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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 29, 2017 2:00pm-3:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at two. a retired appeal courtjudge will lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire — he says it may not be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. the residents and the local people wa nt the residents and the local people want a much broader investigation andi want a much broader investigation and i can fully understand why they would want that. whether my enquiry is the right way in which to achieve that, i am doubtful. the dup says there will not be a breakthrough to restore power—sharing in northern ireland by today's 4 o'clock deadline. a senior member of the vatican, cardinal george pell, is charged with sexual abuse offences in his home country, australia. i'm simon mccoy live in westminster where mps will vote on the queen's speech later. it's been interpreted as a test of authority for theresa may's minority government —— labour is seeking amendments on public spending and brexit. and the culture secretary says
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she is "minded to" refer rupert murdoch's 21st century fox takeover of sky to the competition watchdog. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. sir martin moore—bick — the retired judge chosen to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire — says it's unlikely its remit would be wide enough to satisfy all survivors. sir martin promised a "vigorous inquiry‘ that would look at the problems surrounding the start of the fire and its rapid development in order to prevent this ever happening again. after meeting with residents this morning — he said he understood their desire forjustice and that he would produce an interim report "as early as possible". critics say residents should
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have been consulted. 80 people are now presumed by police to have died. here's our correspondent richard lister. the family and friends of tony disson gathered for his funeral today, a short distance from grenfell tower where he died. with an estimated 80 dead, there will be many more such funerals. looming over them, questions about why they died, who was to blame, how can others be protected. and this is the man now appointed to find the answers, sir martin moore—bick. ajudge for 20 years before he died from the court of appeals, he focused on complex technical cases in the commercial courts. he's promised to consult grenfell survives about how to proceed. they have my greatest sympathy. having said that, i'm absolutely determined that this enquiry will be open and full and will cover all the
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ground so we reach inclusions that a reliable and can prevent anything happening like this again. we need to be part of every single decision made. but those who escaped grenfell tower that night have demanded more input into shaping this process. they appear not to have been consulted about this appointment. i understand this has to be fair and impartial but i believe the victims of this, you know the tower victims first, evacuees second and local residents thirdly should be the ones leading this and deciding what direction this inquiry takes and what remit it has. and a decision by sir martin moore—bick involving westminster city council is also causing grenfell survivors concern. he backed the decision to move a single mother of five to social housing 50 miles away. if i was speaking to families, i would be saying that on its own tells you nothing. the problem is we don't know what the broader record is. setting up the public inquiry
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was always going to be a delicate process. grenfell survivors are being asked to work with the establishment they feel let them down for decades. the aim is for an interim report this summer. with me is the former labourjustice secretary lord falconer. thank you very much for coming in. you have worked with sir michael so what would you say about him? here's a capable judge, an what would you say about him? here's a capablejudge, an extremely capable lawyer and his characteristics that people will trust him, he has no ego, somebody he will get through the material and determined what happened and who is to blame which is the job determined what happened and who is to blame which is thejob he has been doing as a judge, as a first insta nce been doing as a judge, as a first instancejudge been doing as a judge, as a first instance judge in a judge been doing as a judge, as a first instancejudge in a judge at the court of appeal. he is someone capable of doing this job and the
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test for who to have somebody who can do it independently of all pressures and somebody who is able to excite ‘s confidence amongst the people who he has the judge and of course the grand full tower residents and those who live around andi residents and those who live around and i believe he can do that. it's a very sensitive job and interestingly he is managing expectations saying it is unlikely that the remit will satisfy all of the survivors. it is unlikely that an enquiry on its own could do with every single issue that the survivors legitimately have. what i believe the enquiry has to do is identify clearly what happened, who is to blame and what needs to be done for the future. i think it also should identify what the immediate response was like. they are the main issues it should deal with and i believe it needs a judge was able to drive it to the
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conclusion that people are confident and it is a fair conclusion and i think he is a man do that. how will you deal with the various criticisms not necessarily of him but his appointment, mainly that he doesn't have the right expertise? the only way he can deal with those is by proving that he can run the process fairly and that is gaining the confidence of the grenfell tower residents and the wider community. and then by producing a report that is convincing in getting to the bottom of this but the key thing is how he handles himself from now. my experience of him professionally is that he will be able to do that. this is a very difficultjob. this is pressure from every angle, there will be pressured to do it as quickly as possible and there will
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be significant amounts of documentary and live evidence to that you have to get through. he have to do the job of sifting through the evidence but also to gain the confidence of all the people who could have been chosen i think he is somebody who can do both of those difficult tasks, gain confidence and do a good report. the proof of the pudding will be in the eating and i think he is a good choice and he should be left to get on with consulting with people for the skull, how it is run and the terms of reference petite would do a good job and people should have confident. do you think the government should have consulted more with the families and the survivors as to who they would choose because that is a criticism we have heard 7 choose because that is a criticism we have heard? yes and where you appoint a judge it is for the lord chiefjustice to appoint a judge it is for the lord chief justice to make appoint a judge it is for the lord chiefjustice to make a recommendation. you're probably best
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to leave it to be nominated rather than there being a debate about who it should be. if something emerges that makes a judge unsuitable than that makes a judge unsuitable than that would be... when you appoint a judge too sensible to limit primarily to the lord chiefjustice. more question about the personality, does he has a sensitivity and somebody called it emotional intelligence to deal with something as intelligent as this? he is in my opinion someone with great emotional intelligence. he is an understated man, the fact that he is quiet, the fa ct man, the fact that he is quiet, the fact he has no ego, the fact he
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wa nts to, fact he has no ego, the fact he wants to, he is barely able to absorb the emotional impact of what happened. the immensity of the tragedy and the need to have a sensitive report and sensitive of the process. good to talk to thank you. some breaking news that has just come in. a court in russia has found the first of five men guilty for the murder of boris lenska in russia two years ago. other verdicts are coming in, one of five has been found guilty of the murder of the opposition leader two years ago. labour will try to get elements of its general election manifesto into the government's programme when mps vote on the queen's speech later today. they'll call on the government to end austerity in public services, and to negotiate a brexit deal that "delivers the exact same benefits" as membership of the single market and the customs union. simon mccoy is at
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westminster for us. simon. thank you rita, here in westminster the tories will seek approval for their overall legislative programme. here at westminster — the tories will seek parliamentary approval for their overall legislative programme after a week of debate. labour has tabled an amendment to the queen's speech to introduce elements of its own general election manifesto. the party said it was because the conservative programme "was in tatters." a previous labour amendment, on lifting the public sector pay cap, was defeated in the commons last night, after the democratic unionists voted with the conservatives. here's our political correspondent alex forsyth. a piece of parchment setting out the government's policy plans. written by ministers, read by the queen at the formal opening of parliament last week. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others, to build the widest possible consensus on the country's future outside the european union. but now there's a hung
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parliament that consensus will be hard to achieve, notjust on brexit, but other measures, too. the one vote the government is confident of winning, today's, when mps will be asked to approve the queen's speech. i'm confident it will go through. we set out a programme in the national interest, delivering on brexit and other important domestic matters and i think that is important to deliver that said the government can get on governing as the people of britain would expect us to do. the ayes to the right 309. the noes to the left 323. yesterday the government saw off the challenge by labour. they tried to amend the queen's speech, to get more investment in public services and the scrapping of the cap on public sector pay. but whilst some tories hinted at their concerns over austerity... it's time for us to think again about the impact of the public sector pay cap. none were willing to
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undermine the prime minister on such a key vote. today, labour will try again with another amendment. we are putting forward fundamentally what was in our manifesto in the election. a brexit that guarantees trade relations with europe. a government that ends the public sector pay cap. and a government that invests in the education future of all of our children from nursery through to university. despite labour's efforts to tease open any divisions within the conservative party over austerity, it's highly likely that theresa may's queen's speech will get through the commons today. tory mps won't risk challenging her authority on this. and she has the support of ten democratic unionist mps with whom she did a deal to get their backing on key votes. but even with that, the prime minister's majority is slim and labour will seek to exploit that at every opportunity. parliament's likely to see some brutal battles over the next two years. backbenchers will be emboldened, every vote will count in getting anything through, and it won't be plain sailing. well you heard her in that report and with me now is the conservative
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mp for totnes and chair of the commons health selection committee sarah wollaston in the last few minutes we have heard that the government has agreed to women in northern ireland coming over to england being allowed to have abortions. that was the subject for the amendments that was going to be put forward tonight and now presumably doesn't need to be. why has the government done that, is that to wrong—foot labour or are they aware that backbenchers like you are unhappy with issues like that? the issue is there are lots of backbenchers who feel passionately that women should have safe access to termination of pregnancy and that should apply wherever they live our united kingdom and it doesn't seem right that some of them were being charged so many of us were making the case privately to ministers and lobbying for change and it is better
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to do it this way than to have an amendment to the queen's speech. would you have voted against the government? it is better to keep making your case and i often say to people this is how you achieve results, by steadily making the case and asi results, by steadily making the case and as i have done in the commons on public sector pay, we will see movement on this in the coming years and we need to but for that one we also need to work out how we're going to pay freight. but would you have voted against the government if we did not have that news? that is a hypothetical question. it is still a question, would you? hypothetical question. it is still a question, would you ?|j hypothetical question. it is still a question, would you? i think many us would've stuck abstain but that is not what we want we want to see the queen speech to go through how many? others will have to speak for themselves but the way you affect changes is to make a claim to ministers directly. the government
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at some point said we need to push this through, this is the future of this through, this is the future of this government is it? there have been discussions for some time now because it is an equalities issue and a very important one. making that case has paid off and it has happened just before the vote. but thatis happened just before the vote. but that is where we are and i'm glad the government is committed to this, i think it is the right thing to do anything going forward we will see movement on public sector pay. the government won the votes last night so government won the votes last night so in future is theresa may going to be looking over her shoulder all the time now backbenchers like you wondering if she has support? the point is if we have these discussions before legislation is bought to the house and that is a better way of doing things that clearly. . . that better way of doing things that clearly... that hasn't been the case up clearly... that hasn't been the case up until now? the numbers are
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different and this is something we will have a different kind of parliament. i hope that we have far more cross—party working is on key issues because if you take something like public sector pay and the need to increase funding and social care, what we know is that when you put these things in your manifesto, winter fuel payments, the triple lock to the double lock and others, it could mean you lose a huge number of votes are what we might end up with is having manifesto is promising massive giveaways as we saw the labour manifesto whereas what we need is more money into our public sectors. all of us will end up public sectors. all of us will end up paying more and i think that is the dishonest thing and labour promised it would have implications but of course it would. clearly the
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thoughts you are now being listened to and away you haven't been in the past will change the way your party, the government brings legislations through? on the issue of public sector pay for example, we are hearing there needs to be some sort of change in terms of austerity, is there movement? i think they does have to be movement because we know it is having an impact on recruitment and retention. i think to see a cut in real terms pay for nurses for example which has been going on in real terms over the last seven years, it is not sustainable because it means the difference between what you can earn here and what he can earn in a fiercely competitive international market in other sectors outside the nhs means will just continue to other sectors outside the nhs means willjust continue to lose stuff.
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how long do you give theresa may before you start making the point of the vote? i think we are hearing signals that this is under consideration that they will listen to the pay review and i'm hoping by next year certainly that we will see movement on this but it does mean i think that the responsibility for all parties to work together to be clear on how we will pay for this because for the nhs alone we're talking about half £1 billion for every extra 1% in the health service. in the public sector as a whole that has huge implications, it is not just whole that has huge implications, it is notjust the public sector, there are many other sectors were the same issues apply. these are issues we have to grapple with, everybody sees and would like to see this kind of thing happen, public sector staff rewarded but it is a question of not
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being made to pay. it is how we look at the manifesto is to make that happen and i think the public want to see politicians working in a much more consensual fashion. thank you. let's go to our chief political correspondent vicky young. there will be a series of votes after five and there is no question that we are ina and there is no question that we are in a difficult political climate. mps to have lots more power and one who be feeling that this delicacy. the amendment is on the paper today but will ring from northern ireland, just tell me first of all what you
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are looking for? if a woman comes from england to... she cannot access health care even though she contributes to the cost. they court ruling earlier this month get the secretary of state to fund that and he was sake you would not do so. we have heard from the government that they will fund this for northern irish women in england and wales, the fact they have conceived the principal, these women are paying the same taxes that getting different access i think is welcome. a very successful campaign you have run on all of this, is thirsty you think going to encourage other backbenchers to come forward with ideas? at the election theresa may asked her to get a thumping mandate
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and she said they are not the kind of politics that she wants and they felt it wasn't fair to treat northern irish women in this way and i think it is the type of politics that we should do, they want politicians, theresa may i hope is taking note of that. it does sound like a charity be funded. philip hammond said the money will come from the treasury and go to the equalities unit, will you now withdraw your amendment?” equalities unit, will you now withdraw your amendment? i need to see the detail of the scheme but i think the fact the government has conceded the principle that these women have the right to access abortion services without payment is welcome. those women from northern ireland have been heard for so long so ireland have been heard for so long so you need to get this right and i wa nt so you need to get this right and i want to make sure this happens quickly because there are women now he desperately need our support. vulnerable women who eat to make sure the process is right to. this
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is not the only change today, another change about keeping open the option of staying in a single markets, this is mainly about brexit and the type of brexit we have and it doesn't seem to be a labour party policy, are you going to back it i co—signed it and stood in the election campaigning saying to my community give me the mandate to fight for membership of the single market. that isn't contradicting the labour manifesto. what we're trying to do is say the prime minister spoke about this and decided to take things off the table before things began, we want him to go forward with all of the options forward in what is britain's best interest. just to throw that away that asking questions seems to be a bad thing to
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do. we want a job 's first approach and nobody is talking about rerunning the referendum, we're talking about is... the labour position is to abstain, are you going to go along with its?|j position is to abstain, are you going to go along with its? i will be voting for the error because i co—signed it and i said we will fight to the single market. what we wa nt fight to the single market. what we want to make sure are all options on the table. i think there are differences about how we get there. thank you very much indeed. those votes will start at five today. as politicians in stormont continue talks to restore power—sharing, the secretary of state for northern ireland says a deal is still possible.
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speaking in the last hour james brokenshire said significance progress has been made but this was disputed by sinn fein who said there was still no agreement over their demands for an irish language act. our ireland correspondent chris page is in stormont. if the deadline is now perilously close and we are getting mixed signals? that is right the negotiator came out here and how oregon and confirmed what everybody had known by that stage a rally that there wouldn't be a deal by the legal deadline of 4pm this afternoon. he said that the parties we re afternoon. he said that the parties were not close to agreement and that there would not be a process in the assembly to nominate ministers to serve in the devolved government. a meeting had been tentatively scheduled for 12 noon and that was put back and around the time they we re put back and around the time they were making a statement we heard that session had been cancelled
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entirely so we now know for sure that the deadline is going to pass without an agreement and the question is what will happen now. jane is broken sure we understand is planning to give a statement in the house of commons on monday, the party here say they want to continue to work on over the weekend in order to work on over the weekend in order to try to come to some agreement on a deal on these issues but really the political atmosphere here you could say is dreary as the weather. nobody seems to think a deal is close and there are still plenty of gaps separating the two main parties, especially around issues of culture and identity and in particular the issue of legal recognition for the irish language. what happens after the deadline passes, does it mean power—sharing is suspended, is properly suspended and return to westminster? we're not quite sure what the government is going to take after the deadline
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passes. whatever they have said to reporters at lunchtime, they did say that the prius was still achievable and that progress was being made in the parties were engaging intensively doesn't sound like they are willing to admit defeatjust yet. i imagine there will be some kind of measure to allow the parties to continue negotiating, the deadline is set in legislation now so deadline is set in legislation now so in orderfor this to be extended, it will have to be amended burts the political process it is, go. i would think they are still committed to getting the situation up and running but northern ireland has been without a government for six months and civil servants have been administering with no big policy decisions and so the government in westminster will have to take a call
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sooner westminster will have to take a call sooner rather than later and to keep the general business of government is going and how to keep cash flowing so you can see kyle some kind of step, whether or not it is fully direct, that remains to be seen. fully direct, that remains to be seen. we will be back for more information on a little while thank you. one of the pope's closest advisors, cardinal george pell, has been charged in his native australia with historical sexual offences against children. at a press conference this morning the cardinal insisted he was innocent of the charges — and said he looked forward to having his day in court. our correspondent james reynolds reports from rome. this morning st peter's square, the cardinals of the catholic church turned out for a celebration led by the pope, but one of their number was missing. cardinal george pell appeared instead in a vatican press room to respond to the charges made the australian police. i'm innocent of these charges.
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they are false. the whole idea of sexual abuse is abhorrent to me. so i'm very grateful to the holy father for giving me this leave to return to australia. today victoria police have charged cardinal george... earlier in australia, the police outlined the charges against the 76—year—old cleric. cardinal pell is facing multiple charges in respect of historic sexual offences, and there are multiple complainants relating to those charges. for more than a0 years, george pell worked as a priest, then an archbishop in his own country. in 2014, pope francis called him to work in rome. in february last year the cardinal testified via video link to an australian commission investigating official responses to child abuse.
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victims flew in to watch his testimony. now the cardinal will have to defend himself in court. the charges leave the church and the pope in an uncomfortable position. after his election, francis created a commission to deal with allegations of sexual abuse by clerics. now he finds that one of his closest advisers faces charges of his own. the pope will now face questions about his ally. cardinal george pell will appear in court in australia next month. james reynolds, bbc news. let's get an update on the weather now. at least the weekend offers better prospects because we have got quite a bit of a brain out there. some western parts of england and wales. even inland we might see shell was breaking up towards the north midlands and the south—east as
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well. quite windy as well bringing a distinctly chilly feel to things. brighter in the south. again it might spark of showers. through the evening remaining wet and windy. generally a lot of cloud overnight and with that temperature is not dropping off too far. fairly mild, 13-14. dropping off too far. fairly mild, 13—111. friday starts wet and windy across the north and west. largely drive but eventually the rain will slide southwards and eastwards. top temperatures around about 21. hello.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: a retired judge, sir martin moore—bick, will lead the inquiry into the grenfell tower fire. the prime minister says "no stone will be left unturned" by the inquiry. sir martin, who has been meeting residents this morning, promised "to get to the truth as quickly as possible" but he says it may not be as wide ranging as some residents hope. the residents and the local people want a much broader investigation and i can fully understand why they should want that. whether my inquiry is the right way in which to achieve that, i am more doubtful. and we'll be showing the full interview with sir martin, in a few minutes. the dup says there will not be
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a breakthrough to restore power sharing in northern ireland by today's deadline at 4pm this afternoon. one of the most senior figures in the catholic church who is accused of multiple counts of sexual abuse, the vatican treasurer cardinal george pell, says he'll take a leave of absence to fight the charges in australia. and a test of authority for theresa may's minority government as mps are set to vote on the queen's speech later, with three amendments to be voted on, including proposals calling for an ‘end to austerity‘. time for a look at the sport news, now. good afternoon. world number one andy murray has withdrawn from an exhibition event at hurlingham tomorrow, as his preparation for next week's wimbledon takes a blow.
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murray is the reigning wimbledon champion and top seed for next week's tournament, but is suffering from a sore hip. murray had already pulled out of facing frenchman lucas pouille on tuesday, he hasn't been able to train today and says he is also unlikely to be able to practice tomorrow. in the last few minutes, johanna konta has won the first set of her third round match against the french open champion jelena ostapenko. the british number one fought back from a break down to take it 7—5. it's currently 1—0 in the second. there's live coverage from eastbourne on bbc two this afternoon and on the bbc sport website. novak djokovic is through to the semi finals in eastbourne after a straight sets win over the american donald young. the world number four breezed through the first set 6—2 but young was far tougher in the second set, taking it to a tiebreak and pushing djokovic all the way. the serbian taking it 11—9 in the end to reach the last four. it has just been confirmed that
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jermaine defoe has joined bournemouth after leaving sunderland. he was available as a free transfer, following sunderland's relegation. jermaine defoe scored 15 goals last season, earned him a recall to the england side. and the sale of sunderland is now off. the chairmain said it would not be in the best interest. meanwhile, simon grayson has been given permission to speak to sunderland about the vacant manager'sjob. he sunderland about the vacant manager's job. he has sunderland about the vacant manager'sjob. he has been at deepdale for a number of years. warren gatland the british and irish lions head coach says he's had to make some tough calls
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for the ‘must win' second test in wellington on saturday. jonny sexton will start in the pivotal fly half role with owen farrell moved to inside centre, ben te'o drops to the bench. maro itoje will start in the second row with last weekend's captain peter o'mahony is replaced as skipper and in the flank by sam warburton. iam i am delighted with the selection for this week. it has probably been the most nervous i have been, going into this week. i was not sure what was going to happen. some of the quys was going to happen. some of the guys were was going to happen. some of the guys were brilliant on tuesday. i was very nervous about the selection. i am absolutely delighted iam going selection. i am absolutely delighted i am going to be starting the test series. holders england have named their squad for the women's rugby world cup in ireland later this summer. bristol's sarah hunter, who led the team to the six nations grand slam earlier this year, will again skipper the side with emily scarratt as vice captain. 28 players have been called up in total. england will begin their pool b campaign against spain on the 9th of august. great britain's mahama cho matched
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the best ever result for a british man at the world taekwondo championships with silver in the heavyweight division. cho had looked in great form reaching the final but was was unable to contain olympic silver medallist abdoul issoufou of niger who claimed his maiden world title with a 9—4 win. olympic champion jade jones is on course to win an impressive career grand slam of major titles. she's now into the semi finals of the 57 kilogram category which guarantees her at least a bronze. she's hoping to go one better than the silver she won back in 2011. i'll have more in the next hour. the retired judge heading the inquiry into the grenfell tower fire says he is "doubtful" the process will be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. sir martin, who is 70, has been meeting residents of grenfell this morning. he said he understood their "desire for justice". he's been speaking to our correspondent tom symonds.
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fit is an enormous tragedy and i can honestly say i have never seen anything like that building, but is now completely gutted, you can see through it in many places. it is very difficult, even having heard from former residents, to understand what a terrifying experience it must have been to be in that building without any obvious means of escape as the smoke started to rise. they have got my greatest sympathy. having said that, i am absolutely determined that this enquiry is going to be open, full, and cover all of the ground so that we can reach reliable conclusions and prevent anything like this happening again. i have been asked to undertake this enquiry on the basis that it would be pretty limited to
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the problems surrounding the start of the fire and the rapid development, in order to make recommendations as to how this sort of thing can be prevented in the future. i am well aware that residents and the local people want a much broader investigation, and i can a much broader investigation, and i ca n fully a much broader investigation, and i can fully understand why they want that. whether my enquiry is the correct way to achieve that, i am more doubtful. i will give that some thought and make a recommendation. what we could have other ways, that desire for an investigation can be satisfied. i would desire for an investigation can be satisfied. iwould hope desire for an investigation can be satisfied. i would hope to be able to a nswer satisfied. i would hope to be able to answer the basic factual questions, such as how did this fire start, spread, how did it engulf the building at such speed? and also, what internal precautions were there? what steps were available for
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alerting residents, allowing them to escape? the question about you being the man correct for this job. escape? the question about you being the man correct for thisjob. you will have seen, one of the decisions you need to use a go, about fishing, controversial. is that at the description of you, having been chosen to lead this enquiry?” description of you, having been chosen to lead this enquiry? i was surprised to see myself described as controversial. the case, it is one of many i have presided over as a judge. i have been a judge for over 20 years. and with the court of appeal, you do with an enormous range of work, involving local government, central government, and one simply reaches the conclusion that you think is right, applying
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the law as you see it. that's the work of a judge. as we've been hearing mps will vote on the queen's speech later today. labour has tabled an amendment calling on the government to end austerity and negotiate a brexit deal that delivers the same benefits as membership of the single market and customs union. simon mccoy is in westminster for us. thank you. the conservatives are going to be seeking parliamentary approval, for the vote later today. labour, looking to introduce elements of the manifesto, saying that the conservative programme is in tatters. dave penman is general secretary of the first division association union. hejoins me from cardiff. you have got 18,000 members, pretty influential. civil servants, diplomats, the pay cap that the conservatives want to keep going for two years, that is something you
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wa nt to two years, that is something you want to see continue, or have you had enough? the members are some of the most senior public servants. those are the people going to be doing behaviour lifting for government, in terms of brexit go seasons. already working hard on options for government and delivering vital public services. they have paid a heavy price for austerity, many taking homeless money than 2010. we have written to the chancellor, and said we want to see an end to the pay cap, and get decent rises for public services. what happened after the referendum? money that was serving departments, had to be switched to the brexit department? the chancellor only gave money to the foreign office, apart from that, just treating those two new departments. every government department has had to cope with the implications of brexit, thousands of
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civil servants, having no additional resources. that inevitably means for paul cox, on top of the 20% on average efficiencies that they are expected to deliver this parliament. let's face it. your members have unique access to these people making the decisions. talking to politicians and the prime minister every day. not some sort of silent lobbying? of course, the civil service is making the case to government about what it needs. but thatis government about what it needs. but that is a decision for government, ministers. until now, that has been falling on deaf ears, no additional resources. the government have got to decide what they are going to do, it is going to be one physical event in the autumn, the budget, and hopefully the spending round. that is what we have called for. it is simply madness to suggest that the
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decisions taken in 2015, about resources would not be changed after the referendum result and the challenges that the civil service is going to be facing over the next few years, delivering the successful brexit for the country. and if that autumn budget does not deliver? the resources have to be found from somewhere. the latest offer for european union citizens, 3.2 million living and working in this country have got to be registered. they are notjust have got to be registered. they are not just now. applying have got to be registered. they are notjust now. applying for citizenship. challenges and appearance. but the government has said the office can cope with that. madness. if the home office has got to court with that, on top of everything else, the government has got to decide it is going to give extra resources or stop doing something. we are talking about senior diplomats, civil servants,
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are they in touch? really struggling? of course. i'm struggling? of course. i'm struggling before brexit. the previous government had cut resources by 20% between 2010 and 2015, then expected to deliver an extra 20%. brexit, adding to that. we want to deliver a positive outcome for the united kingdom, that is ourjob. the method public servants, some of the most evil people, working on one of the biggest challenges since the second world war. but we need to be given the tools to do that. eye cannot understand why the government would not want to do that. why would you starve the people you want to deliver the successful outcome? thank you very much forjoining us. plenty more from westminster. back to you. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc news:
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a retired appeal courtjudge will lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire, he says it may not be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. the dup says there will not be a breakthrough to restore sharing in northern ireland by today's four o'clock deadline. mps will vote on the queen's speech later — labour is seeking amendments on public spending and brexit. in the business... the culture secretary said she is "minded to" refer rupert murdoch's 21st century fox takeover of sky to the competition watchdog. karen bradley's decision is a blow to the media mogul‘s hopes of having the £11.7 billion deal waved through without further scrutiny. more on that in a minute. the uk's accountancy watchdog,
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the financial reporting council, says its begun an investigation into the auditing of bt‘s financial statements. it in relation to the company's italian division. in january, bt wrote down the value of its italian unit by £530 million after years of "inappropriate behaviour". and almost 10% fall in the number of new cars, built in the uk. with news over the us — several of the big banks — citibank, bank of america, jp morgan, have announced plans to return more to shareholders — after passing annual stress tests held by the us central bank.
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stress tests are ways of telling if a bank is able to withstand a financial shock — they were introduced in a big way after the financial crisis. the banks are going to return water street called us —— stakeholders?” think it is worth taking a moment to note that this is going to be the first time that all the banks have passed these tests, since they were introduced in 2011. these tests can, in two phases. last week we find out the results of the banks were strong enough to withstand another financial shock, this week it was how much capital, what are they doing with assets? that was the result we got last night. how much they can spend in peeing out dividend but also buying back shares. at the same time, a lot of the banks, announced big divident
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pay—outs than many analysts expected. a driverless truck took to the streets of greenwich this week to deliver groceries — the demonstration was part of a trial carried out by online retail giant ocado. zoe kleinman went to see it in action. you can hardly hear it. but this small electric vehicle, almost an overgrown tuk tuk, wants to get you your shopping. for overgrown tuk tuk, wants to get you yourshopping. forsafety overgrown tuk tuk, wants to get you your shopping. for safety reasons, it is driving itself. the vision for how we do online groceries, it is about using large amounts of technology and automation to do that. that is one of the differentiators. it is the ultimate hands free. but how soon before we start seeing these things on the streets ? start seeing these things on the streets? over the next few years,
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you must expect to see many more on the road. it can travel at speeds of up the road. it can travel at speeds of up to 25mph, and has sensors and cameras, to tell it what it is going on around. it is not yet ready for the real world. those controlled conditions, the speed, low speed, the lack of traffic, and safety drivers, all part of the test process. we have to make sure that d riverless process. we have to make sure that driverless technology is going to be safe to use in the public. that is exactly what we are doing. it is not designed to carry family shopping, it is looking at smaller orders. you would not want to be stuck behind one on the way home. rolls—royce, investing the majority
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of cash, treating 200 jobs, and the union are very pleased with the decision. britain's second biggest airport — gatwick — has announced a record year. the 12 months to the end of january was the busiest in its history, with over 44 million passengers passing through its gates, a jump of 7.7% on the previous year. revenues and profits were also up strongly, and the airport is planning heavy investment. and almost two and a half times british citizens living in spain, as spaniards in britain. the statistics are designed to provide more information, head of the brexit gauche asians. 116,000 spaniards are
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loving in britain. we can also take a look at the markets. hsbc doing well. that is because morgan stanley said the rating of stock, upgraded. also, mining sector doing well. metal price up. that is it. i will be back in an hour. the national crime agency says it's increasingly concerned about violent albanian crime gangs and their control of uk drug trafficking. the influence of criminals from countries in the balkans is revealed in the nca's annual assessment of serious and organised crime. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. on their way to make an arrest on a north sea ferry. earlier this year, the national crime agency thwarted a huge drug smuggling operation. police.
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can you open the door, please? it involved p&o worker edward tron, who was jailed along with a colleague. tron's wife was convicted of money laundering. in its annual assessment on organised crime, the nca says corrupt staff working at ports and airports make it easier for gangs to smuggle in drugs. it says corruption at the uk border is a key vulnerability, with the port of dover targeted by people smugglers. the report also says there is a significant threat from albanian gangs, which have a growing influence on organised crime in the uk. this is very much a group that is small in number but big in impact. so we have seen an emergence of violence, particularly around enforcing the drug trade in this group, and hence we have a specific response with partners where we try the best we can to try and disrupt them. we have some cases going through the courts. we have taken large amounts of money out of it. but it was the rise in violence alongside the drugs trade that causes the most concern.
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there's also a warning about cyber crime. the agency says the scale of it is being underestimated, as many businesses failed to report attacks for fear of damaging their reputation. danny shaw, bbc news. if you need funds, email an emir. not an idea most people would have, but it's paid off for the people of godolphin cross near helston in cornwall. the village shares its name with one of the most famous stables in the world, owned by the emir of dubai. people were so desperate forfunds for their local church that one contacted sheikh mohammed bin rashid al maktoum for help. here's lisa hampele. godolphin cross, a quiet village in cornwall where the pace of life is gentle and the methodist chapel looks set to stand empty forever. the villagers were giving up hope of finding enough funds to buy it, and convert it to a community centre. but a bright spark thought of the ruler of dubai. sheikh mohammed bin rashid al maktoum. and his link to godolphin cross.
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their village shares its name with the world —famous godolphin stables in newmarket which he founded. he's rubbed shoulders with the establishment and the powerful. residents sent him a letter, more in hope than expectation, and were amazed when he offered help. i think it's a wonderful gesture. it's not the only giving that they do. they give to other projects around the world and in the uk, but it was fantastic because as i say we were staring down the barrel. we were in trouble, we were going to lose our last space and it was a wonderful gesture. so the sheik who has a passion for horses has become the village's unlikely knight in shining armour. no one will say how much he's given but it is thought to be around £60,000. and godolphin residents say any time he wants to take a break, from his champagne lifestyle, there's a warm welcome awaiting him. if ever he comes down this way, there's a pasty with his name on it,
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let's just say that! lisa hampele, bbc news. time for a look at the weather... good afternoon. it is a contrast across the united kingdom. some wet weather across the north west, and fife, what it is not raining everywhere. most of that across scotland, northern ireland, further east, brighter. this was the view from a weather watcher! contrast across britain. it is also windy across britain. it is also windy across the north, north west, heavy in scotland. to the south west, it is later, lighter, 15 in plymouth. you could see some showers across
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east anglia, but dry weather. 18. the rain is going to be patchy in nature, but across scotland and northern ireland, heavier and more persistent. the wind, it is great if you chilly. are disappointing for latejune. you chilly. are disappointing for late june. pretty wet and windy across scotland. and we are going to be keeping a lot of cloud and with that, mild night. 10—13. possibly 1a degrees. mild but wet for many. friday, wind and rain. tends to be lighter. starting to go back south and eastwards. also, top temperatures up on today. 21—22. as
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that weather goes south, it takes the rain with that. we can see this temporary high pressure for the weekend. that should settle things down. some wind and rain, but most of us are going to have a decent day, bright, breezy, sunshine, and 22, 20 three. 16 for belfast. on sunday, some overnight rain, but sunday, some overnight rain, but sunday looking similar to saturday. most sunday looking similar to saturday. m ost pla ces sunday looking similar to saturday. most places going to be dry, bright, breezy, top of 22, 23. this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at three. a retired appeal courtjudge will lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire — he says it may not be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. the residents and the local people wa nt the residents and the local people want a much broader investigation i
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can want a much broader investigation i ca n fully want a much broader investigation i can fully understand what they would wa nt can fully understand what they would want that. whether my enquiry is the right way in which to achieve that am doubtful. the dup says there will not be a breakthrough to restore power—sharing in northern ireland by today's 4 o'clock deadline. a senior member of the vatican, cardinal george pell, is charged with sexual abuse offences in his home country, australia. i'm simon mccoy live in westminster where mps will vote on the queen's speech later. it's been interpreted as a test of authority for theresa may's minority government —— labour is seeking amendments
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