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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 28, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. this is bbc news. the headlines at 3pm: six people are to be charged in connection with the hillsborough football stadium disaster, 28 years ago. following these thorough investigations and our careful review of the evidence in accordance with the code for crown prosecutors i have decided that there is sufficient evidence to charge six individuals with criminal offences. the senior police officer at the match, former chief superintendent david duckenfield, will be charged with the manslaughter of 95 of the 96 victims. relatives say they've waited years for a decision on who will be held accountable. we just have to see what the future holds with this now. we still have a long journey to go on that. police now say the number of those killed or confirmed missing, presumed dead, in the grenfell tower fire stands at 80 with people from more than 20 flats unaccounted for. also this hour, tackling the world—wide cyber attack.
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as yesterday's outbreak begins to be brought under control, researchers fear a new programme aimed at protecting computers can't stop the bug from spreading. and the creator of paddington, michael bond, has died at home after a short illness. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the senior police officer at the hillsborough disaster, chief superintendent david duckenfield, is to be charged with the manslaughter, by gross negligence of 95 men, women and children. the crown prosecution service says it has enough evidence to charge a further five people in connection with the crush at the fa cup semi—final in 1989.
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the former chief constable sir norman bettison will face four charges relating to alleged lies he told in the aftermath about the culpability of fans. a solicitor who acted for south yorkshire police is charged with perverting the course of justice by changing witness statements. the families of many of those who died were told about the decision at a meeting in warrington from where our correspondent judith moritz sent this report. they've had inquiries, inquests and investigations but the hillsborough families have never seen public criminal prosecutions against anyone involved in the 1989 disaster. they've waited almost 30 years for this moment. this morning they arrived full of hope and anxiety, to be told that six people are to face prosecution. they include david duckenfield who was in charge of policing the match. and sir norman bettison who is alleged to have lied about fans after the disaster. there is sufficient evidence to charge former chief superintendent david duckenfield
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with the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 men, women and children. mr duckenfield was the match commander on the day of the disaster. david duckenfield, seen here in 1989, is being charged with the manslaughter of all but one of the 96 liverpool fans who died in the disaster. we are unable to charge the manslaughter of anthony bland, the 96th casualty who died almost four years labour. the 96th casualty who died almost four years later. this is due to time limitations imposed by the law as it applied at the time. the liverpool fans were killed when the terraces at the sheffield ground became overcrowded during the 1989 fa cup semi—final. david duckenfield had ordered the opening of an exit gate through which fans poured into the ground. in the years after hillsborough sir norman bettison rose through the ranks to become chief constable of merseyside
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and later west yorkshire. given his seniority, prosecutors will askjurors to find that he abused the public‘s trust. former chief constable norman bettison is charged with four offences of misconduct in public office. this relates to alleged lies he told about his involvement in the aftermath of hillsborough and the culpability of fans. the bereaved families emerged from their meeting with the cps having learned there will be prosecutions. i'm absolutely delighted. we've got today everything we could have asked for. the decisions by the cps in my opinion were correct or are correct. and we look forward to the due process through a court of law. graham mackrell was sheffield wednesday company secretary and safety officer in 1989. he's accused of failing to carry out his duties charged under health and safety law and the safety of sports ground act.
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peter metcalf was the solicitor acting for south yorkshire police. he's charged with perverting the course of justice in relation to amendments made to witness statements. former officers chief superintendent donald denton in the middle and dci alan foster who is not shown are charged with the same offence. donald denton is said to have overseen the process of altering the statements. no one from the ambulance service is being prosecuted and no organisation will face corporate charges. it's the culmination of more than four years of work by hundreds of investigators. they've looked through thousands of documents including police notebooks from 1989 which were recovered from lofts, garages and offices and combed through page by page. the investigations have cost in the region of £100 million and expectations of prosecutions were high. donna miller lost her brother paul carlile at hillsborough, today is a hard day, her mother did not live to see the prosecutions announced. the fact that my mum is not here, this is the first big
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event she's not here, she died on the 26th april this year. and this was a day she was determined to be here for. so it's sad for me without my mum. the youngest to die at hillsborough was just ten years old, the oldest, a pensioner. they were all unlawfully killed. there have long been calls for justice. now almost 30 years after they were killed, those said to be responsible will face trial and the prospect ofjail. campaigner and member of the hillsborough independent panel's research team, phil scraton, has welcome the crown prosecution service's decision to bring criminal charges against six people. earlier, my colleague ben brown spoke to him. it has been an incredibly painstaking process. as you know only too well having reported on it for so long, it is nearly three decades and in that situation we
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have seen families, members of family die, others who weren't born at the time now speaking out for families. in that situation, i think they have not only done themselves, not only should they be immensely proud of their achievement, but they have made a major contribution to the way we think about justice have made a major contribution to the way we think aboutjustice in our society and if byjustice we need accountability and that holds making state institutions to account then they have achieved that. and we know the cps were considering charges potentially against more on 20 suspects, individuals, and organisations. but in the end they have decided to go ahead with dhardges against six of those? that situation in law is complex because they have to be very careful that they have to be very careful that they are taking a case and they take major legal advice on this, they're taking a case not on the balance of probablialities, but beyond
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reasonable doubt and what that means is they have to be more than 50% sure that they will get a conviction before they set out, otherwise the case will be dismissed before it starts. police investigating the grenfell fire have released a statement in the last half hour, saying they now believe at least 80 people died in the tragedy or are missing, presumed dead. and they say that there are 23 flats where they've been unable to trace anyone from which they presume no one survived. a list of tenants provided by the management company is now known to be inaccurate, and scotland yard says the investigation into the number of dead will take until the end of the year at least. there were strong exchanges this morning when survivors of the fire confronted the housing minister on the bbc, about the handling of the aftermath of the tragedy. residents told alok sharma that authorities had failed to provide adequate accommodation since the disaster. richard lister reports. two weeks ago, the nation looked on in horror at the worst fire in britain since world war ii. the council was overwhelmed and the
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relief effort too slow. it has improved, but for the survivors every day is a new challenge. you receive a call from the council saying that your hotel is booked and you go down for breakfast and they ask you what time you're checking out. you ring them up and no one seems to know what's going on. they offered us high—rise towers and i've expressed to them that we're petrified and traumatised and so are the kids. it's very hard when you don't say goodbye to someone, but it's worse when you don't know if you should be saying goodbye. the housing minister met residents today on the bbc derbyshire programme. it was a tense encounter. i want permanent accommodation. i'm not moving my child from here. if i don't get permanent accommodation, i'm not going to accept it. the government is struggling to convince survivors their needs will be met.
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anyone whose home has been destroyed will be housed by next wednesday in good accommodation and we will work with housing that's acceptable to them. 68 families will be housed locally in these apartments hopefully next month, but there are almost 400 households still in hotels. government money is being distributed, almost £1.7 million so far, including £5,000 emergency payments to more than 100 households. grenfell is a national disaster with national repercussions. it's now confirmed that cladding from 120 buildings in 37 local authority areas has failed fire safety tests. the government says 120 tower blocks in 37 local authority areas in england have now failed fire safety tests. they were ordered in the wake of the
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g re nfell tower they were ordered in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. theresa may gave the update as she faced mps in herfirst prime minister's questions since she lost her parliamentary majority in the general election. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports from westminster. they say a week is a long time in politics, so the eight weeks since the last prime minister's questions must seem like a lifetime for theresa may. she was putting on a brave face, but the prime minister's lost her majority. labour gained rather than shed seats. a third of the snp‘s westminster contingent have gone, and the ten dup mps from northern ireland are, in the words of their leader, hugely influential. but an even more dramatic event dominated pmqs, the grenfell tower tragedy. jeremy corbyn began by asking when the public inquiry would begin, and he was told a judge would be appointed soon. the prime minister then set out the scale of the wider problem, the cladding of tower blocks.
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as of this morning the cladding from 120 tower blocks across the country, in 37 local authority areas, had been tested, and had failed the combustibility tests. given the 100% failure rate we are very clear with local authorities and housing associations, they should not wait for test results, but should get on with the job of the fire safety checks, and indeed they are doing that. but the exchanges became far more robust when the labour leader linked the tragedy to spending cuts. under her predecessor, fire safety audits and inspections were cut by a quarter. fire authority budgets were cut by a quarter. can the prime minister give an assurance to the house that the further 20% cuts to the fire service planned by 2020 will now be halted? but she said that wasn't the issue. the question is that why is it that despite that we have seen in local authority area after local authority area,
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materials being put up that appear not to comply with those building regulations? when you cut local authority budgets by 40%, we all pay a price in public safety. what the tragedy of grenfell tower has exposed is the disastrous effects of austerity. this should be an issue that across this house we recognise is a matter that has been developing over decades, a matter that has occurred under governments of both colours, under councils of all political persuasions. today's pmqs was a bit of a warm—up for a wider debate on the queen's speech, the government's programme for the next two years. labour will argue not only for more cash for the emergency services, but also that the public sector pay cap should be lifted. they know they won't win that vote — theresa may has the support of the dup. but whatjeremy corbyn
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is trying to do is put pressure on conservative mps who are complaining that their constituents are simply fed up with public sector pay restraint and spending cuts. and it looks like that pressure is being felt. when the defence secretary was asked about the 1% pay cap, he hinted it may be lifted in future. i think we expect inflation to start falling back again from the autumn onwards, but it is obviously something we have to consider, not just for the army, but right across the public sector as a whole. and other ministers weren't exactly defending the pay cap either. what we have been very clear about, and philip hammond has said, we obviously have to learn lessons from the general election, we will have a budget later this year, and he will set out our ongoing plans in that budget. the badges worn by labour mps are from the nurses union calling for a pay rise. jeremy corbyn will hope he has caught the mood of the nation, but the conservatives say only they can deliver the strong economy necessary to fund public services. the headlines on bbc news:
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six people are to be charged in connection with the hillsborough football stadium disaster 28 years ago. former chief superintendent david duckenfield will be charged with the man slaughter of 95 of the 96 victims. police say the final debt told from the grenfell tower will not be known for many months with 80 people currently presumed dead. andy murray is named number one seed for wimbledon which starts on monday. it is the first time in 12 grand slams that the big four make up the top seeds there. novak djokovic is second followed by roger federer and rafa nadal. djokovic reached the third round at eastbourne today in what was his first competitive match on grass. johanna konta is on court as we speak. walden became the first woman to win
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the taekwondo title. talks to restore northern ireland's devolved administration are continuing with just one full day left to reach an agreement. discussions have been taking place between the five main parties and the british and irish governments to try to restore power—sharing at stormont. shaken woodward was northern ireland secretary in the labour government between 2007 and 2010 and joins me now from westminster. even in a place where brinkmanship is the rule rather than the exception this is pushing it to the wire, isn't it? well, i think these talks always go to the wirement when i was them in 2007 to 2010, the talks always went to the wire. the real issue is the wire isn't the end, it is a mechanism to get the parties to focus and what worries me is the additional complication that the tory government have introduced here which is the deal with the dup for
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which is the deal with the dup for which by the way i don't blame the dup for which by the way i don't blame the dupforarguing which by the way i don't blame the dup for arguing their corner. they should do that. sinn fein should do theirs and everyone should do theirs in northern ireland. i do blame the government for abandoning their neutrality and i think the cost of that, even if a deal is reached, is going to be that that deal may not stick and what really worries me about this is that the government to pf°p about this is that the government to prop themselves up in number ten have put the peace process at risk in northern ireland. the dup argue that actually the deal reached with the conservatives benefits northern ireland as a whole? 0h, the conservatives benefits northern ireland as a whole? oh, there is no question that what we know about the deal is helpful to everybody in northern ireland. there will be more money for public services, of course, it is irony on a day when the public sector purse is talking about pay for emergency services and policemen and firemen and apparently there isn't money for them, that suddenly theresa may can find some extra money in northern ireland? what about scotland ? extra money in northern ireland?
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what about scotland? what about wales ? what about scotland? what about wales? what about public sector workers? that's one part of this rather shady deal that's been put together. you expect the dup and i have huge respect for arlene foster. she is a good negotiator and the tea m she is a good negotiator and the team have done what you'd expect a unionist team to do and it is good in that, in so far as it goes for northern ireland. what is not good is that it has been done with a very worrying dealfor is that it has been done with a very worrying deal for northern is that it has been done with a very worrying dealfor northern ireland on brexit. because as far as i can see the dup have agreed in advance of whatever the deal might be, that they will support the tories and any brexit deal. well, what if that deal is bad for northern ireland? what if that deal is bad for the border? where does that leave the people of northern ireland and that really worries me and it's that that makes me think that even if it can be cobbled together in the next 24 hours there, is a very shaky agreement to get the assembly back. but would it be as shaky as the uk government would be without the dup
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in the confidence and supply arrangement and doesn't every party in northern ireland need the uk governmentjust for the next period while the brexit negotiations are under way to be slightly steadier thanit under way to be slightly steadier than it otherwise would have been? well, we certainly need the government to be steadier, but you don't get steadier by a grubby deal which says however badly we negotiate on brexit, the dup will support us. i suspect what the government is going to find out is that if it's a bad brexit deal for northern ireland, the dup actually will look at it. they will see the ulster unionists over their shoulders. they will see the people of northern ireland looking at sinn fein, looking at the alliance and sdlp and saying this is bad for people in northern ireland and then i would hazard that the dup will be tempted to do the right thing and the right thing won't be to continue propping up a bankrupt, morally reprehensible number ten government, it will actually be to help bring this government down. if you're prepared to put the peace process in
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northern ireland at risk, there is clearly nothing you won't do. what theresa may will discover is that the politics of northern ireland are more important than a grubby deal and if she cobbles together a terrible brexit deal, which i think she probably will, i think she may well cover that the dup‘s signature on that piece of paper isn't quite as indelibly marked as thee thinks. a one word answer, if you wouldn't mind, will there be a deal in the next 24 hours in terms of power sharing? yes. a cyber attack which hit organisations around the world yesterday is being brought under control, according to security analysts. among the institutions affected were the ukrainian central bank, the british advertising agency wpp and the port of rotterdam. researchers say they've developed a programme that can protect individual computers, although it can't stop the bug from spreading. with me is brian lord, former director of intelligence and cyber operations at gchq. thank you very much forjoining us,
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brian. good afternoon. to what extent brian. good afternoon. to what exte nt d o brian. good afternoon. to what extent do attacks like this have an impact on the security of states. we mentioned the ukrainian central bank. we know that ukrainian government computers were down as well, a victim of this attack yesterday. so to what extent can cyber attacks effect national security? i think the nature of an attack like this which is similar to the the attack from two weeks ago, are designed specifically to hit large organisations and spread malware within an organisation and therefore have an effect on the efficiency on how they operate. if deployed sis stemically it can significantly impact public services and the business of government even if that is only for a temporary period. and the intention of whoever is behind it, maybe financial, but obviously someone else dreaming up
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another cyber attack may have other purposesin another cyber attack may have other purposes in mind as well? that's an interesting point because when one looks at the nature of this attack, the amount of revenue that it is generated is very, very small and actually, there are very, there are doubts whether the primary purpose of this was in fact financial. the measures that were put in place to collect the money which one would assume if you were financially driven would be the most important element, were random and ad hoc and amateurish. so there is a sense actually that the real intent of this was to cause disruption, was to cause damage, but you are right as well, any observer of this, in mind these tools are in the public domainment any observer can go i'm going to try that. we will try that and we will apply it in a different way against a different set of targets. what more do we know today? what we have seen is that the nature of the attack, i think, in this case
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was introduced into an organisation, it is felt through a system update. an update of ask the accounting software. that's worrying since a lot of security advice is to make sure you update your systems and that's based upon a premise that the updates are secure. it was introduced into the organisations in a slightly different way from before. as we are saying researchers have found a way of how to stop the effect on individual machines, but the spread of this isn't as systemic or as endemic as previous attacks. previous guest was urging that there should be a major investment in core it systems to protect what he called the soft underbelly of these systems. would you agree with that and could you give us an insight into what gchq is doing to mitigate against attacks like this? right,
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0k, first of all, i would agree with that. we are facing the technology debt where each time an organisation, a large organisation defers an update, an upgrade, whether that's security or systemic, what happens the technology debt gets bigger and big. we are all absolutely dependant on our it infrastructure and that's been seen from the effect. if you are dependant upon something you have to invest in it's maintenance otherwise you are leaving gaps all over for people to exploit. in terms of what gchq are doing and within the context of this, this will be the national cyber security centre which we set—up last year. they will be looking at exactly what happened. they will be working with industry to gather as much data as they can to gather as much data as they can to provide one immediate advice and to provide one immediate advice and to start rolling out longer term advice as to how to stop this from happening again. brian, thank you very much. the creator of paddington bear, the author michael bond,
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has died at the age of 91. from paddington's first appearance in print in 1958, he proved a hit with young readers and he was later reinvented successfully on tv and more recently for film. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito looks back at his life. paddington, charming, peruvian, accident prone. the creation of a former bbc cameraman, michael bond. and modelled on his father. "good afternoon", he said, "can i help you"? my father was a very polite man and always wore a hat in case he met somebody and paddington has a lot of him in it. he'd written the first story after buying a toy bear. he didn't think it would ever be published but it was just the beginning, millions were sold and translated into more than 30 languages. michael bond also wrote another
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children's favourite from the 70s, the herbs with parsley the lion. there's parsley. sometimes mr 0nion lets him ring the school bell. hello parsley. but it was paddington that grew and grew. there was, of course, the tv programme. 32 windsor gardens. a paddington musical. a paddington film. my name is... and... this was the prototype made by shirley clarkson for her children joanna and jeremy. yes, thatjeremy clarkson! mrs bird made very good stews. if he had any complaints at all, it was that her dumplings were a little on the small side! friendly, polite and fond of marmalade, there have been many fictional bears, but none quite like michael bond's paddington. michael bond there who has died at
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the age of 91. let's take a look at the age of 91. let's take a look at the weather forecast and thomas shaper knacker has the latest. you can see the journey of the rain in the last 18 hours or so. most of the rain fell across eastern areas overnight. we had more than a month's overnight. we had more than a months worth of rainfall in less than 24 hours really. so today, it's around lincolnshire, eastern parts of yorkshire. most of northern england that will be very, very damp and there is another area of heavy rain in the south—west too, but the south east drier today and also in scotla nd south east drier today and also in scotland you can see much drier weather as well. so maybe a bit of sunshine coming through there. this band of rain will continue to make
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its slow and painfully slow journey northwards. so rain tonight in newcastle and into edinburgh and still some rain across the south—west and maybe nubleging back into central and southern england, but parts of the midlands and east anglia and the south east, a dry night. currie hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh and simon mccoy. as we've been hearing, police investigating the grenfell fire have released a statement in the last hour, saying they now believe at least 80 people died in the tragedy or are confirmed missing, presumed dead. they have been able to talk to at least one person from 106 of the 129 flats in the tower. detective superintendent fiona mccormack from the metropolitan police gave this update a short time ago. a p pa re ntly apparently we are having problems showing give that but we will bring you that news conference after the
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sports news. we'll is still sitting there waiting! world number one defending champion andy murray has been confirmed as the top seed for wimbledon, it takes into account recent grass court form with murray heading a big four as our tennis correspondent russell fuller explains. with extra weight given to grass court formed there are significant differences between the men's rankings and seedings. world number four djokovic will be in the other half of the draw to murray as second seed, roger federer is seeded third and nadal is for. either of those could meet murray in the semifinals. with stan wawrinka at number five a potential quarterfinal opponent for any of them. the women's seedings reflect them. the women's seedings reflect the rankings, angelique kerber number one and johanna konta at number one and johanna konta at number six highest ever grand slam seeding. djokovic has been in action
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at eastbourne today after an almost wash—out yesterday, centre court was packed, djokovic beat pospisil in three sets. his first grass court match this season and he was in a good mood as he looked to get his game in form for wimbledon, it's the first time he's appeared in eastbourne and the first time in seven eastbourne and the first time in seve n yea rs eastbourne and the first time in seven years he has played at a pre—wimbledon grass tournament. angelique kerber beat kristina discover, the sister of karolina pliskova, angelique kerber is into the third round and will face a spanish opponent. british number one johanna konta hopes to follow angelique kerber. these are live pictures on bbc two following coverage of the third round. she is playing sorana coverage of the third round. she is playing sora na cirstea coverage of the third round. she is playing sorana cirstea of romania. she's just taken the first set 6—2 and is leading 2—0 in the second set as you can see. john mcenroe has proposed a contest between men and women to prove his claim that serena williams would be ranked around 700
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in the world on the men's circuit. serena williams won the last of the 23 grand slams in australia in january before announcing she was pregnant. she asked john mcenroe to leave her out of his comments but you stick to his guns and said he had a solution, men and women playing together. he said he was sure the men would be all for it. williams expects to return to tennis as early as january next year. british tae kwon do history with the first british fighter ever to successfully defend a world tae kwon do championships title. she beat her american opponent jackie galloway do championships title. she beat her american opponentjackie galloway at 14-4 in american opponentjackie galloway at 14—4 in the plus 73 kilograms weight class today. it is not sunk in yet, i'm so happy, i did not think it would be so fluent, i knew it would be not easy because they were difficult opponents but i'm made and composed and i am buzzing, i don't think it has sunk in yet. the men's
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heavyweight has guaranteed britain a second medal, he is into the semi finals after beating his iranian opponent. but not a good day for lutalo muhammad. it's his first event after his defeat at the 0lympics event after his defeat at the olympics and he's gone out in the second round. dani alves has confirmed he will leavejuventus as his proposed move to manchester city comes closer. city manager pep guardiola is keen to link up with the 34—year—old after their prolific speu the 34—year—old after their prolific spell together at barcelona. dani alves had one year left on his juventus contract but they have released him from that still. persistent rain has seen today's women's cricket world cup game between south africa and new zealand abandoned. they were due to start at 10:30am in derby but thanks to conditions like this hasn't been a single ball bowled. new zealand and south africa first and second in the
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eight team group stage, having both won the opening games. they each receive one the result today. see you later. thank you very much. labour is to force a vote this evening on an amendment to the queen's speech calling for an end to cuts in the police and emergency services. the party is also demanding an end to the one per cent cap on public sector pay rises. the conservatives say only they will deliver the economy needed to properly fund the emergency services. the liberal democrats have said they will support the labour amendment. we can speak now to the deputy leader of the liberal democrats, jo swinson. good afternoon to you. good to be with you. what do you say to those who say, you are just playing politics? what the conservatives has said is ironic given that the economy is being threatened by this extreme version of brexit that theresa may's tories are still pursuing even though there was no mandate for that at the recent general election. by withdrawing from the single market and the customs union that will threaten
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jobs and our wider economic success, which is what we will need to make sure that we properly fund our public services. that is why we will support the labour amendment tonight and we hope tomorrow labour will be able to work with us on retaining our place in the single market.“ thatis our place in the single market.“ that is the case how do you see the next 24 hours working out? there will be a foot this evening and there are further votes tomorrow on there are further votes tomorrow on the queen's speech and a range of amendments will be considered, one interesting thing in this parliament will be, because the government doesn't have a majority and because of its grubby deal with the dup and its slender majority, parliament will matter. so when parties can work together on issues where they can find agreement, and the other amendments on environmental matters, we'll be working with mps like stella creasy on issues like women's right, there is a real opportunity to force the government to do things differently. they have to listen to
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parliament and that is what my liberal democrat colleagues are committed to making sure that the government does, and where it is necessary to work with other parties. people on the street will say we are in a unique period in history, we need a government that can get us through the next few months and years. they don't want is people playing politics. and is that not certainly what the labour party are doing because that is what you would expect from them in opposition. work, this is about people's lives. the decisions that we are making in this parliament, matters. i would argue that the way in which these brexit negotiations u nfold in which these brexit negotiations unfold is going to have huge on people's jobs, their unfold is going to have huge on people'sjobs, theirfutures, the communities that we as mps serve for decades to come. and it is important we get that right. but the government should be doing is, instead of having a stitch up with
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the dup, reflecting the result of the dup, reflecting the result of the election where no one party won majority and perhaps showing more humility and spirit of compromise to try to work across all the parties to find the best way forward. but it is as if the government has put its fingers in its ears and is ignoring the election result where it did not get a mandate for its extreme version of brexit. or they are pragmatic and trying to get us through the next few months. well i think we need a bit more vision and uplifting positivity and scrambling through the next couple of weeks although i understand the desperation that the prime minister finds herself in in terms of parliamentary arithmetic, this election that she called which was not necessary because she wanted a landslide. she didn't get it and she needs to deal with the reality she has. for the sake of the country that ought to mean working constructively and finding much more cross— party constructively and finding much more cross—party agreement. i think she
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will find that people from all parties would welcome that kind of approach. it is certainly not what we have seen from this government yet. about your party, some have ruled themselves out, sir vince cable looks to be your next leader, are you happy with with that? have worked closely with him and have huge respect for him. i think our party is fortunate to have such a wide range of experience among the elected mps, and indeed in the house of lords as well. there's still some way to go on the leadership election, nominations don't close untiljuly 20 no announcements yet of who the leader will be but you know, i think we've got such a strong team in westminster, and this is the time that the country needs that strong liberal voice that will stand up to the government on brexit plans. i hope the labour party will join us in voting to support the single market although i fear they
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won't. good to talk to you, thank you for your time. police investigating the grenfell tower have put statement in the last hour saying they believe 80 people at least died in the tragedy are missing confirmed dead. they say it will take until the end of the get at least to give a final tally of the number of dead. the metropolitan police's detective superintendent fiona mccormac has spoken. the statement begins with a question from our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. can you give me the latest figures for this you believe are dead or missing? ok. so, the figures we've given previously, around 80 people, that's the number we have got for this matter. i know from all the reporting that is out there and in the local communities that there is a belief that this number is higher. so what we are
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doing to date is actively investigating every flat and going through the flat numbers and looking at how many people survived and how many people we still don't know about. so out of all the flats that we re about. so out of all the flats that were there, 129 flats in grenfell tower over 23 floors, of those flats, 106 flats, we are able to confirm that everybody that was in those flats has survived and what we are those flats has survived and what we a re left those flats has survived and what we are left with is 23 flats, where we know that's not the case now. from those 106 flats... ijust know that's not the case now. from those 106 flats... i just want a clarification, yes, iwas those 106 flats... i just want a clarification, yes, i was going to ask you that. take your time. let me just ask another question. a specific question which will help
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you answer that particular point. yourjob is obviously to try to work out who was in every flat, not just living their but bond that might. absolutely. you have managed to identify some of the people —— on that night. that's right, we the police have spoken to at least one occu pa nt of police have spoken to at least one occupant of 106 of those 129 flats. these people have been able to tell us these people have been able to tell us who was in their flat that might and who was visiting. we've also been able to understand from those occu pa nts been able to understand from those occupants who their neighbours were, and other information about grenfell tower. from there we know that within those 106 flats, 18 people are either dead or now missing presumed dead. those are the numbers we have got from them.
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u nfortu nately, we have got from them. unfortunately, there was 23 flats that we still can't account for our residents. that is where our numbers come from. from the intelligence we have had regarding the occupancy of those 23 flats, coupled with a large number of nine and nine calls from those flats, that's given us that number that we believe to be around 80 people. how useful is it that you have those 909 calls because presumably some people will have caught a number of times. there's not an easy way of telling the exact number in those flats. we're using it for number in those flats. we're using itforan number in those flats. we're using it for an incredible and of information, 999 calls are useful because on the night many residents and visitors moved to higher floors to try and escape the fire. we've been able to establish from some of those calls that the numbers on their flats would not perhaps correlate to the number of people that we believe our resident in that flat. 0n that we believe our resident in that flat. on top of that we have looked
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at many lists given to us by the government, by local communities, and also from other companies such as fast—food delivery companies. we are going everywhere to try to get a true number and i believe that that number will rise throughout this. but what i really appeal to and what we know still exists is that there are other members out there. and to me, these are not numbers. that's what i really want to get across. to me these are people that died in the fire. so i really want to appeal for people to come to the police, to call our freephone number and give us call our freephone number and give us those listeds, tell us what has happened. i've already stated on friday, i will restate it, we are not worried about immigration issues or subletting. we just really want to be able to look after the families of the deceased and account for every victim who died in the fire at the time. you and the
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government and to a certain extent the media which has reported what you and the government are saying have been accused of concealing people you know to be dead, covering up people you know to be dead, covering up the true figure. your response to that? simply, that's not the case at the moment. the first initial housing lists we had were not correct, i understand that london is very transient in terms of population, i'm a londoner myself. so we expect that the initial housing lists are perhaps not the people living in grenfell tower. so we are working from a very difficult start of point. we want to start at the beginning and personally speak to occu pa nts the beginning and personally speak to occupants of every one of those flats. so that is where we are coming to now in numbers. i'm not saying that these will be the confirmed numbers, that will take months and months to do, and we are doing that through talking to occu pa nts, to
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doing that through talking to occupants, to community groups, to establish exactly who was in that flat that night. we are also doing that recovery operation that is going to be a fingertip recovery operation with my officers, along with experts, anthropologists, say, to get a true number of who died that night in the grenfell tower. you say it could take months for you to getan you say it could take months for you to get an official figure. what would you say to people desperate to know what that figure is, about having to wait for that amount of time? we are really working hard with the families of everyone we believe is missing presumed dead. we are communicating at the moment on a daily basis, to give them the full fa cts daily basis, to give them the full facts as we know them at this moment in time, the honesty of this, as you have seen from the photographs, is that we are working with a scene of com plete that we are working with a scene of complete devastation. and this is not going to be a quick investigation. i would not going to be a quick investigation. iwould not not going to be a quick investigation. i would not want it
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to bea investigation. i would not want it to be a quick investigation. i am really conscious that we get honest a nswe rs really conscious that we get honest a nswers for really conscious that we get honest answers for every family member and everybody that lost a friend, or eve ryo ne everybody that lost a friend, or everyone that was concerned about what happened in grenfell tower. it would be wrong to rush it. fiona wilcox feels the same way, it's so, so important that we do this correctly. presumably you must be talking to some families and saying that it may be that you can't provide them with the remains of their loved ones. give us some idea of the difficulties that throws up. that's exactly right. we are working to identify everyone who died in the fire but the tragic reality is that due to the intense heat there maybe some people that we never identify. i was some people that we never identify. iwas in some people that we never identify. i was in grenfell tower yesterday, andi i was in grenfell tower yesterday, and i walked into a number of flats, and i walked into a number of flats, and sulphur myself the absolute challenge of what is in front of us. but every one of my search and
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rescue officers is absolutely dedicated to locating and identifying as many people as possible but the reality is that that may never happen. and that is what we are preparing the families and friends of our loved ones for. cani and friends of our loved ones for. can i ask about the investigation, it isa can i ask about the investigation, it is a complex one. give me some idea of the number of companies that you now have to deal with when you are trying to obtain paperwork and evidence about the way in which the refurbishment of grenfell tower was planned. ok. so far, as you are aware, it was quite an extensive refurbishment that went on in the building. a number of new flats were built downstairs as well as the cladding and insulation that went on there as well. at the moment there are over 60 companies that we are looking into. architects, cladding companies, building companies. and that number is growing regularly at
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the moment. we are trying to prioritise those companies and in communication with them concerning every bit of paperwork from the building. finally your investigation runs alongside a coroner's piece of work and then there will be a public inquiry. is it realistic to expect an interim report from that inquiry desk summer? at the moment i don't know who is leading a public inquiry. i don't know what their terms of reference are so i could not really answer that question. i am hoping that as soon as that person is identified that i will meet them. but you won't have a figure for the number of people who have died until beyond that point, and that is the starting point. it's difficult to answer that because i don't know the terms of reference. i would imagine a lot of it is around safety so i am sure that there are
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parts they can speak about, as both investigations grow the information will come out from there. of god one final question. the police have been criticised. —— i've got one final question. what is your intention about trying to give people clarity about trying to give people clarity about who has died in the fire? for me clarity comes with honesty about this. we are talking numbers. i don't talk numbers, i talk victims. and making sure we look after the families in this investigation. 0ur numbers have gone up and down over the last few weeks, i'll give you an example, we had two people missing presumed dead that we have since established have come back from holiday. what we have to look at with those numbers is making sure that they are correct. so those 23 flats, for me, an absolute priority in making sure that we establish exactly who was there. it was ramadan so a lot of people were
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visiting the building who might have just come in to eat and celebrate with friends. to establish who was in each of those flats that i can give an honest answer is my priority on this matter. that is great, thank you very much indeed. detective superintendent fiona maccormack of the met talking to our correspondent. we can speak to and from now. hejoins me from outside new scotland yard. listening to fiona maccormack, her explanation that it might take until the end of the year to at least have a full and final number of those who died, it gives you some sense of the painstaking effort that is going in to try to determine exactly how many people perished inside grunfeld. absolutely. let's be clear, the authorities, the council, even the media have been accused of covering
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up media have been accused of covering upa media have been accused of covering up a greater death number in the g re nfell tower up a greater death number in the grenfell tower disaster. people have said that effectively the police have hidden information they have about people dying. i think this briefing today was an attempt to put to rest that allegation. what the police say they have been doing is trying to speak to everybody, as you heard, in each flat. to go over that detail again, the senior investigating officer said there we re investigating officer said there were 23 flats out of all of those in g re nfell tower, were 23 flats out of all of those in grenfell tower, which is 129 flats, and that they had spoken to 106, two residents of 126 flats. so of those 23 they have found no one to speak to. that suggests that the bulk of those who died were connected with those who died were connected with those flats, perhaps living there, visiting, or had possibly taken refuge in those flats as the flames had spread. those flats are between floor number 11 and the top floor which is the 23rd floor. the top
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half of the tower. so police now have to reconstruct who might have beenin have to reconstruct who might have been in those flats on the night, not just those living been in those flats on the night, notjust those living there but who might have been there. to do that they say they go to considerable efforts, they are talking to schools, nurseries, government agencies that might have dealings with people from flats come even to fast food deliveries if they have delivered to people in the past there and might have names. the message is, we there and might have names. the message is, we are there and might have names. the message is, we are trying to give an accurate figure that as you heard it will take months because the way in which bodies identified is painstaking and that is how long the police say it will take. tom, thank you for that. a quick line breaking news, us president donald trump has accepted an invitation from the french president emmanuel macron to attend the bastille day celebrations in paris on july 14. attend the bastille day celebrations in paris onjuly14. president trump
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pulls out of one paris agreement but ridge is another one! now it's time for the business news. —— he reaches another one. hello, this is the business news. tesco is cutting 1200 jobs at its head office. that's about a quarter of staff at welwyn garden city and hatfield. it's part of plan to cut costs and boost the company's fortunes. better news for the co—op bank. it's agreed a £700 million rescue package to stop it being wound up. investors have agreed to swap their debt for a stake in the bank. house prices are back on the rise after three months of falls. nationwide says prices rose byjust over 1% this month. so, that means the average house now costs around £211,000. how do you picture life after retirement? lots of cruises and holidays? or will things get a bit tight? according to scottish
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widows only 56% of us are are saving enough for retirement. and here's an odd thing — those of us who are saving, have a strangely optimistic idea about how much money we'll have once we say goodbye to work. catherine stewart, retirement expert at scottish widows joins me. thank you forjoining us. has surprised you buy this figure of 56% ? surprised you buy this figure of 56%? well it is not altogether surprising, automatic enrolment where employers need to enrol their workers into a pension scheme and pay into it has been a great success. but the levels at which people are paying into the scheme may be lulling people into a false sense of security in that they not saving enough to have their dream retirement. i have to ask you, pensions are notoriously difficult. it's a boring and complicated subject. isn't the industry itself a bit off—putting ? subject. isn't the industry itself a bit off-putting? i don't think we have helped in the past. love is in
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the industry government, employers and providers, need to do more to demystify pensions —— all of us in the industry. there's a lot that people are doing to try to simplify it using techniques like putting pension basic videos on youtube and social media and developing smartphone apps so people can have accessible information to hand to understand a little more about how their savings are growing. do you think that will work? you are up against the fact that younger people don't anticipate stopping work. years and the young people obviously have a lot of demands on their money. —— yes. although it is clear one size does not fit all. from our research we know that when young people, indeed many people understand more about pensions they become much more engaged in it. so i think we have to keep trying to spread the message and educate because the younger you start saving the better chance you have for
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retiring. people might not stop working but they can phase themselves into retirement. they are living longer so they will need much more. ok, thank you very much. that's all the business news for now. just a statement coming through from europol about the cyber attack yesterday. it has issued the latest advice to people affected, they say the ambush is more sophisticated than the last attack and repeat their message that businesses should not pay. they say the attack has caused infections worldwide and has not yet been stopped. 0n the "do not pgy" not yet been stopped. 0n the "do not pay" thing, they say that even if you do pay the chances are you won't be able to retrieve your files because the e—mail account that manages the ransom accounts has been blocked. so they say, keep all operating systems up—to—date and
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disconnect affected devices from the internet. they say it has caused infections worldwide and hasn't been stopped. that's the latest from europol. he is the weather. news of more rain tonight so that horrible wet weather in the south—east yesterday is still moving, i think we've got a slight problem here. ithink moving, i think we've got a slight problem here. i think we've got some technical problems but lets just crack on. we've got more rain tonight. let me show you the pressure map. see that area of low pressure, it is heading towards northern areas. these, the temperatures around 8pm this evening, 16
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in london, there's some rain in the south—west but notice the midlands and the south—east, just about try, and the south—east, just about try, a bit fresher tonight, 12 or 13 degrees, then we'll have a look at tomorrow. in the north—east of england scotland, tomorrow in the north wet and rainy, 13 in aberdeen, in the south, 20 degrees. in the next half—hour hopefully you will be able to see me. that's it. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown live in warrington where it has been announced that six people are to be charged in connection with the hillsborough football stadium disaster of 28 years ago. following these thorough investigations and our careful review of the evidence in accordance with the code for crown prosecutors, i have decided there is sufficient evidence to charge six individuals
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with criminal offences. relatives of some of those who died at hillsborough have been giving their reaction to today's news. we just have to see what the future holds. we have still got a long journey to go on now. i'm simon mccoy with annita mcveigh.
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