland as well, but you notice for scotland, not looking too bad tomorrow, especially the north—west of scotland. shelter from the mountains here, there will be sunny spells developing, but elsewhere, beneath the cloud and the rain, temperatures about 15 to 19 celsius. bye— bye. this is bbc news and these are the top stories at 11. google faces a possible record fine over its shopping comparison service
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from the eu's regulator. nicola sturgeon is expected to set out her position on a second independence referendum at holyrood later today. the governor of the bank of england warns that consumer borrowing is increasing rapidly. the us says syria may be preparing another chemical weapons attack and warns president assad will pay a heavy price if it goes ahead. a royal pay rise — the queen gets an 8% increase in her income from public funds, rising to £82 million from the next financial year. and the 50th anniversary of the world's first cash machine being opened, but how many of us still

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