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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 29, 2017 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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let's just say that. lisa hampele, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's jay wynne. it's been really wet across scotland so it's been really wet across scotland so far today. here's a picture from edinburgh, huge puddles. the rain stretches down into parts of wales and the south—west of england as well. it's not all doom and gloom, there is some brighter weather. this is surrey, sunshine breaking through the cloud. this radar picture confirms it's been wet across scotland. the rain is more patchy and northern england, wales and the south—west. the rain is toppling westwards, getting into the western side of northern ireland over the next few hours. notjust side of northern ireland over the next few hours. not just wet, side of northern ireland over the next few hours. notjust wet, also really windy. the wind is quite chilly, not very summery. into the afternoon across the south—west of england there will be some patchy rain around. as temperatures get around 19—20 in the south—east, it might spark off one or two showers, but few and far between. patchy rain
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in north wales and northern england. it spreads westwards across northern ireland and the rate will get pretty close to the western isles over the next few hours. the temperatures in the wind on the east coast, 11—12, not much better in the glasgow area. actually feel the things here. in the evening it stays pretty wet across scotland. the rain across western england and where is becomes lighter and more patchy, but it's still there overnight. it should be drier in the south—east. a fair bit of cloud, temperatures about 14 in the south—east and 10 degrees in the north—west. not a cold night, quite mild for most, but still wet through the morning across scotland and the western side of england, wales and northern ireland. the rain is gradually slipping southwards and eastwards, getting towards the south—east later on. temperatures around 22 here, pressure north and west. the rain pushes through the south—east on friday evening for the start of the weekend we have this range of high pressure that will
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settle things down for the most part. there's a weak front coming into the northwest, a bit of a breeze and some rain, but most places dry, bright, a bit of sunshine will stop breezy, but reasonable in most places. rain will sink south all parts on saturday night. it's gone on sunday. sunday is pretty similar, the saturday, most is pretty similar, the saturday, m ost pla ces is pretty similar, the saturday, most places are dry, variable cloud, some sunshine. temperatures up by a notch or two. in summary it is wet, but the prospects through the weekend are looking that bit better. drier, brighter, maybe a bit warmer. a reminder of our main story this lunchtime. sirmartin sir martin moore—bick is appointed to lead the public enquiry into the g re nfell tower to lead the public enquiry into the grenfell tower fire. he to lead the public enquiry into the grenfell towerfire. he met residents this morning and promised to get the truth as as good afternoon.
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now all the sports news. world number one andy murray has withdrawn from an exhibition event at hurlingham tomorrow, as his preparation for next week's wimbledon takes a blow. murray is the reigning wimbledon champion and top seed for next week's tournament, but is suffering from a sore hip. murray had already pulled out of facing frenchman lucas pouille on tuesday. he hasn't been able to train today and says he is also unlikely to be able to practise tomorrow. another man looking to improve his form at this year's wimbledon is novak djokovic. he's tuning up at the aegon classic in eastbourne, but didn't have things all his own way against american donald young. it had looked a relatively comfortable third round outing as djokovic breezed through the first set 6—2. but young, who's ranked 47 in the world, was far tougher in the second set, taking it to a tie—break and pushing
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djokovic all the way. the serbian target 11—9, and he is through to the semis. warren gatland, the british and irish lions head coach, says he's had to make some tough calls for the must—win second test in wellington on saturday. calls for the must—win second test sam warburton replaces peter o'mahony in the back row and as captain. maro itoje comes into the second row. ben te‘o moves to the bench with owen farrell given a start at inside centre. he'll link up withjonny sexton, who comes in at fly—half. i'm delighted with the selection. probably the most nervous i've been coming intoa probably the most nervous i've been coming into a team selection meeting this week. i didn't know what was going to happen. some guys played brilliantly on tuesday and they could have come straight into the team, which we saw happened before. i was nervous which direction they'd
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90, i was nervous which direction they'd go, but delighted in starting the test series. holders england have named their squad for the women's rugby world cup in ireland later this summer. bristol's sarah hunter, who led the team to the six nations grand slam earlier this year, will again skipper the side with emily scarratt as vice captain. 28 players have been called up in total. england will begin their pool b campaign against spain on the 9th of august. sunderland chairman ellis short has called off the sale of the club. he says a sale "would not be in the best interests" of the club, and says he will continue his financial commitment to the club. meanwhile preston north end have granted their manager simon grayson permission to speak to sunderland about the vacant manager's job. grayson has been at deepdale for four years and is the tenth longest serving manager in england. great britain's mahama cho matched the best—ever result for a british man at the world taekwondo championships with silver in the heavyweight division. cho had looked in great form reaching the final but was unable to contain olympic silver medallist abdoul issoufou of niger who claimed his maiden world title with a 9—4 win. olympic champion jade jones
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is on course to win an impressive career grand slam of major titles in taekwondo. she's now into the world championships semi—finals in south korea. she got there with an 11—8 win over chinese taipei's yu chua chen in the last eight. it guarantees her at least a bronze. she's never won a gold before in the competition. i was iwas in i was in good form. today has been a real mental battle, rather than anything. people don't realise how ha rd anything. people don't realise how hard it is, people saying you are a lwa ys hard it is, people saying you are always going to corners of the world and it's an honour. it is hard, being expected to perform. i'm just happy that it shows that i can be mentally really strong. bbc sport understands the decision to award the 2021 world athletics championships to eugene in oregon is being investigated by the fbi. the decision was made two years ago, with athletics‘ governing body the iaaf bypassing the usual formal bidding process. french prosecutors launched their own inquiry into the awarding
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of the event in 2015. eugene is closely associated with sportswear brand nike, and was given the event despite strong interest from the swedish city of gothenburg. that's all sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. i'll have more in the next hour. a retired court of appealjudge, sir martin moore—bick, has been appointed to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster. theresa may confirmed the appointment of sir martin, saying "no stone will be left unturned" by the inquiry. sir martin, who is 70, has been meeting residents of grenfell this morning. he promised "a vigorous inquiry that gets to the truth" and said he understood the "desire of local people for justice". 137 high—rise buildings have now failed safety tests on cladding. the prime minister, theresa may, released this statement
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on the appointment. mrs may said the inquiry would have "full powers, including the power to compel the production of documents, and to summon witnesses". she said the goal was to find someone who "would be best suited to the task and available to start work immediately... so that we can get answers to what happened as quickly as possible". sir martin is described by her as "a highly respected and hugely experienced former court of appealjudge". she added that "the immediate priority is to establish the facts of what happened" and to "take the necessary action to prevent a similar tragedy from happening". she went on to say that "we must get to the truth about what happened. no stone will be left unturned". although — "we cannot wait for ages to learn the immediate lessons". earlier i spoke tojoe delaney, a local resident and campaigner with the grenfell action group.
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i asked him if he thought sir moore—bick‘s commercial experience will allow him to determine what happened. if you look at the work the grenfell action group have done over the last five years, they have proven incompetent at being able to dig through contracts and find things that were safe and unsafe and their wishes were ignored. while i can see this as a small part of the enquiry, we think the wider remit of the enquiry needs to be led with somebody —— by somebody with a more criminal mind who can dig down into the facts and get to the bottom of the facts and get to the bottom of the shoe is far quicker. contract dispute isn't going to answer why so many people died and so many were evacuated. a criminal angle on this enquiry may be able to do that. obviously everybody wants answers as quickly as they can. do you think that residents are prepared to
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accept the appointment of sir martin and give him the opportunity to prove his worth, if you feel that's what he needs to do? well, it does look to us that there is more and more an attempt to split this enquiry into several strands, and i think that will cause real disquiet with local residents. what do you mean, splitting it into several strands? even martin moore-bick said today he saw himself as more of a contracts person and whether there was criminal negligence or things like that, he may touch on it, but it wouldn't be the focus of his investigation, or whether there has been outright criminal activity. that wouldn't be in the investigation either. personally, i know a lot of the residents see that as crucial. it seems there will be different strands to the enquiry. personally, i think the part that
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sirmartin personally, i think the part that sir martin moore—bick leads should bea sir martin moore—bick leads should be a smaller part of a greater enquiry that is criminally lead. joe delaney from the grenfell action group talking to me earlier. we have just received an interview with sir martin by our home affairs correspondent. let's listen to that. i want to emphasise the enquiry will be independent, but it's essential that we hear from anyone with information that might have a bearing on the task i have to perform. from my brief meetings with residents of the tower and local people, it's quite clear that many of them will have evidence to give that will be of great value to the enquiry. so, yes, we can take account of what they have to say. they have also said they want you to consider the societal issues around this fire, the society in this area
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not being listened to. that's quite a broad point. does that interviewed your thinking? -- does that enter into your thinking? i've been asked to undertake this enquiry on the basis it would be pretty well limited to the problems surrounding the start of the fire and its rapid element. in order to make recommendations as to how this sort of thing can be prevented in the future. i am well aware that the residents and the local people want a much broader investigation, and i can a much broader investigation, and i ca n fully a much broader investigation, and i can fully understand why they would wa nt can fully understand why they would want that. whether my enquiry is the right way in which to achieve that, i more doubtful. and i'll give that some thought and, in due course, make a recommendation. but there may be other ways in which that desire foran be other ways in which that desire for an investigation can be satisfied other than through the work i'm going to do. so you may not be able to give them the white enquiry they want? maybe not. you've
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got to produce an interim report, in the prime minister's terms, as quickly as possible. given that the police don't know at this stage how many people died in the fire, how challenging will that be? very challenging, for two reasons. one, we don't yet know exactly how much material there will be to collate. i suspect quite a lot. and it will have to be digested so that we can make sound conclusions, albeit as quickly as we can. i think it's impossible at the moment to say how long that's going to take. i have on other occasions said a matter of months. some people have talked about two or three months. i don't think that's realistic. on the other hand, i'd be very disappointed if we couldn't get a preliminary report out in undera couldn't get a preliminary report out in under a year. but i'd rather not say with any greater precision now when it's likely to be. can you say with any precision what the
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content would be, what questions you'd be able to answer in the early stages? i'd hope to be able to a nswer stages? i'd hope to be able to answer the basic factual questions, such as how did the fire start, how did it spread, how was it enabled to engulf the whole building at such speed, and also questions such as, what internal precautions there were, what steps were available for alerting residents and allowing them to escape. turning to the question of... inaudible. we have seen coverage of a housing decision you make in the appeal courts a couple of years ago and the word controversial connected to that decision. is that a fair description of you as the man chosen to lead this public enquiry?” of you as the man chosen to lead this public enquiry? i was surprised to see myself described as controversial, but the pace you described is one of many i decided
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over my time as a judge. —— the case you described. i was a judge for over 20 years, particularly in the court of appeal. one deals with an enormous range of work, much of which involves local government or central government, and one simply reaches the conclusion that you think is right, applying the law as you see it, and that is the work of thejudge. you you see it, and that is the work of the judge. you can't you see it, and that is the work of thejudge. you can't pretend you get every case right, at least not in the eyes of the supreme court. so in no case at this stage do you feel you have any loyalties or conflicts that would give you a problem in doing thisjob was that would give you a problem in doing this job was to mark absolutely not. the nature of the job, as it stands, is one of a kind with which i am really very familiar asa with which i am really very familiar as a judge. i spent ten years as a commercialjudge, dealing as a judge. i spent ten years as a commercial judge, dealing with as a judge. i spent ten years as a commercialjudge, dealing with all sorts of cases, including those involving disasters of one sort or
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another, on land or at sea, and i see this as a similar exercise. you've had a chance to see the tower and to speak to those people who escaped with their lives. what is your view of the scale of the tragedy and the scale of the task you now face? it an enormous tragedy andi you now face? it an enormous tragedy and i can honestly say i've never seen and i can honestly say i've never seen anything like that building, which is completely gutted so you can see through it in many places. it's very difficult, even after having heard some of the former residence, to understand what a terrifying experience it must have been to find yourself in that building without any obvious means of escape as the smoke started to rise. and they have migrated sympathy. having said that, —— migrated sympathy. having said that, iam migrated sympathy. having said that, i am determined that this enquiry will be open and full and will cover
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all the ground, so we reach conclusions that are reliable and can conclusions that are reliable and ca n p reve nt conclusions that are reliable and can prevent anything like this happening again. sir martin moore—bick, who has been appointed to lead the public enquiry into the g re nfell tower to lead the public enquiry into the grenfell tower disaster, talking to our home affairs correspondent. let's get more now from on the culture secretary's decision to refer rupert murdoch's 2ist century fox takeover of sky to the competition watchdog. let's speak to the former crimewatch presenterjacqui hames who gave evidence to the leveson inquiry into phone hacking. good afternoon. perhaps you could remind our viewers first of all why you were appearing at the leveson inquiry. well, whilst i was on crimewatch, my husband was a detective chief superintendent investigating the murder of a private investigator called daniel morgan, part of a company used extensively by news international.
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during the course of that enquiry into the murder of daniel morgan, we asafamily into the murder of daniel morgan, we as a family were put under surveillance and had our phones hacked. we had our mail tampered with and things moved in our garden. all sorts of things happened in order to try and disrupt that enquiry, and it turned out, and still shockingly we don't know why, that the people undertaking that surveillance on us were employees of news international, the news of the world. and now, severalyears on from rupert murdoch's previous abandoned attempt to gain full control of sky, the culture secretary is referred this latest bit to the competition watchdog over, she says, media plurality. in other words, the level of influence the murdoch family might have in the media here if the merger was to go ahead. but ofcom said it had no concerns about broadcasting
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standards. what's your reaction to all of that? well, i was quite shocked, to be quite honest. you know, anyone of us who has watched not only what is broadcast on fox news, for instance, but all the shenanigans around the corporate governance of fox news, with sexual harassment allegations, have to be hugely concerned about the fact that these people are now going to take over what is a wonderful organisation in sky news. i personally have huge concerns that james murdoch will be running this company, and it will end up like another fox news. we already have huge concerns and worries about the media landscape in this country, and the idea that we get someone whose track record in corporate governance of media organisations is so appalling, and also facing yet another trial later this year, i don't know how we can't resolve this
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ready quickly and easily byjust turning this town. —— pretty quickly. will you be making any representations to the competition and markets authority about this?m course, as part of my role in hacked off, we will continue to submit evidence. what was telling from secretary of state's statement this morning was the amount of time she kept saying she was relying on the evidence, she wanted to hear evidence, she wanted to hear evidence and facts, and yet she, together with several of her predecessors, have been so instrumental in blocking the second pa rt instrumental in blocking the second part of the leveson inquiry, which would give her the evidence that she needs to have in order to make these decisions. the first part of the leveson inquiry was incredibly light touch. i:e., as a core participant, was denied asking a lot of questions that i wanted answers to, because of the live trials that were going on. and i was assured, along with people
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like alistair morgan, the brother of daniel morgan, that we would get a nswe rs , daniel morgan, that we would get answers, that proper scrutiny of the corporate governance of news international would looked into in the second part of the leveson inquiry. she has continually blocked this second part from going ahead, soi this second part from going ahead, so i don't know how she can have the gall to stand up and say that she has been so instrumental in stopping that evidence being heard. so it sounds as though you don't feel the murdoch family have taken steps, and they argue that they have, to separate areas of the business since the previous attempt to take over control of sky. do you feel that any aspect of what they've done since then shows that they have set themselves on a separate path? no, i don't think they have. we've had undertakings in lieu, which is what she is looking for from them in the meantime. we have had that from this
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company before. james murdoch's track record in actually adhering to those undertakings in lieu has been appalling. that is evidence. she doesn't have to look far to see that. so i do find it quite extraordinary that we are back in groundhog day again, listening to the same things, the same platitudes being said, and i'll be very annoyed if the undertakings in lieu are accepted and that she actually a pproves accepted and that she actually approves this bid. thank you, jacqui hames, the former crimewatch presenter. in a moment, a summary of the business news. first, the headlines. a retired appeal courtjudge, sir martin moore—bick, has been appointed to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire. he says he is doubtful the process will be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. the northern ireland secretaryjames brokenshire says he believes a resolution can be found as negotiations continue over the resumption of power—sharing — the deadline is 4pm this afternoon. one of the most senior figures in the catholic church —
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australian cardinal george pell — says sex offence charges against him are false and he's looking forward to having his day in court. he is taking leave of absence to fight the charges. in the business news, the culture secretary said she is minded to refer rupert murdoch's 2ist secretary said she is minded to refer rupert murdoch's 21st century fox ta keover refer rupert murdoch's 21st century fox takeover of sky to the competition watchdog. the decision isa competition watchdog. the decision is a blow to the media mogul‘s hopes of having an £ii.7 is a blow to the media mogul‘s hopes of having an £11.7 billion deal waved through without further scrutiny. the uk's accountancy watchdog — the financial reporting council — says its begun an investigation into the auditing of bt‘s financial statements. it's in relation to the company's italian division. in january, bt wrote down the value of its italian unit by £530 million after years of "inappropriate behaviour". there's been almost a 10% fall in the number of cars produced in the uk.
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the society of motor manufacturers and traders said that over 136,000 new cars were built in may, 9.7% fewer than the same month in 2016. let's get more on the implications of the decision by culture secretary karen bradley over the 21st century fox bead to complete its takeover of sky. the culture secretary said she is minded to refer the takeover bid to the competition watchdog. earlier, we spoke to media analyst claire enders. essentially the secretary of state saw through the separation that had been made between the assets of the former news corp into two big divisions, one called news corp and the other called 21st century fox. she saw through that to the controlled by the murdoch family trust of each
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these entities, and the fact that these entities, and the fact that these separate entities combined have, as she said, a massive footprint, even in the digital age. i haven't had the opportunity to read the ofcom report, but i look forward to seeing what the calculations have been. that was the co re calculations have been. that was the core finding in the previous transaction in january 2011 core finding in the previous transaction injanuary 2011 by core finding in the previous transaction in january 2011 by the secretary of state, jeremy hunt, and we we re secretary of state, jeremy hunt, and we were completely expecting this result, absolutely. it would have been very surprising if ofcom hadn't arrived, if i may use a metaphor, at the same train station, given that in fact the assets have actually been enhanced. for example, by the acquisition of talk radio in the past by news uk, and even in the absence of any buoyancy in use proper sales, which have fallen by 50%, the combined impact, when you look at non—pay wall websites, the
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reach of those website is very broad. rolls royce say 7,000 jobs in the east midlands are secure — following their announcement on a £150 million investment in uk operations. it's investing the majority of that cash into a test bed in derby that will create 200 jobs. its also gone back on a decision to close a facility down in the area — which will save 150 jobs. unite the union are pleased with the decision. britain's second biggest airport — gatwick — has announced a record year of passengers. the 12 months to the end of january was the busiest in its history — with over 44 million passengers passing through its gates, a jump of 7.7% on the previous year. revenues and profits were also up strongly — and the airport is planning heavy investment. i will be back in an hour. time now
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for a look at the weather. it's been miserable for some. this was the view in edinburgh not long ago. this is a road, not a river. that rain stretches down into north wales and south—west england as well, but it isn't all doom and gloom. in surrey, we saw a glimmer of sunshine breaking through some fairly extensive cloud. you can see the extent of the rain across scotland, heavy and persistent. toppling further west in the next few hours. not just toppling further west in the next few hours. notjust wet but also windy. the wind coming in from the north sea, and creating quite a chilly feel to things in the north and north—east. further south and west, the rain is lighter and more patchy, but some rain nonetheless and still quite breezy. cabbages at maybe 19 or 20 in the south—east, maybe 19 or 20 in the south—east, may be sparking one or two showers. —— temperatures up to maybe 19 or 20. what dole in the north of england. rain spreading westwards.
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the wind for the north and east, not much better than that in the south and west of scotland either. plenty more rain to be had across scotland, windy across the north and west, and gradually that rain becomes lighter and more patchy. a lot of cloud elsewhere, keeping temperatures up at 13 or 1a elsewhere, keeping temperatures up at 13 or14 in elsewhere, keeping temperatures up at 13 or 1a in cardiff and london, probably no lower than 12 or 13 in scotla nd probably no lower than 12 or 13 in scotland and northern ireland, with quite a lot of low cloud. tomorrow, still this area of cloud and rain and still quite a breeze in the north and west. slowly slipping its way south and east, eventually getting to the south later in the day, after temperatures averaged 22 or 23. into the weekend, you get a ridge of high pressure coming in, helping to settle things down nicely. into the weekend, a bit of a
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breeze and some rain, but in most places it's dry, bright and breezy, variable cloud, some sunshine, 23 in london, not bad, and about 18 or 19 in newcastle. there will be some rain on saturday night, but it is gone by sunday daytime. sunday looks similarto gone by sunday daytime. sunday looks similar to saturday, breezy with rain in the north—west, elsewhere mainly dry, and top temperatures up to about 23. in summary, the weekend, better prospects, a bit drier and brighter and, for some of us, a bit warmer. this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti.
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the headlines at two. a retired appeal courtjudge will lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire — he says it may not be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. the residents and the local people wa nt the residents and the local people want a much broader investigation andi want a much broader investigation and i can fully understand why they would want that. whether my enquiry is the right way in which to achieve that, i am doubtful. the dup says there will not be a breakthrough to restore power—sharing in northern ireland by today's 4 o'clock deadline. a senior member of the vatican, cardinal george pell, is charged with sexual abuse offences in his home country, australia. i'm simon mccoy live in westminster where mps will vote on the queen's speech later. it's been interpreted as a test of authority for theresa may's minority government —— labour is seeking amendments

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