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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 27, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 3pm. the scottish government has put plans for a second independence referendum on hold, till after brexit. the scottish government remains committed strongly to the principle of giving scotland a choice at the end of this process. but i warrant to reassure people that our proposal is not for a referendum now, or before there is sufficient clarity about the options. google‘s been fined more than £2.1 billion by the european commission for favouring its own shopping services. theresa may says there should be a major national investigation into what went wrong with cladding on high rise buildings. google has abused its market dominance as a search engine by giving illegal advantages to other google products, its shopping comparison service. a major siebary tack has taken place
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in ukraine. government ministries, power companies and banks are experiencing major problems. also in the next hour, an amber warning on the state of the uk economy. the bank of england says it's worried about a sharp rise in consumer borrowing through credit cards, personal loans and car finance deals. the world's first atm turns 50, but is cash still king? good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the scottish government has put plans for a second independence referendum on hold. in the past our, scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has said that she wants to reset her plans on a second vote and ask the scottish electorate instead in the autumn of next year or the spring of 2019, once the brexit negotiations are over.
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ms sturgeon has also told msps that she would now redouble her efforts to keep the country in the european single market. our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, is in holyrood with the latest. the latest is — there's no change. yes, simon, delayed, the referendum is delayed, according to nicola sturgeon. it is on hold, according to nicola sturgeon. but it is not off the table. that means there would be no legislation for a second independence referendum if she were given the right to hold one. but no legislation before 2018 and no referendum before brexit. instead she wants to focus on redoubling the effo rts she wants to focus on redoubling the efforts to secure a better possible brexit dealfor efforts to secure a better possible brexit deal for scotland to try and keep the country in the single market. i want to reassure people that our proposal is not for a referendum now
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or before there is sufficient clarity about the options, but rather to give them a choice at the end of the brexit process when that clarity has emerged. i am therefore confirming today that having listened and reflected, the scottish government will reset the plan i set out on march 13th. we will not seek to introduce the legislation for an independence referendum immediately. instead we will, in good faith, redouble our efforts and put our shoulder to the wheel in seeking to influence the brexit talks in a way that protects scotland's interests. we will seek to build maximum support around the proposals set out in the payer that we published in december, scotland's place in europe, to keep us in the single market with substantial new powers for this parliament. we will do everything we can to influence the uk in that direction. then at the end of this period of negotiation with the eu, likely to be around
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next autumn, when the terms of brexit will be clearer, we will come back to parliament to set out our judgment on the best way forward at that time, including our view on the precise time scale for offering people a choice over the country's future. in setting out this position today, i'm also issuing a challenge today, i'm also issuing a challenge to the other parties. the scottish government will stand the best chance of positively influencing the brexit outcome if we are at the table, with the full backing of our national parliament arguing for the sensible option of staying in the single market. sojoin us now with i'io single market. sojoin us now with no equivocation, back the demands for the democratically elected scottish government to be at the table, able to influence the uk's negotiating strategy and for scotland and the uk to stay in the european single market. interesting those comments at the end of nicola sturgeon‘s clip there, calling on the scottish parliament
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to come together behind the scottish government to back them for their calls to have a seat at the brexit negotiating table. the other parties in the scottish parliament this afternoon, no surprise in the positions they took. ruth davidson saying nicola sturgeon was singing the same old song to the same old tune. the issue that we've had this la st tune. the issue that we've had this last year has been with a first minister who has tried to use the uk's decision to leave the european union to try and impose another referendum on independence on scotland at the earliest opportunity. no once in a generation, no edinburgh agreement of respecting the result, just a single vision drive to the line by nicola sturgeon to try and secure her place in history. and as her own msps have accepted, that decision cost her 21 seats and the support of half a million scottish voters in the general election. presiding officer, yes voters and no voters,
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most people simply don't want this brought back any time soon. none of the questions that are raised by brexit are answered by ripping scotland out of our own union of nations, our biggest markets and our closest friends. the other parties in the scottish parliament, willie rennie for the liberal democrats said nothing has changed in nicola sturgeon‘s position. patrick harvey for the greens wants to know why scotla nd for the greens wants to know why scotland has to wait longer for a second independence referendum. while kezia dugdale said nicola sturgeon was carrying on regardless. the first minister has said she has heard the views of the people, that she's reflected on the result of the general election and her incredulous conclusion is to double down and continue with her campaign for independence. the truth is the
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threat of an unwanted second independence referendum is dead. this didn't happen because nicola sturgeon wanted it to. the people of scotland have ta ken sturgeon wanted it to. the people of scotland have taken that decision for her. but the first minister is digging her heels in, putting her fingers in herears digging her heels in, putting her fingers in her ears and pressing on regardless. she isjust not listening. first minister, why don't you understand the people of scotland sent you a clear message the the general election — get back to governing. when will you listen and get on with the job that really matters, improving our schools, growing our economy and fixing our nhs? a couple of other interesting points nicola sturgeon made in holyrood this afternoon. she said that she believed independence was not only about brexit that it goes beyond that, in effect, she seemed to be widening out the independence campaign to beyond the snp. there have been criticisms by people in
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the wider independence movement that the wider independence movement that the campaign is too centralised in the campaign is too centralised in the snp. she seems to be acknowledging that. a third point she made, in effect tipping her hat to opposition parties in holyrood that she needs to get on with her dayjob. she says she's proud of the snp's dayjob. she says she's proud of the snp‘s achievement in the ten years in office in scotland but that they would refresh their agenda. fundamentally, all focus will be on her comments to do with a second independence referendum on hold for now, yes, the time table appearing to shift with those comments by nicola sturgeon. but nonetheless, the first minister of scotland saying she strongly believes that people in scotland should have a choice about their future at the end of the brexit process at the risk of repeating myself, lorna, thank you very much. news is coming into us about a major siebary tack, affecting a number of
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russians companies and has also hit ukrainian companies and institutions. we're hearing that ukraine's state energy distributor and kiev‘s main airport have been hit by what's called an unknown virus, which is expected to lead to severe flight delays. the metro, kiev metro has stopped accepting payment cards. several chains of petrol stations have suspended operations. 0ther petrol stations have suspended operations. other companies affected include ukraine's central bank, several tv channels and postal services and the ukrainian deputy prime minister says the government's computer network is also down. so by anyone's standards this is a major cyber attack that is under way. let's go to our correspondent in kiev for us. what more can you tell us? well, this is looking like an extremely widespread attack. it's impacting on both state—owned and private companies here. more than 25
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companies have been affected in some way by this siebary tack. as you mention there, the airport's been affected. the arrivals and departure board has gone down. it looks like flights may be delayed there. the metro here also impacted. you can't pay with a credit card at the moment, because of the impact on the banking system. several banks have reported being affected by this cyber attack. so yeah, the indications at the moment are that this is a far reaching attack. the response of many of the companies appear to have been to shut down their systems and try to prevent its spreading. but it looks in the first few hours, at least, like it's extremely serious for many ukrainian companies. and do we have any idea at this stage if it's spreading beyond the ukraine and russia? well, that's right. there have been reports from russia that companies there have been affected. ros nef,
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there have been affected. ros nef, the big oil company say they have been affected. a huge shipping company has been affected this afternoon by some sort of hack. certainly there are indications this goes much further than just ukraine. certainly here in this country, it's very serious. it's very widespread and still, as every minute goes by, we're hearing of more companies that have been affected in some way. just as i speak to you, we're seeing that the british company wpp, the world's biggest advertising agency is saying it has been hit by a cyber attack. just on that line that you mentioned the advisor to the interior minister saying they believe the cyber attacks originated from russia, what evidence do they have of that? well, we simply have to go with what they say. that's what they believe. that would be the
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default response here in ukraine. there is a conflict going on in the east of this country, with rebels that most people think are backed by russia, so it's a fairly natural first response is to blame this on the russians. obviously there will have to be forensic looks at the virus, if that is indeed what's behind this to try and work out where it comes from. as we've seen in the past with this sort of thing, it's not always easy to track it back and actually work out where the origins of these siebary tacks came from. for the moment, thank you very much. we'll keep a close eye across this major siebary tack as it develops. the internet giant google has been fined a record £2.1 billion by the european commission, for putting its own online shopping services at the top of search results. it's the biggest fine in the commission's history. it said google had abused its market dominance. google now has 90 days
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to end the practice. more details from our technology correspondent, rory cellanjones. put the name of something you might want to buy into google's search engine and right at the top, up pops a helpful box with images of products. do it on a mobile phone and the images are even more prominent. every time you click on one of the adverts, the search giant aims money. it is called google shopping and now it has resulted in a record fine from europe's competition commissioner. google has abused its market dominance in its search engine by promoting its own shopping comparison service in its search results and demoting its competitors. google is under fire because of its sheer size for the pit accused of using its position as the dominant player in online search to squash rivals. kelkoo, a price comparison site says
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it's being squeezed by google shopping and is celebrating today's move. without competition, google can charge merchants whatever they like for advertising. with competition, you end up with lots of people like ourselves, companies competing on prices which brings the price down and that's got to be good for consumers. merchants will charge less. that a good day for consumers. google said it come from tech giants like amazon and it believes brussels has improved the consumers are being harmed for the firm released a statement saying google showed shopping at connecting our users with thousands of advertisers large and small in ways that are useful for both. we respectfully disagree with the conclusions announced today. this is the latest in a series of battles which have pitched europe against american technology companies. the eu says it's enforcing competition law and the americans may suspect this is all about politics. you saw richard stables, ceo of kelkoo group in rory‘s report.
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earlier i spoke to him to get further reaction to today's historic fine for google. the commission has done a fantastic job today. she has stood up for consumers. shes found against google. she has put down a marker and said, they have done some seriously bad things and that represents the size of the fine. this is a great day for consumers. we are going to get back a promise ofa we are going to get back a promise of a proper working, functioning market. while google was abusing its position in the words of the commission, what sort of impact was that having on kelkoo? devastating. we saw huge loss of traffic over the last ten years we've lost 95% of our traffic from google. i don't know one price comparison site that hasn't been massively smashed by google by their actions over the last ten years. was there anything
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that you found you could do during that you found you could do during that time to reverse that, to fight back against that? the problem is that as google is effectively the internet, 90% of people use google asa internet, 90% of people use google as a starting point for search, it's almost impossible for the likes of kelkoo to find other traffic sources. you can't afford to do tv advertising. your revenue per visitor is so small. you have to go through google. google is basically the only platform where you can get traffic effectively. if they decide they want to kill off businesses like kelkoo, that's what they do. today the commissioner has said no, enough is enough. you can't do this in the likes of shopping and this is a decision that could be used in things like travel, could be used in news, maps, local, all the different types of businesses that google goes after. just explain for us, for our
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viewers now, what difference this is going to make when google implements the recommendations of the commission's finding. it has 90 days to do so. so, effectively what the commission has said is you can't preference yourself above everybody else. so what google did is it basically said right all these price comparison sites i'm taking you out of listings and i will put you on page 50 and put myself at the top. what today's decision will push google to do is to say, if we put ourselves at the top of the listing, we need to share that space with companies such as kelkoo and give them real estate, give them the chance to be seen and put ads at the top of google and have the same thing happening in travel and in news etc, etc. it's exactly the same sort of principle that you'd use across lots of industries. the scottish government has put
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plans for a second independence referendum on hold until after the brexit negotiations are complete. google has been hit with a record fine of more tan £2 billion by the eu competition regulator for illegally favouring its shopping services. theresa may says there should be a major national investigation into what went wrong with high rise buildings. in sport, the british and irish lions miss out on a win with the hurricanes. it finished 31—31. the lions squandered a 14—point lead. heather knight scores a century as england produce their highest group total against pakistan. they made 377. andy murray has pulled out of
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today's exhibition match citing a sore hip. the world number one is set to play there on friday. more on those stories around half past ( theresa may has said there must be a major national investigation into the use of cladding on high—rise buildings across the country stretching back decades. it's thought it could form part of a second phase of the public inquiry, already announced into the grenfell tower disaster. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, has been following the latest developments. he said the announcement has prompted a range of fire safety actions. the problem is if you're a council housing manager or perhaps the private managerfor housing manager or perhaps the private manager for the council you need to know what you've done wrong in terms of fitting this stuff and also, the government's guidance to these housing managers is that if you find you have a problem, there are various steps you have to take, for example, bringing in fire safety inspectors to look at the building.
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in the case of camden, those steps included taking pretty much all the residents of four tower blocks out of those towers for their own safety. we're in a bizarre situation where anybody in the council would say, what we did at the time was absolutely legal. the building regulations are incredibly confusing. as far as we understand, the cladding in place was legal. i mean the various regulations say you can use cladding that is potentially going to burn in a fire, as long as the system that you design you put it in is safe. that's a separate test. the government is testing the materials. that's a different approach. there's a growing feeling really that the goal posts have been moved and that councils really don't know what is safe now. adding to the chaos, we've got scenes in camden, where families are being rehoused in hotels for a day or two and they're saying, well, that's not going to work for me. i may as well go home. i spoke to some of them in the council blocks last night, they were saying we're not going to leave. we
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don't feel unsafe. we're not going. when you look at the scale of the work facing camden there, it's pretty enormous. it's notjust the cladding on the outside. it's putting in potentially a thousand fire doors. the leader of the council told me yesterday that they're going to have to ask the government to help them get hold of that number of fire doors in such a short space of time. also, we have got information that the fire doors we re got information that the fire doors were never put into the tower blocks because of cost. that's something we put to the council last night. they've not given us a detailed response. the leader of the council didn't deny it. she said those were questions she too had. scotland's finance secretary is writing to the treasury to complain about the government's deal with northern ireland's dup. in return for the party's ten mps supporting the conservatives, the government is diverting £1 billion to the province. derek mackay says it's a clear breach of the established rules on devolved funding. it's likely he'll invoke a dispute process. the snp believe scotland should be in line for its share of extra cash of £3 billion.
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the government says a prosperity fund for the whole uk will be introduced after brexit. the bank of england has warned against rising consumer borrowing and household debt, in its twice—yearly report about the uk economy. borrowing on credit cards and car finance are at their fastest rate in more than a decade. banks will also be forced to find a further £11 billion in the next 18 months, to protect their finances against the risk of bad loans. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, has the details. are we borrowing too much and could we still afford it if something went wrong? the bank of england warned today that banks were loosening lending to consumers and action was needed to make it tighter. consumer borrowing, outside of mortgages, is nearly £200 billion. consumer credit growth has far outpaced that of household income over the past year with notable increases across credit cards, personal loans and autofinance. in an environment of intense competition interest margins have fallen and risk assessments by banks
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have declined, or by lenders have declined. lenders are more vulnerable to losses and stress. the bank's big concern is consumer lending, on credit cards, personal loans and notably car finance. so far there haven't been that many people who can't keep up their repayments. the bank says lenders may be assuming it's just going to carry on that way. the banks acting to stop lenders being complacent in case those loans go bad, with consumer credit up by 10. 3% and car loans growing at 15%, farfaster than wages, banks are being ordered to set aside an extra £11 billion in case those loans can't be repaid. i think mark carney wants to be proactive. he talked of increasing additional capital a year ago, but he held off because of the brexit issue. i think he wants to make sure the banks are reminded they have to be more cautious in consumer lending given the speed
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the loan books have grown. if banks are forced to tighten up lending, households won't find it as easy to top up sagging incomes with cheap borrowing. there will be consequences. banks will lend less and charge more. currently there are 8.8 million people using credit for daily living costs. it's those people who i'm concerned about. because they will get into trouble and what we need to make sure that we need to protect those people. most of the growth in consumer borrowing has been in so—called personal contract purchase agreements for cars, where car buyers can return the car when the loan period is up. if second—hand car prices drop, drivers would be safe, lenders would be hit. if that happened, the bank of england said, the banks could with stand any losses. the partner of former eastenders actress sian blake has lost his appeal against his whole life jail sentence for killing her
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and their two children. 49—year—old arthur simpson—kent was sentenced to life in prison in 0ctoberfor stabbing ms blake to death along with their sons zachary, eight, and amon, four. this was the verdict a short time ago from the court of appeal. in ourjudgment, in our judgment, having in ourjudgment, having considered all the circumstances put before us, we are entirely satisfied that the judge was entitled to reach that conclusion and on this basis, therefore, we dismiss this application. the amount of public money the queen receives to carry out her work as head of state is to increase next year by around 8% to £82 million. it will help to pay for repairs costing £369 million being carried out at buckingham palace over the next decade. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell has been given a breakdown of the figures. the way it's worked out is that in
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normal times, the queen receives 15% of the net profits of something called the crown estate. this is the estate which owns large parts of london, royal ascot, windsor great park, all sorts of other things. because of the need for this refurbishment of buckingham palace, which is going to costjust under £400 million in ten years, the proportion of the profits from the crown estate, which will go to the monarchy, has been raised to 25% of the net profits. that is what accou nts the net profits. that is what accounts for this increase in the money that is going to buckingham palace. the increase is specifically tied to the refurbishment. now that hasn't actually started yet. they're still at the planning stage, preliminary work. but it is going to bea preliminary work. but it is going to be a huge effort. little of it will be a huge effort. little of it will be visible. because it's all the bits behind the walls and under the floors, which haven't been touched for decades, and which they regard asa for decades, and which they regard as a significant risk to the
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integrity of the building. republic anti—monarchist group they say this amount of money is unsustainable. they say that the sovereign grant has risen 167% since 2012 and they say that the figure from the palace, the palace figure is that the cost of the monarchy equates to 65 p per person in this country, which conveniently is the cost of a first class stamp. republic says that doesn't include security, doesn't include a host of other costs. they say the real annual cost is £345 million, not quite sure how they work that out. but they say that the whole method of financing the monarchy in this country needs to be com pletely monarchy in this country needs to be completely overhauled. a sikh couple say they were told they couldn't adopt a white child, because of their cultural heritage. sandeep and reena mander were both born in britain, and told an adoption agency they were happy to take a child from any ethnic background, but say they were advised instead to adopt a child from india.
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it's legal for adoption agencies to give preference to parents from the same ethnic group, but government guidelines say different racial backgrounds shouldn't be a barrier. 0ur correspondent sara smith has been to meet the couple. after seven years of trying and 16 failed ivf attempts sandeep and reena went to a session on adoptionment when they told —— accepted they weren't going to have a baby of their own. convinced they could offer a child a loving home, though, they went to an interductory session on adoption. when they told the agency adopt berkshire, they'd like to move forward , berkshire, they'd like to move forward, they were informed with only white babies needing families, their indian heritage meant there was no point proceeding. their indian heritage meant there was no point proceedinglj their indian heritage meant there was no point proceeding. i was quite hurt. we had already gone through a long journey and initially i was hurt. then i was angry. they should be looking at us as people and understanding more about our lives, who we are and not just one particular area such as cultural heritage because that can mean
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anything. the couple, both born and raised in britain, tried to get the decision reversed through the agency's own complaints division. they've had support from their own mp theresa may. they haven't even been allowed to start the long application process, which is why now they're taking legal action.|j feel that the council has got it wrong in the sense that they have prioritised cultural heritage as the one and primary factor that they will consider before even allowing couples to register. the effect of doing that is creating a form of segregation. adopt berkshire is the council's adoption agency. when we asked about this case a spokesperson said they wouldn't comment on ongoing court cases. 0n said they wouldn't comment on ongoing court cases. on its website it says, "when placing children for adoption, it will first try to identify prospective adopters who reflect the child's culture and religion of heritage." for us, colour doesn't mean a single thing
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to us. love doesn't have a colour. why differentiate that and the well being of that child growing upjust down to the fact that, i suppose, we're brown skinned. the legal battle, they say, is for future couples in the same position. they've now been approved for adoption from the us. tomasz schafernaker has the forecast. first the fine drizzle and then the heavy rain and all of us today are infor heavy rain and all of us today are in for some heavy rain and all of us today are inforsome damp heavy rain and all of us today are in for some damp weather. if you haven't had any wet weather today, you're lucky. look at all that cloud across the country right now. but the rain is quite hit and miss. some of it will be heavier than others. through the course of this afternoon, it will be quite heavy across the south east and to east
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anglia, parts of the midlands as well. a whole load of rain heading our wayment further north, that rain starting to peter out here. it was heavier earlier on this morning. so, here it is, tonight then, the rain across the south east, east anglia, parts of the midlands and northern england will be heaviest of all. the whole area of rain expands here. so a really soggy night. not so wet across the northern areas. the warmest of the weather will be across the south, 15 celsius. tomorrow, another damp day. rain almost anywhere across the uk, but i will point out across scotland it is looking better. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at 3.30pm: nicola sturgeon is expected to announce her plans for scotland's future later today as she sets out her position for a second independence referendum at holyrood. the search engine google has been
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hit with a record fine of more than £2 billion by the european commission, for abusing its power and illegally promoting its own shopping service. the fine of 2.4 billion euros reflects the serious and the sustained nature of google's violation of eu antitrust rules. the bank of england has issued an amber warning as figures for consumer borrowing and household debt are on the rise. a number of businesses around the world have been hit by a cyber attack. some russian banks and businesses are affected as well as organisations in the ukraine, spain and denmark. it's time for sport. we go to the bbc sports centre and john watson. simon, a very good afternoon to you. england's women produced their highest world cup total
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as they made 377—7 to set pakistan a huge target in the second match of their world cup campaign. joe wilson is in leicester. england responding after that opening defeat? yes, john, we need to put it into context. england came into this match under pressure after that defeat, but secondly, that they started their innings badly. pakistan choosing to bowl first and bowler friendly conditions. sarah taylor opening the batting in the absence of the injured lauren winfield. england were 42—2. what happened next was a stand of 213. england put a total on the board, i think, everybody does see as a
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winning total. pakistan's hopes of getting past 377 were pretty much nil to begin with and i can tell you that in response they have already lost two wickets for just 26 runs. so, everything good in england's world apart from potentially still the weather. 0ne world apart from potentially still the weather. one thing to watch out for, pakistan have to get to 20 overs for their reply to be meaningful to get a result. we are about ten overs in and the sun is more or less shining. just over 2,000 in to watch by the way here at grace road. joe wilson, thank you very much indeed. the under 17s reached the final of the euros. 0lly foster is in poland and joins us. 0lly, the euros. 0lly foster is in poland andjoins us. 0lly, i the euros. 0lly foster is in poland and joins us. 0lly, i guess this england side will be hoping to emulate that very, you know, fair
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success that the other national sides have been having? yes, the age groups have done really well, john. we arejust groups have done really well, john. we are just south about a ten mile south of west of krakow. kick off is underan south of west of krakow. kick off is under an hour—and—a—half away against germany. yes, it is an under 21 match, but any england—germany match is something to savour. let's bring in terry butcher. england have grown into this tournament. they started off with the draw against the swedes, but came from behind against slovakia, a good win against the hosts to top their group? they have got better. i have been impressed with the style of football that they are playing. it's fast and it's entertaining and attacking, but strong at the back and the germans in contrast won the first two games comfortably and took it easy against
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italy and lost the game and sometimes in a tournament, i have been ata sometimes in a tournament, i have been at a few tournaments, if you lose momentum during the tournament, it's hard to pick it back up, i'm hopeful that germany don't pick anything back up. it is eddie boothroyd's first full match in charge. 0nly1—0, but the germans look really strong and they looked really strong apart from the defeat against the italians which was a funny old game. you don't want to be pushing yourself out. i have been there before, 82 in the world cup, we won the first two games and comfortably went through. the germans can score goals. the england players will love the stadium. it's nice and warm in there. it's a beautiful stadium. the stars of today, superstars of tomorrow. right on cue. thank you, terry. terry will be on five live commentary. 5pm kick off your team. the team bus has arrived save and sound. back to you,
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john. olly foster, thank you very much indeed. let's hope they can produce a big result later when the game gets under way. andy youry has —— murray has pulled out of his exhibition match. that's all the sport. damien johnson will have more in the next hour. 0lly is lucky. if that was me or you, that bus would never have appeared! companies around the world are reporting they have been hit by a major cyber attack. wpp is among dozens major cyber attack. wpp is among d oze ns of major cyber attack. wpp is among dozens of firms reporting problems, but it's dozens of firms reporting problems, but its impact has been felt most in ukraine where the government's state power distributor and kiev‘s main airportare state power distributor and kiev‘s main airport are affected. let's speak to alan woodward. hejoins me now speak to alan woodward. he joins me now from speak to alan woodward. hejoins me now from wiltshire. the
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difficulty with an attack like this, it spreads so fast, doesn't it? yes, imean i'm it spreads so fast, doesn't it? yes, i mean i'm as i'm talking to you, i'm watching things happen on the screen over here. we are getting various bits of analysis coming through about it. it looks like it might be using something very similarto might be using something very similar to the ransom ware that we saw. this isn't people clicking on a link in an e—mail and getting their computers infected. this looks like there is some ought owe mated mechanism spreading this. there are two possible mechanisms, but it's spreading extremely fast. is this like the one that hit the nhs not long ago? very similar. the mechanism, it looks like the way, if you split it into two parts, the bit of software that's holding the computer to ransom is different. it does it in a different way. instead of encrypting every file, it looks like it's encrypting the master record that tells you where your files are kept which is just as devastating, but the way it's
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spreading looks very similar and that's what everybody is trying to ta ke that's what everybody is trying to take apart as i'm speaking to you. anybody who reacted to the last attack and upgraded, updated their systems, would they be affected by this? that's the bit we don't know yet. everybody should hopefully have papped their systems so the bug, this so—called bug that was there, it should if you have patch assistance, you should be ok, but there is a suggestion coming out as i'm speaking to you, there maybe another part, they may have managed to update that to get around that pa rt to update that to get around that part of it. at the heart of it, there is a demand for money, is there? it is the same old thing. motivation is money and they want you to pay bitcoins to an address. it is just you to pay bitcoins to an address. it isjust criminals you to pay bitcoins to an address. it is just criminals trying to make money. how fast in the time we have been talking, who else has been affected ? been talking, who else has been
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affected? well, it's, it started in ukraine, there are banks in russia. we have seen if go to denmark. there isa we have seen if go to denmark. there is a shipping company that's been affected. there is reports in poland. the banks in russia. it looks like some companies in spain as well. yes, it is going that fast. alan, if i'm watching you in a business which perhaps is feeling vulnerable, do i just business which perhaps is feeling vulnerable, do ijust go and switch my system off now? no, i mean, you can't. it's like any criminals, it is terrorism, isn't it, you can't get into it. you just have to hope a, you've done your back—ups and secondly, that your systems are up—to—date. all the various antivirus people are working like mad trying to get the signatures out there to make sure it is spotted and it can't get in. but earlier on, only a couple were picking it up. what they are able to do, they are evolving very, very fast. almost faster than we can keep the security
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softwa re faster than we can keep the security software up—to—date. faster than we can keep the security software up-to-date. who is behind it? is this so big it can only be state sponsored or what? the bottom line is we don't know. no, i don't think that's true in terms of how big it is. the organised crime gangs are big, very big and they make hundreds of millions out of this. i have seen one ransom ware campaign where they got to 350 million. it is not to say that some smaller rogue states, one of the things that north korea have done in the past they have committed cybercrime to raise foreign currency. there was an initial suggestion that that —— when the russian banks started getting hit, that's a lot of these —— that's the problem with these cyber weapons. i suspect it is greedy criminals. i think we will be talking about this again. for now,
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thank you. alan woodward there. a man from berkshire says he's lucky to be alive after surviving being hit by a bus in the centre of reading. simon smith was walking on gun street on saturday morning when a bus crashed, knocking him over as it did so. but amazingly, he was able to walk away. this report from ben moore begins with some shocking cctv images of the accident. a quiet saturday morning in the centre of reading, punctuated by a spectacular accident. by spectacular accident. by any reckoning simon smith, the local man on the receiving end of a bus, that comes from nowhere, should be seriously injured or worse. yet he calmly walks into a nearby bar. minding his own business basically. the purple turtle is one of the best known bars in the town and its cc tv ca ptu red known bars in the town and its cc tv captured the whole thing. known bars in the town and its cc tv captured the whole thingm known bars in the town and its cc tv captured the whole thing. it looks
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like the bus has gone out of control. it's almost gone into turbo. it has suddenly sped up and doubled its speed if not more. it is absolutely shocking. i can't believe that simon got up and dusted himself off and walked away from it. it's a miracle that he's alive. the scars of the incident are plain to see. reading buses says it was an awful incident which is being investigated internally. thames valley police say no arrests have been made. simon himself is nursing painful injuries. we called simon a few hours after the day of the accident and yeah, he was in a lot of pain. he was yeah, he was still in shock basically. he couldn't believe what had happened. as you might expect, a shave this close has gone viral. the bar has been inundated with requests from the media and people are talking about it online. most of them simply admire the way
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simonjust kept calm most of them simply admire the way simon just kept calm and carried most of them simply admire the way simonjust kept calm and carried on. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc news: the scottish government has put plans for a second independence referendum on hold until after the brexit process is complete. google has been hit with a record fine of more than £2 billion by the competition regulator. a major cyber attack is taking place in ukraine where government ministries and banks are experiencing problems and it's spreading. hello. in the business news: the european commission has fined the company that owns google more than £2 billion
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for illegally promoting its own shopping services in search results. it's the biggest ever such fine handed out by the commission. high street banks are being forced to find and extra £11.4 billion to act as a buffer in case borrowers fall behind on paying back their loans. it's being ordered by the bank of england which is worried some lenders have become a bit too relaxed about lending. ukraine has been targeted by a large—scale cyber attack. the government, power companies and banks have all been having major problems with their computer systems. elsewhere, the russian oil company rosneft, and the british advertising group wpp say their systems have also been hit. 50 years ago today, the world's first cash machine was installed outside a branch of barclays in enfield in london. now there are 70,000 in the uk and three million worldwide. the cash machine has come a long way, but are its days numbered as we all go cashless? ron del nevo is with the atm
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industry association. hejoins me now. thank you for joining us. ifind when i go to an atm machine it can be in a dodgy area with some dodgy person hanging around and thick be a bit dirty. who uses the machines anymore? are you looking in the mirror? i think the vast majority of atms aren't dirty and they are not in dodgy areas and they are used by almost everybody. 40 million people each month make withdrawals from atms in the uk. very popular, notjust in the uk, but around the world. aren't we all going cashless, contactless, card and that sort of thing? well, co nta ctless and that sort of thing? well, contactless has been hyped by organisations which make a lot of money out of card transactions, but 85% of all transactions worldwide are using cash. here in the uk, an example of the statistics, last year in the 50,000 convenience stores we
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have in this country, 76% of all transactions were made using cash. 0nly10% using contactless. co nta ctless 0nly10% using contactless. contactless is significant, but nowhere near replacing cash as the number one payment method. how does the atm plan to keep up with the rise of cashless? well, it is an interesting one. it is not so much keeping up with the rise of cashless, it is replacing bank branches. originally atms were put in so people could get cash when bank branches were closed, but now bank branches were closed, but now bank branches were closed, but now bank branches are closing per per na ntly, we bank branches are closing per per nantly, we will see groups of smart atms set—up in communities, neighbourhoods, village and small towns around the uk making sure that the people still have a financial services touch point in their local community. this is vital so that they can actually carry out the transactions they carry out at bank
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branches. when you say smart atms, what does that look like? they look like the atms we have today, but capable of carrying out more transactions so you will be able to go along, deposit notes and coins and those will be recycled in the machine, and made available to other people and businesses to withdraw. you will be able to apply for loans, mortgages, credit cards, pay your taxes, pay for your car parking fines, any number of transactions that you can carry out in countries around the world today, but we just don't have them yet on uk atms. ron, thank you very much. i will try and find a better class of atms to use in future. in other news, the american firm that supplied the cladding used on grenfell tower says it has now stopped selling it for use in high—rise blocks. arconic says the move is because of "issues" thrown up by the fire, which is believed to have killed at least 79 people. heineken wants to buy almost 2,000 pubs from punch taverns. it's also proposing to sell some
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pubs in order to head off concerns about competition. regulators are considering the deal over the the next few months. nintendo has announced another re—release. this time it's bringing back the super nintendo entertainment system. it was first launched in 1990 and sold 50 million units worldwide. some analysts think it's part of a drive to boost sales of its latest console, the ninetendo switch. the markets. it has been a flat day here in uk. stocks in car—makers have been under pressure after a major car parts company in germany warned of rising costs and tougher market. that's hitting car stocks here and in europe. 0n the currency markets, the eurojumped to a nine—day high after comments from the boss of the ecb suggested a recovery in the european economy. that's all the business news for now. thank you very much.
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at least 1,700 patients could have been harmed by an administrative error which led to thousands of nhs records being accidentally sent to storage. the records included test results for cancer and child protection notes that should have been sent to hospitals or gp surgeries. doctor richard vautrey is a representative of the british medical association. hejoins me on webcam from bournemouth. thank you for your time today. we say at least 1700 patients may have been harmed because about a third of the 700,000 notes have yet to be checked. when do you think it will become clear whether anyone has actually suffered as a result of all of this? well, i think firstly to say it is a scandal that so much clinical information, so much important clinical information was not passed on by this company to gps so that they can provide the best possible care to their patients. it will take sometime to really work
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out the full—scale of what has happened here, but it is a scandal that it was allowed to happen in the first place. yes, it wasn'tjust that these records in some sort of blunder were left to pile up in a warehouse. the national audit office found that the company had become aware of a risk to patients in january 2014, but senior managers didn't develop a plan to deal with it or tell the government or nhs england for another two years and action could have been taken and wasn't. that is an absolute scandal. why do you think this situation developed? well, the scale of this is astounding and the fact that it went on for so long is equally astounding. i think what happened was this was a private company who didn't really appreciate the importance of the information that they were expected to pass on to gp practises around the country and didn't have a mechanism in place to identify the problem early enough and then to swiftly deal with it. this is basic information. a private
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company though, part owned by the department of health. so was there a conflict of interest? yes, well clearly, the department of health, you know, had a share in this company and they should have been performance managing the contracts ina performance managing the contracts in a better way and ensuring that the service that they commissioned and the nhs commissioned delivered on the expectations on the contract. was anyone managing the performance as far as you are aware? well, i think that's something that you would need to ask the department of health and nhs england. i think we have real concerns that this went on for so long and that the information that gps needed to be able to treat their patients properly was not made available to them for many years in some cases. would have there have been an expectation that gps would have tried to find out where this information was if they were expecting a report on a particular patient and hadn't received it, was there any onus on gps surgeries or hospitals to chase up these reports? well, i think gps would try to chase
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up well, i think gps would try to chase up information of where it was clearly missing, but in some cases it wasn't even known that this information was missing because patients may have expected the information to be transferred and they may have seen another gp in another part of the country and expected that information to be passed on when they had a clinical episode elsewhere and they have not gone back to their gp for many months afterwards, so it wouldn't have been known to their gp that this information was generated. so it isa this information was generated. so it is a sandal that this information was not passed on swiftly and it was not dealt with as quickly as it ought to have been. what needs to happen to stop this sort of situation happening again? well, clearly, lessons need to be learnt and firstly, we can't cut costs by simply outsourcing these services to private companies. we need to ensure that the funding for these really vital back office functions are properly resourced and that the service is delivered within the nhs by those who know the importance of
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what they're doing and have the skills to be able to do it properly. is this finally a direct result of effo rts is this finally a direct result of efforts to save money in the nhs? and clearly, when costs are attempted to be saved, then risks develop and we need to ensure that the proper investment is made. that these types of corners are not cut again because patient care suffers asa again because patient care suffers as a result of it. ok, thank you very much. a 92—year—old world war ii pilot is believed to have become the first german since the war to fly in a spitfire. during his career, hugo broch flew more than 300 missions. he also received the knight's cross of the iron's cross during the war, which was awarded in recognition of extreme bravery and military leadership. 0ur correspondent robert hall has been to biggin hill to see the flight. at the airfield which served in the front line of the battle of britain, the roar of a merlin engine. during his career, hugo broch was credited with.81victories in 324 missions,
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earning him his country's highest military honour. today, his first encounter was with one of the machines he flew a fighter being painstakingly rebuilt at biggin hill's heritage hangar, but for hugo broch, the best was yet to come. the spitfire was a legend on both sides of the channel and he had waited most of his life to fly in one. the spitfire was held in high regard and high esteem. i'm happy to be here. i'm very much looking forward to be meeting everyone later and to the spitfire flight. the spitfire gained its iconic status during the summer of 1940 when the raf‘s young pilots fought to keep hitler's forces at bay. alongside the hurricane it became a symbol of courage and resistance, so much that another german fighter said he would like a squadron of spitfires. with rain clouds looming, the ground crew prepared for today's scramble. it may have been decades ago, but hugo
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broch knew the drill. the flight was captured for a documentary about the man and the machines and cockpit cameras enabled us machines and cockpit cameras enabled us to share hugo broch's delight as the spitfire soared above the kent hills. he declined an offer to take the controls saying that in this case he was just a back seat driver! 0n case he was just a back seat driver! on one question though he was adamant. the aircraft he flew was still the best! time for a look at the weather. tomasz schafernaker is back with us. have you been back outside? i can confirm that it is still very damp outside. not pretty at all and it will stay like it through most of the day to be honest and it brought in an ugly air of low pressure. it won't be bringing rainfall every day. within it, there will be
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windows of opportunity, but on balance, this mass of cloud that's been streaming in, will be stuck on top of us, swirling around in the coming days. so in the short—term, this is what we've got. you can see rain dotted around across the country. still a chance of thunderstorms and we've had some thunderstorms and we've had some thunderstorms across the south east. this is 7pm. 17 celsius in london. around 17 celsius in the south—west as well. you can see spots of rain and some of it, it is more than a few spots. patchy rain on and off across wales and northern parts of england as well, 14 celsius there in kendal. let's look at northern ireland because here downpours brewing as i speak, but a bit of dry weather too, so it's not raining all the time. remember the downpours, some of us are get them and others want. scotland, it is the eastern areas that have been cloudy and wet. the western isles have had a better day. yorkshire, damp weather for sure.
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wherever you are today, it is overcast and at worse you will get downpours and through the evening, look at this area of rain. it is expanding and there is a hint of green and the green is the computer indicating very heavy rain sweeping eastern areas. warm or mild tonight. 16 celsius in the south. fresher in the north. here is an ugly area of low pressure. very deformed area of low pressure. very deformed area of low pressure. very deformed area of low pressure. it didn't really mean anything to most people, but itjust basically means there will be another very cloudy day with outbreaks of rain, the heaviest of which falling across eastern areas. wind coming off the north sea. look at that, scotland, much better. so tomorrow, i think a much drier, not necessarily sunnier day, but a dry day and maybe some sunshine coming through across the south as well and then that rain shifts and goes back into scotland. with it also a strong wind blowing out of the north—east and north. maybe some central and eastern areas brightening up on
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thursday and there is a light at the end of the tunnel because it looks as if things will turn dry and brighter this weekend and i emphasise the word, "drier" because it doesn't necessarily mean it is going to be dry all the way through. so whatever the weather, enjoy it, whatever you've got. this is bbc news. the headlines at 4pm. the scottish government put plans for a second independence referendum on hold until after brexit. the scottish government remains committed, strongly, to the principle of giving scotland a choice at the end of this process. but i want to reassure people that our proposal is not for a referendum now or before there is sufficient clarity about the options. a major cyber attack is underway affecting banks and power companies in a a number of countries including russia and the ukraine, where it was first reported. google is fined more than £2.1 billion by the european commission for favouring its own
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shopping services. theresa may says there should be a "major national investigation" into what went wrong with cladding on high rise buildings. and in the next hour...

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