Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 27, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 2pm. google‘s been fined more than £2.1 billion by the european commission for favouring its own shopping services. theresa may says there should be a major national investigation google has abused its market dominance as a search engine by giving illegal advantages to other google products, its shopping comparison service. theresa may says there should be a major national investigation into what went wrong with cladding on high rise buildings. nicola sturgeon is expected to set out her position on brexit and a second independence referendum this afternoon. the governor of the bank of england issues an amber warning over rapidly rising consumer debt. the public spending watchdog says at least 1700 patients may have been harmed, when thousands of patient records were accidentally put in storage. the world's first atm was installed at a barclays in north london in 1967.
2:01 pm
there are now 70,000 in the uk. 0ne one man's tale of survival after being hit by a bus. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the internet giant google has been fined a record £2.1 billion by the european commission, for putting its own online shopping services at the top of search results. it's the biggest fine in the commission's history. it said google had abused its market dominance. google now has 90 days to end the practice. more details from our technology correspondent, rory cellanjones. put the name of something you might
2:02 pm
want to buy into google‘s search engine and right at the top, up pops a helpful box with images of products. do it on a mobile phone and the images are even more prominent. every time you click on one of the adverts, the search giant aims money. it is called google shopping and now it has resulted in a record fine from europe's competition commissioner. google has abused its market dominance in its search engine by promoting its own shopping comparison service in its search results and demoting its competitors. google is under fire because of its sheer size for the pit accused of using its position as the dominant player in online search to squash rivals. a price competitive site is being squeezed by google shopping is celebrating today's move. without competition, google can charge merchants whatever
2:03 pm
they like for advertising. with competition, you end up with lots of people like ourselves, companies competing on prices which brings the price down and that's got to be good for consumers. merchants will charge less. that a good day for consumers. google said it come from tech giants like amazon and it believes brussels has improved the consumers are being harmed for the firm released a statement saying google showed shopping at connecting our users with thousands of advertisers large and small in ways that are useful for both. we respectfully disagree with the conclusions announced today. this is the latest in a series of battles which have pitched europe against american technology companies. the eu says it's enforcing competition law and the americans may suspect this is all about politics. it's an eye watering finer. richard stables is the ceo of kelkoo group, another price—comparison site.
2:04 pm
hejoins me on webcam from brussels. good afternoon to you. are you satisfied with this sanction, with the level of fine? i think the commission has done a fantasticjob today. she has stood up for consumers. she's found against google and put down a marker and said they have done some seriously bad things and that represents the size of the fine. this is a great day for consumers. we are going to get back a promise of a proper working, functioning market. while google was abusing its position, in the words of the commission, what sort of impact was that having on kelko? devastating. we saw huge loss of traffic, over the last ten years, we've lost over 95% of our traffic coming from google, as have most of the other competitors in this space. i don't know one price comparison site that hasn't been massively smashed by google, by their actions over the last ten years. was there anything that you found you could do
2:05 pm
during that time to try to reverse that? to fight back against that? well, the problem is that as google is effectively the internet, 90% of people use google as the start of search. it's almost impossible for the likes of kelko to find other traffic sources. you can't afford tv advertising because your revenue per visitor is so small. you have to go through google. google is the only platform where you can get traffic effectively. if they want to kill off businesses like kelko, that's what they do. today the commissioner said no, enough is enough. you cannot do this in the likes of shopping, this is a decision that could be used in things like travel, it could be used in news, maps, local, all the different types of businesses that google goes after. just explain for us, for our viewers
2:06 pm
now, what difference this is going to make when google implements the recommendations of the commission's finding, it has 90 days to do so? so, effectively what the commission has said is you can't preference yourself above everybody else. what google did is it said right, all these price comparison sites, i'm putting you on page 50 where you get no traffic. i put myself at the top. what today's decision is really going to push google to have to do is say, if we're going to put ourselves at the top of the listing, we need to share that space with other players such as kelkoo and give them real estate, give them the chance to be seen and put ads at the top of google. the it's the same thing happening in travel and in news etc, etc. it's exactly the same sort of principle you'd use across lots of industries. you are poised, presumably, as are many others, for
2:07 pm
this new situation that you'll find yourselves in? this is a fantastic day for consumers and we are very, very pleased. we have spent many yea rs very pleased. we have spent many years now just very pleased. we have spent many years nowjust trying to survive. i've had to lay off lots of people. it's been very, very tough. it's because of google anticompetitive behaviour. they have done illegal acts. the evidence is absolutely overwhelming. i just acts. the evidence is absolutely overwhelming. ijust pick up one thing that you said earlier, that people would say this is a usa versus europe. it's not. so many of the complainants and the people going against google are american company, yell, 0racle, news corp. they said yesterday in a letter, we support what the commissioner is doing. google tried to dot same thing, nobody‘s come out on their behalf, which says a lot of things. this is about google hurting consumers, plain and simple. are you continuing your action against google or does this bring an end to
2:08 pm
it? no, we will continue our action against google. we will continue that in the high court. 0k, ceo of that in the high court. ok, ceo of kelkoo group, thank you very much. two weeks after the fire, families from the area and beyond are still facing uncertainty about where to live. thousands of people were told to leave their flats in camden in north london at the weekend, after tower blocks there were found to be covered in the same type of cladding as grenfell, but some people are now adamant they will return home. tom burridge reports. help for the hundreds in north london still out of their homes. most turning up here at the local leisure centre are staying in hotels. 10.45 in the evening, somebody called and said, we've found you a place, can you move? isaid, yes, i can, but for how long? and they said two nights. i'm not going to move for two nights. with the children and everything, you wake them up 10.45 in the evening, they don't sleep because we have to move. we will be somewhere else and then tomorrow you have to return back
2:09 pm
into the sports hall. other residents pitched up this morning with donations for those who had been evacuated. people's lives put on hold. 0n the one hand, camden council says their homes are not safe, but for many moving out suddenly with small children or elderly residents and into a hotel simply hasn't worked and many tell us they're now moving back into their flats. people like 0sman and his wife and theirfive children — last night seven of them stayed in three rooms. the hotel told us we have to check out today 12 o'clock and we have got one hour and a half to go and pack our stuff and leave and we don't know where we are going to go next. all this because the cladding, together with other fire safety measures in their block of flats, was not deemed safe. some residents have complained about conditions in their hotels. in response britannia hotels released a statement: buildings across the country,
2:10 pm
public and private, are being inspected following the fire at grenfell. it was a tragedy that demands change. tom burridge, bbc news. with me is our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. it's the scale of that change, because we've had 95 buildings checked, every single one has failed. was going on? this is a growing crisis, a fire safety crisis in social housing, and possibly other areas too, hospitals and private tower blocks are being checked. i think what a lot of people now want to know is: what are these tests that the government is carrying out on sections of cladding taken from tower blocks across the country. the government is not answering that question. we've asked many times over the last few days and into last week. the problem is if you're a council housing manager 01’ if you're a council housing manager
2:11 pm
or perhaps the private managerfor the council you need to know what you've done wrong, in terms of fitting this stuff. the government's guidance to these housing managers is if you find you have a problem there are steps you have to take, for example, bringing in fire safety expectors to look —— inspectors to look at the building in. camden that meant taking pretty much all the residents of four tower blocks out for their safety. we're in a bizarre situation where a council will say that what they did at the time is legal. as far as we can understand, the cladding in place was legal. the various regulations say you can use cladding that is potentially going to burn in a fire as long as the design you put it in as part of is safe. that is a separate sort of test. the government's doing a test of the material. that's again a different approach. i think there's a feeling among, growing feeling that the goal posts have been moved and that councils really don't know what is safe now. adding to the
2:12 pm
chaos, we've got these scenes in camden, where families are being rehoused in hotels for a day or two and they're saying, that's not going to work for me, i may as well go home. i spoke to some of the refuseniks last night. they said they won't go. when you look at the scale of the work there it's enormous. it's not just scale of the work there it's enormous. it's notjust the cladding on the outside. it's putting in potentially a thousand fire doors. the leader of the council told me they will have to ask the government to help them get hold of that number of fire doors in such a short space of fire doors in such a short space of time. also, we have got information that the fire doors were never put into the tower blocks because of cost. that's something we put to the council last night. they've not given a detailed response. the leader of the council didn't deny it and said those were questions she too had. because she's beenin questions she too had. because she's been in thejob questions she too had. because she's been in the job for... questions she too had. because she's been in the job for. .. a month. thank you very much. the bank of england has warned against rising consumer borrowing and household debt, in its twice—yearly report about the uk economy.
2:13 pm
borrowing on credit cards and car finance are at their fastest rate in more than a decade. banks will also be forced to find a further £11 billion in the next 18 months, to protect their finances against the risk of bad loans. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, has the details. are we borrowing too much and could we still afford it if something went wrong? the bank of england warned today that banks were loosening lending to consumers and action was needed to make it tighter. consumer borrowing, outside of mortgages, is nearly £200 billion. consumer credit growth has far outpaced that of household income over the past year with notable increases across credit cards, personal loans and autofinance. in an environment of intense competition interest margins have fallen and risk assessments by banks have declined, or by lenders have declined. lenders are more
2:14 pm
vulnerable to losses and stress. the bank's big concern is consumer lending, on credit cards, personal loa ns lending, on credit cards, personal loans and notably car finance. so far there haven't been that many people who can't keep up their repayments. the bank says lenders may be assuming it's just going to carry on that way. the banks acting to stop lenders being complacent in case those loans go bad, with consumer credit up by 10. 3% and car loa ns consumer credit up by 10. 3% and car loans growing at 15%, far faster than wages, banks are being ordered to set aside an extra £11 billion in case those loans can't be repaid.|j think mark carney wants to be proactive. he talked of increasing additional capital a year ago, but he held off because of the brexit issue. i think he wants to make sure the banks are reminded they have to be more cautious in consumer lending given the speed the loan books have grown. if banks are forced to tighten up lending, households won't find it as easy to top up sagging
2:15 pm
incomes with cheap borrowingment there will be —— borrowing. there will be consequences. banks will lend less and charge more. currently there are 8. 8 million people using credit for daily living costs. it's those people who i'm concerned about. because they will get into trouble and what we need to make sure that we need to protect those people. most of the growth in consumer borrowing has been in so—called personal contract purchase agreements for cars, where car buyers can return the car when the loa n buyers can return the car when the loan period is up. if second hand car prices drop, drivers would be safe, lenders would be hit. if that happened, the bank of england said, the banks could with stand any losses. it's 2. 15. the headlines: google has been hit with a record fine of more tan £2 billion by the eu competition regulator for illegally favouring its shopping services. nicola sturgeon is expected to set out her position on a second
2:16 pm
independence referendum at holyrood shortly. the governor of the bank of england hasissued the governor of the bank of england has issued an amber warning that consumer borrowing is rapidly increasing. the british and irish lions miss out ona win the british and irish lions miss out on a win over the superrugby side the hurricanes. 31—31 it finished. the hurricanes ran in three second—half tries. heather knight scores a century in the women's world cup in pakistan. it leaves them well placed for victory, following defeat to india in the opening match. andy murray has pulled out of today's exhibition match, citing a sore hip. it's said to bea match, citing a sore hip. it's said to be a precaution year measure with the world number one set to play on friday before beginning the defence of his wimbledon title on monday. i'm back with more on those stories at half past. we're expecting shortly,
2:17 pm
scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will set out her position this afternoon on what she refers to as "the way forward for scotland". nicola sturgeon had called for a second independence referendum, to be held in the autumn of next year or the spring of 2019. we'll bring you that statement live as soon as it begins. the prime minister has been visiting a school in bristol today and speaking about scottish independence. let'sjust listen to what she's had to say. when i first became prime minister, i was clear that one of the injustices we needed to deal with was this whole issue of how we work with and how we help people with mental health problems. i'm particularly concerned, as i set out injanuary, particularly concerned, as i set out in january, with particularly concerned, as i set out injanuary, with ensuring that we're dealing with young people's mental health and assuring young people of their mental health. that's why this is so important today. i've come here to 0rchard school. what i've heard from the pupils and from the teachers is the importance of raising awareness of young people's mental health and of giving young people the confidence of being able to speak to somebody when they have
2:18 pm
a mental health problem and identifying that. that's why this training for teachers is so important. so ensuring that in every school, starting with secondary schools, there will be a member of staff who can identify mental health problems and help to work with the young people to address those issues. separate to the mental health, you're in a school here today, schools funding was a controversial issue in the election. all schools are going to be worse off infour all schools are going to be worse off in four years' time under current plans. what are you doing about that? as we set out in ma nifesto about that? as we set out in manifesto at the time of the election, we will continue to put record levels of funding into schools — record levels of funding into schools - per head of pupil the funding is going down. we will continue to increase the funding thatis continue to increase the funding that is going into schools. i want to see that we have a fairer distribution of that funding across the country, so i'll be working with schools. we have put out some proposals. we will be listening to responses to that. we want to make sure there is a fair distribution of the money around schools. at the moment, we see some schools getting significantly more per head of pupil
2:19 pm
than others. no extra money? there is extra money — than others. no extra money? there is extra money - per head of pupil it is going down. there will continue to be extra funding going into schools. we need tone sure we have a fair —— need to ensure we have a fair —— need to ensure we have a fair distribution. you've done your deal with the dup, scotla nd done your deal with the dup, scotland and wales, indig nation from there. why no extra money for them and indeed for england as well? we've seen across scotland, wales and england government investing in those parts of the country, if you look at scotland, we've seen city deals in scotland. we've seen the same here in the south—west, the bristol city deal. we've seen the local growth deal. the government recognises the importance of investing in all parts of the country. that's what i want to ensure, a cannes tray that works for eve ryo ne ensure, a cannes tray that works for everyone and ensuring we see growth and prosperity across the whole country. nicola sturgeon's due to make a statement this afternoon. we don't know exactly, what but suggestions she way speak about indyref two and it's been dubbed.
2:20 pm
what are your thoughts on scotland's holding another referendum ? what are your thoughts on scotland's holding another referendum? what nicola sturgeon should be saying is that she's going to completely take off the table indyref2. i think that was the clear message from the general election. i think now is the time for the united kingdom to be pulling together not being driven apart. finally prime minister, coming up this morning you discussed an investigation into the flammable, well, flammable materials being used on high rise buildings, cladding, tell me about that. what we've seen from the investigations that have taken place from the investigations that have ta ken place of from the investigations that have taken place of cladding material in tower blocks across the country is that we've seen so far 100% of these materials being combustible. something has clearly gone wrong over a number of years. we need to find out what, why and how to make sure it doesn't happen again. the prime minister talking about a wise range of subjects, including the issue —— a wide range of subjects, including scottish independence.
2:21 pm
0ur scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, is in edinburgh. looking ahead to the speech from nicola sturgeon, the context has changed considerably since she first spoke about the notion of having indyref2 in the autumn of next year or spring 2019. yeah that original announcement made about three months ago, way back in march, feels like a long time now. a lot has happened since. 0f long time now. a lot has happened since. of course, it was all tied up with brexit, a majority of people here in scotland voted to remain as pa rt here in scotland voted to remain as part of the european union. nicola sturgeon said she wanted people here in scotland to have a chance to vote ona in scotland to have a chance to vote on a second independence referendum, once the terms of those negotiations to leave the european union were known. of course, there was a general election campaign where the unionist parties campaigned heavily on the issue of a second independence referendum, saying no to that. a general election result where the snp, while still the
2:22 pm
biggest party by far here in scotland, did see a significant dent in the number of seats they have at westminster, falling from 56 to 35. their share of the vote from 50% to 37%. nicola sturgeon herself said on the day after the result that the question of another independence referendum was a factor in those results and said she would reflect on it. that is what we expect her to talk about this afternoon in the scottish parliament. her statement will start imminently. it will last about 15 minutes. then she will take questions from others in the chamber. she has a very difficult juggfing chamber. she has a very difficult juggling act going forward, those unionist parties wanting her to take the prospect of a second independence referendum off the table entirely. the conservatives said indyref2 is dead. those in her party not so keen to shut down that
2:23 pm
option, perhaps urging her to stay steady as she goes. the co—conveners of the green party here in scotland wrote to say she should stick to the time table as previously set out. of course, the snp and the scottish parliament rely on the greens, they relied on the greens to get a mandate for her to try and seek the right to hold a second referendum. they won't be happy if she now changes her position. she's been getting a lot of advice from various sources. do you think at the very least she's going to park the idea of another independence referendum for the time being and move away from those dates this she talked about earlier this year? it is hard to know exactly what she's going to say this afternoon. i think she will try to do the very tricky thing of squaring a circle, trying to keep her options open going forward, perhaps let the time table that she set out slip a little. perhaps
2:24 pm
change the issue a little. perhaps try to tie it to brexit a little more strongly. but she will have a challenge because the unionist parties here in scotland do sense weakness. they will keep going at her on this issue, if she gives herself room for manoeuvre going forward. presumably part of nicola sturgeon's calculations will have been to keep the notion of another referendum up her sleeve as a response it a so—called hard brexit. yeah, the snp are opposed very strongly to the idea of a hard brexit. they know that a majority of people in that referendum a year ago voted against leaving the european union, so at least on the issue of europe, they know a majority of people here in scotland are on her side. she will want to keep options open, with negotiations over brexit going forward. we don't know how
2:25 pm
they will resolve, whether it will bea they will resolve, whether it will be a good result for the united kingdom or one which is not so positive. i think she will try and keep her options open. she will try and tip her hat to the fact that these results in the general election weren't as good as perhaps the snp had hoped for. as i said, she herself acknowledged that the idea of a second independence referendum — let's hear what she has to say. some of those challenges like brexit are not of our choosing, but we must always remember that scotland is one of the richest countries in the world with resources and talent in abundance. 0ur task is to make the most of our great potential and build the kind of country we want to be, a fair, prosperous open and tolerant country. working towards that goal my responsibility as first minister is to build as much unity and
2:26 pm
consensus as is to build as much unity and consensus as possible. that is why, after the election, which was, of course, after the election, which was, of course , won after the election, which was, of course, won by the snp in scotland... applause isaid thati applause i said that i would reflect on the outcome and in particular on the issue of an independence referendum. i have done so carefully, taking time to listen to a broad spectrum of voices both within and out with my party. i want to set out today where those reflections have taken me. before i do so, though, let me underline two enduring points: firstly, it remains my view and indeed the position of this government that at the end of the brexit process the people of scotland should have a choice about our future direction as a country. indeed, the implications of brexit
2:27 pm
are so potentially far reaching that as they become clearer, i think people will increasingly demand that choice. we face a brexit that we did not vote for and in a form more extreme than most would have imagined just one year ago. now the terms of that brexit are being negotiated by a uk government with no clear mandate, precious little authority and no real idea, even within its own ranks, of what it is seeking to achieve. where we must hope for the best, the reality is that with the uk government's current approach, even a so—called good deal will be on terms substantially inferior to our current eu membership. of course, there is now a real risk that the uk will crash out of the eu with no deal or a very bad deal. with deep and long lasting consequences for jobs, trade, investment, living standards and the opportunities open to future generations. 0n
2:28 pm
standards and the opportunities open to future generations. on top of all of that, as we saw so clearly in the deal struck with the dup yesterday, we now have a uk government that talks about wanting to strengthen the bonds of the uk, but in reality is so desperate to cling onto power at any cost that it is prepared to ride roughshod over the very principles of the entire devolution settlement. so if scotland is not simply to be at the mercy of events, but instead in control of our own future, then the ability to choose a different direction must be available to us. secondly, presiding officer, there is no doubt that the scottish government has a mandate to offer the people of scotland that choice within this term of parliament. we have not one but two elections, with that explicit commitment in our manifesto. and the scottish parliament has also endorsed that position. by any normal standard of democracy, that mandate is beyond question. op
2:29 pm
parties no matter how strongly they disagree with us on independence, as is their right, should therefore stop trying to turn the basic rules of democracy on their head. applause presiding officer, the mandate we haveis presiding officer, the mandate we have is beyond doubt, but deciding exactly how and when to exercise it isa exactly how and when to exercise it is a matter of judgment exactly how and when to exercise it is a matter ofjudgment and it is a judgment that must be made in the interests of the country as a whole. that is what i have been thinking carefully about. before, during and since the election campaign, i have had hundreds of conversations with people in every part of scotland about the issues of brexit and a second independence referendum. that, of course, some people who don't want a referendum ever because
2:30 pm
they oppose independence in all circumstances. i respect that position. it is entirely honourable and just as legitimate as the position of those who support independence in all circumstances and want another referendum tomorrow. but many people, probably the majority, fall into neither of these categories. indeed, having spoke ton many people who voted yes in 2014 and to many others who did not but who would be open minded in future, what has struck me is the commonality of their views. they worry about the uncertainty of brexit and the lack of any clarity whatsoever about what it means. some of them just want a break from the pressure of making big political decisions. they agree our future should not be imposed on us but feel it's too soon right now to make a firm decision about the precise timing ofa firm decision about the precise timing of a referendum. they want greater clarity about brexit to
2:31 pm
emerge first and they want to be able to measure that up against clarity about the options scotland would have for securing a different relationship with europe. in the meantime, whatever their scepticism about the likely outcome of the negotiations, they want the scottish government to focus as hard as we can on securing the best possible outcome for scotland. indeed that view has even more force now that the general election and the weakness of the uk government has re—opened the possibility, however narrow, of averting a hard brexit and retaining membership of the single market. i have a duty to listen to those views and i intend to do so. the scottish government remains committed to the principle of giving scotland a choice at the end of this process but i want to reassure people that our proposal is not for a referendum now or before there is sufficient clarity about the options
2:32 pm
but to give them a choice at the end of the brexit process when that clarity has emerged, so i am confirming that having listened and reflected, the scottish government will reset the plan i set out in march. we will not seek to introduce the legislation for an independence referendum immediately, but will in good faith redouble our efforts and put our shoulder to the wheels in seeking to influence the brexit talks in a way that protects scotland's interests. we will seek maximum support around the proposals set out in our paper, scotland's place in europe, to keep us in the single market with new powers. we will do all we can to influence the uk in that direction and then at the end of the period of negotiation with the eu, likely to be next autumn, when the terms of brexit
2:33 pm
will be clearer, we will come back to parliament to set out our judgment on the best way for it, including the timescale for offering people a choice on our future. i am also issuing a challenge to other parties. the scottish government will stand the best chance of positively influencing the brexit outcome if we are at the table with the full backing of our national parliament by doing for the option of staying in the single market, so join us now with no equivocation, back the demands for the democratically elected scottish government to be at the table to influence the uk's negotiating strategy and for scotland and the uk to stay in the european single market. the second conclusion i have reached is this. the focus on the when and how of the referendum has been at the expense of setting out
2:34 pm
the reasons why scotland should be independent. we're only talking of another referendum so soon after the la st another referendum so soon after the last one because of brexit and it is certainly the case that independence may be the only way to protect scotland from the impact of brexit but the case for an independent scotland goes far beyond the brexit. many of us already believe that independence is the right and the best answer to the many complex challenges we face and the best way to seize and fully realise are many opportunities, but we must persuade the majority in scotland of that. we have not done that yet but i have no doubt that we can, so the challenge for all of us who believes scotland should be independent is to get on with the hard work of making that case on all its merits in a way that is relevant to the changes, hopes and challenges we face now and in
2:35 pm
the years ahead. that is what we will do but we will not do what loan because the independence case is bigger than us. my party will engage openly and work as part of the wider independence movement. we will seek to engage and grow that movement and build the case that having decisions made by us, not for us, offers the best future for our country. we will seek to best future for our country. we will seekto win best future for our country. we will seek to win the case that governing ourselves is the best way to tackle the challenges we face as a country, from building a better and more sustainable economics to growing our population, strengthening our democracy and tackling problems of poverty and inequality. my last point is this, the snp government has been in office for ten years. i am incredibly proud of our achievements, delivered in the most
2:36 pm
challenges of circumstances and in the face of unprecedented westminster cuts. i am also clear about our priorities moving forward, notjust fighting about our priorities moving forward, not just fighting scotland's corner in brexit but growing our economy and making sure the public services we rely on by their when we need them from cradle to grave. that means working every day to improve education, equip our nhs, lift people out of poverty and build a social security system with dignity at its heart, but any government after ten years needs to take stock, so over this summer as we prepare our next programme for government and our budget for the year ahead, thatis and our budget for the year ahead, that is what we will do. we will set out our vision for the country we lead with the creative, old and radical policies that as far as possible within the current powers
2:37 pm
available to us will help us realise that bold vision for scotland. presiding officer, we look for to getting on with the job in the best interests of all the people of scotland. we now have about 30 minutes for questions. there is around 30 minutes for questions and a lot of interest. ruth davidson. minutes for questions and a lot of interest. ruth davidsonlj minutes for questions and a lot of interest. ruth davidson. ithink the glum faces protest too much with the extended applause. since the 2014 referendum no one in this chamber has called for members on the snp benches to revoke their belief in independence but the issue we have had has been with the first minister
2:38 pm
who tried to did use the uk's decision to leave the eu to impose another independence referendum. no ones ina another independence referendum. no ones in a generation, no member agreement respecting the result, just a single decision to try to secure nicola sturgeon's place in history, and that decision cost 21 seats and the support of half a million scottish voters in the general election. yes voters and no voters, most people simply don't wa nt voters, most people simply don't want this brought back soon and none of the questions that are raised by brexit are answered by ripping scotland out of our own union of nations, our biggest markets and closest friends, and today's statement will fail to give any assurance to those people that this first minister is listening to them, and she makes virtually no mention
2:39 pm
of her domestic responsibilities, instead of appearing to be in denial about her mistakes in this past year and is leaking credibility and confidence in her leadership. her response hasn't been to reflect but to lash out at the uk government and to lash out at the uk government and to sing the same old songs in the same old tune, so let me ask, she claims to be putting the referendum to one side and will not introduce the referendum bill immediately, so why doesn't she give the country some certainty and take it off the table for the rest of this parliament? the reason it would be wrong to take, to use ruth's language, a choice over our future off the table for the duration of this parliament is this. the conservative government are taking this entire country down a path that is potentially the most damaging thing to happen to us for a
2:40 pm
generation or more. we don't yet know the destination of that journey but we do know if the tories get their way, the outcome of this could be devastating for scottish jobs, trade, living standards, the opportunities of generations to come. i do not think it is right for scotland to be left at the mercy of work the tories want to take us regardless of how damaging that is to our present and future, and that is why i believed at the end of this process people should have that choice, but equally i recognise that people do not feel ready right now to say when that choice should happen because of the uncertainty created not just by happen because of the uncertainty created notjust by brexit but by there a close approach to with that this government is pursuing, so we will take account of that and listen and over the next months, we will do
2:41 pm
everything in our power with absolute focus to try to get from brexit and outcome that best protects scotland's interests and i repeat my challenge to other parties, if you also have scotland's interests at heart, get behind this government in seeking to be at the table influencing these negotiations and getting the best outcome for scotland. it used to be that ruth davidson thought being in the eu was best to scotland and then she capitulated, she used to think being in the single market was best for scotland. for once can she stand firm and back big scottish government in getting the best deal for scotland? government in getting the best deal for scotland ? the difference government in getting the best deal for scotland? the difference between us and the uk government is we will continue to make judgments that be considered to be in the best interests of the country and that is in stark contrast to the uk government right now, having
2:42 pm
blundered and miscalculated its way into an eu referendum and then into a hard brexit position and then into a hard brexit position and then into a general election, it is now so desperate to cling to power at any cost regardless of the damage that will do to our economy, to the reputation of the country to loosen settlement, even to peace in northern ireland, it is a shameful approach to governing and what is even more shameful is that ruth davidson is prepared to be a cheerleader for all that, davidson is prepared to be a cheerleaderforallthat, so davidson is prepared to be a cheerleader for all that, so ruth davidson continued to be at cheerleader for the conservatives, i and this government will continue to ta ke and this government will continue to take decisions in the best interests of scotland. kezia dugdale. the first minister says she has heard the views of the people, she has reflected on the results of the election and her conclusion is to
2:43 pm
double down and continue her campaign for independence but the threat of unwanted second independence referendum is dead and this didn't happen because nicola sturgeon wanted it to, the people of scotland have ta ken sturgeon wanted it to, the people of scotland have taken that decision for her. but the first minister is digging her heels in, putting her fingers in herears digging her heels in, putting her fingers in her ears and pressing on regardless. she isjust not listening. first minister, why don't you understand the people of scotland sent to a clear message that the election, get back to governing. when will you get on with the job that matters, improving our schools, growing our economy and fixing our nhs? it's clear that chelsea dugdale scripted that question before she listened to the statement that we made. we will not proceed with legislation for
2:44 pm
independence immediately but will do everything in our power to get the best possible outcome from brexit. we will do all in our power to protect scotland's interests and then we would judge the best way for it to make sure scotland is not at the mercy of the outcome of that process regardless of how damaging it is in the difference between my position and cosy dugdale's position is simple. i want scotland to be in control of our future. i don't want us to have to accept any decision imposed by a tory government regardless of the damage it does. i wa nt regardless of the damage it does. i want us to be in control of our own future, labour having advised many people in scotland to vote for the conservatives want to leave the future of our country at the mercy of the conservatives. that will continue to be the difference between our two parties. patrick
2:45 pm
harvie. scotland has not consented to being taken out of the european union against our will. scotland has not consented to the social and economic wreckage which will result if that happens. if the first minister does not introduce a referendum bill until after autumn next year, how long will it be after we have been dragged out of europe without having consented to it before the people of scotland or even entitled to make their choice and white after a negotiation between a uk government and eu in situations and these systems made by every other member state in europe, why should the people of scotland be the only ones without the right to make a decision on that timescale?”
2:46 pm
believe scotland should have a choice at the end of this process but i recognise that the uncertainty around this process which is down to the incompetent reckless approach of the incompetent reckless approach of the uk government, that makes it difficult even for those who do want as choice at the end of this process to see how we can set a firm timescale and that is why i have said today we are resetting the plan i outlined on march the 13th. we will not introduce that legislation now, we will seek to get the best deal for scotland and then make a judgment on the right time for a choice when we have greater clarity, which on the timescale being followed now i estimate it would be around autumn of next year. i think thatis around autumn of next year. i think that is the sensible way ford because that first recognises the desire of people not to be rushed, not to have to make a choice before
2:47 pm
they have the information to make an informed choice, something i never wanted people to have to do, but secondly it to make sure that we have the ability to protect our interests at the end of this process. for many people the real impact of brexit has not started to be felt, i suspect that is about to start to change quickly but as first ministerl start to change quickly but as first minister i cannot let anybody across this country in the pipes and pretend i do not have profound concerns about the impact of what is about to happen on people in scotland, not just now about to happen on people in scotland, notjust now but about to happen on people in scotland, not just now but for many years to come. to choose that would be one thing but do have that imposed upon us, firstly through the eu referendum and then through having no choice at the end of the process, would be profoundly wrong, soiam process, would be profoundly wrong, so i am balancing those interests, recognising that it is not simply for me to decide the future of this
2:48 pm
country but making sure it is equally not for a conservative government at westminster to decide the future of this country regardless of what anybody across scotland might want. willie rennie. the first minister has had a long ha rd the first minister has had a long hard think and has concluded she should call another independence referendum at a time of her choosing, so nothing has changed. if she wanted to prove she had listened, the first minister should trigger a in this chamber which would rule out another independence referendum in this parliamentary term. will she agreed to that? since willie rennie didn't seem to give any respect to win the scottish parliament did vote on this matter, why would we expect him to expect their vote why would we expect him to expect theirvote in why would we expect him to expect their vote in the future? it seems
2:49 pm
he wants to pick and choose when he respects the well of this parliament, but on the issue of this referendum, i don't agree with the positions of the conservatives for labour, they want to leave this country at the mercy of whatever happens in brexit are damaging it is but at least their positions have consistency and logic. there is no consistency and logic. there is no consistency or logic on the position of the liberal democrats on this issue. they don't want to give people in scotland the choice that they want a second referendum on the issue of eu membership. his position issue of eu membership. his position is ridiculous, which is quite so few people across this country take him or the liberal democrats seriously. i would appreciate it... nicola sturgeon says that having listened and reflected to scottish voters she
2:50 pm
will reset the plan for considering a second independence referendum in scotland. she set out in march earlier this year that she was going to look at the issue either next autumn or in the spring of 2019, that was when she hoped to have a second independence referendum but now she says in autumn of next year she will begin to look at the issue, so she has parked it but she is holding the possibility of another referendum as a response to brexit. she said she will look at what brexit brings and says the people of scotla nd brexit brings and says the people of scotland should have an opportunity to hold the future of the country in their hands. the scottish labour leader kathy dugdale says the idea ofa leader kathy dugdale says the idea of a second independence referendum is now dead tells nicola sturgeon
2:51 pm
the people of scotland have decided that an ruth davidson said why doesn't she give the country some certainty and just take it off the table for the duration of this parliament? we will be back with our scotla nd parliament? we will be back with our scotland correspondent lorna gordon at 3pm to look at this in more detail. at least 1700 patients could have been harmed by patient records being sent to storage rather than to gps. test results including cancer and treatment plans were among letters from hospitals which never got to gps. a company contracted to forward mail for patient twhos had moved or changed doctors allowed letters to pile up in a warehouse.
2:52 pm
a report by the watchdog the national audit office said a backlog of 709,000 letters built up. it said 1700 patients were potentially harm. all the letters are being checked in a process which will cost £6.6 million or more. for everyone, every bit of correspondence, they're looking to see if there was harm and they're letting the patients know and getting experts to look at it. they have identified potential harm. for those cases they're looking into it to find out has there been actual harm caused? patients' representatives are angry that the programme was allowed to continue for so long and some people may find their care was affected. we are shocked on behalf of patients that such a scandal has occurred. and to add to that, the lack of transparency is worrying for everyone. and patients will have their confidence in the system dented even further.
2:53 pm
the department of health said no cases of harm to patients had been identified so far. and that work was continuing with nhs england to ensure that this didn't happen again with officials mindful of the need for transparency. the issue was raised by labour in the house of commons. isn't it a scandal that 709,000 letters were failed to be delivered, left in an unknown warehouse and many destroyed ? no government on any side can ever guarantee there will be no breach of contract. but what we can do is make sure we react quickly when that happened, which happened on this occasion and we can make sure we have better assurance than we had on this occasion and i can assure the house that the appropriate lessons will be learned. a man from berkshire says he is
2:54 pm
lucky to be alive after being hit by bus in the centre of reading. amazingly, he was able to walk away. this report begins with some shocking cctv images. by by any reckoning, simon smith should be seriously injured but he calmly walks into a nearby bar. the purple turtle is one of the best—known bars in the town and cctv captured the whole thing. it looks like the bus has gone into control, it is, double
2:55 pm
speed not more. that is shocking, i cannot believe that simon got up, dusted himself down and walk away. it's call his life. the scars of the incident are plain to see. reading bosses say the incident is being investigated internally. thames valley police is no arrests have been made. simon is nursing painful. we called simon a few hours after the date of the accident and he was ina lot the date of the accident and he was in a lot of pain, he was still in shock, couldn't believe what happened. as you might expect, a shave this close has gone viral. the bar has been inundated with requests from the media and people are talking about it online. most of them simply admire the way simon
2:56 pm
kept calm and carried on. that is unbelievable, remarkable he was able to get up. i thought the bus was going to hit ben! simon, if you're watching, get yourself checked out. let's catch up with the weather and some grim news. it's not very pleasant out there today and this whole week is not looking great either. a lot of cloud. damp at the very least. wet at worst. this is what it looks like today. a mass of cloud rolling in off the atlantic. another massive cloud coming in from the south. here is the rain from overnight and this morning. you can see mostly affecting northern areas, not quite the far north of scotland. in the south it was dry until a few under storms developed locally
2:57 pm
across parts of the east midlands. a whole mass of rain heading in the direction of south eastern areas. let's start the afternoon forecast here, so this is 4pm. you can see rain from brighton, through london, portsmouth and southampton. bournemouth getting some ring as well. a bit more patchy, that rain. on and off, across the south west of england, across wales, yorkshire, all the way into the lake district. here we had the worst of the rain. that went through earlier on. in northern ireland there is a chance of some downpours. some brief downpours with thunder and lightning a possibility. looking at scotland, an easterly wind on the north sea coast from aberdeenshire, dundee and only around 11 or 12 degrees. that is below average. spots of rain at least across yorkshire. then that wet evening and night across south—eastern and central areas, that massive rain will be moving very slowly from south, pushing northwards. to the south it is not cold. 14, 15, still quite warm and muggy. this messy picture, a big area of multiple lows. that is sat on top of us for the rest of the week.
2:58 pm
different areas will be getting rain at different times. the worst of the weather on wednesday across the east coast. quite a strong wind blowing off the north sea. chilly in places like hull and newcastle. we're only talking temperatures of 13, 15. there might be sunshine in east anglia and the south—east and northern and western scotland. in fact, here not so bad on thursday. across central scotland and the western areas, a strong wind blowing. maybe improving briefly in central and eastern areas on thursday. this is bbc news. the headlines at 3pm. the scottish government has put plans for a second independence referendum on hold, till after brexit. the scottish government remains
2:59 pm
committed strongly to the principle of giving scotland a choice at the end of this process. but i warrant to reassure people that our proposal is not for a referendum now, or before there is sufficient clarity about the options. google's been fined more than £2.1 billion by the european commission for favouring its own shopping services. theresa may says there should be a major national investigation into what went wrong with cladding on high rise buildings. google has abused its market dominance as a search engine by giving illegal advantages to other google products, its shopping
3:00 pm

71 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on