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tv   Breakfast  BBCNEWS  June 29, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the next step into finding out what caused the tragedy at grenfell tower — a retired high courtjudge will be appointed to lead the public inquiry. it comes as the group representing housing associations calls on the government to stop its testing of cladding because the results are already so conclusive. good morning. it's thursday, the 29th ofjune. also this morning: theresa may faces a further challenge to her authority today, as labour tries once again to force changes to the queen's speech. one of the highest ranking cardinals in the roman catholic church has been charged with historical sex offences. good morning from the gateway to
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snowdonia. figures today show the number of people being rescued in the mountains is up on last year. later in the programme we will find out why. ten years ago today, the first iphone went on sale sparking a smartphone revolution. but how have they changed the way we live? i'll be finding out. we've come to sheffield to hear about a multi—million pound plan by the lawn tennis association to revamp grassroots tennis and we're also launching our breakfast summer challenge with world number one andy murray the first to take it on. and sarah has the weather. good morning. we've got a lot of cloud across the skies today bringing heavy rain for northern and western parts. i will have a full forecast in 15 minutes.
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good morning, first our main story. a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick, is today expected to be appointed to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. the news comes as police say at least 80 people are believed to have died in the fire, but they don't expect to confirm the exact number for at least another six months. simonjones reports. the government says it is determined to get to the truth of what happened at grenfell tower, and this is the man set to be given that task — a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick. he specialised in commercial law, in a career spanning almost 50 years. with the clamour for answers, he will be expected to produce his initial findings quickly. the police say they may not be able to confirm how many people died until the end of the year, at the earliest. they estimate so far that the death toll stands at 80, but stress that is not the final picture. some victims may never be identified. as the investigation continues, the national housing federation is calling on the government to stop its testing of cladding, and instead focus on removing it, to make people safe.
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having had 120 different tests, from different samples, from different buildings, in different parts of the country, i think we can now say that, according to the tests that the government is carrying out, this cladding is not fit for purpose. we don't need to test any more of it. today, another victim of the fire will be laid to rest. his family say they are devastated, and will miss him terribly. the sad reality is there will be many funerals to follow. our political correspondent alex forsyth joins us now from westminster. this will be a significant decision — who leads this enquiry — talk through the politics behind it. we know that man who is charged with leading the quest for answers, sir
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martin moore—bick, a long career in commercial law, with expertise and in highly technical cases and respected by colleagues. we initially expected the appointment of thisjudge within initially expected the appointment of this judge within days. it has taken of this judge within days. it has ta ke n two of this judge within days. it has taken two weeks. part of the reason for that is ministers know it is crucial to get this right from the start. you will remember the child abuse enquiry which is going on at the moment. but as that four different chairs since it was set up, prompting lots of criticism. there is understandable concern that public enquiries can drag on, beset by problems, they can fail to get to the truth. the prime minister made clear in this case she wants no stone left unturned, she wants residents to be involved. she has appointed a chair and it is vital this command is public trust. for the moment, thank you. theresa may will face a major test of whether she has enough authority to stay in power, as mps vote on the queen's speech later today. with the support of the democratic unionists,
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the government is expected to pass its plans for the next parliament, after narrowly surviving a vote last night on changes to public sector pay. butjeremy corbyn is calling on mps to support labour's plans for the economy and brexit. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. the ayes to the right, 309—darter plot the first vote of this parliament on a labour amendment to the queen's speech proposing to end the queen's speech proposing to end the cap on public sector pay rises when the government's way. this was the first test of theresa may's deal with the dup made to boost the numbers on her side in the commons. last night it delivered — all ten dups voted in line with the conservatives to see off the opposition‘s challenge. today fm of the final vote on the queen's speech which sets out the government's policy programme labour will try their luck against op yellow we're putting forward what was in the ma nifesto putting forward what was in the manifesto in the election, on brexit, which guarantees trade relations with europe, a government
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that ends the public sector pay gap and a government that invests in the educational future of all children from nursery through to university. labour thinks it is on the front foot with its calls to end austerity. many conservatives admit the cuts didn't go down well on the doorstep during the election campaign. but after signals from senior cabinet members and downing street sources that the paper would be reviewed, number ten later in sister there was not yet any change in policy. we will not make our decision on public sector pay until the pay review body has reported and we will listen to what they say and we will listen to what they say and we will listen to what people in this house has said before making a final decision. theresa may is expected to win the vote on the queen's speech today with the support of the dup and her backbenchers are likely to rebel. but her majority is slim — her authority is still fragile. today is also the deadline for northern ireland politicians to agree a power sharing executive at stormont. discussions have been
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ongoing since january. our ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast for us this morning. we have been waiting for this deal and they have been hopes for a deal. how likely that we will get a deal? morning, naga. the time runs out in under ten hours of the three time at 4pm this afternoon and the pressure of their deadline hasn't broken the deadlock. politicians negotiated late into the night until around 2am this morning what i understand major disagreements go on between the dup and sinn fein. the sticking point is the irishman quit. sinn fein was legislation, the irish language act to protect and promote the gaelic tongue, but the dup want a broader piece of legislation which would also cover issues which are important to unionists. if the deadline does pass without a deal andi deadline does pass without a deal and i think at the moment that is likely, then the northern ireland
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secretary james brokenshire has likely, then the northern ireland secretaryjames brokenshire has a number of options — you can extend the deadline, which has happened before, or he can get ministers from london to take over some or all of the functions of the devolved government hero stormont. 0k, the functions of the devolved government hero stormont. ok, for the moment, thank you very much. —— here at stormont. australia's most senior roman catholic official has been charged with historical sex offences. cardinal george pell is responsible for the vatican's finances and is considered to rank third in the catholic church worldwide. our correspondent phil mercer is in sydney. just tell us what the police have said. the police say that australia's most powerful catholic cleric and one of the most high—ranking officials in the vatican is facing multiple sexual assault allegations. we understand that these allegations date back to the 1970s. what they do, they bring the 1970s. what they do, they bring theissue the 1970s. what they do, they bring the issue of abuse right to the door of the vatican. cardinal pell is a key financial adviser to the pope
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and ina key financial adviser to the pope and in a statement issued a few hours ago the cardinal said that he again strongly denied any wrongdoing and said that he would be happy to have his day in court and would return to australia to strenuously defend the allegations. now, he is due to appear before a magistrate in the city of melbourne onjuly the 18th. at the moment we don't know specifically the nature of these allegations. we may know more in a week's time when a magistrate will determine whether specific details of these allegations will be made public. thank you. the united states has announced tough new security measures for commercial flights arriving from more than 100 countries. it will mean enhanced passenger screening and heightened security standards at airports. the measures stop short of expanding the ban on laptops in hand luggage, imposed for flights from eight countries in the middle east, north africa and turkey. the chinese president, xijingping, will arrive in hong kong later to celebrate 20 years since britain returned it to chinese rule. a massive security operation is under way as protests are planned throughout the visit.
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yesterday democracy activists were arrested after chaining themselves to a monument to symbolise the handover. young people are resentful of beijing's growing involvement in local affairs. a decision will be revealed later over a proposed merger between sky and 21st century fox. if 0fcom approves the takeover, rupert murdoch's company would assume total control of the broadcaster — a deal which has been cleared by european commisision competition authorities. 0pponents believe the deal would give murdoch too much power in the uk media. families of those killed at hillsborough in 1989 have supported the decision to prosecute six men including former police officers after 96 liverpool football supporters died as a result of overcrowding at the fa cup
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semi—final. last year new inquest concluded the fans have been unlawfully killed. the national crime agency says it's becoming increasingly concerned about violent albanian gangs which it says are exerting "considerable control" over the uk drug trafficking market. the agency says corruption among staff working at ports and airports is a "key vulnerability", making it easier for gangs to smuggle in drugs. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw has more. 0n on their way to make an arrest on a north sea ferry. earlier this year the national crime agency thwarted a huge drug smuggling operation. police. can you open the door please? it involved a p&0 worker who was jailed along with a colleague. his wife was convicted of money laundering. in the annual assessment on organised crime the nca says
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corrupt on organised crime the nca says corru pt staff on organised crime the nca says corrupt staff working at ports and airports make it easierfor gangs smuggling drugs. it says corruption at the uk border is a key vulnerability. with the port of dover targeted by people smugglers. the report also says there is a significant threat from albanian gangs which have a growing influence on organised crime in the uk. this is very much a group that is small in number but big impact. so we have seen an in number but big impact. so we have seen an emergence of in number but big impact. so we have seen an emergence of violence particularly around in forcing the drug trade in this group and hence we have a specific response with partners where we tried the best we can to try and disrupt them. we have some cases going through the courts. we have taken large amounts of money out of it. it was the rising violence alongside the drugs trade that causes the most concern. and a warning about cyber crime. the agency says the scale is underestimated. many businesses failed to report attacks for fear of damaging their reputation. household energy bills and carbon emissions will soar unless ministers devise new power saving
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policies after brexit, according to a new report. the independent committee on climate change says eu energy efficiency rules on household appliances have helped reduce emissions. it's warning that the uk government now needs to to extend energy savings through better home insulation. music's returned to a part of mosul after it was liberated from the so—called islamic state. singing # skies are blue... musician nabil atrak—shi was forced to hide his guitarfor three years, because playing it was forbidden. some students, who secretly kept their instruments, have now returned to study at the school. those are the main stories. mike is out and about this morning and there isa out and about this morning and there is a certain rallying theme — tennis
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is a certain rallying theme — tennis is the theme. where are you, mike? in sheffield. i havejust hit an awful shot, really embarrassing. yes, iam awful shot, really embarrassing. yes, i am in sheffield at the grace health and sports centre. we are talking tennis. everyone is getting excited —— graves. we are getting excited —— graves. we are getting excited about wimbledon. it starts on monday with andy murray, the top seed, and world number one. we are asking what is being done about the next generation, like my friends here and to make the game more accessible to all. well, today it is exciting because they are launching this association... they are unending afunding this association... they are unending a funding pot of £250 million to revamp tennis courts across britain, to put in floodlights, to make them multi— surface or build indoor centres like
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you. that's what we are talking about this morning. plenty more to come. first, the rest of the sport. a very important lions announcement. the team has been announced for the game on saturday. johnny sexton and owen farrell will start together for the lions in the second test against new zealand. having the lost the opening test, warren gatland's side have to win in wellington. captain sam warburton has also been handed a start in one of three changes to the side beaten 30—15 last weekend. usain bolt was back on european soil last night and the world record holder made a winning return in the 100 metres. he won in a time of 10.07 seconds in the czech city of 0strava as he prepares for the world championships in london this summer. there was an easy win for the four—time 0lympic gold—medallist mo farah too. he won his final 10,000 metre race on an iaaf circuit in a near world best time this year of 27 minutes and 12 seconds. british number onejohanna konta is into the third round in eastbourne. a straight sets win over romania's sorana cirstea sets up a match with the french open champion jelana 0stapenko this afternoon.
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that's this afternoon actually. plenty more on tennis to come as we talk last till tennis and we will reveal pa rt talk last till tennis and we will reveal part of our summer breakfast challenge, a huge mug, 30 seconds to get tennis balls into this mode from ten metres. charlie, you saw the first attempt at this when andy murray gave it a go —— this mug. rather appropriately, andy murray kicks off the game, set, mug challenge. as many balls in that mug as possible. i saw it happened and what didn't surprise me is he is so
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competitive about that! we will see more of that later on! here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. it's been a bit rainy today, seems like this is what the gardens have wanted? that's right, good morning, at least a break for watering the garden is. for many parts more rain in the forecast, this was yesterday at headingley in leeds and similar skies today —— watering the garden is. cloud, wet and windy weather. particularly wet weather this morning for the north—east of england and for southern and eastern scotla nd england and for southern and eastern scotland with some heavy downpours and strong winds. heavy rain in the south—west of england, that will slowly ease but still pretty dam at 8am. as we move across the midlands and southern england, it's looking drierfor east anglia, and southern england, it's looking drier for east anglia, some and southern england, it's looking drierfor east anglia, some brighter spells but you could catch the odd
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shower. some drizzly rain elsewhere. it will be particularly heavy across the likes of fife and aberdeenshire, difficult driving conditions through the morning with a lot of lying surface water through the central belt of scotland. this area of rain will edge north and west, easing a bit across parts of england but the rain pushing in across all of scotla nd rain pushing in across all of scotland and northern ireland. drizzly rain for parts of wales, parts of south—west england into the afternoon but drier in the south—east, 19 or 20. pretty disappointing, just 13 or 1a under the cloud and the rain towards northern and western parts of the country with some really windy conditions here too. 0nto this evening and overnight, we will keep the breeze, cloud and wet weather across scotland into northern ireland, wales and western parts of england but the rain will ease in intensity, not as heavy as this morning. by tomorrow morning, again northern and western parts of the
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country a bit disappointing with some cloud, breeze and outbreaks of rain. also some showers towards the south—east, you could catch perhaps a happy ora south—east, you could catch perhaps a happy or a thundery one but perhaps a bit warmer, 23 by tomorrow —— heavy. we have this front slowly moving away from the south—east by the weekend and then a ridge of high pressure building in by the time the weekend comes. by the time we get to saturday, a bit of rain in the south—east but that should clear to leave a brighter and warmer day, less windy with temperatures 16—22. that theme stays into the second half of the weekend. 0n that theme stays into the second half of the weekend. on sunday, largely dry conditions, perhaps a shower in the far north—west but most of us drier and brighter, 15-23. most of us drier and brighter, 15—23. things looking up but we have quite a bit of rain in the forecast today. sarah, thanks very much. let's look through some of the papers. shall we start with the
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guardian? a story yesterday there was a lot of focus on, six people including two former police officers have been charged with criminal offences over the 96 deaths in middlesbrough is a disaster and an alleged police cover—up which followed —— hillsborough disaster. that's on the front page of many of the papers. 0n the front page of the daily telegraph. many families celebrating the news yesterday. also on the front page of the daily mirror as well. the front page of the times, looking at a few stories, the times, looking at a few stories, the pc here is pc wayne marques, who has given a very graphic but very emotional and startling account of what happened when terrorists attacked people at london bridge and borough market and he described how he fought off three terrorists with his batting and he was stabbed and blinded in one eye in that attack ——
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bat on. more of that interview after 8am, absolutely compelling interview. front page of the daily mail as well, security chiefs facing questions over how a hate preacher was allowed to live in the uk for two years. ben, where are you taking us? to tesco, in the times they announced yesterday tesco is cutting 1200 jobs days after saying more jobs would go at call centres in cardiff. all of this is part of the big turnaround plan tesco launched three years ago. it's intending to save £1.5 billion as you can see and it comes after tesco recorded one of the biggest corporate losses ever three years ago. this turnaround plan seems to be paying off because in the last set of figures tesco grew at its fastest rate since 2012. not great news if you're employed there, 1200 jobs going at tesco but nonetheless it is turning around its fortu nes nonetheless it is turning around its fortunes it says. i want to show you this story from the times. japanese
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technology. charlie, you and i wear shirts, we have to get them laundered and cleaned, apparently you hang it on a new high—tech hangar, it costs £150. the shirt all the hangar? the hangar, it is clean and it will get rid of smells, it gets rid of grilled meat, i don't know why your shirt would smell of grilled meat but you hang it for seven hours overnight. £150. i would have to look into that, would have to see if that is good value for money. quite a clever little idea. i think i willjust put it in the washing machine. are you going to get one? no, only on sale in japan otherwise i would of course. we're at the time of year when the days are at their longest so no better time to be outdoors. but for those who enjoy hill walking or mountaineering,
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there are warnings about how to stay safe. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is in snowdonia for us this morning. as i'm seeing behind you, as it is here, visibility not that great. that's right, charlie. a little murky you could describe this morning, the gateway to snowdonia, if you go that way and carry on for a bit, you get to snowdon. new figures from mountain rescue said today the number of people being rescued on the heels is up. 2000 people rescued last year, up 170 —— on the hills. there were only 1a daysin on the hills. there were only 1a days in the year were mountain rescue weren't called out. hello. you got into trouble on dartmoor, what happened ? you got into trouble on dartmoor, what happened? i was training a group of youngsters for the ten hills challenge and i was walking with them and we were about five
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kilometres from the nearest road, the weather was very much like today, i put my foot in a hole and fell over sideways and broke my ankle badly. it can happen to anybody? yes, i'm an experienced walker, i've been on dartmoor many times and a good navigator but it can happen to anybody. let's speak to chris from mountain rescue, white or more people calling you guys? more people are getting onto the hills. -- more people are getting onto the hills. —— why are. they are less prepared and they don't realise the mountains can bite back. it is good ina way mountains can bite back. it is good in a way if more and more of us are venturing out? we are happy to see more and more people outdoors rather than in front of a screen, it is good, but a lot of them lack the experience, it is too easy to step out of the car and venture onto the mountains without being fully prepared. what's the one piece of advice you would give to people? be prepared, there's a lot of
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information out there, the mountain safe website, there are also clubs where people can find information and learn how to get the right kit and learn how to get the right kit and enjoy the hills. you were out overnight? i only got in at three a.m.! thanks for talking to us. chris said be prepared, ed conway is a self—styled adventurer who has got what got what he described as essential kit —— what he describes as essential kit? you want the outdoors to be in drawable, accessible and safe —— enjoyable. i have paper maps. phones don't always work. when it is cold the voltage could drop and it could die. take a paper map in case. take a set of gloves and a hat. ahad porch, it gets dark every day, people forget that sometimes —— a head torch. some
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sweets for nutrition. in a backpack, carry it on your back, that means you can spend more time outdoors and enjoy it. i should tell you that ed is the only person to have run and swu m is the only person to have run and swum the length of britain? in 2013! decided to swim from lands end to john o' groats, which took three and a half months. i wish i knew then what i know now because that was quite silly! a great bit of advice. i'm going to leave you with the view. i have seen a better here, the clouds are low, but even as it is it isa clouds are low, but even as it is it is a pretty stunning site. the testa m e nt to is a pretty stunning site. the testament to the beauty of a place when it is tested chucking it down with rain and it still looks beautiful. people like their scenery like that, less than perfect, dramatic! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london news, i'm alpa patel. police want to speak to a man in connection with a double acid attack last week. 24—year—old john tomlin should not be approached by the public if spotted. the victims have been left with life—threatening injuries after the attack in east london. a care quality commission report into the london ambulance service says it has made significant progress since it was put into special measures 18 months ago. it also praised the service for the care and compassion shown by crews during the grenfell tower fire and the recent terrorist attacks at westminster bridge, london bridge and finsbury park. all of our staff are committed to doing the best they can do day in day out and still hitting targets against a population increase in
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demand over 6% of what we're contracted for so it's a demanding job, everybody does whenever they're in the control centre here or front line staff or support in the background, everyone is committed to providing excellent care. drivers with the aslef union working on the southern rail network, have resumed their overtime ban. this means a limited timetable is in place from this morning, with more than 1,000 services cut. there's been more than a year of industrial action on the southern network, in protest against the introduction of driver—only trains. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning across the whole network. 0n the roads, there are long delays on the m25 clockwise at j5 for sevenoaks, following a collision, queues are back to jii. there are london bound delays on the a2 heading out of eltham into kidbrooke due to works. in north acton, park royal road is closed at the junction of coronation road and acton lane
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due police incident to the south of middlesex hospital. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. if you were hoping for sunshine today then you're going to be rather disappointed. very similar to how it was yesterday so rather great day all in all with always the chance of all in all with always the chance of a bit of drizzle forming from the thickness of the clouds. we're starting on around 12 degrees, the air is still rather humid, as it was yesterday, so still that rather sticky feel to things without the temperatures being too high. just the high teens, maybe nudging 20 in central london so a bit of drizzle on and off, the risk that will peter out through the day and we could see some late afternoon brightness but with that good, a few showers. 0vernight it will stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud around, a few clear spells here and there and we'll start the day tomorrow on a mild note and tomorrow should be a bit brighter and we could see a few spells of some trite but this could
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create showers. expect a bit of wet weather tomorrow and if you're headed out tomorrow evening then you should prepare for some rain, some other quite heavy at times. 0ver should prepare for some rain, some other quite heavy at times. over the weekend it's looking a lot nicer, early risers on saturday morning could see some wet weather but it will slowly brighten up, sunshine on the weekend with temperatures in the low twenties. that clearly wasn't kate, it was elizabeth, wasn't it? i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment but also on breakfast this morning... ready, steady, go. he's won wimbledon and the olympics twice, but how did andy murray fair in our game, set and mug challenge? find out in around 20 minutes' time. scientists have been using ultrasonic detectors to eavesdrop on bats' conversations in a london park. we'll be revealing what they chat about about later in the programme. # i don't wanna hear
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sad songs anymore. . . she's been busy coaching other people in the voice and the x factor, but now rita 0ra's back in front of the microphone herself with a new single co—written by her pal ed sheeran. she'll be here to tell us all about it before 9am. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick, is today expected to be appointed to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. the news comes as police say at least 80 people are believed to have died in the fire, but they don't expect to confirm the exact number for at least another six months. there'll be another big test for theresa may in the commons today as she faces a key vote on the queen's speech. with the support of the democratic unionists, the government is expected to pass its plans for the next parliament, after narrowly surviving a vote last night on changes to public—sector pay. labour has tabled a further amendment ahead of today's debate. police in australia have charged one of the most senior
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roman catholic cardinals, george pell, with sexually abusing children. cardinal pell is in charge of the vatican's finances and is considered to rank third in the hierarchy of the church. he is accused of multiple offences dating back to the 1970s. catholic officials in australia say he strenuously denies all allegations of abuse. a decision will be revealed later over a proposed merger between sky and 21st century fox. if 0fcom approves the takeover, rupert murdoch's company would assume total control of the broadcaster — a deal which has been cleared by european commisision competition authorities. 0pponents believe the deal would give murdoch too much power in the uk media. household energy bills and carbon emissions will soar unless ministers devise new power saving policies after brexit, according to a new report. the independent committee on climate change says eu energy efficiency rules on household appliances have helped reduce emissions. it's warning that the uk government now needs to to extend energy savings through better home insulation.
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a reward of £6,000 is being offered for information about four second world war medals, which were lost by a blind veteran at a motorway service station. 96—year—old alfred barlow was returning home from a pilgrimage to normandy earlier this month, where he fought on the beaches more than 70 years ago. he noticed his medals were missing after leaving the norton canes services near walsall. crimestoppers are now offering £5,000 for their return, on top of a reward from actor hugh grant of £1,000. remember hearing him talk about that? he was just so upset. remember hearing him talk about that? he wasjust so upset. moved a lot of people. if you have any information, please get in touch. it is time to talk to mike to find out what he's up to today. he is in
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sheffield and he is playing tennis as long as it doesn't wear him out too much. iam too much. i am studying beforehand and backhand of this four—year—old sam. look at the power he generates. what a talent. the question is how to help youngsters like sam at four how to become the next champion like andy murray. today the lawn tennis association hope to help, announcing a pot of money, £250 million, to reva m p courts across a pot of money, £250 million, to revamp courts across great britain. we will get a word with him later on. yes, whether it is building indoor centres like here in graves, or floodlights and multicentre courts. let's speak with two of the coaches here. jess, you had to face me earlier with the awful shots.
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sorry. why do these facilities make a difference? you can see the investment in sheffield in tennis, it has been fantastic. we have kids like sam on court. we have had a huge investment in parks across the city. we have had the courts all resurfaced and we want people out on the courts especially in wimbledon time. what more can be done to help the likes of sam become the next andy murray? the key thing is to keep it fun. we what people put off because they are not interested. we have great coaching programmes. the main thing is to make sure tennis is accessible. it is for any age, sam's age and older, any colour — it doesn't matter your colour — able—bodied, it doesn't matter. anyone can play tennis. centres like this are perfect. you can play any time of the year. and how accessible
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is it, with all of the facilities like this, although is it seen as a middle—class sport, for those with money? yes, it had an image of being a rich person sport, but that is changing, hopefully. it is accessible, affordable. it doesn't matter how much money you have. this ce ntre matter how much money you have. this centre is affordable. there are people from all walks of life coming here. how much would you need, or your parents' need to fork out? for a group lesson, £22 for the term. that is quite a few sessions. hopefully that is affordable for a lot of people. there are a lot of free tennis programmes available as well. if you can't afford that, then there is a possible route for anyone no matter how much money you have got. i am inspired looking at sam. he is still going strong. so, jess, finally, i suppose the thing is that if you want a game with a mate you
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turn up at a park and you can get in and play cheaply? absolutely, online we have tennis sheffield .com with information on how to play on the brand—new courts. you can also turn up brand—new courts. you can also turn up with a friend, pay and play, we have coaching sessions. it is all going on at the moment. thank you very much. more from you later. let's go through the rest of the sport. well done to johanna let's go through the rest of the sport. well done tojohanna konta, at home in eastbourne and she is into the third round after an impressive display yesterday warming up impressive display yesterday warming upfor impressive display yesterday warming up for wimbledon of course. she looked in impressive form as she beat romania's sora na cristea in straight sets. she'll play the french open champion jelena 0stapenko today for a place in the last eight. johnny sexton and owen farrell will start together for the lions in the second test against new zealand. having the lost the opening test, warren gatland's side have to win in wellington. captain sam warburton has also been handed a start in one of three changes to the side beaten 30—15 last weekend.
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sexton and farrell together — interesting. the 19—time world and olympic champion usain bolt made his first appearance of the season in europe last night, in the czech city of 0strava. it is one of his favourite places to run. and, of course, the jamaican world record holder got the victory in the 100 metres. although he was disappointed with his time of 10.07 seconds, and it continued his preparation for the world championships in london, which are now just over a month away. bolt plans to retire from athletics after the worlds. there was also victory for the four—time 0lympic gold—medallist mo farah, who won his final 10,000 metre race on the iaaf circuit at the event. he dominated the field to come home in a near world leading time this year of 27 minutes and 12 seconds. so, there we are. back in sheffield.
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sam is still going. he is amazing. he is means pressure. in a few moments' time we will launch game, set and. it is five metres away from where you have to hit the ball. charlie, we will see how are you and andy murray, the world not all at, got on at queens when he was the first to take it on. i have to give ita first to take it on. i have to give it a go. first to take it on. i have to give ita go. i first to take it on. i have to give it a go. i will put down the microphone and you can see how it is supposed to be done in my dreams. it is harder than it looks. charlie, do the commentary. mike is going for the commentary. mike is going for the underarm technique and the idea is simple — hit as many balls as you can in 30 seconds into the mug. is simple — hit as many balls as you can in 30 seconds into the muglj have got one! others have done better, it is fair to say. we will see more of that later. andy murray,
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quite exciting, is our first co ntesta nt. quite exciting, is our first contestant. pretty quite exciting, is our first co ntesta nt. pretty si m ple quite exciting, is our first contestant. pretty simple but a very entertaining talent. it brings out competitiveness as well. sarah will have the weather for us a little later. northern ireland faces the prospect of a return to direct rule from westminster if today's 4pm deadline to restore the devolved government isn't met. power—sharing at stormont broke down in january, and after repeated attempts to forge a deal talks are deadlocked. let's talk to kathryn simpson, politics lecturer at manchester metropolitan university. good morning. for those people who possibly find the situation at stormont quite confusing, not sure where we are, could you give us a few lines on where we sit today. todayis few lines on where we sit today. today is the deadline for a power—sharing agreement to be put in place for the executive in northern ireland. the deadline is 4pm. this has been set in stone since a election in march, triggered by the resignation of the late mark
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mcguinness over the renewable heat initiative scheme at the time in january. the things that will be on the table i imagine today will be things like brexit, same—sex marriage, these kind of key issues, the irish language act in particular, to get together — how is a power—sharing agreement going to be put together for northern ireland. these issues were on the table before. they have been on the table before. they have been on the table for quite sometime and they we re table for quite sometime and they were still on the table in march. talks were suspended for easter time and then also they were suspended again with the onset of the general election. how much has personality played a part in this. arlene foster and the late mark mcguinness didn't have an excellent relationship in comparison with the relationship that mark mcguinness had with his
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predecessors with the dup and peter robinson, and also doctor ian paisley. that has played a role. the relationship between arlene foster and michelle 0'neill currently — there is a little tension. they need to go past that. they need to put a devolved government together for the best of northern ireland and power—sharing is what everyone wants put in place. they have untilfour p.m.. is the clock on the countdown, is there a real prospect of something being achieved? yes, there is. there is no reason why they could not be ideal mate by 4pm today. it is complex and there are key issues, like i mentioned previously, to be discussed at this time. it is a possibility. there is a delicate balance to be made between interference and influence
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for the positive. i am talking about arlene foster's, the dup's agreement with theresa may's conservative government. even in the whole run—up to the agreement they said there would be no bias? this is the crux of these negotiation. 0ne would be no bias? this is the crux of these negotiation. one of the things coming out is, the dup have been distracted because of this confidence in supply agreement put with the conservative government, and james brokenshire is at pains to stress he hasn't been privy to those negotiations in order to keep that impartiality for power—sharing negotiations in stormont. there are questions on the other side, sinn fein has said, how impartial is the government when we are putting together a power—sharing agreement? that is what you are supposed to be when you put this together. it is an issue and it will definitely be on the table and it will be discussed as well. and the 1.5 billion that
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the dup have secured for northern ireland — how is it going to be distributed among the wider community and evenly as well? thank you very much for that. the deadline is 4pm this afternoon. it is wet outside for many of us this morning, although the gardens hopefully will be blooming. sarah is having a look at hopefully will be blooming. sarah is having a look at this. hopefully will be blooming. sarah is having a look at this. good hopefully will be blooming. sarah is having a look at this. good morning. last week's heatwave is a distant memory. we have a lot of cloud around today and some outbreaks of heavy rain. we have seen a lot of rain through the last 2a hours and there is a lot of standing water, so there is a lot of standing water, so there are difficult driving conditions with the weather. and particularly heavy in the north—east of england and for southern and eastern scotland. not just of england and for southern and eastern scotland. notjust the rain but also the wind to contend with. rush—hour through the central belt of scotla nd rush—hour through the central belt of scotland and you are likely to see some wet weather. also across northern ireland the rain is edging
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through the day, 13 or 1a in the north—west with patchy rain in parts of northern england and wales to the south—west. southern and eastern areas look dry and bright and also overnight remaining dry too. tomorrow morning temperatures between 13— 1a first thing and we will continue to see rain across parts of scotland, northern england, northern ireland, wales, into the south—west. some dry weather to the south—east, 23 degrees, a touch warmer with heavy showers around. a little unsettled for the next few days but things look dry and bright for the weekend. back to you both. ten years ago today that the very first iphone went on sale. who knew what they would then do to our lives! if you had asked me how long the iphone had been around, i would say longer by quite a bit. there are obviously other brands but lots of people have them and it's
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almost synonymous. you know hoover and vacuum cleaner, smartphone app and vacuum cleaner, smartphone app and iphone has almost become like that. it's had a massive impact in terms of technology and what's achievable in along with other iphones, the terminology and technology has changed so much in such a short space of time. can i tell you this random fact? the first smart phone had a boy's name, ibm simon, 25 years ago this year. didn't know that! there's another boy we should talk to who knows much more, ben, good morning! ten yea rs ten years since the first iphone came along and it really kicked off the revolution in smart phones. yeah, can you believe it's been that long? or does it feel like they've been around forever? ten years ago the first iphones went on sale in the us. they weren't the first smartphones but they totally transformed the industry. apple introduced the idea of an app store where you could download programmes to do just about everything.
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making calls, sending messages, ordering food, hailing a taxi or doing your banking. almost anything you can think of, there's an app for it. and this shows just how sales of the iphone took off. they got off to a modest start, 3.7 million in 2007, but soared to 232 million by 2015. last year there was a dip in sales, some experts say that means we've hit the peak, that everyone who wants one, has one until something equally revolutionary comes along. matt hunt is an app developer for apadmi, who make some of the biggest apps including skyscanner and the bbc iplayer radio apps. we should say to prove how much technology has changed things, we are broadcasting live on the bbc
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brea kfast are broadcasting live on the bbc breakfast facebook live page. sarah, our social media producer is with us, good morning, sarah. bradley in the background and tracey our floor manager. we will continue the conversation after this interview on facebook live so very multimedia this morning. matt, nice to see you. you brought some of these phones in, they give you an idea of how much they give you an idea of how much the market has changed. as i touched on, it wasn't the first, the iphone wasn't the first smart phone but it did revolutionise the market? absolutely, the smartphone industry was trying to get going from the late 90s, early 2000s, things like the phone there and the eriksson are 380 which was the phone that was first called a smart phone. —— r380. you could make calls and fold them out. that was being developed and what we started to see in the industry early on was the idea you could build your own apps and
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install them and it wasn't until the iphone first turned up that they showed a different and better way that you could... i can't help but laugh, look at that, that's 20 years old. you were very much around at the time of this, you were involved in the early days? absolutely. in the early days, we've got phones, people said, and pdas, portable devices where you could do a camera and e—mailand devices where you could do a camera and e—mail and staff, we brought that together to bring about a smart phone. what apple did was they showed the industry a different way and they change the interface, how simple and elegant it was, people used to stroke their iphones. that was one of the first iphones? that's from our first office on display and people used to love how clear the icons were and how good the graphics work and you could download apps and choose what else you wanted on your phone. even though you could do that
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on some smart phones around at the same time, it's weirdly difficult to do. from a business point of view, it changed the way we did things, you can do mobile banking now, it's not just about making you can do mobile banking now, it's notjust about making calls and sending messages, businesses have to change how they interact with consumers through smart phones. absolutely, the interesting trend we have seen is smart phones came along and we as consumers drove the revolution, we want these things, great, we use them, but businesses thought why can't we benefit and change the way we do business? even from education to medical, doctors are saying why can't we use smart phones and benefit from them? the dip in sales we saw on the grass, we hit the peak at the top of the market, what will be the next big thing? -- the graph. they will a lwa ys thing? -- the graph. they will always entice us with the next big thing and there's interesting stuff you hear that's coming along. we've
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been promised virtual reality or mixed reality and we'd been promised some of these things that will start to appear that we can access using our phones. never predict apple, i've learned that. they will always surprise you. good advice. matt, good to speak to you. a quick reminder, we will continue this conversation and look at more of these phones on the bbc breakfast facebook live page. more from me after 7am. thanks, ben. it's that time of year, wimbledon starting on monday. we will have a fun new addition, a massive brea kfast fun new addition, a massive breakfast mug. bbc breakfast has been challenging the world's top tennis players to take on our mug, not mike, but he is on a court in sheffield this morning and can tell us more. it's brilliant. this is the mugger, it is giant, i could do with this for my tea and coffee in the morning
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—— this is the mark, it is giant. —— mug. you've got 30 seconds to get as many tennis balls into this month from five metres. we have challenged all sorts of sports stars over the last few weeks, including world number one andy murray and charlie was at queens to treasury this. let's see what happened. andy, welcome to our bbc breakfast game, set, mug challenge. thank you. current world number one, reigning wimbledon champion, you've been in that tightest of situations. do you feel tension mounting? that tightest of situations. do you feel tension mounting ?|j that tightest of situations. do you feeltension mounting? i know a lot of the other players have had a go so of the other players have had a go soi of the other players have had a go so i don't want to be down the bottom of the list. there's some serious rivalry going on. bottom of the list. there's some serious rivalry going onlj bottom of the list. there's some serious rivalry going on. i know. i'm going to set the clock, 30 seconds, as many balls as you like. you can choose your style, do you know what style you're going to go
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with? overarm i think. you can hit them a little bit harder this way so i'm trying to get as many... i want as many goes as possible in 30 seconds. ok, got it. ready, steady, go. that's one in. andy's going for very quick succession, he's not looking at the balls he is picking up, he's kind of got a rhythm going on, i'm seeing quite a few going in now. look at the concentration on the face, he is concentrating as the balls go in, 16 seconds, just coming up balls go in, 16 seconds, just coming up to ten seconds. i think you've hit more balls than any other player we've seen. going pretty fast. we've got one second and that's time up. what was that? you think that went well? i think that went very well. come on then. do the count for me. 0ne, come on then. do the count for me. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, 11, 12, 13,
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14. 14 balls. not bad. not bad? very good. thank you so much and good luck in the weeks ahead. lovely to see you, thank you. he set the bar really high. world number one, he was extremely competitive, no escaping that. mike is there with the mug. you nearly got hit their! it's not that easy, people are thinking it is easy but it isn't, is it? the little girl showed how easy it was, straight in, first go. they are loving it here, the youngsters at the graves health and sports centre, it's not easy, i had a little go earlier. 14 is incredible, that has set the boy bar really high. let's see how sam goes, have another go! i asked him really high. let's see how sam goes, have another go! iasked him if really high. let's see how sam goes, have another go! i asked him if he wa nted have another go! i asked him if he wanted to come nearer and he didn't, he didn't want to be patronised. andy murray has set the bar really high. look at that, that was in.
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after a few little goes the youngsters are doing really well, far better than me. what have you made of this, have you got it in yet? not yet but it was really annoying when i hit a ball and it just landed on the edge. that happened to me, so frustrating, isn't it? well done, you keep going. sam, you played brilliantly this morning, how did you find it, what did you make of the mug? good. you like it, do you approve, is it good? yeah. have you got it in yet? no. what will it feel like when you do, special? yeah. who is going to win wimbledon? i don't know. a lot of pundits will say that but we are going for andy murray. really addictive this, what is your name? sarah. have you got it in? yeah. what's the secret? i don't know. you
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got it in first go? hit it soft. underarm or overarm? underarm. andy murray went overarm but our players here going underarm. it's getting really addictive, plenty more challenges involving top tennis stars and other stars across sport over the next few weeks with wimbledon starting on monday. very exciting. you think it is fair to ask a young person who is going to win wimbledon, let me ask you. actually i'm going to say rafa nadal. i would love sir andy murray to win it for a third time but he's been struggling with a few little niggles and injuries, form hasn't been the best, for romantics, four rafa nadal to do it again would be incredible. a fabulous answer. thanks very much, mike. you get the picture, over the next few days all week or so we will get a whole bunch of people to take part in the challenge. —— or weak. this
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is the leaderboard. andy murray is on 14. he's the top and the bottom of the leaderboard! more players and mike said we will get more sports people involved as well so more on that over the next few days. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alpa patel. police want to speak to a man in connection with a double acid attack last week. 24—year—old john tomlin should not be approached by the public if spotted. resham khan and her cousin have been left with life—threatening injuries after the attack in east london. a care quality commission report into the london ambulance service says it has made significant progress since it was put into special measures 18 months ago. it also praised the service for the care and compassion shown by crews during the grenfell tower fire and the recent terrorist attacks at westminster bridge,
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london bridge and finsbury park. all of our staff are committed to doing the best they can day in, day out and still hitting targets against a population increase of demand of 6% over what we're contracted for. so it's a very demanding job everybody does whether they're in the control centre here or front line staff or support in the background, everyone is committed to providing excellent care. drivers with the aslef union working on the southern rail network have resumed their overtime ban. this means a limited timetable is in place from this morning, with more than 1,000 services cut. there's been more than a year of industrial action on the southern network, in protest against the introduction of driver—only trains. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a fairly good service on the tube. but there are delays on london 0verground
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between richmond and stratford. and also willesden and clapham junction due to a faulty train. 0n the roads and there are long delays on the m25 clockwise at j5 for sevenoaks following a collision, queues are back to j4. there are london—bound delays on the a2 heading out of eltham into kidbrooke due to works. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. hello, good morning. if you were hoping for sunshine today then you're going to be rather disappointed. it will be very similar to how it was yesterday so rather grey day overall with always the chance of a bit of drizzle forming from the thickness of the clouds. some drizzle on and off. we're starting on around 12 degrees, the air is still rather humid, as it was yesterday, so still that slightly sticky feel to things without the temperatures being too high. just the high teens, maybe nudging 20 in central london. so a bit of drizzle on and off, the risk that will peter out through the day and we might even see a bit of late afternoon brightness but with that good
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there could be a few showers too. 0vernight it will stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud around, a few clear spells here and there and we'll start the day tomorrow on a mild note and tomorrow should be a bit brighter and we could see a few spells of sunshine but this could create showers. expect a bit of wet weather tomorrow and if you're headed out friday evening then you should prepare for some rain, some of it quite heavy at times too. over the weekend it's looking a lot nicer, early risers on saturday morning might see a little bit of wet weather but it will slowly brighten up. sunshine on the weekend with temperatures in the low twenties. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the next step into finding out what caused the tragedy at grenfell tower — a retired appeal courtjudge will be appointed to lead the public inquiry. it comes as the group representing housing associations calls on the government to get on with removing cladding, rather than carrying out more tests. good morning, it's
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thursday the 29th ofjune. also this morning — theresa may faces a further challenge to her authority today, as labour tries once again to force changes to the queen's speech. good morning to the gay way to snowdonia. the number of people rescued from the mountain is up from last year. later on in the programme we will try to find out why. it's a time of year that many of us are jetting off on our holidays. i'll be talking to the boss of the uk's second biggest airport — gatwick — about summer delays and what travel might look like after brexit. we've come to sheffield to hear about a multi—million pound plan by the lawn tennis association to revamp grassroots tennis they will revamp courts across
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britain with £250 million across the next few years. we also reveal our brea kfast next few years. we also reveal our breakfast summer challenge, name set to make mug and apart from for your 0xfa m to make mug and apart from for your 0xfam doing very well here we will also see how sir andy murray got on. look at this! said just got that ian! live on breakfast! we will also see how andy murray went on this challenge. and sarah has the weather. it is a gradient drizzly day for many of us. heavy rain across scotland and parts of northern england and ireland. i will bring you the details in about 15 minutes. good morning, first our main story. a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick, is today expected to be appointed to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. the news comes as police say at least 80 people are believed to have died in the fire, but they don't expect to confirm the exact number for at least
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another six months. simonjones reports. the government says it is determined to get to the truth of what happened at grenfell tower, and this is the man set to be given that task — a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick. he specialised in commercial law, in a career spanning almost 50 years. with the clamour for answers, he will be expected to produce his initial findings quickly. the police say they may not be able to confirm how many people died until the end of the year, at the earliest. they estimate so far that the death toll stands at 80, but stress that is not the final picture. some victims may never be identified. as the investigation continues, the national housing federation is calling on the government to stop its testing of cladding, and instead focus on removing it, to make people safe. having had 120 different tests, from different samples, from different buildings, in different parts of the country, i think we can now say that, according to the tests that the government is carrying out, this cladding is not
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fit for purpose. we don't need to test any more of it. today, another victim of the fire will be laid to rest, tony disson. his family say they are devastated, and will miss him terribly. the sad reality is there will be many funerals to follow. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth joins us now from westminster. it isa it is a significant announcements. can you tell us more about the appointed judge? we had expected thisjudge to be appointed judge? we had expected this judge to be announced quickly. instead we are some two weeks on. pa rt instead we are some two weeks on. part of the reason for that is because it is so crucial that the government get this right. there is an understandable perception among some that public enquiries can be lengthy and can drag on, they can be beset by problems. think of the ongoing enquiry into child sexual abuse which is on its fourth chair.
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the government can afford to make a mistake on this. the announcement later today, the man who will lead the years, had a long career in international law and is respected by his colleagues. his challenge now is to lead this quest for answers and in doing so, somehow restore public trust. there'll be another big test for theresa may in the commons today as she faces a key vote on the queen's speech with the support of the democratic unionists, the government is expected to pass its plans for the next parliament, after narrowly surviving a vote last night on changes to public—sector pay. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo has the details. the ayes to the right, 309. the first vote of this parliament on a labour amendment to the queen's speech proposing to end the cap on public sector pay rises went the government's way. this was the first test of theresa may's deal with the dup, made to boost the numbers on her side in the commons.
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last night it delivered — all ten dups voted in line with the conservatives to see off the opposition's challenge. today the final vote on the queen's speech which sets out the government's policy programme, labour will try their luck again. we're putting forward what was in the manifesto in the election, on brexit, which guarantees trade relations with europe, a government that ends the public sector pay gap and a government that invests in the educational future of all our children, from nursery through to university. labour thinks it's on the front foot with its calls to end austerity. many conservatives admit the cuts didn't go down well on the doorstep during the election campaign. but after signals from senior cabinet members and downing street sources that the paper would be reviewed, number ten later insisted there was not yet any change in policy. we will not make our decision on public sector pay
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until the pay review body has reported. and we will listen to what they say, and we will listen to what people in this house has said before making a final decision. theresa may is expected to win the vote on the queen's speech today with the support of the dup and her backbenchers are unlikely to rebel. but her majority is slim, her authority is still fragile. today is also the deadline for northern ireland politicians to agree a power sharing executive at stormont. discussions have been ongoing since january. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast for us this morning. chris, how likely is it we'll see a deal? there has been a lot of discussion about whether or not a deal will be met or agreed on by the deadline. that is right. at the moment i don't think a deal is looking likely. the deadline comes officially at four o'clock this afternoon that the
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pressure of that deadline has not helped to break the deadlock. there are still gaps between the dup's and sinn fein. as i understand that the main sticking point is around the issue of irish language. sinn fein wa nt issue of irish language. sinn fein want a piece of legislation to detect and promote the daily tongue. the dup are looking for a broader piece of legislation that cover cultural issues that are more important for unionists. so what if there is no deal? extensions to political negotiations in northern ireland are not unknown. so they could amend the law to extend the deadline. and sources are saying at the moment that deadline is still very much for cop this afternoon. alternatively, ministers in london could take over some or all of the functions of the devolved government here. as we look to that deadline, also, i suppose, here. as we look to that deadline, also, isuppose, having here. as we look to that deadline, also, i suppose, having some influence in the talks if this agreement and the conservatives. influence in the talks if this agreement and the conservativeslj
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don't agreement and the conservatives.” don't think the deal between the dup and the tories have had a big impact or hindered the negotiations here. uni sa, well, the prospect of an extra £1 billion to spend as a result of the deal should make it more likely that sinn fein would wa nt to more likely that sinn fein would want to go back into government. sinn fein say that the issues is not about cash, it is about issues like the irish language. nationalists say they will be watching to see if the dup getany they will be watching to see if the dup get any special favours as this new relationship takes shape of the coming months but the tories say no, that will not happen. the deal at westminster is for everyone in northern ireland. police in australia have charged one of the most senior roman catholic cardinals, george pell, with multiple historical sex offences. cardinal pell is in charge of the vatican's finances and is considered to rank third in the hierarchy of the church. he is accused of a number of offences dating back all allegations of abuse. the national crime agency says it's
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increasingly concerned about the influence criminals from the balkans — particularly violent gangs from albania — have over the uk drug trafficking market. in its annual assessment on organised crime, the nca says corrupt workers at ports and airports make it easier for gangs to smuggle in drugs. it also warns about the threat of cyber—crime from russian—speaking nations. household energy bills and carbon emissions will soar unless ministers devise new power saving policies after brexit, according to a new report. the independent committee on climate change says eu energy efficiency rules on household appliances have helped reduce emissions. it's warning that the uk government now needs to take up the challenge. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin. we have more and more gadgets all the time. tvs are bigger. many homes have multiple screens. 0ur chores done by machine. yet the average
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home is paying less for energy than we we re home is paying less for energy than we were before, according to the climate committee. it's because appliances like this are being forced to be ever more energy—efficient by eu regulations. that means they do the same amount of work but for less power. it cuts on bills and it reduces carbon emissions. but for how long? the biggest saving has been thanks to its elation and gas boilers. gas demand is down 23% since 2008, the report says. it is exciting that we have managed to keep bills down as well is getting emissions down. the reason for that, the reason we are spending £20 a month less on our bills is because of the tough eu regulations. this government will have to make sure that we replicate those regulations and improve them.
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greater home installation is the big challenge ahead. the committee says the government has to find some way of persuading people to invest in making their homes warmer. without doubt, the uk's target for emissions and affordable energy will be missed. she is one of the biggest stars on the parliament and her live shows as aladdin minutes. but last night, dell suggested her to could be the last time she takes to the stage. plane to a record—breaking crowd at wembley she said she does not suit touring. she said who knows, i will remember this night for the rest my night even though we may never see you again we will see about that. it is 12 minutes past seven now. mps will vote today on the queen ‘s speech. the big test on how much support a new government has. but cross to westminster. we're
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joined by asa bennet, assistant comment editor at the daily telegraph and 0wenjones a guardian columnist. this is a new style of politics in parliaments. we saw a close vote last night, is this what we will need to get used to?” last night, is this what we will need to get used to? i think so. the tories will have their work cut out. after filling the support of the dup, the ten mps came out they turn out there. it replicates the majority the government had thanks to the dup's help. it went labour‘s suggestion was rejected by 14 votes. 0bviously someone needs to elaborate. strong and stable. that was the phrase... it has been ditched now, to be honest, but strong and stable. what does the vote last night tell us about strong and stable? many people question
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whether we are being governed by a coalition of chaos at the moment. with the conservatives, i think many people would be great angry about be spending a lot of time lauding emergency service and public sector workers but then they will march and vote in real terms to slash their p5y~ vote in real terms to slash their pay. with the democratic unionist party dropping this government are, they have obviously got £1 billion of extra money for northern ireland but again, they have gone through to vote against giving public sector workers a pay increase here. the real problem, as you pointed out, the strong and stable government that we will promise during this general election campaign is that the messages all over the place yesterday and it is chaos. senior cabinet and ministers suggesting the opening lead that the freeze it should end. the problem with this
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government is that because the authority of the leadership has imploded, discipline amongst the party is imploding as well. there is no strong centre nor strong leadership. you will get cabinet ministers opening lead suggesting we should freeze the and the —— end of the pay cut. there's no escaping the notion that philip hammond seems to be free to say what he wishes in a way he wouldn't have previously. that's changed significantly, hasn't it? he talks with the competence of a man who has had a near death experience and survive, theresa may was about to get rid of him but now after the election he is as safe as anything. you've got an independent, freewheeling cabinet where people are happy to speak their minds whether it be on the public sector pay gap, austerity or brexit and the end result is whereas before a well drilled cabinet would be able to
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discuss things over the table, agree their lines and sing from the same hymn sheet, now it is a real cacophony when they should be focusing and get in line behind some sort of message. at the same time, 0wen, the reality is for the labour party, we talk about cacophony of noise from the conservative party... great word. it is a greatjo good word. the votes are going through and probably will go through. we've got another vote today. it leaves jeremy corbyn almost in the same position as he was in practical terms because this government is getting through what it wants to get through, albeit uncomfortably? we're at the beginning in theory of ideas of this, that's before... we're already seeing wages balding in this country, the longest squeeze on wages in a very long—time —— falling. the idea this government
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can keep itself together for five years, a full—term parliament, keeping the democratic unionist party as well as rebellious backbenchers onside when the authority of the prime minister, of the leadership of the conservative party has imploded, it's a bit fantastical. you will have now, if we've already got a situation where conservative cabinet ministers are openly briefing against their own party policy, and openly briefing against each other and ridiculing each other. we've had borisjohnson, philip hammond, david davies publicly briefing against one another. the idea this government at another. the idea this government at a time when the country is facing these series of crises can keep itself together is questionable, we don't have strong and stable government in this country, no one can argue that. thank you both very much. looked pretty dry in westminster but
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for lots of us there a lot of rain around. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. that's right. a lot of clout and grey scenes in many parts of the country, this is what things are looking like in devon —— cloud. heavier rain further north, especially across parts of northern england and scotland. that's how things are looking today, pretty cloudy, some wet and windy weather around, especially across the north—east of england, southern scotland. antrim and down in northern ireland seeing wet weather edging northwards and westwards through the day. further south the rain isn't as heavy but patchy rain in parts of the south—west of england, wales. into the midlands, the south—east of england and east anglia, some drier weather, some brightness breaking through the cloud but again the chance of catching a passing shower. north wales into northern england, outbreaks of rain this morning, should ease later on but heavy rain across more easterly parts of
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northern ireland into the south—east of scotland, which is pretty heavy, so of scotland, which is pretty heavy, so difficult driving conditions on the roads especially in the far north of england and the central belt of scotland. notjust the rain but also brisk winds, especially if you're exposed around the east coast of scotla nd you're exposed around the east coast of scotland and north—east england. through the afternoon, rain edging northwards and westwards. further south and east it's a bit drier and brighter, 19 or 20 in the south—east but under the cloud and rain you're looking at around 13 or 14 across scotla nd looking at around 13 or 14 across scotland and northern ireland, pretty disappointing for the time of year. into the evening and overnight, we keep the rain in many northern and western parts. a bit drier tonight towards the south—east but a mild night wherever you are with the cloud and breeze, those temperatures down to around 13 or 14. tomorrow? a similar day to today, and the rain not as heavy but patchy raincoat across scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, wales and down to the
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south—west. brighter in the south—east, 23, but the chance of a few heavy and thundery showers into the afternoon. the weekend? after this fairly unsettled, changeable speu this fairly unsettled, changeable spell it looks like this weather front will push away to the east allowing a ridge of high pressure to build into the weekend. initially some rain in the south—east on saturday and a front into the far north—west but much of the country having a better day. a return to sunnier skies and temperatures, edging to 22 or so. that theme continues on sunday so and improving picture, higher pressure building in, a drier day on sunday, more sunshine on offer and temperatures by sunday up to 23. quite different from today for many of us. sarah, thanks very much. ben has details on gatwick numbers. we often talk about heathrow but gatwick are in the big row about who gets the next big runway in the south—east. the airport only has one
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ru nway south—east. the airport only has one runway and it's been battling with heave—ho to wind permission to get another one. —— heathrow to win. gatwick was named and shamed as one of the worst when it comes to delays. 30% of all international flights having at least a 30 minute delay. i will be speaking to the chief executive to ask about those delays so executive to ask about those delays so stay tuned for that. the pound jumped nearly 1% after the governor of the bank of england suggested that interest rates could rise if business investment grows. mark carney said rates going up would depend on whether a drop in household spending is countered by more companies ploughing money back into their businesses. the bank's interest rate is currently at a record low of 0.25%. and the iphone turns ten years old today. it wasn't the first smartphone but it's fair to say it really
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transformed the market, letting customers download apps allowing them to do just about everything, making calls, sending messages, ordering food, hailing a taxi, or booking a holiday. in 2015 the firm hit a record for sales selling 232 million of them, they have since fallen slightly. that's because of all the competitors out there, samsung, huawei, among others. but ten years old. are you a keen walker? i am, it's the best way to clear your head. do you walk in the rain? i do walk around manchester in the rain. and that happens pretty frequently! the reason i ask is because we are looking at how safe people are when they do go walking. it's a lovely time of year but you need to be mindful about being safe.
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the difference between this week and last week, the british weather changes so quickly. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is in a stunning snowdonia for us this morning. you get a sense of the mist over the hills in the background behind you, what is it like today? good morning. it's a little murky to be honest but there will be people going out saying a bit of rain won't stop them. new figures from mountain rescue said the number of people who have called them to be rescued is up on last year, up about a 10th, almost 2000 people called mountain rescue last year and actually there we re rescue last year and actually there were only 14 days last year when there were no callouts at all. we can have a chat with fi, you got into trouble on dartmoor?” can have a chat with fi, you got into trouble on dartmoor? i broke my ankle on dartmoor a couple of years ago. it was march, i was hiking, the weather was like this and i was involved in a simple accident, could happen to anyone, put my foot in a
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rabbit hole and fell over sideways and looked down and my foot was pointing in the wrong direction. air ambulance got you out? yes, they rescued me. it was a tossup between them and mountain rescue, we had no mobile signal where we were. i was lucky because i was with people who knew how to navigate so they could give an accurate location and they had training so they knew how to get hold of help. but a nasty situation. shows it can happen to anyone. chris, you were out overnight, you are from mountain rescue? we were out overnight with a man who lost confidence where he was and he made the 999 call and we went to eventually find him with a bit of difficulty but we found him and brought him down to safety at around 3am. thank you for getting up early this morning. why are so many people getting into trouble on the mountain is? there's a greater number on the mountains and a greater number going out to enjoy the great outdoors ——
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mountain is? sadly a lot more people don't have the experience to do this. when there's the slightest hiccup they make a 999 call. we would prefer them to actually be safe. be prepared. let's have a quick chat with sean connolly, he is an adventure ambassador. he has got with him... this is in your essential pack of stuff? this is the bare minimum. we want to make the outdoors enjoyable, accessible and safe and the first thing is take the right kit. 0n safe and the first thing is take the right kit. on a day like today you will take waterproofs but the rain could change at any time, as could the weather, take a hat, nutrition, water, people forget once you're at
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the top of the mountain you're only halfway. head torches and my personal favourite, a paper 0ns map. people rely too much on technology? they do, batteries in the cold don't la st they do, batteries in the cold don't last too long, they die and things like that so if you can learn how to navigate a bit it will go a long wait. simple things, simple bits of kit will help you not get lost. shawna knows this stuff because... you can tell me, you walk, swamp and cycled all around britain —— sean.” did land's end tojohn o' groats, swimming, cycling and running. the swimming, cycling and running. the swim was the toughest one, four and a half months at sea. very tough! we will leave you with a view of snowdon, snowdonia, the gateway to snowdonia. the clouds are low but it is still a stunning view. absolutely beautiful. speak to you later! some of the mist getting into
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the wires causing a little bit of an interruption there! if you're a fan of beautiful scenery you will probably of beautiful scenery you will pro ba bly love of beautiful scenery you will probably love poldark, we have alert tomlinson who plays imelda. —— imelda —— emily tomlinson. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alpa patel. police urgently want to speak to a man in connection with a double acid attack last week. a warning viewers may find some of these pictures disturbing 24—year—old john tomlin should not be approached by the public if spotted. resham khan and her cousin have been left with life—changing injuries after the attack in tollgate road in east london. a care quality commission report into the london ambulance service says it has made significant progress since it was put into special measures 18 months ago. it also praised the service for the care and compassion shown by crews during the grenfell tower fire and the recent terrorist attacks at westminster bridge,
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london bridge and finsbury park. all of our staff are committed to doing the best they can day in, day out and still hitting targets against a population increase of demand of 6% over what we're contracted for. so it's a very demanding job everybody does whether they're in the control centre here or front line staff or support in the background, everyone is committed to providing excellent care. drivers with the aslef union working on the southern rail network have resumed their overtime ban. this means a limited timetable is in place from this morning, with more than 1,000 services cut. there's been more than a year of industrial action on the southern network in protest against the introduction of driver—only trains. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a fairly good service on the tube. but there are delays on london 0verground between richmond and stratford.
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and also willesden and clapham junction due to a faulty train. 0n the roads, and there are long delays on the m25 clockwise at j5 for sevenoaks following a collision, queues are back to j4. there's a knock on effect the a25 as a result. there are london—bound delays on the a2 heading out of eltham into kidbrooke due to works. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. hello, good morning. if you were hoping for some sunshine today then you're going to be rather disappointed. it will be very similar to how it was yesterday so rather grey day overall with always the chance of a bit of drizzle forming from the thickness of the clouds. some drizzle on and off. we're starting on around 12 degrees, the air is still rather humid, as it was yesterday, so still that slightly sticky feel to things without the temperatures being too high. just the high teens, maybe nudging 20 in central london. so a bit of drizzle on and off, the risk that is going to peter out through the day and we might even
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see a bit of late afternoon brightness but with that good there could be a few showers too. 0vernight it will stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud around, a few clearer spells here and there and we'll start the day tomorrow on a mild note and tomorrow should be a bit brighter and we could see a few spells of sunshine but this could create showers. expect a bit of wet weather tomorrow and if you're headed out friday evening then you should prepare for some rain, some of it quite heavy at times too. over the weekend it's looking a lot nicer, early risers on saturday morning might see a little bit of wet weather but it will slowly brighten up. sunshine on the weekend with temperatures in the low 20s. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick, is today expected to be appointed to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. the news comes as police say at least 80 people are believed to have died in the fire,
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but they don't expect to confirm the exact number for at least another six months. there'll be another big test for theresa may in the commons today as she faces a key vote on the queen's speech with the support of the democratic unionists, the government is expected to pass its plans for the next parliament, after narrowly surviving a vote last night on changes to public—sector pay. labour has tabled a further amendment ahead of today's debate. police in australia have charged one of the most senior roman catholic cardinals, george pell, with multiple historical sex offences. cardinal pell is in charge of the vatican's finances and is considered to rank third in the hierarchy of the church. he is accused of a number of offences dating back to the 1970s. catholic officials in australia say he strenuously denies all allegations of abuse. a decision will be revealed later over a proposed merger between sky and 21st century fox. if the regulator 0fcom approves the takeover, rupert murdoch's company would assume total control of the broadcaster — a deal which has been cleared by european commission competition authorities. 0pponents believe the deal
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would give murdoch too much power in the uk media. household energy bills and carbon emissions will soar unless ministers devise new power saving policies after brexit, according to a new report. the independent committee on climate change says eu energy efficiency rules on household appliances have helped reduce emissions. it's warning that the uk government now needs to to extend energy savings through better home insulation. an increased reward of £6,000 is now being offered for information about four second world war medals, which were lost by a blind veteran at a motorway service station. 96—year—old alfred barlow was returning home from a pilgrimage to normandy earlier this month, when he noticed his medals were missing after leaving the norton canes services on the m6 toll road. crime stoppers are now offering £5,000 for their return, on top of a reward from actor hugh grant of £1,000. coming up on the programme sarah
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will have the weather for you. not long to go now until wimbledon — which means one thing — we all go a bit tennis mad for a couple of weeks. mike is already a step ahead of us — he's in sheffield this morning iam in i am in line he was my friends from a tennis school here in sheffield. we are talking grass—roots tennis, asi we are talking grass—roots tennis, as i take my place at the back of the line. wedding my term. my friends watch wimbledon and are inspired to what is being done at grassroots to help them achieve any dreams they may have to make tennis accessible? today, the lawn tennis association is announcing that they are making available a new pot of money, £250 million over the next few years to revamp courts across the country in great britain. so they could have multiservice court,
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floodlights all new indoor centres like the one here. that is the idea. let's talk to alistair, the participation director at the lawn tennis association. hello. what difference do you think facilities like this can make? it is notjust about facilities, you do need to engage as well with the inner—city kids, they wouldn't normally get a chance to play tennis. we are making the single biggest commitment we have made ever to facilities. were asking the community due come together with ideas for transforming facilities like this. working with partners like sheffield council to provide fantastic indoor facilities to transform areas like we have already here. also hoping to inspire more kids to pick up a racket, to ta ke more kids to pick up a racket, to take part and play in a strong community facility that is easily accessible and affordable. pounds
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initially, another £125 million to come. but the idea is to be able to walk out of your home and to go to a cheap local court. in that happen because of this money? what were hoping for is to get community thinking about how they deliver the rack on a tennis experience for everyone. it is about providing affordable and easily accessible facilities that can be as cheap as 30- £50 facilities that can be as cheap as 30— £50 per household membership that will let you play all year around right through to initiatives that we run next weekend where we have a tennis weekend. they offer people a free trial and in the opportunity come down and play air deceives tennis is a sport for them. especially a day like today, nobody wa nts to especially a day like today, nobody wants to play tennis outside. now it is bringing through more champion players? it is fundamental because we wa nt players? it is fundamental because we want this to be the catalyst to increase the number of indoor facilities by 50%. the same with
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courts with floodlights so that they can be used all year round and people have the opportunity to play with some certainty, to come on down toa with some certainty, to come on down to a court and have a good game of tennis and enjoy the sport. but talked out to a real—life example. let me introduce you to chris and fate. we were speaking a few moments ago. when fay was three years old you wanted to play tennis your local park near your house but you could because it was rundown. how bad was it, would you say? dreadful. just inaccessible, no access to coaching or anything. so that's why we had to joina club or anything. so that's why we had to join a club to be able to access that. and that was expensive, i guess, and not you near your home at all? definitely. but now that everything is being regenerated and accessible for the community they are fabulous. and, cat is available as well. so it has made a
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difference. what is it like for you now? you couldn't remember what was i when you were but how about now? it is good for every community to experience tennis and may be inspire other young kids my age and younger and older to play tennis. so to what extent and older to play tennis. so to what exte nt d oes and older to play tennis. so to what extent does it make you able to play more fun every week? my tennis club is down the road from me so when i feel... when i feel like i want, because i wanted a light, then i need to do the training as well. and, literally, i love tennis and i don't know what i would do without it. in practice it makes perfect. are you a fan ofjohanna konta? the british number one, seeded number 64 wimbledon. speaking ofjohanna konta. .. wimbledon. speaking ofjohanna konta... she is warming up four
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wimbledon and safely into the third round fools not she looked in impressive form as she beat romania's sora na cristea in straight sets. she'll play the french open champion jelena 0stapenko today for a place in the last eight. johnny sexton and owen farrell will start together for the lions in the second test against new zealand. having the lost the opening test, warren gatland's side have to win in wellington. captain sam warburton has also been handed a start in one of three changes to the side beaten 30—15 last weekend. the 19—time world and olympic champion usain bolt made his first appearance of the season in europe last night, in the czech city of 0strava. and of course, the jamaican world record holder got the victory in the 100 metres. although he was disappointed with his time of 10.07 seconds, it continued his preparation for the world championships in london — which are now just over a month away.
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bolt plans to retire from athletics after the worlds. there was also victory for the four—time 0lympic gold medallist mo farah, who won his final 10,000 metre race on the iaaf circuit at the event. he dominated the field to come home in a near world leading time this year of 27 minutes and 12 seconds. let's return to the action. back here with my friends at the centre. we have some of the pupils from a local school. including my nine—year—old friend here. how often do you have the chance, do you have a chance to play tennis in your local park? yes. do you have facilities to play nearby? yes.
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that's good. do you love tennis? are you inspired byjohanna konta and andy murray? would you like to play more? yes. and how about your facilities? cheap. how much does it cost? i play sometimes. and how it is it you finding a court?” cost? i play sometimes. and how it is it you finding a court? i go with my friends. so, you can. things are improving. that is the main thing. and i will have the chance to practise enough to sometimes realise their dreams. would you like a game over here with our giant market? we will have that for you in ten minutes time? —— mug. do people in england pay too much for their prescriptions? and should patients with long—term conditions be exempt? 40 health charities have come together to update the list of illnesses exempt from charges, saying it has barely changed since it was established in 1968. the nhs prescription charge
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in england is currently £8.60. they're free in scotland, wales and northern ireland. a survey by the prescription charges coalition has found that a third of people who pay for their medicines have not picked them up due to the cost. and it's calling for conditions such as parkinson's, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis to be added to the list for free prescriptions, joining the likes of cancer, epilepsy and diabetes. we're joined now by gp dr golda parker. good morning to you. can we deal first of all... you mentioned in the lead there it will not getting their prescription that they need they say they can't afford it. are you dealing with people in that circumstance? 0ne lovely lady i know who worked and had a foot condition, a painful one. she needed a list of medication to treat it and she said
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she had been putting up with it for six months. what is happening? why is the medicine working? she told me that the she was not affording them. —— could not afford the medication. it really is true and a pounds 60 is a lot for a prescription, especially if you have many items. why has the list not been updated in so long?” have no idea. back in 1968 we were not treating the things that we are treating now. it was a different world. this is the modern world with modern medicine and people are living longer. we test for different rings, we treat different things and we know about more diseases. can we afford to supply so many priests to make free prescriptions?” afford to supply so many priests to make free prescriptions? i am not an expert that it is not an even playing field. in manchester i must pay for my prescription. if i rows, i don't have to. i think itjust
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needs to be evened out. that list needs to be evened out. that list needs looking at. for example, patients with a low thyroid get one medication forfree. patients with a low thyroid get one medication for free. they need that ona medication for free. they need that on a long—term basis. if they get a fungal toenail infection, then that prescription is free as well and in the majority of cases that is unrelated to their thyroid. it needs to be looked at so that those prescription is unrelated to chronic conditions are for and that money then funded into other illnesses. these are difficult decisions to make because supposing, you mention parkinson's, some people think you should, it is a long—term condition when people can be affected young. but where do you draw the line? who is going to be the one who decides which conditions are and which conditions are not? becomes quite difficult. were a lot of people say it has to change. —— albeit.
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difficult. were a lot of people say it has to change. -- albeit. people may say, well, i have an infection because my immune system is low because my immune system is low because of rheumatoid arthritis and that prescription should be paid for because it is the result of rheumatoid. it is linked. who makes that decision? gps are in a difficult condition. -- position. you have guidelines, why would you be in you have guidelines, why would you beina you have guidelines, why would you be in a difficult position? if a ruling came about where you pay for the prescription as a result of your chronic condition, but you did not pay for the prescriptions outside of that, for example, a chest infection. patients may say that is linked in. so therefore i need to pay for it. thyroid, for example. someone's thyroid is out of control and they have a low thyroid or rheumatoid arthritis and they are on ta blets rheumatoid arthritis and they are on tablets which suppress, lower their immune system and they get a chest infection. people say that is linked
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in with a chronic condition and they should get the prescription for free. the problem is why do england pay and the rest of the country doesn't? that is the bigger picture. it is because of the devolved parliaments. thank you for your time and experts to make expertise. —— expertise. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. fairly grey skies in many parts of the country and out of all that cloud, some drizzly rain around. this is the scene in devon taken by weather watcher allen and heavy rain further north, especially in the north—east of england, southern and eastern scotland where the heavy rain is combined with pretty brisk winds from the north sea. a lot of wet weather across many northern and western parts am that rain edging across all of scotla nd that rain edging across all of scotland and northern ireland into the afternoon. further south some brighter spells, brighter spells towards london and 13 or 14 where
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you have the cloud and rain. through the evening and overnight, temperatures not falling much lower than that. drizzly rain in scotland, northern ireland, wales and west of england but it will ease and it should stay mostly dry down in the south—east. through the day tomorrow, the midlands, southern and south—eastern england should see some brightness but perhaps heavy showers later, 23 here. further north and west you have the cloud and rizzoli outbreaks of rain bugbear with the weather, it looks like things will turn brighter and warmer through the weekend —— rizzoli outbreaks. thanks very much. it certainly im proves thanks very much. it certainly improves through the week. with sarah casting a fairly gloomy weather picture, ben, people talking about holidays? it's not necessarily good when you get there but the airports might get you somewhere warmer, drier, better. gatwick, the uk's second biggest airport says passenger numbers hit
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45 million last year, up nearly 8% on the ear before. the airport, which has only one runway, has been battling with heathrow to win permission to build another. but as more of us head off on holiday this summer, gatwick was named and shamed as one of the worst for delays with 30% of all international flights having at least a half hour delay. the chief executive of gatwick airport steve wingate joins me now from our london newsroom. let's touch on those figures, record numbers of people flying through the airport, great news, up 8% in terms compared to last year but at the same time the worst offender for delays. why? looking at gatwick, we saw 44 million passengers last year, up saw 44 million passengers last year, ‘7 saw 44 million passengers last year, up 8% on the previous year, with a lot bigger choice in destinations and significantly more long haul and that's important. we expect to see further growth this year, up to 45, maybe 44.5 million passengers but we
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are working closely with punctuality, airlines and ground handlers and the european air—traffic controllers and the good news is as we work into —— as we move into the summer season we are seeing improvements on the punctuality at gatwick. it's all well and good saying you're planning for 45 million passengers but if they're not getting away on time that's not good news. if you look at the industry standard, a flight is on time if it leaves within 60 minutes of its scheduled departure. gatwick on average last summer flights were leaving 19 minutes after so if we focus on the improvement there's no reason we can't pull that back in and get the service levels of punctuality back to where passengers want them. looking at the feedback from passengers, about their experience of travelling through the airport, it's never been higher. let's talk about runways, you've been battling in the past with heathrow. heathrow
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was named the preferred place. are you prepared to accept you're not getting another runway? looking at gatwick, we've never said we don't wa nt gatwick, we've never said we don't want another runway, we've said we are prepared to build another one and we continue to make that offer to the government. what happens at heathrow is a matter for the heathrow is a matter for the heathrow and the government. we are nearly full. 0ur scheme is a good scheme and what you can see is we can reach the long haul destinations, we now serve over 60 different ones, and our scheme is fully privately financed and not needing any taxpayer subsidy. when we talk about the delays and the number of passengers it comes down to the fact you need another runway, is that the easiest way to avoid delays? it's not hurting people into the terminal, it's getting people in the terminal, it's getting people in the air? another runway would help with better punctuality at the airport. in terms of the new runway, the key question that was asked of us was the key question that was asked of us was could gatwick support long haul routes? 0ver
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us was could gatwick support long haul routes? over the last few years we have demonstrated that. today we're announcing a new route to taipei, two weeks ago to buenos aires, shortly before that to singapore and more to come over the coming weeks. let's talk about brexit because open skies are an important thing in terms of cheap flights to europe for everyone, what happens with regards to brexit in regards to cheap flights? that unites every player in the aviation industry in the uk. we've made our points to the government and the government has listened and it's very important to every player, airports, airlines, ground handlers, air—traffic control that as part of the brexit negotiations we maintain not only the rights to fly the current routes but to grow in the future both to europe and north america. stuart wingate, the chief executive of gatwick airport, thanks for your time this morning. more from me after 8am, see you then. we're quite excited about wimbledon. you are, you love tennis?”
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we're quite excited about wimbledon. you are, you love tennis? i do. the thing about wimbledon, you don't have to love tennis to love wimbledon. is the occasion and everything that surrounds it. shall we go mug to mug? see what i did there? we have small mug and big mug. mike can explain why the game, set, mug challenge is kicking off today. tell us, mike? giving you a sense of how big this mug is, i'm not in it, iwouldn't giving you a sense of how big this mug is, i'm not in it, i wouldn't be able to get out because it is so large but this is what we are using for our big summer challenge, game, set, mug challenge. 30 seconds to get as many tennis balls in as you can from around five metres away. you see sam, if you were watching at 7am, he's only four and he's one of the star players in sheffield here, he got it in live on air at 7am and i think it was his second go. i said
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have another go and he said no, i've done my challenge twice, i've got to get on with my own training. we will leave him to it. the said it was a good game at least! it's very addictive, we are finding, the game, set, mug challenge. while they have a go, my friends from porter croft school, let's see how the world number one search andy murray got on when he was one of the first to try the challenge with charlie at queen's. andy, welcome to our bbc breakfast game, set, mug challenge. thank you. no worries. current world number one, reigning wimbledon champion, you've been in the toughest of situations. do you feel tension mounting? i know a lot of the other players have had a go so i don't want to be down the bottom of the list. there's some serious rivalry going on. i know. i'm going to set the clock, you're going to have 30 seconds, you know how it works? 30 seconds, as many balls as you like. you can choose your style, do you know what style you're going to go with?
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0verarm i think. you can hit them a little bit harder this way so i'm trying to get as many... i want as many goes as possible in 30 seconds. 0k, got it. ready, steady, go. that's one in. andy's going for the very quick succession, he's not even looking at the balls he is picking up, he's kind of got a rhythm going on, i'm seeing quite a few going in now. looking at the concentration on the face, he's following the ball very closely as it goes in. we're on 16 seconds, just coming up for 20 seconds now. ten more seconds. i think you've hit more balls than any other player we've seen. going pretty fast. we've got one second and that's time up. what was that? you think that went well? i think that went very well. come on then. do the count for me. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, 11, 12, 13, 14. that is 14 balls. not bad. not bad?
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it's very good. thank you so much and good luck for the weeks ahead. lovely to see you, thank you. cheers. so, mike, the thing is, fascinating how competitive andy murray was because the first thing he wanted to know, we're not revealing how others have done yet, but they want to know how the other players did and we've done quite a few and we will reveal those over the next few days. that's what's so exciting, charlie. there's great rivalry already but i have to say, sir andy murray looked very pleased, he has set the bar really high with 14 in 30 seconds! actually you've got to realise he got off to a slow start but then got into the zone and they were almost automatic. 0urfriends from porter zone and they were almost automatic. our friends from porter croft school in sheffield are having a go, we will talk to them in a moment, they are having a go first, have you got
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one in yet? no. how about you? no. of the new hit the room, it is really frustrating. 0verarm or underarm? overarm. smash it like andy murray. if you put it like this it will go over. have another go. i think i'd put you off! do what sounded, four years old, got it straight in. what is your name? arkenhead. have a go, ahmed. off the rim! -- arkenhead. have a go, ahmed. off the rim! —— ahmed. he's gone. come on, ahmed. that was brilliant, the best one yet. what is the technique? underarm. you reckon underarm? what about you, jamelia, going underarm as well? so exciting! i think maybe we are in the wake. have another go, we are in the wake. have another go, we we re we are in the wake. have another go, we were pretty new off. a big one ——
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in the. not bad at all! well done! are you enjoying this challenge? that's the main thing! —— in the. it's harder than it looks.” that's the main thing! —— in the. it's harder than it looks. i got two in 30 seconds so you are doing better than me —— in the. practice makes perfect so we are going to continue. what have you had a go, charlie? we will reveal that at a later date but the suffice to say it wasn't as good as others. thanks very much, mike. you would be forgiven for not being as good as andy murray. shall we have a look at the leaderboard? andy murray. shall we have a look at the leaderboa rd ? at andy murray. shall we have a look at the leaderboard? at this stage of the leaderboard? at this stage of the competition it isn't overly revealing but there you are, just andy murray. 14, quite impressive, almost one every two seconds. andy murray. 14, quite impressive, almost one every two secondsm andy murray. 14, quite impressive, almost one every two seconds. it all depends on what other people have done. you've done a few. we will reveal them over the coming weeks. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london news, i'm alpa patel. police urgently want to speak to a man in connection with a double acid attack last week. a warning viewers may find some of these pictures disturbing 24—year—old john tomlin should not be approached by the public if spotted. resham khan and her cousin have been left with life—changing injuries after the attack in tollgate road in east london. a care quality commission report into the london ambulance service says it has made significant progress since it was put into special measures 18 months ago. it also praised the service for the care and compassion shown by crews during the grenfell tower fire and the recent terrorist attacks at westminster bridge, london bridge and finsbury park. all of our staff are committed to doing the best they can day in, day out and still hitting targets against a population increase of demand of 6% over what we're contracted for. so it's a very demanding job everybody does whether they're in the control centre here or front
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line staff or support in the background, everyone is committed to providing excellent care. drivers with the aslef union working on the southern rail network have resumed their overtime ban. this means a limited timetable is in place from this morning, with more than 1,000 services cut. there's been more than a year of industrial action on the southern network in protest against the introduction of driver—only trains. is let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a fairly good service on the tube. but there are delays on london 0verground between richmond and stratford. and also willesden and clapham junction due to a faulty train. 0n the roads, this is the picture on the a406 westbound. it's slow on the north circular into neasden from staples corner and the m1. still problems on the m25 clockwise where it's slow from j2 to j5 at sevenoaks because of a collision. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
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if you were hoping for some sunshine today then you're going to be rather disappointed. it will be very similar to how it was yesterday so rather grey day overall with always the chance of a bit of drizzle forming from the thickness of the clouds. some drizzle on and off. we're starting on around 12 degrees, the air is still rather humid, as it was yesterday, so still that slightly sticky feel to things without the temperatures being too high. just the high teens, maybe nudging 20 in central london. so a bit of drizzle on and off, the risk that is going to peter out through the day and we might even see a bit of late afternoon brightness but with that good there could be a few showers too. 0vernight it will stay mostly dry, a lot of cloud around, a few clearer spells here and there and we'll start the day tomorrow on a mild note and tomorrow should be a bit brighter and we could see a few spells of sunshine but this could create showers. expect a bit of wet weather tomorrow and if you're headed out friday evening then you should
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prepare for some rain, some of it quite heavy at times too. over the weekend it's looking a lot nicer, early risers on saturday morning might see a little bit of wet weather but it will slowly brighten up. sunshine on the weekend with temperatures in the low 20s. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom hello. this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the next step into finding out what caused the tragedy at grenfell tower — a retired appeal court judge will be appointed to lead the public inquiry. it comes as the group representing housing associations calls on the government to get on with removing cladding, rather than carrying out more tests. good morning. it's thursday the 29th ofjune. also this morning: theresa may faces a further challenge to her authority today, as labour tries once again to force changes to the queen's speech.
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welcome to the gateway to snowdonia. new figures today show the number of people being rescued from the mountains has risen in the last year. we will try to find out why, later in the programme. good morning. ten years ago today, the first iphone went on sale, kicking offa first iphone went on sale, kicking off a smartphone revolution. i will look at the way they have changed the way we live. and good morning from sheffield, where we are talking about grass—roots tennis and seeing how young players like sam here can benefit from the announcement today from the lta that they will invest £250 million to revamp courts right across britain. we also have our brea kfast across britain. we also have our breakfast summer challenge. we will see how the world number one, andy murray, got on when he took the challenge. and we'll be chatting to two star guests after 8.30. rita 0ra will be here to tell us
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about her new single, and we'll be talking about poldark with eleanor tomlinson, who plays demelza in the popular drama series. it's a wet thursday morning for many of us — sarah has the weather. the unsettled theme continues, further heavy rain on the cards, but things should brighten up by the weekend. all the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick, is today expected to be appointed to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. the news comes as police say at least 80 people are believed to have died in the fire, but they don't expect to confirm the exact number for at least another six months. simonjones reports. the government says it is determined to get to the truth of what happened at grenfell tower, and this is the man set to be given that task — a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick. he specialised in commercial law, in a career spanning almost 50 years. with the clamour for answers, he will be expected to produce his initial findings quickly.
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the police say they may not be able to confirm how many people died until the end of the year, at the earliest. they estimate so far that the death toll stands at 80, but stress that is not the final picture. some victims may never be identified. as the investigation continues, the national housing federation is calling on the government to stop its testing of cladding, and instead focus on removing it, to make people safe. having had 120 different tests, from different samples, from different buildings, in different parts of the country, i think we can now say that, according to the tests that the government is carrying out, this cladding is not fit for purpose. we don't need to test any more of it. today, another victim of the fire will be laid to rest, tony disson. his family say they are devastated, and will miss him terribly. the sad reality is there will be many funerals to follow. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth joins us
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now from westminster. this is an important appointment, not least for the family and friends of those directly affected. it is crucial, because there is understandably an awful amount of anger among the residents of g re nfell tower anger among the residents of grenfell tower and the wider community, who say their voices have not been heard for years, that they have been let down by those in authority, so the prime minister announced this public enquiry to try to get some answers, and she has promised there will be no stone unturned. she says the residents will be involved in setting the terms of reference, and though it will take time, there will be an interim report. but there is a perception among many in the public that these types of enquiries can drag on, can be beset by problems, canfailto drag on, can be beset by problems, can fail to get to the truth of what happened, so there is a lot of
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pressure on this one to avoid those pitfalls. the first detail we have so pitfalls. the first detail we have so far is this expected announcement today that sir martin moore bick will lead the enquiry. he will undoubtedly come under scrutiny because he is the man now charged with leading the quest for answers but also trying to restore public trust. alex, thank you. there'll be another big test for theresa may in the commons today as she faces a key vote on the queen's speech. with the support of the democratic unionists, the government is expected to pass its plans for the next parliament, after narrowly surviving a vote last night on changes to public—sector pay. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo has the details. the ayes to the right, 309. the first vote of this parliament on a labour amendment to the queen's speech proposing to end the cap on public sector pay rises went the government's way. this was the first test of theresa may's deal with the dup, made to boost the numbers on her side in the commons. last night it delivered — all ten dups voted in line with the conservatives to see off the opposition's challenge.
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today ahead of the final vote on the queen's speech which sets out the government's policy programme, labour will try their luck again. we're putting forward what was in the manifesto in the election, a brexit which guarantees trade relations with europe, a government that ends the public sector pay gap and a government that invests in the educational future of all our children, from nursery through to university. labour thinks it's on the front foot with its calls to end austerity. many conservatives admit the cuts didn't go down well on the doorstep during the election campaign. but after signals from senior cabinet members and downing street sources that the pay cap would be reviewed, number ten later insisted there was not yet any change in policy. we will not make our decision on public sector pay until the pay review body has reported. and we will listen to what they say, and we will listen to what people
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in this house have said before making a final decision. theresa may is expected to win the vote on the queen's speech today with the support of the dup and her backbenchers are unlikely to rebel. but her majority is slim, her authority is still fragile. today is also the deadline for northern ireland politicians to agree a power sharing executive at stormont. cris page is in belfast for us this morning. lots of debate about whether a deal will be struck today. just over eight hours to go until the deadline runs out. it does not feel like a deal is on the cards at the moment. politicians negotiated until about 2am. the talks haven't broken down and more meetings are expected today, but i understand there is still some distance between
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there is still some distance between the two might largest parties, the democratic unionists and sinn fein. the main sticking point is over the irish language. sinn fein wants a piece of legislation which will promote and promote the gaelic town. the dup would prefer a broader piece of legislation which would also cover some cultural issues which are more important for unionists. if there is no agreement by 4pm today, there is no agreement by 4pm today, the government have a number of options. they could amend the law to extend the deadline, and that has happened before, including the negotiations here, or they could get ministers in london to take over some of the responsibilities that would otherwise be taking care of by the devolved government here. cardinal george pell, responsible for vatican finances, has been accused of historical child sex offences. in the last half hour a press conference has been held at the vatican.
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james reynolds has been watching. james reynolds has been watching. james comey take us through what has happened. lets remember who he is - he is the number three official in the vatican, so what is happening to him is extremely important, both for australia and for the catholic church itself. the police in australia have charged him with multiple counts of sexual abuse going back a long period. he has given a statement here at the vatican is actually saying, i am innocent of these charges, they are false. the whole idea of sexual abuse is abhorrent to me. the vatican has said it has learned with regret the news of the charges against him, and it expressed its respect for the australian justice system. the cardinal will give up his duties here for a period and will travel back to australia to have his day in court, as he put it, we understand he will appear in
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court injuly. the chinese president, xijingping, has arrived in hong kong to celebrate 20 years since britain returned it to chinese rule. a massive security operation is under way as protests are planned throughout the visit. yesterday, democracy activists were arrested after chaining themselves to a monument to symbolise the handover. the national crime agency says it's increasingly concerned about the influence criminals from the balkans — particularly violent gangs from albania — have over the uk drug trafficking market. it says corrupt workers at ports and airports make it easier for gangs to smuggle in drugs. it also warns about the threat of cyber—crime from russian—speaking nations. household energy bills and carbon emissions will soar unless ministers devise new power saving policies after brexit, according to a new report. the independent committee on climate change says eu energy efficiency rules on household appliances have helped reduce emissions. it's warning that the uk government now needs to take up the challenge. she's one of the biggest stars on the planet and her live shows
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sell out in minutes. but last night adele hinted her current tour could be the last time she takes to the stage. playing to a record breaking crowd of 98,000 people at wembley, adele said she doesn't suit touring, but she will always write music, adding that "i might never see you again at a live show. who knows? but i will remember this for the rest of my life." we might ask rita 0ra, who will be joining us later, about that. sarah will have the weather in a few minutes. the time now is 11 minutes past eight. anyone would be forgiven for running away from unimaginable and terrifying danger, but pc wayne marques ran straight towards it. 0n the night ofjune the 3rd, the british transport police officer found himself face to face with the london bridge attackers. the 38—year—old was one of the first on the scene as the terrorists
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began their assault. pc marques took on all three knifemen, armed only with a baton. he's been speaking to the bbc about his experience that night. we should warn you that some viewers may find his account distressing from the start. this guy is on the floor, pleading for his life. the first attacker, without any mercy, stands over him and continues attacking him. i took my bat on with my right hand, full extension, i took a teat breath, and i charged him. i tried to take the first one out in one go also i swung as hard as i could, everything behind it. iwas as hard as i could, everything behind it. i was aiming straight for his head, and swinging like that, horizontal motion, straight for his head. then, while i am fighting the first one, i got a massive whack to
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the right side of my head and felt metal. i thought maybe it was a poll or rob are at first. afterwards, i realised it was a knife that the second one hit me with. as soon as i got the whack on the right side of my head, might i went dark, vision went completely out of it. i am staring at them with one eye, the bat on in my hand, and the three of them are staring at me, and we are in some kind of like mexican stand—off, like a surreal cowboy movie, getting ready to draw. and i'm just getting ready for them to rush me. we were staring at each other for anywhere between ten and 30 seconds. i couldn't tell you why we we re 30 seconds. i couldn't tell you why we were staring at each other. maybe there were waiting for me to go down
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—— they were waiting for me to go down or to bleed out. but i wasn't backing down. and they were staring at me. for some reason, they didn't come to rush me. the officer that's holding my hand, i called his name to three times, and he lowers the radio and comes in close. i had blood in my mouth that i was spitting out, so why couldn't get my message out. i started giving last m essa g es to message out. i started giving last messages to my family, my partner. he's like, no, mate, you are going to do it yourself. i said his name one more time and said, listen, just do it, just do it. and as i was saying that, the last little bit of light went, and that was it, i was out. but i still think about the eight people but i wasn't able to help. had i got there sooner,... i
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got there at the time that i did. but i would just like to think that idid but i would just like to think that i did what i did to keep the people that i saw being attacked and being hurt, keep them alive, keep them out of danger as best i could. pc wayne marques, speaking about his experiences on the night of the london bridge terrorist attack. the thing that strikes you hearing somebody like that talk is he ran towards the danger and the thing he is most upset about even though he has been injured and obviously very emotionally affected is that he didn't get to save more people. we thank him for sharing his thoughts because it cannot be easy reliving those thoughts. thank you to pc
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waymarks. it is 8:15am. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the appointment of a retired court of appealjudge as head of the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire, will be confirmed later today. labour will try again today to force changes to the queen's speech, to introduce elements of its own general election manifesto. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. i think lots of gardeners will be happy with how this week has gone so far in terms of the weather. that's right, we can have a break from watering the garden is, we have had quite a lot of rain and there is more to come today, pretty grey and cloudy. here is the scene around the coast of argyll and bute captured by a weather watcher. eight will be cloudy with some wet and windy weather today, particularly across scotla nd weather today, particularly across scotland and the north of england, heavy and persistent rain through the morning. difficult driving
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conditions. the rain will move into eastern parts of northern ireland and this bulk of wet and windy weather works north—westwards through the day today. further south the rain is fairly light and patchy across the manchester region, the west of wales and south—west of england. this is 4pm, mostly dry in the east midlands, east anglia and south—east, there could be some brightness, 19 or 20 degrees. further north and west thicker cloud, drizzly rain, temperatures 12 or 13 degrees, that's pretty disappointing for the end ofjune. not only heavy rain across scotland but strong winds coming from the north—east. we have that wet and windy weather. in the evening it tends to ease in intensity, not quite as heavy across scotland, although it continues tonight across northern ireland, wales and western parts of england we keep the cloud and patchy outbreaks of rain. dryer in the south—east but wherever you
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area murky in the south—east but wherever you are a murky night, low cloud, hill fog, the odd patch of fog in the south—east. 13 or 14 degrees overnight. through the day tomorrow it will not be as wet as today, but we have outbreaks of patchy rain across scotland, northern england, northern ireland, wales and the south—west but elsewhere brighter conditions and some sunshine. the chance of the odd isolated shower, the odd rumble of thunder in the south—east. moving through to the weekend it will be an improving picture, we have a front in the south—east bringing rain, slowly edging away, and elsewhere across the country original higher pressure moving across, which will quieten things down on saturday during the day. after the rain clears from the south—east, dry weather across the board, later in the day rain and breezy conditions in the far north—west but temperatures are a touch warmer by the time we get to saturday, 16—23d, and sunday looks like a saturday, 16—23d, and sunday looks likea dry saturday, 16—23d, and sunday looks like a dry day for most of us. sunshine and lighter winds and it will feel that little bit warmer.
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highs of 15—23d. there with the u nsettled highs of 15—23d. there with the unsettled changeable weather over the next few days, the weekend promises something and something brighter. something for everyone, thank you very much, sarah. let's talk about airport numbers. we are talking about gaelic. —— gatwick. gatwick airport's announced passenger numbers are up — ben has more on that and the other main business stories. good morning, gatwick, the uk's second biggest airport says passenger numbers hit 45 million last year, up nearly 8% on the year before. the airport only has one runway and has been battling heathrow to win permission to build another. but gatwick has also been named and shamed as one of the worst for delays. speaking to me a little earlier, the chief executive told us the airport is operating close to full capacity and another runway would help ease congestion, without needing taxpayer funding. could a rise in interest rates be on the cards? the pound jumped nearly 1% yesterday after mark carney, the governor of the bank of england hinted that they could go up — if businesses start investing again.
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household spending has been falling as more of us feel the squeeze on our incomes, but mr carney said spending by businesses could cancel out that fall. interest rates are currently at a record low of 0.25%. and the iphone turns ten years today. it wasn't the first smartphone — but it's transformed the market with its app store, letting customers download programmes that let us do just about everything — make calls, send messages, orderfood, hail a taxi, or book a holiday. in 2015, the firm hit a record for sales, selling nearly 232 million iphones. they've since fallen slightly. just to give you a clue about what was coming up, that is what the image was. do you want to play again? yes, please. we have allison with us. do you know
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what she does? i think it has something to do with the picture on the screen. bat specialist. do you know what they sound like? no. listen to this and tell me what you think it sounds like. bat echolocation. do you know straightaway when you hear that bat what it is saying? that bat is looking around, they don't really use their eyes to navigate, they use sounds, they emit a very high frequency sound from the mouth and as it bounces back from all of the services that it touches the bat creates a picture of its environment. at the moment it is
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sending off regular pulses of ultrasonic sound creating a picture. it is like sonar in the water? exactly. they make pictures in the air? yes. alison fairbrass is a bat specialist. what have you learned? it is early days but we have just deployed 15 ultrasound centres across the olympic park in stratford in london and it creates an amazing picture of what the bats are doing every single day. one describe the sensors, are they stuck on poles, or buildings? they are on lamp posts and have an algorithm and in—built which detects the bat calls in sound recordings, which requires lots of power so recordings, which requires lots of power so they are plugged into lamp posts across the park at the moment. what are you hoping to find out that you don't already know about bats? we hope to find out how to design
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and manage the city but for wildlife. at the moment there is a great project at the olympic park created that has held various dhahmaan —— whole area is devoted to wildlife and we hope it is good for wildlife and we hope it is good for wildlife but we don't really know what is good for wildlife. the idea is with an improved way of monitoring bats in the city we can understand how better to manage spaces like the olympic park so they can be as good as they can be for wildlife. we can listen to some more bat language now. we are told the sound we are going to hear is about how they communicate. aalesund maybe you can help us, we can listen in and you can explain afterwards. bat noises. it sounds like birdsong to me. these are social cause, they are chatting
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to each other, often sounds like a singsong to each other. they are very social so they will be chatting to each other in their wrists and thatis to each other in their wrists and that is what it sounds like. do they hunt together? i'm not sure if they do. they are the kind of questions we are going to ask. we can listen toa we are going to ask. we can listen to a sound when they are hunting for their prey. interesting to hear what you think of this one and how that would affect a group of them. bat noises. closer those sounds, the more they are repeated and closer together, i presume when that is when they are closer to their prey. when they want more detail on the environment they start to emit their echolocation much more quickly which creates a more detailed picture. when they are trying to home in on a tiny insect
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bass beat up how quickly they echo locate so they can get really fine detail and get the insect. are you fond of bats? the conventional wisdom about them is they are pretty ugly. no, they are beautiful! they are extraordinary looking creatures. definitely, there are some that are prettier than others. there are some really cute ones that are really furry, some of the big ones you get in the tropics are an amazing looking as well, they almost look like little bears with wings. i think they are wonderful. do you think we are still scared of bats? loads of people are, so many people that i meet are really scared of them because they think they will fly into their hair and get trapped. i haven't met anybody who that has happened to but there is a big stigma around them. somebody once said my great grandad had a big bat fly into his hair. if it flew into your hair you would
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have trouble, you wouldn't be able to get it out will stop coming up in a moment on the bbc will stop coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. here on breakfast, graham's out in beautiful snowdonia for us this morning with some tips on how to stay safe in the great outdoors. you are talking about safety in the mountains and the hills. that's right, it's raining here but interesting figures from mountain rescue showing a rise in the number of people who have been rescued in the mountains, up about a tenth in a year. they have given us this essential kit you should take, warm clothes, food, water, torch, whistle, compass, map and a bag. we will talk to mountain rescue in about 15 or 20 minutes to see why there are more people being rescued. but first it's time for the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. lots of cloud and western areas. some drizzly weather. something a bit drier in the south—east. some
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bright spells and temperatures could get up to 19 celsius. rain for northern ireland, northern england and much of scotland through the afternoon. a breeze from the north sea will make it feel chilly. things will ease off through the night and into the early hours of friday. still cloudy, misty and murky around western areas, dry towards the east. temperatures of 12—14dc. 0n western areas, dry towards the east. temperatures of 12—14dc. on friday, this band of rain will be with us through the morning. as we go through the morning. as we go through friday, the rain will break up. still one or two mac showers. temperatures up to 23 celsius. at the weekend, this ridge of high pressure starts to move in. a bit of rain first thing in the morning, that clears. 0therwise, dry with
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sunshine. sunny spells on sunday for most parts. temperatures up to 23 celsius. although the next few days look wet and cloudy, there are some improvements at least for the weekend. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and jamie robertson. sky's the limit — will rupert murdoch's takeover plans for the pay tv giant be cleared for lift off? live from london, that's our top story on 29th june. with his control of 21st century fox, sky and uk newspapers, the fears are that mr murdoch wields too much power in the british media. also in the programme: central bank conundrum — the end of cheap money leaves
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mark carney and mario draghi lost for words, and the markets don't like it. we'll get some clarity from an expert.
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