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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 28, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. after a near 30—year battle, the families of those who died at hillsborough will find out this morning whether anyone is to face criminal charges. it follows two separate enquires into what happened on the day of the match and whether there was a cover up afterwards. good morning, it's wednesday the 28th ofjune. also this morning: one of the uk's most senior police officers says that a reduction in stop—and—search has led to an increase in knife crime. victims tell breakfast more needs to be done. very angry. can see it in my eyes. this has got to stop. this knife
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thing's this has got to stop. this knife things got to stop. are you paying thousands of pounds too much in hidden fees on your pension? the regulator is to announce a crackdown on firms that manage our money but why are we still getting a raw deal? in sport... not again. england lose to germany on penalties. nathan redmond's miss means they fail to make the final of the under—21 european championship. and carol has the weather. i'm here to place an early—morning football with the guys from man v fat to see how teamwork has helped men like this and 3000 more around the country lose a combined total of 30 tons in wake. —— to play some. and carol has the weather. for england, wales and northern ireland some rain on the cards, some of it will be heavy but as temperatures rise we could have thundery downpours. the dryers conditions today are likely to be in
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scotland. more details in 15 minutes —— driest conditions. good morning. first, our main story. the families of those who died at hillsborough will find out later this morning whether anyone will face criminal charges. an inquest ruled last year that the 96 liverpool fans who died at the stadium in sheffield in 1989 were unlawfully killed. 0ur north of england correspondent judith moritz reports. # walk on, with hope in your heart... it was a moment of history, the inquest‘s finding last year that 96 liverpool fans were unlawfully killed at hillsborough. for theirfamilies, it was justice, but their legal journey did not end there. steve kelly lost his brother michael in the disaster. he's spent the 28 years since then calling for those responsible to be held accountable. there's got to be this accountability. it's paramount in this whole case to give the families respite and the survivors of hillsborough and you know, to truly let us put to rest the 96. it's got to.
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the fans were killed when the terraces at the sheffield ground became overcrowded during the 1989 fa cup semifinal. since 2012, there have been two criminal inquiries into hillsborough. 0peration resolve investigated the day of the disaster. it identified 15 key suspects. 0ffences considered include gross negligence manslaughter. one of those waiting to hear whether he will face charges is former chief superintendent david duckenfield, who was the south yorkshire police match commander. the police watchdog, the ipcc, investigated cover—up allegations, identifying eight key suspects. it considered offences including misconduct in a public office and perverting the course of justice. the former west yorkshire chief constable, sir norman bettison, has revealed that he's been treated as a suspect by the ipcc. it isn't known whether he wailface charges. hundreds of investigators have been working from these offices
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for the last four years at a cost of £100 million. there is an expectation that charges will be brought, after such a long wait and such large—scale effort. judith moritz, bbc news, warrington. that decision will be announced to the families at 11am this morning. we will keep you in touch with that through the day on the bbc for you. computer systems around the world have been hit by a major cyber—attack affecting banks, retailers, energy firms and transport networks. the companies have been told their computers will remain frozen until a ransom is paid. experts who have examined the code say in some ways it's more sophisticated than the wannacry virus used in a global attack last month, which badly hit the nhs. labour is to table an amendment to the queen's speech calling for more spending on the police and fire services. it will also call for an end to the 1% cap on public sector pay rises. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. good morning to you once again,
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iain. labourare good morning to you once again, iain. labour are unlikely to win this one so what is the gameplan? you're right, dan, labourwant to win the argument rather than the vote because theresa may on monday signed the deal with those ten dup mps from northern ireland, so is she should have the votes in the bag to defeat labour but what labour want to do is first say if you can find £1 billion for northern ireland to stay in power, can't you find some cash to prevent public spending cuts elsewhere in the uk? they're aiming to make conservative mps feel uncomfortable, some of those who lost their seat at the election saying on the doorsteps people were saying on the doorsteps people were saying that pay restraint had gone on for too long so what labour are trying to do is force conservative mps to nail their colours to the mast and vote down the proposal to lift the public sector paid gap. jeremy corbyn is looking to invest
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more in public services after grenfell, his opponents say he is politicising the issue but it hasn't hurt him in the opinion polls and in response the conservatives said we have protected police spending but if you want to protect public services you need a stronger economy and that is something that labour can't deliver. iain, thanks, speak to you later. sinn fein has accused the democratic unionist party of failing to give any ground in talks to restore devolved government at stormont. sinn fein has accused the democratic unionist party of failing to give any ground in talks to restore devolved government at stormont. two weeks on from the grenfell tower fire, theresa may has called for a major national investigation into the use of cladding on high rise buildings. every one of the samples tested from 95 buildings across england have now failed safety tests. 0ur reporter simonjones is in west london for us this morning. what more can you tell us about
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these safety tests? well, 95 buildings tested so far and all have failed. the thing that strikes you hear two weeks on is just how many questions remain about what happened, why are these buildings 110w happened, why are these buildings now failing these new tests? why did the fire at grenfell tower take hold so the fire at grenfell tower take hold so drastically? how many people actually died? will we ever know the final total? 0utside this church, this has become one of the focal points for the grief with people putting up posters and bringing flowers. the posters have people on sadly now presumed to have died. to give you a sense of where we are this morning, that same methodist church and a short distance away is what remains of the tower. still a shocking sight to see it two weeks
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after the tragedy took place. a big focus of this investigation is going to be cladding, tests have failed on high—rise buildings across the country but we've found nine nhs trusts have been found to have buildings with cladding similar to g re nfell tower. buildings with cladding similar to grenfell tower. we've been told schools will be asked to check any buildings four storeys or higher, that might not be the tests we've seen that might not be the tests we've seen on that might not be the tests we've seen on high—rise buildings but they will have to look at what the cladding, if any, will have to look at what the cladding, ifany, is made will have to look at what the cladding, if any, is made up of. there's confusion among local authorities about what they should be looking for because they say now they're not clear about what is safe and what is deemed unsafe. simon, thanks very much. we will be there through the morning speaking to people who had to leave their homes because of what happened at the tower. services providing support for people who are older and disabled face more cuts despite extra money being put into the system. that's according to research by the directors of adult social care for councils in england.
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the report says more than two thirds of local authorities had to dip into their financial reserves last year to meet increasing demand. the government says it's provided more funding and will consult on how to maintain services long—term. a major annual study of public opinion in england, scotland and wales suggests that almost half the population favour raising taxes to increase spending on public services. nearly 3,000 people were interviewed for the british social attitudes survey between last july and november. researchers say there's evidence people are more eurosceptic after the referendum than at any point in the last 33 years. one of the uk's rarest birds of prey is heading towards extinction in england, according to the rspb. there are just four breeding pairs of hen harriers left, and numbers are declining fast across the rest of the uk. even in the bird's traditional stronghold of scotland, the numbers are down. the reasons include illegal persecution and destruction of their natural habitat. they are beautiful creatures, aren't
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they? if you are just waking up then you might want to wake up a little bit more for this. a pedestrian has had a miraculous escape after being struck by a bus in reading city centre. the moment was captured on cctv, as ben moore reports. we must warn you that some people might find these pictures upsetting. it is disturbing to watch but he survived and he's 0k. a quiet morning in reading until this spectacular accident happened. the man on the receiving end of the bus, simon smith, should by rights be seriously injured or worse. so it's nothing short of astonishing when he calmly gets up and walks into a nearby bar. simon khan to talk to the bbc for legal reasons but his friends here have been in
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touch. we call called simon a few hours after the day of the accident and yeah, he was in a lot of pain. he was still in shock basically, he couldn't believe what happened. i can't believe simon got up, dusted himself off and walked away from it. it's a miracle he is alive. the scars the bus left as it hit this wall coming to a stop are there for all to see. many here think it careered around all to see. many here think it ca reered around the all to see. many here think it careered around the corner because ofa careered around the corner because of a mechanical failure, careered around the corner because of a mechanicalfailure, but careered around the corner because of a mechanical failure, but that's now the subject of an ongoing investigation. reading buses says it is shocked by the incident and sends it regrets to simon. it's sharing the bus‘s on—boa rd it regrets to simon. it's sharing the bus‘s on—board cctv with police. as you might expect this footage has now gone viral. the main comment, most people admire how simon just kept calm and carried on. just extraordinary pictures!
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that was ben moore reporting. it is terrifying to watch, isn't it, and yet he was all right and he walked away from it. shall we show you again? walking along the street, bus comes around the corner... i'm not going to make sound effects. he gets hit so hard, so many things could have gone so wrong with that and for him to walk away is incredible. it still has to hurt, though, hasn't it? good morning! sorry, i can't bring you good news either to calm everything down. sorry, i can't bring you good news either to calm everything downm sorry, i can't bring you good news either to calm everything down. in a world that is constantly changing, some things remain the same. do you know what dan is talking about? death, taxes and penalty shootouts. and england losing to germany in a semi—final on penalties. it was so disappointing last night, such high hopes for our england under the team but when you compare the set—ups,
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the england and german set—ups, we've talked about the youth teams and the young players coming through the england setup and saint georges park and how successful it is, it is progress but an interesting stat, of the team playing for england, there we re the team playing for england, there were 200 premier league appearances within that team, the german team, 1100, more than 1000 bundesliga appearances. experience. they play more. but also they were beaten by a better team. germany deserved to go through. yes, and the germans were resilient and confident and have a swagger about them! it was the germans, in the semis, on penalties, again. it finished 2—2 after extra time and nathan redmond's miss ended the england under—21s‘ run in the european championship the england under—21s‘ run in the european championship in poland. germany will play spain in the final. a plan for england to play a friendly in thailand to win backing for their 2018 world cup it was a form of bribery, according to a former fa chairman. it's criticised in fifa's investigation into alleged
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corruption into the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 world cups. england's cricketers recovered from their opening loss at the women's world cup. they thrashed pakistan in leicester with a record—breaking total, nat sivver scoring 137. and novak djokovic will be hoping for some sunshine today as he gets ready for wimbledon. he managed only one game of his match in eastbourne yesterday before the rain came. it's a part of his buildup, he decided to go to eastbourne because he needed to work on his grasscourt game and then low and behold, the weather got in his way! it might help him for wimbledon, both! somebody else would know better than that. if he gets it back together he is formidable, once it clicks. but if. it's interesting he has chosen andre agassi to work with because he's a man that got it back together
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ain! he's a man that got it back together again! the rebuild! the weather is really looking miserable, carol? i trying to put a positive spin on things because a lot of us need and wa nt things because a lot of us need and want the rain. i've been speaking to farmers who have been crying out for it. you won't be disappointed. we saw a lot of it yesterday in parts of the uk. this morning waking up to some surface spray on the roads. so if you are travelling take extra care. you can see the amount of rain we have had through the night. some of that has been torrential. even a couple of inches in a short amount of time. this morning it still is reining in the south—west and through parts of wales, the midlands, at the lincolnshire, where it is still heavy. at the start of the day as well. these are the temperatures we are looking at at eighta.m.. not temperatures we are looking at at eight a.m.. not farfrom temperatures we are looking at at eight a.m.. not far from this at the moment. in the northern england and northern ireland, a lot of cloud. some of it coming into the east of
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northern ireland. for scotland a lot of cloud around, but for scotland today you will see the best of the web. we will see some brighter skies coming along. through the day we have an onshore flow down the east coast, so it will be quite windy at times. locally we will have gales and that close inland, making it feel cold, combined with the rain. there will be sent dry interludes in the south—east. as temperatures rise we could get some thundery downpours. northern ireland is trying. 16 in belfast, in aberdeen highs of about 13. through this evening and overnight we continue with the rain. you can see it around this low pressure. still quite windy as well. there will be dry interludes. still dry in scotland, with the odd shower. not a cold night. these are the values you can expect in towns and cities. tomorrow we start with a rain. tomorrow it is edging further north. although it will be wet, the area willjust be
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wet, except for the south—west. scotland, the far north of northern england and northern ireland. we hang on to the rain in the south. still mighty, up to 20. as we push further north under the rain we have about 12 — 15. into friday the low pressure is still very much driving the weather, but you can see how it sta rts the weather, but you can see how it starts to curl around and it is sinking south. a squeeze on isa buyers indicating it will be windy in the east and the west. here is the band of rain. it will ease in parts of wales and england, as it sinks towards the south—east. not getting there until much later in the day. 22 in london, 19 in cardiff and kind in scotland and northern ireland another reversal of fortunes. the drier and brighter day. this weekend drier and brighter sums it up. it won't be bone dry, but not as wet as today.
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that's good news. thank you! she always sprinkle is a little bit of positivity! ben'sjoined us she always sprinkle is a little bit of positivity! ben's joined us to have a look at the papers. would you like to kick things off? thank you so much! the daily telegraph talks about banks for getting lessons of the past, a p pa re ntly getting lessons of the past, apparently risking a new financial crisis by allowing a sharp increase in carloans, crisis by allowing a sharp increase in car loans, credit card debts and that according to the governor of the bank of england, warning yesterday. the front page of the times. top teams split over brexit. and that's miranda kerr on the front. £6 million ofjules handed to us investigators, who suspect there may have been bought with stolen money. the guardian looks at those pictures
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from eastbourne. their main story is about social mobility policies. they say failing to reduce inequalities between the rich and poor. that's according to a report by the social mobility commission. the mirror, a double blow for pensions. women and younger workers face crisis in their retirement. and one of the stars of poldark saying she will stay a fiery redhead for good. and the latest on the decision, the final heartbreak. devastation as the european court refuses to save their sick child. i want to pick up on that story you mentioned. as i delve inside the telegraph. you touched on it, that issue of car loans. in the same way that the housing crisis all unfolded because people couldn't pay their
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mortgages, there's a real and on many experts and the bank of england about whether we are weaned too much and whether if there is a rising interest rates people won't be able to pay those car loans back, leading to pay those car loans back, leading toa to pay those car loans back, leading to a lot of second—hand cars on the market. and it all starts to unravel. what the bank of england has told the banks is they have to put more money aside to cover any bad loans. i just put more money aside to cover any bad loans. ijust want put more money aside to cover any bad loans. i just want to put more money aside to cover any bad loans. ijust want to mention this story we touched on yesterday, this story we touched on yesterday, this is staggering fine for google. 2.4 billion euros, for overly promoting its own shopping services over those of its rivals. google says it has to change. we spoke a moment ago about the england under—21 is and teams and how you compare them. i want to talk about one particular team this morning, the all blacks. there is a brilliant piece in the times this
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morning about the ethos, the heritage. we talk about the all blacks as being one of the greatest teams ever. they are not perfect, but they have something like a 77% win rate since 1973. they talk about the humility, from senior tojune you. they do it thing at the end of training where everybody tidies their own kit, everybody carries there own, they don't walk around with headphones on, the eat together and talk and bring theirfamilies into the team environment. what's it called? sweeping the shed. whoever you are, however brilliant, you take your turn at sweeping the shed after training. i think we should do the equivalent after every show, tidy the sofa. i think we should, it is one of my pet hates! i also offered to bring in my own equipment. i don't want to cause any great scare, but a fishing expert is
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saying that a great white shark has been seen hunting repeatedly off hampshire and warns holidaymakers to be on their guard. just a warning. has jaws arrived on british shores? we hope not! just to say, sharks are very important. a life lesson for us all, thank you very much. first introduced as a way of combating crime, the power to stop—and—search members of the public is one of the most contentious aspects of british policing. in england and wales, the use of stop—and—search has more than halved in the past five years, but one of england's most senior police officers says that's led to a rise in knife crime. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been speaking to some of those affected. everytime i go down, people are
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walking past and it is just a normal day, but that's where my life ended, where his life ended. he was at college, studying law... just so horrible. on the same street in leicester where amy's son tyler was stabbed to death in 2015, sean was attacked one month before. they stabbed me once in my back, and if i didn't survive this could be my mum sitting here feeling exactly that. they both believed jail sentences for knife possession should be longer and that police should be stopping and searching more people, more often. if the stop-and-search was more present, then i believe my son would still be here today. dairy angry. you can son would still be here today. dairy angry. you can see son would still be here today. dairy angry. you can see it in my eyes. this has got to stop. this knife thing has got to stop. across england and wales, police are
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stopping and searching far fewer people than they used to. in 2011 there were more than 100,000 stop and searches, according to the most recent home office figures that number has now dropped by 65%. those figures relate to searches for offensive weapons. since 2011 overall knife crime has fallen, but in the past two years it has gone up by almost 13%. stop-and-search legally done is absolutely vital pa rt legally done is absolutely vital part of our armoury. so we should be doing more of it. like all police chiefs, mike barton was told in 2014 by the home office that stop—and—search needed reform. it should be intelligence led, more effectively targeted. you think there's a link between national decrease in and search and the recent increase in knife crime? we have not done any hard science to say that there is a direct link, however, we are all bright people
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and we can all work it out and you've got to say that it's a reasonable hypothesis. these two are 16. they are members of break the chain, a london—based group of volunteers. carrying a knife is normalised, like wearing socks. how do you feel about carrying a knife? they believe talking to people is the best way to dissuade them from carrying knives. cairo has himself been stopped and searched. he says the police handled it badly.|j been stopped and searched. he says the police handled it badly. i felt embarrassed. when i asked them why i was searched they looked nervous. underused. i've never been in trouble with the police. if you drive past and stare at me i'm going to be nervous. stop—and—search needs to be nervous. stop—and—search needs to be nervous. stop—and—search needs to be dealt with better. west midlands police training centre and a stop—and—search exercise for officers. this force believes fewer searches can be just as effective. it isn't about numbers. since 2011—
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2012 we have reduced the amount of stop and searches we conduct, but the arrest rate from that remains exactly the same, so it would appear now that we are targeting the right people. what grounds have you got the search? the home office says it supports stop—and—search when carried out properly and that there is no proven link between a number of searches and levels of knife crime. but as a police tactic, it remains controversial. later we'll be speaking to a member of the race equality organisation, the runnymede trust, looking at the issue of racial profiling and stop and searches. that's at 8:10am. still to come this morning: have you ever heard of man versus fat? no, i haven't. it's a football league for obese men. kat's at the soccer in the city stadium in manchester for us. good morning! good morning. yes,
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forget your bikini diet and your pure juice forget your bikini diet and your purejuice detox, this is how these quys purejuice detox, this is how these guys lose weight. i am here to play a early—morning football. these guys have tried everything to lose weight, but it turns out team work is the way to do it. there are teams from stoke, birmingham and manchester and in a little while and will speak to some of these people about how they have gone about losing a combined total of 30 tons in weight. that's coming up later. now the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm katharine carpenter. in the fortnight since the granville fire, charities and community groups have been overwhelmed with donations for those affected —— grenfell. now they are to be sold off to raise money. 40,000 boxes of excess clothes have been moved to this
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british red cross warehouse and the charity will now sell them in its shops around the country. all the money raised will go to the london fire relief fund. the deadline for drivers to prove they can speak english has been extended. transport for london brought in a requirement for new drivers saying it was vital for passenger safety, but uber says the test would put 33,000 private hire drivers out of business. the victoria and albert museum have unveiled their new £55 million redevelopment. as well as new public spaces and galleries, the facades of the grade i listed building have been revealed for the first time. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning, apart from a part suspension on the dlr between all saints and canary wharf because of a faulty train which is also causing delays on other parts of that line. 0n the trains there are delays of up to 15 minutes and some cancellations on southern trains between hurst green and east grinstead due
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to earlier flooding. tickets being accepted on local buses and thameslink services. out on the roads this is the north circular westbound where the exit slip is closed on chingford road at the crooked billet interchange. traffic coping at the moment. elsewhere, traffic is building up due to an incident on westbound a2 between bean interchange and junction 2 of the m25. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. all the thirsty gardens after the warm weather breathing a sigh of relief this morning. we've had a lot of rain overnight. still a couple of outbreaks around this morning. stays cloudy, but he should try out later. many places waking up to a dry start. we have some outbreaks of rain, however, fairly light and patchy. a dry picture this afternoon. maybe some brightness, but that will spark off a couple of showers. the maximum temperature is still struggling at about 19
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celsius. 0vernight tonight it's a much drier picture. the rain moves north and south. the minimum temperatures between 12 and 14 celsius. thursday, a dry start. we could see a couple of showers moving up could see a couple of showers moving up from the south. we could have a rumble of thunder mixed in. the maximum temperature about 19— 20. the rain that moved away north moves back down again southwards, as we had through friday. so we have some outbreaks of rain. some of that could be heavy, but it starts to clear away overnight on friday and into saturday. things were quite there will improve as we head into there will improve as we head into the weekend. some drier weather around. we should see a couple of sunny spells and temperatures making a slight recovery. about 21— 22 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it's wednesday 28th june.
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coming up on breakfast today: with confusion over who's looking after the displaced residents of grenfell tower, we'll ask a community spokesperson about what life is like two weeks on from the fire. also this morning: support is rising for higher taxes to fund public services, according to the latest british social attitudes report. we'll find out why. and matt allwright's made his career cracking down on rogue traders, now he's back with a new series of watchdog. he'lljoin us later with a new addition to his team, our very own steph. leather heard of her! yes you have! —— never heard of her! all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. a decision on whether people and organisations will face criminal charges over the hillsborough disaster will be announced this morning. the crown prosecution service will reveal its intentions at a meeting with victims‘ relatives this morning. 96 liverpool fans died when the terraces at the sheffield
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ground became overcrowded during the 1989 fa cup semi final. stephen kelly's brother, michael, died in the disaster. it's paramount in this whole case to give the families respite and the survivors of hillsborough and you know, to truly let us put to rest the 96. it's got to. news on that throughout the day for you across the bbc. two weeks on from the grenfell tower fire, theresa may has called for a major national investigation into the use of potentially flammable cladding on high rise buildings. every one of the samples tested from 95 buildings across england have now failed safety tests. last night the government confirmed all school buildings over four storeys tall are having their external cladding analysed as well. labour says it will challenge mps today to oppose further austerity. the party will call for more spending on the police and fire services as an amendment to the queen's speech, as well as an end to the 1% cap on public sector pay rises. the conservatives say only
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they will deliver the economy needed to properly fund the emergency services. computer systems around the world have been hit by a major cyber—attack affecting banks, retailers, energy firms and transport networks. the companies have been told their computers will remain frozen until a ransom is paid. experts who have examined the code say it's more sophisticated than the virus used in a global attack last month, which badly hit the nhs. services providing support for people who are older and disabled face more cuts, despite extra money being put into the system. that's according to research by the directors of adult social care for councils in england. the report says more than two thirds of local authorities had to dip into their financial reserves last year to meet increasing demand. the government says it's provided more funding and will consult on how to maintain services long—term. one of the uk's rarest birds of prey is heading towards extinction in england, according to the rspb.
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there are just four breeding pairs of hen harriers left, and numbers are declining fast across the rest of the uk. even in the bird's traditional stronghold of scotland, the numbers are down. the reasons include illegal persecution and destruction of their natural habitat. this is a story about cows. you may have heard the phrase "til the cows home." well, it happened to five—year—old bella from cheshire when she played her ukulele to a herd of cows in llandudno. look at this! here she is with just a few of the herd watching, and before too long, she was joined by many more of them. like a junior george formby. like ajunior george formby. like the pied piper of cows. the usual
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ukelele technique as well when it seems to be working! look at that! who knew the cows love a ukelele? now i do! i might go and try that myself. have you got one? know, i've got a guitar, will that work the same? you've got to play it like bella is playing, side on, a bit of that. excellent. i like the way she dressed as little red book had. she saidl dressed as little red book had. she said i can't be here all my, mummy! -- little said i can't be here all my, mummy! — — little red said i can't be here all my, mummy! —— little red riding hood. said i can't be here all my, mummy! -- little red riding hood. gorgeous, beautiful! i hope you recorded that at home everybody! i'm sure we will replay it! i'm sure. talking about replaying, a familiar story in the football, an england team losing to germany in the semifinals on
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penalties. they had been practising every day this month, not making a big deal about it. the germans say they didn't do any practice. that's annoying, isn't it? i don't know if it's true, looking at them i think they probably had. did you see the piece of paper in the german keeper's sock? he knew which way each one was going to go. based on what they have done in the past? yes. research is key. your sock as well, that's what i like. just so happens! good morning, everyone! once again, england have lost the semi—final of a football tournament to germany on penalties. this time it was the under 21s european championship, england came from behind to take the lead through chelsea's tammy abraham. but the germans levelled and after extra time, nathan redmond penalty was saved and the side followed the fate of the senior teams in 1990 and 1996. we've been practising for weeks but
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in the end of the two players you would put props on to score every time, the goalkeeper makes a great save so we'll have to take that. it's been a real team effort and i think we can be pleased with a lot of things we've done. and in the end we've lost on a penalty shootout and next time we need to be better for it. plenty of other football to look forward to! it's only 25 days since real madrid won the champions league but this season's competition is already under way! welsh champions the new saints lost 2—1 to europa fc of gibraltar in the first qualifying round. scott quigley got them back into the game with this brilliant effort but they conceded a second goal. the second leg is next week. fifa officials investigating alleged corruption were told plans for england to play a friendly in thailand to win backing for their own world cup bid were a form of bribery. the former fa chairman geoff thompson made the admission when interviewed during a fifa enquiry into the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 tournaments, won by russia and qatar. england's women have got their cricket world cup campaign back on track after a 107—run victory in a rain—affected match
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in leicester yesterday. natalie sciver and captain heather knight both hit their first one—day international centuries as the hosts reached a record breaking 377—7 from their 50 overs. pakistan were well behind in their chase when rain saw the match abandoned. it was exciting to watch, watching her at the other end of striking it like that and it's the type of cricket we want to play, exciting to show what we can do. that can do that and to see her do that is obviously brilliant from our perspective but it's a great performance obviously but there's a lot more cricket to be played in this tournament. novak djokovic had entered the aegon international in eastbourne with hopes of gaining some much—needed grass court practice ahead of wimbledon but spent a lot of yesterday twiddling his thumbs. the former world number one had taken the first game against canada's vasek pospisil when the rains came and never went away. they'll try again today. i bet he's listening to our carol! while, the current world number one andy murray pulled out of an exhibition match at the hurlingham club in london,
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saying he had a sore hip. he is still expected to play at the club on friday before beginning the defence of his wimbledon title on centre court on monday afternoon. i know he wanted to play that game but his team decided it was better to getan but his team decided it was better to get an extra day's rest, he's got a busy fortnight coming up. you're there next week? next week and the week after we will be there alive. and carol? yes, and carol. great, see you later on this morning. today marks two weeks since the fire at grenfell tower in west london. at least 79 people are known to have died in the blaze, with hundreds left homeless. a lot has happened in the last 14 days, with scenes of anger and despair but also hope, resilience and a fearsome community spirit amongst those affected. holly hamilton looks at what we know so far. at its height, 40 fire engines and more than 200 firefighters battled
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the blaze. dozens were rescued but despite their efforts, 79 people are now known to have died. the fire started in a fridge freezer but what caused it to spread so quickly will be key to the investigation. the focus so far has been on the cladding. samples from 95 towers in 32 local authority areas in england have all failed by a safety tests. the government was criticised for its slow response to the tragedy, but has since announced a full public enquiry, £5 million fund for the victims and a promise to rehouse all those affected in the local area. the tragedy has evoked a huge outpouring of support. millions of pounds have been donated as well as clothing, food and other essentials. simonjones is in west london for us this morning. good morning to you once again, simon. can i start by asking about this countrywide investigation into high—rise cladding. where are we
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with that at the moment? so far 95 high—rise buildings from 32 different local authorities have had their cladding tested and there's been a 100% failure rate. local authorities are being told to prioritise the buildings they have most concerned about but it appears the tests are extremely stringent, perhaps more strong than the tests that were taking place before the cladding was put on the buildings. it's not just high—rises cladding was put on the buildings. it's notjust high—rises that are being tested, we're also told nine nhs trusts have buildings that have similar cladding to grenfell tower, they will need to be tested. schools are being told to check any buildings 0ar storeys or taller, perhaps not for the testing but look at what the cladding is made of to see if there's any concerns about bad gash four. what about the residents, we will be speaking to
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them live later on, but two weeks after the terrible incidents, what is the general feeling among residents? -- four. ithink is the general feeling among residents? -- four. i think the mood has changed. i spent a lot of time there over the last couple of weeks. initially it was shock, then greece, then anger and i think now once again what we're hearing is that residents want to get their voices heard —— then grief. we got the nearby notting hill methodist church and this has become a focus for some of the outpouring of grief, you've got flowers and posters showing pictures of the many now feared dead. lots of people in the local community got together and they've written an open letter saying they wa nt to written an open letter saying they want to be an active part of the public enquiry, they don't want to be brushed aside. what they want to make sure it is their voices are heard and on top of this they're demanding anyone found to be responsible for what happened in the tower, and those that didn't deal with the aftermath very well, the
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local authorities, should be brought to justice. so local authorities, should be brought tojustice. so a local authorities, should be brought to justice. so a very strong feeling here two weeks on, perhaps a moment of reflection but people here saying they're determined their voices are heard. simon, thank you for that this morning. simon jones, heard. simon, thank you for that this morning. simonjones, nearby to g re nfell tower. this morning. simonjones, nearby to grenfell tower. wheel bespeak into a number of residents later in the programme to get more information about how the feeling has changed in the two weeks —— we'll be speaking to. will have people who were in the tower and those who had friends there. —— we'll have. and all so we'll get something from those trying to improve safety at the building. if you've looked out of the building chances are it's not looking great. not the best but carol is here with a positive spin. rain is crucial, rain is your friend? lots of people are crying out for rain and we've seen a lot of rain tonight and it is raining heavily in
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some parts of england and wales in particular. if you are travelling, expect a lot of surface water and spray on the roads. 0n the radar picture you can see the extent of the rainfall. at the moment it is heaviest in parts of east anglia and lincolnshire, but it is rotating around low pressure, succumbing in across eastern parts of england, wales and down into the south—west. even wales and down into the south—west. eve n a cross wales and down into the south—west. even across central parts of southern england with got the rain. in between there's a lot of cloud and it is quite muggy start to the day again. these are the temperatures you can expect. not far off now. in northern england again a lot of cloud and a couple of showers. some of the rain edging into northern ireland. for scotland you will have the driest weather today. that doesn't mean you have wall—to—wall blue skies. there will bea wall—to—wall blue skies. there will be a lot of cloud, with brighter breaks, and drizzly bits and pieces. the other thing is down the east coast we have an onshore wind, so things will feel cold, especially if
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you have the rain. the wind just blowing inland. across some parts with exposure there will be gales. the rain will advance northwards through the day. we will have some bright interludes develop. as temperatures rise that could spark thundery downpours. northern ireland drying off as the rain pushes away. scotla nd drying off as the rain pushes away. scotland remaining largely dry through the afternoon. through this evening and overnight still the wind will be a feature, pushing down through the irish sea and the english channel. you can see how the rain migrates northwards, getting across northern england, in true scotla nd across northern england, in true scotland and back into northern ireland, curling across southern areas as well. temperature wise, 11— 12. tomorrow a game we have a bit of a change. the difference pushing up the scotland at northern ireland. trifle england and wales, except for in the south—west, where we have that rain. in any sunshine we could
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have up to 20 celsius as we move further north. it will feel cooler in the rain, 12— 15. on the coastline it will feel colder still. as we had from thursday into friday the low pressure is still very much driving the weather and is with us for much of the week, but you can see that it starts to swing round and will then pull back. as it does so it is dragging the weather front with it, so the rain around the weather front will start to pull back towards the south—east. behind it brighter skies. the wind changes toa it brighter skies. the wind changes to a cooler direction and we have high as in london of 22 celsius. thank you. we shall see you throughout the morning. carol finding optimism in the rain. in a few minutes, the financial regulator is set to announce a crackdown on the hidden fees charged on our pensions. ben has been looking into it. 0pen question. what's going on? explain!
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it's a bit complicated, but i will do my best. this is scrutiny for people who manage our money. our investments, pensions, all of that. when we take out a pension they invest it in the stock market and we hope they will give us a return at will fund our retirement. the market is worth about £7 trillion, is worth thinking about. a lot of money. that's why the regulator is getting involved and they say it involves all sorts of things, where it's a personal or work pension. maybe it is some of the people who have a defined contribution pension scheme. you put your money in, every month, that's invested in the stock market and you hope you get a bigger return. the regulator says it is vital but there's not much scrutiny of the charges and fees imposed on these and where you make an investment it could cost you thousands of pounds in costs and that's really important. they say it
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is about improving transparency. let me talk you through some of the numbers. it affects three quarters of all uk households that have a pension. and as more and more of us get involved in where that money is going, it is very crucial that we keep a night on how the money is being invested. the financial conduct authority wants better scrutiny of those charges and fees and says we simply aren't getting value for money, we don't really have any idea of where the money is being invested and what these we are asked to pay on it. this is a staggering statistic. the research suggests you could be £14 and £400 worse off from making a single bad decision about where your money is put and that i think is a staggering amount of money and that's what the originator wants to come down on. they are big decisions. how can you make them and know what will happen? at the moment there's no way of getting clarity on the transparency.
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it is interesting to raise the £400 issue. say someone said to you, on your fund we will charge you a quarter of a percent every year, all we can charge you 1% every year and a little bit more for a transaction. it doesn't seem like a big difference. .75% of the difference, but it could equate to £14,000 worse off over the 20 years that your pension is invested, or it is very clear that you have to look at the small print and the regulator says it has to be very clear. they will clamp down on this old boys club, we all of the money is sloshing around, they are charging fees without anyone giving it any real scrutiny. so they will make it transparent and clear and people can make the decisions. thank you. you know when you throw a trillion around? by you know when you throw a trillion around ? by matt you know when you throw a trillion around? by matt stieger said something i always remembered. —— maths teacher. 1,000,000,000th second is 12 days, a billion seconds is 32 years and 1 trillion seconds is 32 years and 1 trillion seconds is about 31,000 years. i've never heard of it like that.
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then you get the scale of how much bigger they are. thank you. by matt stieger! —— maths teacher. if you're a man who's a bit on the larger side, you might have tried a few diets and weight loss groups, which end up being targeted at women. but now a football league, specifically for overweight men has been set up. kat downes is pitch side in manchester for us this morning. it has an interesting name as well. yes, it is called man v fat. if you wa nt to yes, it is called man v fat. if you want to lose weight you might go to the gym, joined join a zumba class. for these people none of that worked. what has worked is playing football with a group of guys. you
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might bea football with a group of guys. you might be a bit overweight and you wa nt to might be a bit overweight and you want to shed the pounds. it works if you do it together. in a minute i will talk to some of these super slimmers and find out more about their stories. here is a quick look at how it works. this is my first season and i've lost 3.5 stone. i am enjoying life better. i feel i am getting more out of it. hang on! there you go. it has made me a lot fitter. and a lot thinner. i made me a lot fitter. and a lot thinner. lam made me a lot fitter. and a lot thinner. i am still rubbish at football! rubbish or the next reynaldo! that doesn't matter here. what counts is shedding the stones. as well as goals on the pitch... teams get bonus calls for the amount of weight they lose together. teams get bonus calls for the amount of weight they lose togetherlj really of weight they lose together.” really struggled to lose weight through the years, joined a lot of
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the commercial weight loss organisations and obviously so many of the people voted those are women and itjust of the people voted those are women and it just felt of the people voted those are women and itjust felt it of the people voted those are women and it just felt it wasn't of the people voted those are women and itjust felt it wasn't quite right for me. there was a lot of talk about fitting into a bikini and so really it was about finding something that was suitable for men, something that was suitable for men, something that was suitable for men, something that would really empower them, something that would help them to lose weight and that's where man v fat football came from. it works, thanks to teamwork. when we first started we had a tiny room and it ended up with the whole team cramming into this tiny rooms, because they were supporting each other and cheering each other on and wanting each other to do well. this league in manchester isn't the only one. there are 24 a the country. that's 3000 men getting out, playing football and losing weight and in around 1.5 years they've lost a combined total of more than 30 times! —— 30 times. combined total of more than 30 times! -- 30 times. you've lost four
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kilos this week! ross has lost 4.5 stone since january. before this he found there was nothing accessible for guys like him who wanted to lose weight. you are looking at your men's fitness which is about a sixpack, getting your abs and work out and show your muscles. those lads, we are nowhere near that. we need to lose weight confidently and if it is having a group of lads taking the mickey out of you and doing it that way it's perfect, absolutely perfect. with the tons ticking away, it proves that whatever works for you is the best in the battle for the bulge. this leak has only been going for about a year and a half and these quys about a year and a half and these guys already have a lot of great stories about how much weight they have lost. i am going to talk to the founder. banks are having us this morning and getting these guys out to play football. —— thanks for having us. we have pictures of how you looked before you lost weight, equals it was about your personal journey that led this, wasn't it? exactly. when i was trying to lose
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weight myself i found all of the support groups and products were aimed exclusively at women and i wa nted aimed exclusively at women and i wanted to find something that would actually support meant and provide accountability and support for normal guys around the country. how does it work? your goals on the pitch are combined with weight loss. how does it work? before each game the players weigh in and the weight loss goals they accrue during those weigh ins are added to the goals they score on the pitch and essentially that's how we create our tables. there are obviously leads across the country now for men who wa nt to across the country now for men who want to lose weight and who are looking for something that's a bit morse eatable for them. it seems to be working brilliantly. and thanks to karen, who is the dietician here. this isn't just about to karen, who is the dietician here. this isn'tjust about playing 30 minutes of football week, it is about making a life change?m minutes of football week, it is about making a life change? it is. traditionally men's seed dieting as something women do. so obviously the increased physical exercise is important, but we have to underpin
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that with three regular meals, reducing snacking, those sorts of things and i am there to support those lifestyle changes. so this is a way for men to get into weight loss, not just losing weight a way for men to get into weight loss, notjust losing weight by taking exercise, it is about making life changes and changing the way you live and eat and how you think as well. we just heard from ross. sorry to interrupt you, but a great story from you as well. what was it that prompted you to make the change? there were quite a few things. health reasons, things like that. one of them, mainly, was around wanting to go out and do skydive and there are weight limits, about 13.5 stone. that's what i was aiming for. stupidly my mum and my wife said that if i lost weight they would come with me. now i am at 15 stone, so they are panicking, but i'm getting close to it now! so you only have half a stone to go before your wife and mother jump
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only have half a stone to go before your wife and motherjump out of a plane with you ? your wife and motherjump out of a plane with you? yes, and i hope they remember it! i can't wait. proof if it is needed that perhaps a competitive edge is just what you need to lose the weight. the stakes couldn't be higher. congratulations on losing 4.5 stone? since january the 20th, so just over five months. it turns out that teamwork is the key to shedding the pounds. really quickly. if he does lose all of that weight, is he still allowed to play on the team? i think once you have lost the weight, do your team try to dump you? because you get extra goals for losing the weight, so once you are skinny they say, hang on, you aren't scoring the goal is? one of our guys has dropped below the limit, but he can still play for us the limit, but he can still play for us and get goals on the pitch. we wa nt to us and get goals on the pitch. we want to break up the team! we're champions! champions in weight loss and on the pitch. a combined
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victory. good to hear. i was worried for him. an important question you were worried about. more on that later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm katharine carpenter. clothes donated the victims of the g re nfell tower clothes donated the victims of the grenfell tower fire will be sold off to raise money for those affected. in the days following the fire charities and community groups were overwhelmed with donations. now 40,000 boxes of excess clothes have been moved to this british red cross warehouse will stop the charity will sell them in its stores in aid of the london fire relief fund. the deadline for minicab drivers to prove they can speak english has been extended until next year because of legal proceedings. transport for london brought in the language requirement for new drivers saying it was vital for passenger safety. but uber claims the test would put thirty three thousand private hire drivers out of business.
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the victoria and albert museum has unveiled its new £55 million redevelopment. as well as new public spaces and galleries, the facades of the grade i listed building have been revealed for the first time. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning apart from a part suspension on the dlr between all saints and canary wharf because of a faulty train, which is also causing delays on other parts of that line. on the trains, southeastern services are at a standstill between charlton and slade green because of a problem at plumstead. out on the roads, this is the north circular westbound, where the exit slip is closed on chingford road at the crooked billet interchange. traffic coping at the moment. in the west end, oxford street is closed in both directions between oxford circus and tottenham court road due to over—running works so buses are on diversion. and the traffic lights are not working on east india dock road at the junction of saltwell street
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and upper north street. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. all the thirsty gardens after the warm weather breathing a sigh of relief this morning. we've had a lot of rain overnight. still one or two outbreaks around this morning. stays cloudy, but it should dry out later. many places waking up to a dry start. we do have some outbreaks of rain, however, fairly light and patchy. a dry picture this afternoon. maybe some brightness, but that could spark off a couple of showers. the maximum temperature still struggling at about 19 celsius. overnight tonight it's a much drier picture. the rain moves away north and south. the minimum temperature between 12 and 14 celsius. for thursday, a dry start. we could see a couple of showers moving up from the south. we could have a rumble or two of thunder mixed in as well. the maximum temperature staying similar, about 19—20.
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the rain that moved away north moves back down again southwards, as we had through friday. so we have some outbreaks of rain. some of that could be heavy, but it starts to clear away overnight friday and into saturday. things look like they'll improve as we head into the weekend. some drier weather around. we should see one or two sunny spells on saturday and temperatures making a slight recovery. about 21— 22 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. after a near 30—year battle, the families of those who died at hillsborough will find out this morning whether anyone is to face criminal charges. it follows two separate enquires into what happened on the day of the match and whether there was a cover—up afterwards. good morning, it's wednesday, 28th of june.
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also this morning: two weeks on from the grenfell fire disaster and we learn what it's like for those who have left their homes. one of the uk's most senior police officers says that a reduction in stop—and—search has led to an increase in knife crime. victims tell breakfast more needs to be done. very angry. can see it in my eyes. this has got to stop. this knife things got to stop. are you paying thousands of pounds too much in hidden fees on your pension? the regulator is to announce a crackdown on firms that manage our money but why are we still getting a raw deal? in sport... not again. england lose to germany on penalties. nathan redmond's miss means
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they fail to make the final of the under—21 european championship. i'm here playing some early morning football with these guys to find out how team work has helped these men and 3000 others like them around the country lose a combined total of 30 tons in weight. and carol has the weather. for england, wales and northern ireland some rain on the cards, some of it will be heavy but as temperatures rise we could have thundery downpours. the driest conditions today are likely to be in scotland. more details in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. the families of those who died at hillsborough will find out later this morning whether anyone will face criminal charges. an inquest ruled last year that the 96 liverpool fans who died at the stadium in sheffield in 1989 were unlawfully killed. our north of england correspondent judith moritz reports. # walk on, walk on,
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with hope in your heart...# it was a moment of history, the inquest‘s finding last year that 96 liverpool fans were unlawfully killed at hillsborough. for theirfamilies, it was justice, but their legal journey did not end there. steve kelly lost his brother michael in the disaster. he's spent the 28 years since then calling for those responsible to be held accountable. there's got to be this accountability. it's paramount in this whole case to give the families respite and the survivors of hillsborough and you know, to truly let us put to rest the 96. it's got to. the fans were killed when the terraces at the sheffield ground became overcrowded during the 1989 fa cup semifinal. since 2012, there have been two criminal inquiries into hillsborough. operation resolve investigated
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the day of the disaster. it identified 15 key suspects. offences considered include gross negligence manslaughter. one of those waiting to hear whether he'll face charges is former chief superintendent david duckenfield, who was the south yorkshire police match commander. the police watchdog, the ipcc, investigated cover—up allegations, identifying eight key suspects. it considered offences including misconduct in a public office and perverting the course of justice. the former west yorkshire chief constable, sir norman bettison, has revealed that he's been treated as a suspect by the ipcc. it isn't known whether he wailface charges. hundreds of investigators have been working from these offices for the last four years at a cost of £100 million. there is an expectation that charges will be brought, after such a long wait and such large—scale effort. judith moritz, bbc news, warrington. that decision will be announced to the families
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at 11am this morning. we'll have coverage of that across the bbc this morning. two weeks on from the grenfell tower fire, theresa may has called for a major national investigation into the use of cladding on high—rise buildings. every one of the samples tested from 95 buildings across england have now failed safety tests. our reporter simonjones is in west london for us this morning. you can see people have been laying tributes to the victims at this church. good morning, simon. yesterday it was announced an independent panel has been assembled to advise on safety measures. what more can you tell us? some controversy about that this morning, it is chaired by sir ken knight, a former london fire commissioner, and ina former london fire commissioner, and in a previous investigation into a fire in camberwell that killed six, he advised against the retrospective
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fitting of sprinklers in the high—rise buildings in all cases because he said sometimes it's not practical economically or it's not viable to do that. what we've got here, though, two weeks on our many questions still left unanswered, how many people died in the fire, why are so many buildings now failing the safety test? to give you a sense of where we are, this is the church that's become a site for many people to pay tributes, to bring flowers, posters of those who have lost their lives. then it's very much in the shadow of grenfell tower. it's not just tower blocks causing concern. we've got nine nhs trusts who also have cladding similar to grenfell tower and that will be tested and schools are being told to check the cladding on buildings hire van four storeys to see what they are made of
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—— hire than. local people want to be heard here. they want to make sure any failings during the aftermath should be brought tojustice. during the aftermath should be brought to justice. we will be speaking to some of the residents later in the programme. iain watson joins us from westminster. i know labour is going to be talking about grenfell tower today and about funding for emergency services, what more can you tell us? that's right, i'm george ezra will be accused of trying to politicise the tragedy at g re nfell tower trying to politicise the tragedy at grenfell tower but his approach doesn't seem to be harming him in the opinion polls ——jeremy doesn't seem to be harming him in the opinion polls —— jeremy corbyn. he's called for more funding for the police and fire service since the tragedy took place and today he is trying to amend at the queens speech, the government programme for the next two years, to try to guarantee the funding but he won't
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win because theresa may now has the support of ten mps from northern ireland, the dum ps, so she can vote down his attempt but what he will try to do is win the odd and andy baris conservative mps at the same time —— dup. some conservatives who lost at the last election are saying on the doorsteps people felt public sector cuts had gone on for too long. —— dup mps ——... the government will say if you want decent public services, you need a strong economy to deliver them and they say that something labour simply can't do. thank you very much. more from westminster later. sinn fein has accused the democratic unionist party of failing to give any ground in talks to restore devolved government at stormont. they say there had been no movement on the rights of irish speakers or the lgbt community. but the dup has insisted it has no red lines and accused sinn fein of being involved
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in a high—wire act. the deadline for reaching a deal is tomorrow afternoon. services providing support for people who are older and disabled face more cuts, despite extra money being put into the system. that's according to research by the directors of adult social care for councils in england. the report says more than two thirds of local authorities had to dip into their financial reserves last year to meet increasing demand. our social affairs correspondent allison holt reports. one of the uk's rarest birds of prey is heading towards extinction in england, according to the rspb. there are just four breeding pairs of hen harriers left, and numbers are declining fast across the rest of the uk. even in the bird's traditional stronghold of scotland, the numbers are down. the reasons include illegal persecution and destruction of their natural habitat. they are beautiful creatures, aren't they? you get a real sense there of how
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stunning they are. want to watch these pictures closely.” stunning they are. want to watch these pictures closely. i still can't believe it! —— you want to. a pedestrian has had a miraculous escape after being struck by a bus in reading city centre. when we showed this personally someone said they spilt their cereal over their dog so what this carefully! we must warn you that some people might find these pictures upsetting. it is disturbing to watch but he survived and he's ok. a quiet morning in reading until this spectacular accident happened. the man on the receiving end of the bus, simon smith, should by rights be seriously injured or worse. so it's nothing short of astonishing when he calmly gets up and walks into a nearby bar. simon can't to talk to the bbc for legal reasons but his friends here have been in touch. we called simon a few hours after the day of the accident and yeah, he was in a lot of pain. he was still in shock basically,
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he couldn't believe what happened. ijust can't believe simon got up, dusted himself off and walked away from it. it's a miracle he's alive. the scars the bus left as it hit this wall coming to a stop are there for all to see. many here think that it careered around the corner because of a mechanical failure, but that's now the subject of an ongoing investigation. reading buses says it's shocked by the incident and sends its regrets to simon. it's sharing the bus‘s on—board cctv with police. as you might expect this footage has now gone viral. the main comment, most people admire the way simon just kept calm and carried on. then he gets up and he walks into
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the nearest building, which happened to bea the nearest building, which happened to be a pub. good on him! he's ok, the best news to come out of that but it is actually quite terrifying to watch! for the second time in less than two months, a computer virus is sweeping across the world. a large—scale cyber attack that started in ukraine has been taking systems offline. a british advertising agency is among the companies that have been hit. yesterday's cyber attack seems to be similar to the one that struck the nhs last month. our security correspondent gordon corera has more. during the day it became clear that the problem was not contained in ukraine but was spreading. reports came in of companies affected from russia, across europe to the uk and also the us. those affected included oil producers, shipping and pharmaceutical companies and a london based advertising group. they we re london based advertising group. they were all faced with a screen like this, telling them they've been locked out of their computer and needed to pay a ransom to get back
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in. computer systems which have not been upgraded or patched are usually the most vulnerable. our security correspondent gordon corera there. joining us now is technology expert tom cheesewright. he knows a thing or two about these things! i think we spoke to you last time there was a cyber attack. what's the difference with this one, it spread really quickly. we talked about the one that affected the nhs, what are the key differences here? the first is how it got out there, it was uploaded into a ukrainian tax system and it spread from that system and it spread from that system to anybody that downloaded a softwa re system to anybody that downloaded a software update from there, that gets into all sorts of organisations that deal with them. from there it had three orfour that deal with them. from there it had three or four different ways of spreading across networks through organisations inside the ukraine and international organisations. we don't know of any other ways it spread outside that, typically e—mails, phishing e—mails that encourage people to download the software. from what you can read
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into it, does it seem aimed at ukraine, deliberately targeting them? what points us into that direction is it started with this softwa re direction is it started with this software in the ukraine, secondly it doesn't on second reflection looked like a piece of ransomware. the core code of the system seems very sophisticated, it's taking advantage of lots of different flaws in softwa re of lots of different flaws in software to spread quickly through networks. the piece of software written to collect the money is basically rubbish. it is very simplistic. it's not about the cash? no, it isjust a poor disguise. they've only been paid about £8,000, which has affected so many people, so maybe it's not about the money. how can businesses protect themselves? is it like drug testing, they are ahead in terms of the technology they use that you can use to fight against this? this isn't like someone pointing a gun at you but like a flu virus spreading, it gets the old and infirm first so you have to make sure your systems are
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up have to make sure your systems are up to date and if possible you've upgraded to the latest versions of the software and you have good antivirus in place and good backups but most of all you have to make sure your users and your setup in terms of policy is right. if things do get in that means they can't spread quickly. other systems especially vulnerable at the moment or the attackers are becoming more sophisticated? part of the problem is the nsa was stopped tiling what it called cyber weapons. they were stopped piling weapons for getting into different computers. —— stockpiling. these were then shared with the public and now lots of cyber criminals are using these weapons in attacks. so these weapons feature in the software and allow it to spread rapidly across networks. this use of cyber attacks, we had the defence secretary michael fallon
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speaking yesterday about the use of cyber attacks against isis, which have been successful, so whichever you look at it this is the future. this is the new battleground and there is some evidence that this is a target at ukraine, and it is based on where it started and what it has caused. hats this is a cyber attack on ukraine. we've seen it attacked the chernobyl nuclear reactor, so it is taking down the automated checking of levels, which is very dangerous. affecting the movement of all sorts of goods around the world as well. thank you. ifear as well. thank you. i fear we as well. thank you. ifear we will as well. thank you. i fear we will have to talk to you again. why don't you just stay there! something we also always talk about, the weather. good morning. i've got quite a lot of rain this morning and overnight. if you are travelling first thing watch out for extra
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surface water and spray on the roads. on the radar picture what you will find this we have seen a lot of rain. some parts have had two inches over the course of the night. at the moment the heaviest rain is in east anglia, through cambridgeshire and into lincolnshire. this rain is rotating around low pressure. this morning it is wet in wales, south—west england, towards south—east england and east anglia. in between the rain there are some drier interludes. we lose the cloud around and there is drizzle. but it isn't a cold start to the day. for more than england it is dry at the moment, at the rain is on its way from northern ireland. rain moving east and south through the day and for scotland you will have the driest weather today across the whole of the uk. that doesn't mean wall—to—wall blue skies. there will be quite a lot of cloud at times. down the east coast of scotland and england you will find the onshore
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flow will be quite windy and it will feel cold. especially if you combine that with the rain. the rain moves away from the south—east. it will brighten up through the day as temperatures worries it could spark shunter we showers. —— as the temperatures rise it could spark a thundery showers. england, scotland and northern ireland will see the rain. it never leaves the south—east and it calls back in again. temperatures are in double figures in cities. lower than that in rural areas. tomorrow it is scotland, northern england and northern ireland with the rain. some of it still fringing in the west of wales. a lot of dry weather for the rest of england and wales. temperatures tomorrow in the south, 16— 20 celsius. if you are stuck under the rain in the north it will be the cooler. 12— 14. as we had through thursday, into friday, this low
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pressure, which is dominating at the moment, starts to sink further south. the weather front is dragged southwards with it. on friday itself here is the band of rain associated with it. you can see how it is fragmenting on the western front. still heavy at times and still keen wind, but this time it is coming from the north, which is a direction. nonetheless, london could still hit 22 celsius. as we head into the weekend it will be drier and brighter. that doesn't mean it will be dry and bright all the time, because there will be some atlantic fronts coming from the west. but we don't expect them to be as heavy or produce as much rain as we have seen all are going to see today. thank you very much. ben is with us, looking at some of the main business stories. we have been talking about the clampdown from the regulator, the clampdown from the regulator, the financial rigoletto, one of these we pay on our pensions.
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they've just unveiled a crackdown, the financial conduct authority, after complaints that firms are charging too much on this. the market is worth £7 trillion but it is unclear what visa being imposed and higher fees are eating is unclear what visa being imposed and higherfees are eating into is unclear what visa being imposed and higher fees are eating into the value of our retirement savings. it is important because three quarters of all uk households currently have a pension that is invested in the stock market. more for you on that in about half an hour. elsewhere, toshiba has failed to sell its memory business, despite plans to sell it to the japanese government. it needs to sell the firm for about $18 billion to pay for its failed us nuclear business that collapsed earlier this year. without a deal the future of toshiba remains in doubt and the whole firm could colla pse doubt and the whole firm could collapse as a result. more than three quarters of the population of the world now uses facebook. it
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announced it has 2 billion people using the site, 13 years after it was founded by mark zuckerberg at harvard. he famously dropped out of university after globe on the —— launching the global networking site. but critics long predicted the demise of the firm, as snapchat and instagram it into user numbers. 2 billion for facebook! not a bad figure for someone who set it up at university. absolutely amazing. thank you and see you later. flipping out the numbers today! first introduced as a way of combating crime, the power to stop—and—search members of the public is one of the most controversial aspects of british policing. in england and wales, its use has more than halved in the past five years. but, in an exclusive interview, one of england's most senior police chiefs has told breakfast he believes the drop in stop—and—search has led to a rise in knife crime. our reporter tim muffett has the story. everytime i go down,
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people are walking past and it's just a normal day, but that's where my life ended, where his life ended. he was at college, studying law... just so horrible. on the same street in leicester where amy's son tyler was stabbed to death in 2015, sean was attacked one month before. if i didn't survive this could be my mum sitting here feeling exactly what amy's feeling. amy and shaun believe jail sentences for knife possession should be longer and that police should be stopping and searching more people, more often. if the stop—and—search was more present, then i believe my son would still be here today. very angry. you can see it in my eyes. this has got to stop. this knife thing has got to stop.
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across england and wales, police are stopping and searching far fewer people than they used to. in 2011, there were more than 100,000 stop and searches. according to the most recent home office figures that number has now dropped by 65%. those figures relate to searches for offensive weapons. since 2011, overall knife crime has fallen, but in the past two years it has gone up by almost 13%. stop—and—search legally done is an absolutely vital part of our armoury. so we should be doing more of it. like all police chiefs, mike barton was told by the home office in 2014 that stop—and—search needed reform. it should be intelligence—led, more effectively targeted. do you think there's a link between a national decrease in stop—and—search and the recent increase in knife crime? we have not done any hard science
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to say that there is a direct link, however, we are all bright people and we can all work it out and you've got to say that it's a reasonable hypothesis. cairo and shelby are 16. they are members of break the chain, a london—based group of volunteers. carrying a knife is normalised, like wearing socks. how do you feel about carrying a knife ? they believe talking to people is the best way to dissuade them from carrying knives. cairo has himself been stopped and searched. he says the police handled it badly. the van stopped and they slammed open the door. "wait there!" i felt embarassed. when i asked them why i was searched they said i looked nervous. i'm a youth. i've never been in trouble with the police. if you drive past in a van and stare at me, i'm going to be nervous. stop—and—search needs to be dealt with better.
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west midlands police training centre and a stop—and—search exercise for officers. this force believes fewer searches can be just as effective. it isn't about numbers. since 2011—2012 we have reduced the amount of stop and searches that we conduct, but the arrest rate from that remains exactly the same, so it would appear now that we are targeting the right people, intelligence—led searches. what grounds have you got to search? the home office says it supports stop—and—search when carried out properly and that there is no proven link between a number of searches and levels of knife crime. but as a police tactic, it remains controversial. we will be discussing this later. later we'll be speaking to a member of the race equality organisation, the runnymede trust, looking at the issue of racial profiling and stop and searches. that's at 8:10am. also to come this morning: have you ever heard of man v fat? it's a football league for obese men. kat's at the soccer in the city
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stadium in manchester for us. it is all about losing weight. it started two years ago and they've lost a combined total of 4000 stone! and you get goals for the amount of weight you have lost! amazing. really fascinating. more on that later. now it's time for the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm katharine carpenter. clothes donated to victims of the grenfell tower fire will be sold off to raise money for those affected. in the days following the fire, charities and community groups were overwhelmed with donations. now 40,000 boxes of excess clothes have been moved to this british red cross warehouse and the charity will sell them in its shops around the country. all the money will go to the london fire relief fund the deadline for minicab drivers to prove they can speak english has been extended until next year because of legal proceedings. transport for london brought
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in the language requirement for new drivers, saying it was vital for passenger safety. but uber claims the test would put thirty three thousand private hire drivers out of business. the victoria and albert museum has unveiled its new £55 million redevelopment. as well as new public spaces and galleries, the facades of the grade i listed building have been revealed for the first time. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning, apart from a part suspension on the dlr between all saints and canary wharf because of a faulty train which is also causing delays on other parts of that line. on the trains, southeastern services are at a standstill between charlton and slade green because of a problem at plumstead. on the roads, oxford street is closed in both directions between oxford circus and tottenham court road due to over running night works. all buses there are on diversion. the exit slip of the westbound north circular is partially closed on chingford road at
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the crooked billet interchange. and the traffic lights are not working on east india dock road at the junction of saltwell street and upper north street. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. all the thirsty gardens after the warm weather breathing a sigh of relief this morning. we've had a lot of rain overnight. still one or two outbreaks around this morning. stays cloudy, but it should dry out later. many places waking up to a dry start. we do have some outbreaks of rain, however, fairly light and patchy. a dry picture this afternoon. maybe some brightness, but that could spark off a couple of showers. the maximum temperature still struggling at about 19 celsius. overnight tonight it's a much drier picture. the rain moves away north and south. the minimum temperature between 12 and 14 celsius. for thursday, a dry start. we could see a couple of showers moving up from the south. we could have a rumble or two of thunder mixed in as well.
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the maximum temperature staying similar, about 19—20. the rain that moved away north moves back down again southwards, as we head through friday. so we have some outbreaks of rain. some of that could be heavy, but it starts to clear away overnight friday and into saturday. things look like they'll improve as we head into the weekend. some drier weather around. we should see one or two sunny spells on saturday and temperatures making a slight recovery, about 21—22 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a decision on whether people and organisations will face criminal charges over the hillsborough disaster will be announced this morning. the crown prosecution service will reveal its intentions at a meeting with victims‘
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relatives this morning. 96 liverpool fans died when the terraces at the sheffield ground became overcrowded during the 1989 fa cup semi final. steve kelly's brother, michael, died in the disaster. it's paramount in this whole case to give the families respite and the survivors of hillsborough and you know, to truly let us put to rest the 96. it's got to. news on that throughout the day for you across the bbc. two weeks on from the grenfell tower fire, theresa may has called for a major national investigation into the use of potentially flammable cladding on high rise buildings. every one of the samples tested from 95 buildings across england have now failed safety tests. last night the government confirmed all school buildings over four storeys tall are having their external cladding analysed as well. labour says it will challenge mps today to oppose further austerity. the party will call for more spending on the police and fire
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services as an amendment to the queen's speech, as well as an end to the 1% cap on public sector pay rises. the conservatives say only they will deliver the economy needed to properly fund the emergency services. computer systems around the world have been hit by a major cyber—attack affecting banks, retailers, energy firms and transport networks. the companies have been told their computers will remain frozen until a ransom is paid. experts who have examined the code say it's more sophisticated than the virus used in a global attack last month, which badly hit the nhs. one of the uk's rarest birds of prey is heading towards extinction in england, according to the rspb. there are just four breeding pairs of hen harriers left, and numbers are declining fast across the rest of the uk. even in the bird's traditional stronghold of scotland, the numbers are down. the reasons include illegal persecution and destruction of their natural habitat. time for my favourite story of the
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day! cow news with a difference! five—year—old bella from cheshire started playing her ukulele to a herd of cows in llandudno. here she is with just a few of the herd watching, and before too long, she was joined by many more of them. then she's got a massive crowd like the pied piper. you know what we would call that if she worked in the newspaper industry? mukele! she said you can't be here all night, monday! mukele! they play music to cows when
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they are milking them! what for, why? may be to relax them. cows really like music. bella's .be. .. hold on a minute, going to say it again, mukelele! penalties! england fans are used to it, though, aren't they? too many times. england under 215 lost to germany in the european championship semi—final yesterday on penalties. do we practice loads? 0r yesterday on penalties. do we practice loads? or do we do what the germans 5ay practice loads? or do we do what the germans say they did, not practice at all and turn up and have a go? i'm not sure i believe them by the look5 i'm not sure i believe them by the looks of that penalty 5hootout. once again, england have lost the semi—final of a football tournament to germany on penalties. this time it was the under 21s european championship, england came from behind to take
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the lead through chelsea's tammy abraham. but the germans levelled and after extra time, nathan redmond penalty was saved and the side followed the fate of the senior teams in 1990 and 1996. we've been practising for weeks but in the end of the two players you would put odds on to score every time, the goalkeeper makes a great save so we'll have to take that. it's been a real team effort and i think we can be pleased with a lot of things we've done. and in the end we've lost on a penalty shootout and next time we need to be better for it. it's only 25 days since real madrid won the champions league but this season's competition is already under way! despite a stunning goal from scott quigley, welsh champions the new saints lost 2—1 to europa fc of gibraltar in the first qualifying round. the second leg is next tuesday. fifa officials investigating alleged corruption were told plans for england to play a friendly in thailand to win backing for their own world cup bid were a form of bribery.
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the former fa chairman geoff thompson made the admission when interviewed during a fifa enquiry into the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 tournaments, won by russia and qatar. england's cricketers thrashed pakistan to get their women's world cup campaign back on track. natalie sivver and captain heather knight both hit their first one—day international centuries, as england reached a record—breaking 377-7. pakistan never got close, the rain intervened, and england won by 107 runs. it was exciting to watch, watching nat at the other end striking it like that was brilliant. it's the type of cricket we want to play, we wanna be exciting and we wanna show what we can do. we all know nat can do that and to see her go out and do that is obviously brilliant from our perspective, but it's a great performance obviously but there's a lot more cricket to be played in this tournament. novak djokovic had entered
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the aegon international in eastbourne with hopes of gaining some much—needed grass court practice ahead of wimbledon but spent a lot of yesterday twiddling his thumbs. the former world number one had taken the first game against canada's vasek pospisil when the rains came and never went away. they'll try again today. from what carol has been saying, i'm not sure they'll have much luck. while the current world number one andy murray pulled out of an exhibition match at the hurlingham club in london, saying he had a sore hip. he is still expected to play at the club on friday before beginning the defence of his wimbledon title on centre court on monday afternoon. he did play earlier in the day yesterday and maybe he felt some soreness during that training match and decided not to continue and play hours of tennis. nothing too much too worried about but he needed the rest. rest is a good thing! you're going to be not on the sofa for the next couple of weeks? the next fortnight from wimbledon, i am so
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lucky, i love myjob and this is my favourite time of year, one of my favourite time of year, one of my favourite things to do, wimbledon fortnight with carol. can it get any better than that? breakfast with carol every morning, it's the dream! i'm living it! a competition now with a difference, manv a competition now with a difference, man v fat. 24 leagues have been set up man v fat. 24 leagues have been set up to help big men lose weight. set up up to help big men lose weight. set up 20 years ago, the men so far have lost a combined impressive total of 40005t. cat downs is pitch side in manchester for us this morning. 40005t. cat downs is pitch side in manchesterfor us this morning. some incredible numbers! some amazing stories, you're right, in a moment i will speak to a man who has lost 27% of his body weight, incredible stories here at man v fat and i'm not just pitch stories here at man v fat and i'm notjust pitch side, i'm on the pitch, you have to have eyes on the back of your head, these guys can
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get serious weight behind the ball. how do you go about losing weight? that was the problem that led to the birth of man v fat. join a zumba class ? birth of man v fat. join a zumba class? a slimming diet? that didn't work for a lot of these guys but what did work was playing football every week and making a life change with overweight guys like them, and it's worked. across the leagues around the country 3000 men have lost a combined total of more than 30 tons. in a moment i will speak to some of them but here's eight quick look first at how it works. —— a quick look. this is my first season and i've lost three and a halfst. i'm enjoying life better, i feel like i'm getting more out of it. there you go! made me a lot fitter and a lock thinner! still rubbi5h you go! made me a lot fitter and a lock thinner! still rubbish and football! rubbish or the next
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ronaldo? that doesn't matter here. what counts is shedding the stones. as well as goals on the pitch... teams get bonus goals for the amount of weight they lose together.” really, really struggled to lose weight through the years. i joined really, really struggled to lose weight through the years. ijoined a lot of the commercial weight loss organisations and obviously so many of the people who go to those are women and itjust of the people who go to those are women and it just felt of the people who go to those are women and itjust felt it wasn't quite right for me. there's a lot of talk about fitting into a bikini. so really it was about finding some going that was suitable for men, something that would really empower them, something that would really help them to lose weight and that's where man v fat football came from. it works thanks to teamwork. when we first started we had a tiny little broom cupboard room where the men would come and weigh—in and it ended up would come and weigh—in and it ended up with the whole team cramming into these tiny rooms because they were
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supporting each other, cheering each other on and wanting each other to do well. this league in manchester isn't the only one, there are 24 around the country. that's 3000 men getting out, playing football and losing weight and in around a year and a half they've lost a combined total of more than 30 tons. so that's 906.1, you've lost four kilos this week. ross has lost 4.5st since january. before this he found there was nothing accessible for guys like him who wanted to lose weight. you look at your men'5 fitne55, get a 5ixpack, 5how look at your men'5 fitne55, get a 5ixpack, show your muscles when those lad5, we're nowhere near that. we need to be able to lose weight comparably and if it's having a group of lad5 taking the mickey out of you and doing it that way it's absolutely perfect. with the tons ticking away it proves whatever works for you is best in the battle against the bulge. so forget your bikini diets and your
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juice detox is, this seems to be working for men, a way of getting men to lose weight and engage in a healthy lifestyle. andrew, it seems to be the key to getting men involved in weight losses, not taking yourself too seriously, i love the team names, can you give me a few? allows of humour, we have team names like the cerebral —— there's lots of humour. in manchester we had 17 stone roses. my favourite was chafing the cure and.” stone roses. my favourite was chafing the cure and. i want to bring in —— chafing the cure dream. you're the first council to have takena you're the first council to have taken a risk and started working with man v fat to help bring down obesity numbers —— chafing the cure in. what results have you seen? mears
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it's been great, we don't see it often in these services. the men who ta ke often in these services. the men who take it up in solihull appeared to be sticking with it, which is part of the battle. let me bring in ben. you lost 27% of your body weight. we have some before pictures of you, how you look before you lost the weight and you have loved man v fat so much that you have gone on to be a coach in the league. how important is teamwork in this? a lot of it is not wanting to let your team down? definitely, big accountability coming in every night weighing in not only with guys you don't want to let down but those supporting you through the week, we have groups that are chatting and supporting through the week so you feel you're doing it for the team as well as yourself. the goals on the pitch count as well so to your position in the league so you can get bonus
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goals for losing the weight. a lot of the games are decided purely by the weight loss goals and the pitch scorecard affected as much often. it's a good balance between competitive football and weight loss. congratulations and congratulations to everyone for coming out and playing so early. they've come from birmingham, stoke and manchester and it's notjust about fun, there's a big trophy at sta ke, about fun, there's a big trophy at stake, some serious silverware. check this out for a trophy if you win our mini bbc breakfast tournament this morning. not bad, hey? that looks so good. you won't have seen it, it was behind you, we will show you later, but one of the guys will show you later, but one of the guy5in will show you later, but one of the guy5 ina will show you later, but one of the guys in a black shirt 5cored will show you later, but one of the guys in a black shirt scored and believable goal which we will try to 5how later. believable goal which we will try to show later. i want to see that, please, that will be amazing. show later. i want to see that, plea5e, that will be amazing.” show later. i want to see that, please, that will be amazing. i love some of those names, 17 stone roses. chafing the dream was my favourite,
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at least they aren't taking themselves too seriously! 27% of your body weight! if you like rain, that's what you would have seen. that's right, a wet start for many places, but not all of the uk. there'll be a of standing water, surface spray, we have had heavy rain through the night. the heaviest rain has been across england and wales. at the moment the heaviest rain is the east anglia, heading up through the likes of lincolnshire. it is all rotating around an area of low pressure and it will continue to do so and drift further northwards as we go through the day. that will allow it to brighten up in the south—east. not especially sunny. still a lot of cloud. the brightest skies will be in scotland, where we will have sunshine later, especially in the
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west, and the rain moves away from northern ireland and into northern england. down the east coast there is an onshore flow that will be windy. if you are stuck under the rain and wind it will feel chilly. in the afternoon as temperatures rise that could spark a thundery downpours. there will be showers. we will hang on to the rain in south—west england and also parts of wales. it will be on and off through the day. for northern ireland the rain will clear you, at the moment it is in the east. it will push southwards, allowing brighter skies to develop. maybe one or two showers. sunny skies in scotland will be in the west. down the east coast we have an onshore flow, so it will feel cool. through the evening and overnight the rain continues to push northwards, getting across all of northern england and through parts of scotland and back into northern ireland and it remains in south—west england, through the english channel. in towns and cities
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temperatures stay in double figures. lower than that in the rural areas. tomorrow is the turn of northern england, scotland and northern ireland to see the rain, but still some coming through the west of wales and south—west england. for the rest of wales and england largely dry, except for the odd shower. still that keen wind coming in from the north sea, through the irish sea and into the english channel. if you are exposed to that, especially in the east, it will feel cold. further south with the dry conditions temperatures getting up to about 17— 20 celsius, but cooler than that as we push further north. that low pressure still with us thursday and into friday, but it is sinking and dragging the weather front with it, which produces some rain. the wind veers to more of a chilly direction, more of a northerly. the rain turns more patchy. still potent in the east. a fair bit of dry weather, with highs of 22.
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lovely. see you in about 25 minutes. today marks two weeks since the g re nfell tower today marks two weeks since the grenfell tower fire. at least 79 people are known to have died in a blaze, with hundreds left homeless. a lot has happened in the last 14 days. we've seen anger, despair, but also hope, resilience and a community spirit. at its height, 40 fire engines and more than 200 firefighters battled the blaze. dozens were rescued but despite their efforts, 79 people are now known to have died. the fire started in a fridge freezer but what caused it to spread so quickly will be key to the investigation. the focus so far has been on the cladding. samples from 95 towers in 32 local authority areas in england have all failed by a safety tests. the government was criticised for its slow response to the tragedy, but has since announced a full public enquiry, £5 million fund
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for the victims and a promise to rehouse all those affected in the local area. the tragedy has evoked a huge outpouring of support. millions of pounds have been donated as well as clothing, food and other essentials. we're joined now from west london by amanda fernandez, who lives next to grenfell tower, and pilgrim tucker, who was involved in the tower's fire safety campaign. good morning and thank you for joining us. if i canjust ask you first, amanda, i know you lived very close to the tower. how close and are you able to get back into your home? i live on the lancaster estate, the tower is part of that state. so literally the ground level, right at the base of the tower. the tower acts as a central hub for the power to the rest of the
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estate, so another 845 homes. when the tower came down literally the estate shut down because we had no hot water, no electricity, all of the minor things you need to have a safe home. and of course added to that you had... we don't know if there are still toxins in the air, there's been no report, there has been no co—ordination or official response to any of the residents that were evacuated, so we are still not in our homes. there is access, but it's not safe, it's not safe. and where are you staying at the moment? my family is in temporary accommodation, we are outside... in the hammersmith and fulham borough. one is in westminster and the other is in one is in westminster and the other isina one is in westminster and the other is in a different location. did you get any choice about where to go? we know some people don't want to be
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able to see the tower. did you get a choice? you didn't get a choice. you didn't even get offered this option. it was kind of, you need somewhere to sleep and if you have small children or elderly or whoever you need to be somewhere, you need to be sheltered. so we just took what we we re sheltered. so we just took what we were given. a lot of people are further away and for different reasons i know a lot of my friends and family who were in the tower don't want to be anywhere near the tower and are still forced to have tower and are still forced to have to pass it every day because we still have to come to the recovery centre that is next to the tower as well. i personally can't leave my community. i don't necessarily want to look at it, it is very hard, but i'm always here at 8am and we leave at midnight to go home and sleep.” will come back to you in a moment. pilgrim, we know you were in charge of this fire safety campaign and
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there's been so much talk and looking at what went wrong. what we re looking at what went wrong. what were your main concerns before this? the main concern of the residence at the time i was working here was the overall refurbishment job that was going on. the quality of the work that was going on and how the residents here were being treated by the council, by the tenant management organisation. is the —— the specific thing we were looking at was the boilers and the positioning of boilers in houses and the pipework to and from those boilers. apparently they had been consulted on the work that was being done and they had a show flat and on the show flat the boilers were positioned somewhere sensible, above the kitchen sink. in the kitchen. but then they realised that when the work started happening, the residents realised the boilers were
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being placed in this narrow corridors leading to the front door, so partially obstructing the front doors. and the pipework to those boilers was sticking out several inches out of the walls. so they we re very inches out of the walls. so they were very unhappy about that. they tried to get in touch with the tmo and council about moving the boilers and council about moving the boilers and putting them where they were originally meant to be and the council was so unresponsive. they just didn't reply to any e—mails and actually it took people protesting in the end. they tried petitioning. but they had to protest in the end. and in the end of those who protested did get those boilers moved, but the ones who didn't have them positioned in the hallway. at them positioned in the hallway. at the time we weren't really aware that there would be a problem with the flammability of the cladding, but we knew they were all of these historical fire safety problems. the power surges, fire safety equipment
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not being checked regularly and they complained about that for a long period of time and had no response. they were very worried about that. we do know, and i can still see you are very we do know, and i can still see you are very emotional about it, we know there will be this public enquiry and they will be looking at so many things with regard to what happened, how it happened and the rest of it. are you optimistic that this will bring answers and change?” are you optimistic that this will bring answers and change? i don't feel very optimistic. what is really shocking is that theresa may spoke to the media about the public enquiry yesterday before she even reply to the tenants. the tenants e—mailto the reply to the tenants. the tenants e—mail to the day before yesterday —— e—mailed her the e—mail to the day before yesterday —— e—mailed herthe day e—mail to the day before yesterday —— e—mailed her the day before yesterday and asked for several things, which under the circumstances are not just reasonable, they are hugely important. they've asked for input into choosing the chair, the terms of reference and advisers and making sure this is a really thorough
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public enquiry that looks back over the years at all of the causes of this and all of the negligence that happened building up to that fire and just the absence of the authorities in the aftermath and the fa ct authorities in the aftermath and the fact that the people here will have to fend for themselves and there was nobody here doing theirjobs. so, no, it doesn't really fill with —— me with confidence. people here have already lost trust in the authorities and theresa may is now asking them to trust her again, but they contact her and she doesn't reply to them and she goes astray to speak to the media. just appalling. so rude. amanda, i can see you are nodding at agreeing with some of the things pilgrim is saying. if i can ask you, presumably, hopefully, at some point you will be allowed to go
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back to your house. how do you feel about that? there are several factors that they have to kind of... several boxes they have to tick before we can go back to our house. the state of the environment right now, our homes are so close to the tower that any work that is being done to the tower will always affect us and! done to the tower will always affect us and i can't see that being done in the near future. us and i can't see that being done in the nearfuture. apart us and i can't see that being done in the near future. apart from that, a lot of my friends and family were actually on the tower and managed to escape and some didn't, so there's a lot of emotions there as well. it's not something i've actually thought about yet, because we are just trying to process everything, going back to our homes, to our possessions and what's left is something that you don't even look forward to because everything is com pletely forward to because everything is completely changed, it's not the same. this is why we put in an enquiry that we need to be involved.
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this is why we put in our statement that we need to be involved, because right from the beginning there has been systematic failure, right from before, during the fire, and now after. it's just giving before, during the fire, and now after. it'sjust giving us no hope. briefly, how would you describe the way you personally feel at the moment? look, i keep saying, the first week are was in shock and full of anger and shock. complete shock. the second week little bit of emotion, i couldn't talk properly. this past weekend i've had time to kind of reflect and realise, actually, if we don't speak up now time is passing, it is already becoming chip paper for a time is passing, it is already becoming chip paperfor a lot of the world and we are still living it. it feels like two years have passed and it's only two weeks, if we haven't moved, everything is going in slow motion. personally, iam moved, everything is going in slow motion. personally, i am still filled with a lot of anger but i know we have to channel it in a way
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that the world can support as, it's not only the immediate community, it is everyone's support we need. this is everyone's support we need. this is for everyone across the world who lives in social housing. things have to change. it's enough. enough is enough. i appreciate your time. rest of luck. —— best of luck. really powerful testimonies from both of them. a lot of people are catching up on this programme on iplayer these days. that interview will be available on iplayer later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm katharine carpenter. clothes donated to victims of the grenfell tower fire will be sold off to raise money for those affected. in the days following the fire, charities and community groups were overwhelmed with donations. now 40,000 boxes of excess clothes have been moved to this british red cross warehouse
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and the charity will sell them in its shops around the country. all the money will go to the london fire relief fund. it has raised over £3.2 million for the victims so far. the deadline for minicab drivers to prove they can speak english has been extended until next year because of legal proceedings. transport for london brought in the language requirement for new drivers, saying it was vital for passenger safety. but uber claims the test would put 33,000 private hire drivers out of business. construction work begins today on a new business district in east london. a chinese developer is investing over £1.5 billion in the royal albert dock project, close to city airport. the finished development will be a mixture of offices and homes. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning, after the earlier problems on the dlr. on the trains southeastern services are suspended between charlton and slade green because of
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a problem at plumstead. on the roads: oxford street is closed in both directions between oxford circus and tottenham court road due to over running night works. all buses there are on diversion. on the m1 there's a lane closed northbound betweenjunction 8 for hemel hempstead and junction 9 for redbourn because of a broken down lorry. and finally traffic is heavier than normal on the m4 eastbound from j3 hayes to the elevated section and j2 brentford. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. all the thirsty gardens after the warm weather breathing a sigh of relief this morning. we've had a lot of rain overnight. still one or two outbreaks around this morning. stays cloudy, but it should dry out later. many places waking up to a dry start. we do have some outbreaks of rain, however, fairly light and patchy. a dry picture this afternoon. maybe some brightness, but that could spark off a couple of showers. the maximum temperature still struggling at about 19 celsius. overnight tonight it's
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a much drier picture. the rain moves away north and south. the minimum temperature between 12 and 14 celsius. for thursday, a dry start. we could see a couple of showers moving up from the south. we could have a rumble or two of thunder mixed in as well. the maximum temperature staying similar, about 19—20. the rain that moved away north moves back down again southwards, as we head through friday. so we have some outbreaks of rain. some of that could be heavy, but it starts to clear away overnight friday and into saturday. things look like they'll improve as we head into the weekend. some drier weather around. we should see one or two sunny spells on saturday and temperatures making a slight recovery, about 21—22 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin.
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after a near 30 year battle, the families of those who died at hillsborough will find out this morning whether anyone is to face criminal charges. it follows two separate inquires into what happened on the day of the match and whether there was a cover—up afterwards. good morning. it's wednesday, 28thjune. also this morning: two weeks on from the grenfell tower disaster we hear what life is like for those who've been forced to leave their homes. one of the uk's most senior police officers says that a reduction in stop and search has led to an increase in knife crime. victims tell breakfast more needs to be done. very angry. i can see it in my eyes,
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yeah. this has got to stop. this knife thing has got to stop. good morning, we could be paying thousands of pounds too much in hidden fees on our pensions. the regulator has managed a crackdown, but many of us are still getting a raw deal. in sport, not again! england lose to germany on penalties nathan redmond's miss means they go out at the semi final stage of the under—21 european championship. i'm playing early morning football with these guys in manchester to find out more about how teamwork is helping these men and 3,000 like them around the country lose a combined total of more than 32 tonnes in weight! and carol has the weather. for england and wales, it is a wet start. some heavy rain around. it will improve in the south east. for
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northern ireland, the rain will clear you and then it will brighten, but the driest conditions of all will be in scotland. i'll have more details in 15 minutes. see you later. thank you very much. first, our main story. the families of those who died at hillsborough will find out later this morning whether anyone will face criminal charges. an inquest ruled last year that the 96 liverpool fans who died at the stadium in sheffield in 1989 were unlawfully killed. our north of england correspondent judith moritz reports. # walk on, walk on, with hope in your heart...# it was a moment of history, the inquest‘s finding last year that 96 liverpool fans were unlawfully killed at hillsborough. for theirfamilies, it was justice, but their legal journey did not end there. steve kelly lost his brother michael in the disaster. he's spent the 28 years since then calling for those responsible to be held accountable. there's got to be this accountability. it's paramount in this whole case to give the families respite
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and the survivors of hillsborough and you know, to truly let us put to rest the 96. it's got to. the fans were killed when the terraces at the sheffield ground became overcrowded during the 1989 fa cup semi—final. since 2012, there have been two criminal inquiries into hillsborough. operation resolve investigated the day of the disaster. it identified 15 key suspects. offences considered include gross negligence manslaughter. one of those waiting to hear whether he'll face charges is former chief superintendent david duckenfield, who was the south yorkshire police match commander. the police watchdog, the ipcc, investigated cover—up allegations, identifying eight key suspects. it considered offences including misconduct in a public office and perverting the course of justice. the former west yorkshire chief constable, sir norman bettison,
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has revealed that he's been treated as a suspect by the ipcc. it isn't known whether he will face charges. hundreds of investigators have been working from these offices for the last four years at a cost of £100 million. there is an expectation that charges will be brought after such a long wait and such large—scale effort. that decision will be announced to the families at 11am this morning. two weeks on from the grenfell tower fire, theresa may has called for a "major national investigation" into the use of cladding on high—rise buildings. every one of the samples tested from 95 buildings across england have now failed safety tests. our reporter simonjones is at a church in west london where people have been laying tributes to the victims. we have been talking to two women who know grenfell tower extremely
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well. you get the sense that there are so many questions still to be answered? absolutely. i think you have seen the range of emotions over the past couple of weeks. initially, the past couple of weeks. initially, the shock and dismay about what had happened. then the anger and then the reflection and now, people definitely wanting answers. now, there has been a letter written to theresa may from local people saying they need a voice and there is some controversy this morning over the chairman sir ken knight because he carried out an investigation into a previous fire in camberwell that happened a few years ago. he said in that case that he didn't believe that case that he didn't believe that high rises should be forced to fit sprinklers. he said in some cases, it is not economically viable or practical, it is up to the landlord, but that's something he's going to have to revisit. but the
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people here just want some answers and quickly. we have been speaking to one woman who lives in the shadow of the tower and hasn't been able to return home. a lot of people are further away and for different reasons. i know a lot of my friends and family who are in the tower don't want to be anywhere near the tower and are forced to have to pass it every single day because we have to come to the recovery aid centre that's next to the tower as well. my personally, i can't leave my community. i don't necessarily want to look at it, it's very ha rd necessarily want to look at it, it's very hard to, but i'm always here. 8am in the morning i'm here and we leave at midnight to go home and sleep or to the hotel and sleep. so a huge effect it is having on residents. i want to show you where we are in relation to the tower. this is the church where people have been coming over the past couple of weeks, leaving flowers and displaying posters of people who have lost their lives or are missing, presumed dead. ithink have lost their lives or are missing, presumed dead. i think two weeks on, the big thing is the
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number of questions that still remain. how did this fire take hold so drastically? how many people died in it? that's a question we may never be able to answer. simon, for the moment, thank you very much. let's go to westminster now and to our political correspondent iain watson. iain, labour's going to be talking about the grenfell tower today to call for more spending for emergency services. that's right, dan. ithinkjeremy corbyn will be accused by his opponents of trying to politicise the grenfell tragedy. he certainly argued for greater funding for the police and the fire service since the fire occurred and it doesn't seem to have harmed him that approach and the opinion polls, but what it is trying to do today is to amend to change the queen's speech, the government's programme, for the next two years to guarantee that extra funding. he won't win because theresa may now has the support of ten dup mps theresa may now has the support of ten dup mp5 from northern ireland. she can vote down this attempt by labour in the commons later on
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today. that's guaranteed, but i think whatjeremy corbyn is going to try to do is embarrass conservative mps and try to make them feel uncomfortable if they are voting not just against extra funding for the emergency services, but also he is going to say that labour would lift the public sector pay cap and on the doorsteps, conservatives who lost the seats at the last election were saying that people felt that perhaps pay restraint and public spending cuts had gone on for too long. effectively if conservative mps are going to be loyal to theresa may, they're going to have to vote to keep that pay cap and there will be a clear dividing line between the main parties, but what the conservatives are saying in response is look, if you really want decent public services, you need a strong economy to pay for them and that's something which labour can't deliver. iain, thank you. sinn fein has accused the democratic unionist party of failing to give any ground in talks to restore devolved government at stormont. they say there had been no movement on the rights of irish speakers or the lgbt community. but the dup has insisted it has no red lines and accused sinn fein of being involved
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in a high—wire act. the deadline for reaching a deal is tomorrow afternoon. services providing support for people who are older and disabled face more cuts, despite extra money being put into the system. that's according to research by the directors of adult social care for councils in england. the report says more than two—thirds of local authorities had to dip into their financial reserves last year to meet increasing demand. the government says it's provided more funding and will consult on how to maintain services long term. former top gear presenter richard hammond has spoken for the first time about crashing a super car whilst filming in switzerland earlier this month. he told the drive tribe website he was on a practice run for a race when the car veered off the road, tumbled down a hill and burst into flames. i was aware that i was up, that i was high, that inevitably the car
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was high, that inevitably the car was going to come down. and yeah, of course, it was a moment of dread oh god, i'm going to die. and also i was aware that the car was taking just such a beating. if you look at those craters, that's a big hole which was impact. it looks like the thing has been dropped from space to have a hole that big. what was going through my mind well, this is it. he had a few scrapes in cars, hasn't he? that was while filming for the grand tour. glad to see he's ok. first introduced as a way of combating crime, the power to stop and search members of the public is one of the most controversial aspects of british policing. in england and wales, the use of it has more than halved in the past five years. but, in an exclusive interview, one of england's most senior police chiefs has told breakfast he believes the drop in stop and search has led to a rise in knife crime. our reporter tim muffett
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has the story. everytime i go down, people are walking past like it'sjust a normal day, but that's where my life ended, where his life ended. he was at college. he was studying law... it's just so horrible. on the same street in leicester where amy's son tyler was stabbed to death in 2015, sean was attacked one month before. they stabbed me once in my back which went straight into my artery. if i didn't survive this could be my mum sitting here feeling exactly what amy's feeling. amy and shaun believe jail sentences for knife possession should be longer and that police should be stopping and searching more people, more often. if the stop—and—search was more present then i believe my son would still be here today. very angry. you can see it in my eyes. this has got to stop. this knife thing has got to stop. across england and wales, police are stopping and searching
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far fewer people than they used to. in 2011, there were more than 100,000 stop and searches. according to the most recent home office figures that number has now dropped by 65%. those figures relate to searches for offensive weapons. since 2011, overall knife crime has fallen, but in the past two years it has gone up by almost 13%. stop—and—search, legally done, is an absolutely vital part of our armoury. so we should be doing more of it. like all police chiefs, mike barton was told by the home office in 2014 that stop—and—search needed reform. it should be intelligence—led, more effectively targeted. do you think there is a link between a national decrease in stop—and—search and the recent increase in knife crime? we have not done any hard science to say that there is a direct link, however, we are all bright people and we can all work it out and you've got to say that it's
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a reasonable hypothesis. west midlands training centre and a stop and search exercise for officers. this force believes fewer searches can be just as effective. it is not about numbers. since 2011, 2012, we have reduced the amount of stop and searchs that we conduct, but the arrest remains the same. so it would appear now that we are targeting the right people, intell lens—led searches. targeting the right people, intell lens-led searches. the home office says it supports stop and search when carried out properly and there is no proven link between the number of searches and levels of knife crime. but as a police tactic, it remains controversial. we'rejoined now by zubaida haque who's from the race equality think—tank, the runnymede trust.
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it isa it is a vital part of the police armoury, would you agree?” it is a vital part of the police armoury, would you agree? i am sure it is in terms of policing, i am sure they have their own motivations for stop and search, and it works in certain instances. the bigger question is, is it an effective strategy for addressing the knife crime and the causes of knife crime, and as important, what are the side effects ? and as important, what are the side effects? what is the counter—productive effect in terms of the impact on the community ‘s that it focuses on? i suppose it is which one you give more weight to. do you see the correlation that knife crime goes down as stop and search goes up? i am a statistician,
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correlations are very complicated, in the sense that if you just say stop and search goes down and knife crime goes up, people she the two are connected, but we live in a society where there is a lot more going on. you have to ask broader questions, what else is going on in society? knife crime is a symptom of violence that is going up as well. we need to talk about that as well. the other thing is there have been big cuts in youth services since 2010, approximately £400 million has been cut from youth services, and they have been big cuts in policing. you have to ask, has not had an impact also on crime? and on knife
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crime? because knife crime is a reflection of crime per se. we need to look at the wider context. the have to keep going back to the fact that stop and search might be good in particular instances, so it might begin in terms of... there are two reasons why people carry knives. one is for status. that is a less important reason, the major reason is for protection. stop and search is for protection. stop and search is quite good at addressing status related reasons for carrying knives, because if you take away someone's's knife then, they can think, street cred is not worth it, i would rather just get rid of the knife. but if you take away the knife from someone
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who is doing it to protect themselves because they fear for their safety, because they fear being victimised, they are likely to go and just get another weapon. a knife is a weapon of choice, take it away, they will either get another knife or another weapon. that is when it stopped and searched does not address the issue. we talked to somebody who had been stabbed, another young lad who had been stopped and searched, he said that it could be done in better ways. what do you say to those communities where young people are dying, especially in london, because of this crime? what do you say about how to stop it? it is not that it is a good tool, it depends how it is used. it is a tool. that is what i would say, there are other tools. policing per se... stop and search is about policing. what we have to
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think about is community policing, a more gentle way of working with communities are building trust with communities, not seeing communities viewing individual young black boys as suspect. community policing has been a more effective crime prevention, working at grassroots level, getting intelligence from the community, parents trust you and young people trust you. they need to be able to trust police to look after their safety, because if they believe the police are looking after their safety, they will not feel they need to protect themselves. that is the crux of the issue. they fearfor that is the crux of the issue. they fear for their own safety, which that is the crux of the issue. they fearfor their own safety, which is why they carry knives are. so much to talk about. we area we are a little late for the
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weather, but an important discussion to be had. it isa it is a wet start across many parts of the uk, and it has been a wet night. expect a lot of standing water and surface spray. we have seen some torrential downpours over night and this morning. we have heavy downpours around the wash and cambridge are and lincolnshire. it curls around through wales. the course of the morning, it will edge further north, and in northern ireland it will edge further south. it brightens up there, but the brightest guys will be in scotland. later, it brightens up across the south—east. near the east coast, there is a cold wind from the north sea, which is exacerbating the call feel. into the afternoon, the rain across northern england, moving away from the south. as temperatures
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rise, it could spark some thundery showers. full south—west england, the rain will be on and off through the rain will be on and off through the day. it is the same for wales. the rain will not be terribly far away. for northern ireland, the rain has moved south, so it has brightened up. the brightest sky in scotla nd brightened up. the brightest sky in scotland will be in the west, but there will be dry weather. like the east of england, and onshore flow makes it feel cooler. through this evening and overnight, the main advances northwards. the curl continues down through the south—west and into the english channel. we are in pretty good shape temperature wise. tomorrow we start with the rain across northern england, much of scotland and northern ireland. it will be more
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showery in the south. but there will bea showery in the south. but there will be a lot of dry weather around, some bright spots of anything. this cool wind coming from the north sea, extending through the irish sea and the bristol channel and the english channel. under the rain, the bristol channel and the english channel. underthe rain, it the bristol channel and the english channel. under the rain, it is going to feel much cooler, especially on the east coast. as we head from thursday into friday, the low— pressure thursday into friday, the low—pressure tracks the weather front with it, taking the rain south. you can see the squeeze on the isobars. it will be windy. there will be some dry weather around as well. it will feel cooler in the wind. the garden needs rain! we all need rain! you have a hair on your shoulder!
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excellent! are we paying too much on pensions? the regulators say so. shall i do a bit of business news? it isa shall i do a bit of business news? it is a team effort! you get on with that! the financial regulator has unveiled a crackdown on firms that manage our pensions and investments over complaints they're charging too much in fees. the market is worth £7 trillion but critics say it's not clear what charges are imposed by fund managers and higher fees are eating into the value of our retirement savings. three quarters of uk households currently have a pension invested in the stock market. it says that price competition is weak in a number of areas of the industry. gina millerfrom scm private has been campaigning against unfair fees for years and joins me now. i have the report here, they say
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price competition is weak, there are sustained high profits over a number of years. but it is not a revolution. it does not go far enough. it is a proconsumer agenda, but there is a lot of dragging here. this is one of the last industries when it comes to cartel like behaviour, and for ten years i have campaigned to say it has to stop, especially on fees, because about 50% of these are hidden. that is of people's hard earned money that they are handing over. it is wrong. you talk about it being a cartel, but first, why should we care about this? why would anybody watching this? why would anybody watching this care about fees that they might think about in ten, 20, 30 years? you are handing over your money, you wa nt you are handing over your money, you want it to gross or you can look after yourself in your old age. you wa nted
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after yourself in your old age. you wanted to pay a fair fee, but you have a right to know what that is. 50% of it has been hidden. you think you are paying 1% and you are getting a 5% return, if you are paying two or 3%, getting a 5% return, if you are paying two or 3%, you are not getting a huge return on your money. it is the fund managers and the industry that are making a profit, not you, but it is your money, and also because of the ageing of our population, we have to have a better functioning industry. what would you like to see change? some have described it as the last gravy train in the city, this old boys' club, there is no transparency. what do you want to see change? it is simple, as we do in every other walk of life, have a ticket price, 100% transparency, one single number so people can understand, and also in a format that is regulated, so you can
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make comparisons. one of the problems of this report is that it says that one single number for retail investors but for institutional investors they are going to give them a better deal and say there have to be a consistent format. why should ordinary investors be treated as second—class kapadia to professional institutional investors? many people will recognise you from the campaign that the one against the government about the parliamentary approval for brexit. how different will financial services look after two? -- after brexit? i have campaigned for this to ten years now, and the shock will come after brexit, because it is not going to be the industry which has just been able to do as it once, it will have to fight much harder. as we have already seen, the eu almost
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clinical in the way they are coughing up some of our agencies. banking may go to frankfurt. the industry has to think about the impact of brexit. more later. earlier on, we talked about the football league set up to stop —— to help men losing weight. earlier on, this goal was scored, an absolute belter, and a proper celebration as well. i bet he is pleased that was on the tv. did he get that? more shortly.
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i had there. good morning. it's not a great start to the morning. we've already had about a month's worth of rainfall falling in parts of south—east england. more rain in the forecast today and for some of us, it's going to last all day. well into the afternoon. we've got an area of low pressure which is dominating the weather and that's giving us these weather fronts and around this area of low pressure we've got this area of rain. so let's look at things at 4pm. it will be raining across parts of south—west england into the afternoon. temperatures 15, 16 celsius. i think for south—east england, it will become drier, perhaps a bit brighter later on, but into the midlands, northern england, heavy rain continuing. quite a strong wind as well in the north—east making it feel chilly. we could see rain towards the borders
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and dumfries and galloway and for northern ireland it is looking largely dry. but through this evening and tonight, as you can see, that rain will continue and it will just edge its way further north. just pivoting a little bit into scotland, but continuing for north wales and down towards the south—west of england. temperatures overnight tonight to 11 or 12 celsius. during thursday, it is scotland's turn to see some of that rain. that will be heavy and cool in the east of scotland. rain edge nothing northern ireland. damp and drizzly for parts of england and north wales and towards the south—west. dry and bright in the south east. that's where temperatures could get to 20 celsius. further north and west, cooler and 12 celsius in aberdeen. low pressure is still with us as we go into friday. weatherfrontsjust rotating around this area of low pressure. so, more rain in the forecast during friday. that rain will gradually edge its way further south and eastward as the day goes on, fragmenting as it does so. some
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brighter skies for scotland and also northern ireland on friday. top temperatures 16 to 22 celsius, but the weekend is looking a little bit drier and brighter. bye—bye. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and rachel horne. another big cyber hack brings yet more disruption to business around the world. as it reaches australia we'll ask whether companies are doing enough to themselves safe? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 28thjune. banks, retailers, energy firms and kiev airport in ukraine are among thousands targeted by the ransomware attack. also in the programme: the troubled japanese giant toshiba says it will sue western digital, accusing it of interfering in attempts to sell off its flash memory business.

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