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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 30, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. new questions over the grenfell tower disaster, as pressure grows on kensington council. last night the first full council meeting, since the fire, ended in chaos, after a row over whetherjournalists could attend. this morning it emerges that the cladding, originally due to be used on the tower, was downgraded in order to save money. good morning, it's friday 30thjune. also this morning: the parents of 10—month—old charlie gard — who lost their legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment — say his life support will be switched off today. 2017, the next few days will be the
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worst ever life. we know he is going to go. we don't even get a say on what will happen. so—called islamic state under siege in syria. american—led forces surround is fighters in raqqa. good morning. there's no need for men to wear a tie in the house of commons from now on says the speaker of the house — so this morning i'll be seeing if formal dress codes at work are on their way out. in sport — three days before wimbledon, the british number one johanna konta, recovers from a heavy fall at eastbourne, to beat the world number one, angelique kerber. and we'll hear the tale of menai the tropical sea turtle found washed up on a north wales beach earlier this year, thousands of miles from home. we'll hear how she's edging closer to a return to the wild. and sarah has the weather. good morning. a cloudy day with
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drizzle in the north and west. sunshine and showers towards the south—east. sunshine and showers towards the south-east. details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. there are fresh calls for the leader of kensington council to resign in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. a council meeting to discuss the tragedy was called off last night within minutes of starting after a row broke out over the attendance of members of the public and press. a document seen by the bbc has also revealed more details about the cladding used on the tower. our correspondent, dan johnson, is in west london for us this morning. dan, just start by telling us about some of those angry scenes at the council last night. bit by bit we are finding out more about this disaster, about this fire and about the materials that may have caused it to spread. over two weeks since the disaster, there are still people who need help, who need somewhere to properly move to to live and there are people in
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authority, figures from the local council, who should be in charge but appeared to be struggling with coping with this disaster. a meeting of councillors ending in chaos. another sign of the council creaking under pressure. that is the reality. having failed to properly respond to the disaster, last night kensington and chelsea failed in a bid to ban reporters from this meeting. our reputation absolutely (bleep) it.l high courtjudge reputation absolutely (bleep) it.l high court judge had reputation absolutely (bleep) it.l high courtjudge had to remind senior councillors their discussions are supposed to be open. so the top tea m are supposed to be open. so the top team walked out. the leader of the council's labour group to man's changes, not just at the top. council's labour group to man's changes, not just at the toplj would say that not only does the leader the council need to go and certainly the tenant management organisation, who is a supposedly
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providing housing policy, they need to go but at this stage the entire cabinet needs to go. if they are incapable of sorting themselves out then i would agree that the government needs to send in commissioners. before the meeting last night, the council leader accepted the criticism but said he was not going. the scale of this was absolutely enormous, unprecedented. i think absolutely enormous, unprecedented. ithink any absolutely enormous, unprecedented. i think any council would have found it difficult to have everything in place at once. was a big challenge for a relatively small london borough and i am sure we could have done better and we will look what we could have done quicker or better and that will be one of the we learn from this tragedy. the panels, on the building, are a key area for investigation. the bbc has been told during refurbishment zinc cladding was rejected in favour of an hour many alternative, not as fire reta rda nt, many alternative, not as fire retardant, but it has the same official rating. it was chosen because it is cheaper. the council
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saved more than £290,000. how costly that decision could have been is one of many questions for the enquiry. and london's mayor said last night the decision to cancel that meeting beggared to leave. he said the council needed to be transparent, needed to try and give answers to the residence here. the council itself has said that it increased the budget during the refurbishment of this tower. it said that it committed to putting more money in at different stages and it says it is committed to working with the enquiries that are now under way. but, certainly, blocking the public and the media from that meeting has not done anything to help faith in the process that now involves all the process that now involves all the different authorities who were involved in this building. in the last few days we have also had a reminder of the situation that survivors of this fire have been left in, struggling to find somewhere to live that are suitable for them. it is a nightmare. i
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cannot sleep. i sleep and i wake up. i slid four hours a day —— sleep four hours a day. we just want to get out. many tough questions, not just for kensington and chelsea council but also for all the authorities who had involved. everybody is waiting to see exactly when the public enquiry will actually get going and whether that can command the confidence of all the people who have been touched by this disaster. the parents of 10—month old charlie gard — who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment — say he will stop receiving life support today. charlie has a rare genetic condition and brain damage. doctors at great ormond street hospital say the us treatment would not have helped him. we should be over the road, sitting
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next to our son's bed, spending the last few precious hours with him. we just thought we would take five minutes out to tell you where we are. it is a video no-one should ever have to make. in a heartbreaking u—tube post, 10—month—old charlie's parents say they are being denied their last hope for their baby boy. we promised our boiler will make everyday we would take him home. that is the promise we thought we could. —— we promised our boy every day. we want to sit on a sofa with him, we want to sit on a sofa with him, we want to sleep in a bed with him. we have a cot that he has never slept in. are now being denied that. charlie was born with a rare genetic condition and severe brain damage. his parents have been fighting to keep his life—support switched on since march, despite doctors saying
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there is no hope for improvement. they took that fight all the way to the european court of human rights. but this week they lost, as judges agreed with the british courts it was most likely charlie was being exposed to continued pain. today, his life—support will be switched off. his parents say they are being rushed the difficult time of their lives. we begged them today to give us lives. we begged them today to give us this weekend. some of our family and friends can come. they can come before tomorrow so the last time they saw charlie will be the last time they ever see him. great ormond street hospital so they will not comment on specific details of patient care, but this is very distressing situation for charlie's pa rents distressing situation for charlie's parents and all the staff involved and focus remains with them. after six years of war, fighters of the so—called islamic state group are heavily under siege in the syrian
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state of raqqa. as a coalition progresses, they are already preparing for life after the defeat of is. our correspondence sent this report from its pre— airbase. —— correspondent sent this report from a temporary airbase. if and when racal falls, if and when racalfalls, it if and when racal falls, it will be a large part thanks to the american presidency. if you look at the record today, we have now, coalition backed operations in iraq and syria have cleared out a 60,000 square kilometre area of territory and we have liberated over 4 million people. as the coalition advances into raqqa, families are fleeing. many end up in this camp. all lived under the harsh rule of islamic state. not all against their will. one corner of the camp is reserved
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for the wives and children of is fighters. this woman left 11 on for raqqa a few years ago to join her husband. after he was killed she married eight and is in and she joined the ranks of a privileged group, the wives of foreign fighters. american troops in syria number in the hundreds, they won't say exactly how many as special forces are say exactly how many as special forces a re involved say exactly how many as special forces are involved in the fighting on the ground, their planes bomb raqqa from the air. isis is certainly not defeated. when mosul is liberated when iraq is liberated there is a lot of hard work left.|j asked the general as he knew the whereabouts of the self—declared leader of the caliphate? man, i was hoping you would know. if you know, please tell me and we will kill him for —— forthwith. please tell me and we will kill him for -- forthwith. capturing the city
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itself, despite being surrounded, will prove to be a long and hard fight. the american tennis player, venus williams — who is due to play wimbledon next week — has been involved in a car crash, which led to the death of a 78—year—old man. a police spokesman told the bbc they were investigating the incident in florida, which happened earlier this month. williams‘s lawyer said the tennis star "expresses her deepest condolences to the family" affected. taxi drivers, who went to the aid of people caught up in the manchester arena attack, were seen sashaying down the catwalk last night, to mark the opening of the manchester international festival. the event also included other mancunians — in place of professional models — to create what organisers described as a living "self—portrait of the city". a rare sea turtle found washed—up on a beach in anglesey has been taken to gran canaria ahead of her expected release. menai — named after the section of water, which separates anglesey from mainland wales — is an olive ridley turtle. the species would normally be found
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in warmer waters close to the equator — as our wales correspondent, sian lloyd, reports. taking a step was to home. menai's arrival at this turtle sanctuary marks a new chapter in her remarkable story. she has defied the odds on getting this far and will spend the next four weeks here. by her side, marine biologist frankie who has helped nurse back to health. here it is sunny and we saw the second day she was here she was basking quite happily, floating on the surface, relishing the sunlight on her shell. it is thought menai was swept off course, away from the south—western breeding grounds of africa, pass the east coast of america and back across the atlantic, all the way to the uk in the gulf stream. when she was found last november she was just minutes
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away from the anglesey zoo. the team there had to overcome hyperthermia, buoyancy problems and got her feeding again. really, what we want to do was take a further south—west and the laity and release in slightly warmer waters where she is north of the breeding grounds and let her find north of the breeding grounds and let herfind her north of the breeding grounds and let her find her own way there. north of the breeding grounds and let her find her own way therem that happens, menai will be back where she belongs where experts hope she will breed and play a part in helping secure the future of this endangered species. she will be happy in the canary islands. mike might have a total fat for us. do you? just lying on a each tower. she just wants to get out into the water again. i call her love. like my grandma. did she look
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like a turtle? i asked i didn't say it. i am like a turtle? i asked i didn't say it. iama like a turtle? i asked i didn't say it. i am a bit worried now, this weekend. medical staff will be busy. johanna konta had a fall and andy murray has a sore hip. he won't play today, will not play again properly until wimbledon. you just worry about them both, whether they will be fully fit. hopefully they will be. hopefully they can recover over the weekend. johanna konta, underlined her wimbledon credentials, with a dramatic win, over world number one angelique kerber, at eastbourne. konta was already a set up, when she suffered a heavy fall, late into the match. but after treatment, the british number one, took the second set to reach the semi—finals. she'll play czech third seed karolina pliskova later today. reigning champion andy murray, finds out later, who he'll play in the first round of wimbledon. but there are concerns about his fitness. the world number one, was due to play an exhibition match today, but has pulled out because of a sore hip.
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16 years, after he made his name there as a teenager, england strikerjermain defoe has re—joined bournemouth on a three year deal. a clause in his sunderland contract meant the 34—year—old could leave for free, following their relegation from the premier league. and french police, have been unable to trace the driver, accused of crashing into, the three—time tour de france winner, chris froome, while on a training ride in may. the briton, who rides for team sky, starts the defence of his title tomorrow. in the papers in a moment, a hole in one at the golf course. i will explain later. thank you! the front pages. starting with the telegraph. actually, we are going to go to the weather. blame me. i was leading you down the garden path. we were told and i said, no, we're
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doing the papers. it is almost like we have a voice in my ear telling me what to do, which is not the case! i worry when a voice as he might yet happen when i'm not in the studio. that's another story! i am sure sarah is levelheaded and have it altogether! good morning. very serene looking morning. this is ca ptu red serene looking morning. this is captured by one of our weather watchers in norfolk. a bit of mist on us, but not that quiet everywhere. more rain on the cards through today. for the last day of june let's have a look at last week. we had the record—breaking heat. this time the rain is in focus. parts of scotland, edinburgh, broke the record. 178 millimetres falling in edinburgh, the wettestjune on record. the bit of a topsy—turvy month. through the course of today we have some rain. this is the radar
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picture, showing we have had wet weather in wales, south—west of england as well in recent hours. in northern and western parts we will continue to see that drizzly rain through this morning. eight o'clock in the morning, wet weather and windy weather for the likes of pembrokeshire and cornwall. it turns left windy and dry up as we move across the midlands and south—east of england. a mild and relatively bright start for the likes of kent and towards norfolk. more cloud heading further north into northern england, northern ireland and some patchy drizzle. it won't be raining all the time in parts of scotland, but there will be patchy outbreaks at times and it will feel windy the northern and western parts. further towards the south—east we should have sunshine breaking through into the afternoon, but without sunshine also the chance of a couple of heavy showers and if you catch one there could be hail and possibly thunder and heavy rain around. but as in the north and west, 14— 16,
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and heavy rain around. but as in the north and west, 111—16, but in the south—east we are likely to see a 23 degrees, so feeling pretty warm. into this evening and other area of rain moves down east coast of england, east anglia and the south—east, but elsewhere it is dry and it is an improving picture as we look ahead to the weekend. we have this ridge of high—pressure moving on. there will be low pressure again approaching from the atlantic, not for many other cities are dry and bright picture and all parts should see sunshine at least one day of the weekend. on saturday any early rain clears from the south—east. lots of dry and sunny weather install, for more cloud and drizzly rain moves across scotland and northern ireland late in the afternoon. temperatures about 24. mostly dry again on sunday, but showers look into the south—east and perhaps the few blustery showers in the north—west. but it is looking like a brighter and drier weekend. thanks very much! now we will do the papers. good idea. good morning! good morning.
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the guardian front—page. we will discuss this in a few minutes with our political correspondent, alex, about the events yesterday. people say this is the new kind of parliament we will have, with these concessions we had in the last few minutes and these tight votes. the front page of the daily telegraph: the picture is of prince charles, the prince of wales, donning silver snow goggles in the northern territory in canada... i'm loving the names! i'm loving the names! i'm not sure if i am doing them justice. the headline is that more than 50,000 patients with metal hips are being told they must undergo blood tests after they have been found to
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be more toxic than originally thought. the times focuses on grenfell tower and issues around the cladding, suggesting the council was cutting costs, keeping the cost of the cladding down. we will talk more about that story on the front of the times and the telegraph, but a couple of stories in the business pages of the telegraph. more eyes watching the city watchdog, looking at car finance deals. are they bringing back control in the uk? and this one from sony. getting back into the vinyl business, beginning to press their own records, the first time in decades they've done that. ididn't that. i didn't realise they were that popular! when the money starts flowing into it you know they are popular. this time tomorrow, the lions are building up to their second test. sam warburton is captaining this weekend and he says it is the biggest game of his life. some are even saying if they lose this one and lose the series 3—0 it could be
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the end of the lions as we know them, but i think that exaggerating. and of course, look at this, the cliff collapse. this is in west dorset, on the 15th hole. they fencedit dorset, on the 15th hole. they fenced it off and played on. thank goodness no one was hurt on this occasion because it was very dramatic. so there is a path going across there? literally yards from the bunker and it just caved in. ground under repair! thank you very much. we will have alex forsyth at westminster. this is looking atjeremy corbyn axing three shadow ministers. that was over the rebellion over the brexit vote. let's go to alex. this is the kind of... we are getting a glimpse now really just what this new style of
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parliament will feel like on a day—to—day business sense, aren't we? i think that's right. the realities of a hung parliament, where every single vote counts and so backbench mps and some on the front bench are calling it brave. some labour mps went against the leadership yesterday because they backed an amendment which called for the uk to stay in the single market when it leaves the eu. labour's official position is that it should retain the benefits of the single market. the micawber and sacked three frontbenchers and another one resigned. he is asserting his authority, if you like, after the result. on the conservative side the government had to make concessions to stop some of its backbenchers rebelling because there were suggestions there might support a labour amendment to ensure free access to abortions in england for women from northern ireland. the government has agreed to fund them to stop its tory backbenchers causing trouble, so this is very much the new reality now. boulder backbench mps, which can cause a
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problem for party leaders. thank you very much. fewer people are taking their own lives on the railways. the reduction in this number is thought to be due to groundbreaking partnerships between the charity samaritans and network rail. people have been trained on what to do if they spot someone looking vulnerable. there's been an 18% reduction in such deaths since the programme started last year. every year more than 200 people take their own life on the railways. people of all ages, from all backgrounds. the initial shock after oscar died... you'rejust backgrounds. the initial shock after oscar died... you're just numb backgrounds. the initial shock after oscar died... you'rejust numb and then in the weeks and is numb —— and months afterwards you get hit with a tsunami of grief. oscar was just 16 when he took his own life in 2015.
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he was smart, fun, popular at school. there was no clue as to how he was really feeling. you feel like your heart has been turned into glass, shattered. you are so vulnerable yourself and at that point you could take your own life. carmel is now starting a charity in oscar's name, going into schools, encouraging children to speak out about their feelings. what we do know is that many people who are suicidal, one of the things they are feeling... you can learn how to prevent suicide. in recent years nearly 15,000 rail staff and transport police have been on this groundbreaking samaritans course, showing them what to do if someone looks vulnerable. andy admits he was cynical before the lesson, but he is soon “— cynical before the lesson, but he is soon —— he soon relied on it to help a man in real trouble. soon —— he soon relied on it to help a man in realtrouble. i sat down, i spoke to him, asked him if i could help asked him if he wanted to talk. he said to me he was a coward and
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that he wanted to die. so i ask him if he would come and sit in the van and let me talk to him. at the time it was the only safe place i could think to get him. he says one thing in particular came back to him. think to get him. he says one thing in particular came back to himlj can remember the instructor actually saying, don't say "i know how you feel". that's always stuck in my mind because it is the type of thing i probably would have said, so that's in your mind, not to say it. rail staff stepped into talk to a vulnerable person on average —— an average of four times a day last year and the number of rail suicide is now going down. if it was you that was stood there, in a vulnerable position, how would you feel if someone didn't come up and talk to you and you were allowed to go and take your own life? it's horrific, isn't it? you would want someone. . . horrific, isn't it? you would want someone... you would want to be able to thank someone one day.
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that was carmel, speaking to our transport correspondent. for details about organisations which offer advice and support, visit the bbc website above: or call any time for free to get information. see you at the bottom of the hour. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. survivors of the grenfell fire, along with many others who witnessed the tragedy, are being offered free counselling and support. there are concerns about the long—term impact the fire could have on the mental health of those affected. among those being supported by the charity unity of faiths is an islamic teacher whose pupils lost friends in the disaster. when a see them, i sometimes cry,
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when i hear their stories. but in order to keep them strong, i try to not show them weakness. i tried to show them, yes, it is sad but you need to overcome it. feltham prison and young offender institution has been judged unsafe and one officer was even assaulted during the inspection. a new report says the younger boys eat all their meals alone, locked in their cells. there's said to be serious violence— involving a number of different weapons. however, inspectors did describe mental healthcare at feltham as impressive. let's have a look at the travel situation now. first the tube — the met line has severe delays between rickmansworth and amersham. however, southern trains will have cancellations and reduced services today, due to industrial action. there'll be no off peak service on the gatwick express between brighton and gatwick although a full service is expected
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to run to the airport from victoria. this is how the blackwall tunnel looks. queues already this morning northbound from blackwall lane. in dulwich, a water main's burst. the a205 south circular thurlow park road is flooded and down to one lane westbound by west dulwich station. and in westminster, saint margaret street and abingdon street are still shut southbound from parliament square to great college street for works. time for a look at the weather now. here's elizabeth rizzini. good morning. once again there will be plenty of cloud around today, but also brighter spells and possibly spells of sunshine and also some heavy showers, especially towards southern areas of the capital through the morning. some of them quite sharp and fading away into the afternoon. watch out for the showers towards the south. elsewhere, mostly dry and a fairly bright start. sunshine breaking through at times and the like reeves. top can produce up and the like reeves. top can produce up to 23 celsius, so feeling warmer than yesterday. if you are headed out tonight, friday night, the aware
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that it could be raining by the time you get home. so dry for the first pa rt you get home. so dry for the first part of the bidding, and a weather front is sinking down from the north. —— the evening. worst of the rain will be light and patchy. we start tomorrow a bright note, about 14 celsius. a pleasant day coming on saturday. there will be sunshine around through the morning and again for the last part of the day as ugly clouding over —— of the day, clouding over —— of the day, clouding over —— of the day, clouding over in the middle. warm in the sunshine. top temperatures of about 24 celsius. we could have showers on sunday, but they will clear the sunny spells again in the afternoon. that's it for now. there's more from us in half an hour, here at bbc london news. and there's plenty more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address or on our radio station, bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning.
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it's the simple test that saves lives — but new research suggests many women still aren't aware of the need for cervical screening. we'll look at what's being done to change that. where a tyre. it seems quite irreleva nt where a tyre. it seems quite irrelevant in some ways. —— wearing a neck tie? appropriate uniform or irrelevant tradition? sean will be looking at whether dress codes in the workplace have gone out of fashion. from climbing the career ladder, to scaling new heights. after 8:30, we'll bejoined by the american free—climber widely regarded as the world's greatest. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. there are fresh calls for the leader of kensington council to resign in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. a council meeting to discuss the tragedy was called off last night within minutes of starting after a row broke out over the attendance of members of the public and press. a document seen by the bbc has also revealed more details about the cladding used on the tower. our correspondent, dan johnson has more. a meeting of councillors
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ending in chaos. another sign of the council creaking under pressure. that is the reality. having failed to properly respond to the disaster, last night kensington and chelsea failed in a bid to ban reporters from this meeting. our reputation... absolutely (bleep) it. a high courtjudge had to remind senior councillors their discussions are supposed to be open. so the top team walked out. the leader of the council's labour group demands changes, not just at the top. i would say that not only does the leader of the council need to go and certainly the tenant management organisation, who is a supposedly providing housing policy, they need to go but at this stage the entire cabinet needs to go. if they are incapable of sorting themselves out then i would agree that the government needs to send in commissioners.
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before the meeting last night, the council leader accepted the criticism but said he was not going. the scale of this was absolutely enormous, unprecedented. i think any council would have found it difficult to have everything in place at once. it was a big challenge for a relatively small london borough and i am sure we could have done better and we will look at what we could have done quicker or better and that will be one of the things we learn from this tragedy. the panels stuck on the building, are a key area for investigation. the bbc has been told during refurbishment zinc cladding was rejected in favour of an aluminium alternative, not as fire retardant, but it has the same official rating. it was chosen because it is cheaper. the council saved more than £290,000. how costly that decision could have been is one of many questions for the enquiry. in around ten minutes'
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time, we'll be speaking to the labour councillor, robert atkinson — who challenged the kensington council leader at the meeting last night. parents of 10—month—old charlie who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for treatment to take him to america for treatment to say he will be taken off life support today. charlie has a rare genetic condition. doctors say that the us treatment would not have helped him. chris and connie say they have now been told they will not be able to take their son home to die. nurseries in england are warning local councils are failing to provide enough money to fund more free childcare for three and four—year—olds. from september children will be eligible for 30 hours free nursery education a week — if both parents are in work. however the national day nurseries association say most won't be able to afford to provide the extra hours. more than a quarter of women
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who are overdue for a cervical cancer test don't know screening is available, according to cancer research uk. the charity found there was a particular lack of awareness among women who spoke english as a second language. around 3,000 new cases are diagnosed every year and the charity says more needs to be done to reach women who are missing tests. we were very surprised to find that some were completely unaware of the programme and that tended to be women from black, minority and ethnic groups and those who did not have english as a first language. that's just that although all women in the country who are age eligible for screening are sent to an invalid patient inviting them to take part, for some women that is not a good way to reach them. the american tennis player, venus williams — who is due to play at wimbledon next week — has been involved in a car crash, which led to the death of a 78—year—old man. a police spokesman told the bbc they were investigating the incident in florida, which happened
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earlier this month. williams‘s lawyer said the tennis star "expresses her deepest condolences to the family" affected. taxi drivers, who went to the aid of people caught up in the manchester arena attack, were seen sashaying down the catwalk last night, to mark the opening of the manchester international festival. the event also included other mancunians — in place of professional models — to create what organisers described as a living "self—portrait of the city". time now this sport. yes and we are nervously waiting for news of the condition of our top tennis players. you know, in spore, when you have a fall and adrenaline keeps you going. the day after that the pain will kick in so we have thatjohanna konta is ok because she is doing so well wimbledon next week. johanna konta is, for the moment, through to the semifinals at eastbourne but her victory over
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angelique kerber came at a price. konta was already a set up when she suffered a heavy fall late into the match. following a lengthy stoppage while she received treatment, the british number one eventually took one of several match points to win the second set and booked her place in the last four. she'll play czech third seed karolina pliskova later today. well... i slipped and i hit my head so my head is a little sore right but we will see. it has been a easy afternoon so... notjust for myself but for many players. we played a lot of tennis today so definitely looking forward to recovering the best i can and playing again. heather watson is also into the last four at eastbourne, she'll play caroline wozniacki today. you can see that match on bbc two from 11 o clock. in the men's draw, novak djokovic kept his wimbledon preparations on course, after beating american donald young in straight sets. the serbian, won the first set easily, but had to survive, two set points in the second before, winning it in the tiebreak. djokovic, who's seeded second for wimbledon,
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plays daniel medvedev, in his semi final today. meanwhile andy murray, has withdrawn from an exhibition event in london today with a sore hip, denting his preparations for wimbledon. murray is the reigning champion and top seed for the tournament at the all england club, but has pulled out of two matches this week. and the world number 855 alex ward, will be in this morning's main wimbledon draw, he's the only british player, to come through the singles qualifying event. he beat russia's teymuraz gabashvili. ward had lost his previous seven matches, before this week. simon grayson says he wants to give sunderland fans 18 they can be proud of after he was appointed as their new manager. he signed a three—year deal with the club. he replaces david moyes who resigned in may and joins afterfour years david moyes who resigned in may and joins after four years with fellow championship club preston. also signing a three—year deal is england
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strikerjermaine defoe who is making a return to bournemouth. he had a clause in his contract allowing him to leave for free following sunderland's relegation from the premier league. he is leaving sunderland. he scored 15 goals last season. in one year before the world cup, the reigning champions are frightening form. their reserves side cruised into the final of the confederations cup. they scored twice early on. how about this goal for mexico? look at the distance! it was a only a consolation but worth seeing again. germany will play chile in the final on sunday in saint petersburg. in rugby league, leaves edged a thrilling match. they are up to second now in the super league table. the rhinos ran in four tries. they survived a late fight back to dent the hopes of saint helen ‘s finishing in the top four. there is nothing a mother will not
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do for a there is nothing a mother will not do forafun, there is nothing a mother will not do for a fun, is there? even if you are grown man playing in a professional tournament, a chinese player through his part into the water at the 11th. something my would never do. a tantrum going on. 20 minutes later, that is his mother wading into the water to find it. attracting attention from the other players. she found it, possibly for posterity. she realises it is broken and throws it back in. her efforts that some of the other players into fits of laughter as they looked on in amazement at the effort she had gone to. and all in vain. what a lovely mother. if my mother saw me through my part in the water... have you done that? no. if she saw me throwing my putter in the water, she would then threw me on. that water
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does look manky as well. thank you very much, mike. we will have the weather a little later but first, let's return to our main story. a chaotic meeting at kensington council last night. aborted soon after it began. robert atkinson was there who criticise the leaders saying that the reputation of the council is in the gutter. thank you for joining council is in the gutter. thank you forjoining us this morning on a councillor. can you describe, furs, described the atmosphere and what happened last night in that meeting which effectively was brought to a premature conclusion. we went to the meeting to find out what the council was proposing to do, to find a way forward to look after our residents. the leader of the council then read out a statement, statement he should have made ten days ago, and then when he became aware that the press we re when he became aware that the press were present he then summarily ended the meeting. it turned into chaos
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with none of our questions answered. that led me to call for the suspension of the council and the appointment of commissioners. simply because the council, even after ten days, is failing to get to grips with the situation. the council is saying that they were following legal advice, that they could not proceed with the meeting with the press there. if that is not true? they are changing their story. what i was subsequently told was that they did not want to intrude on two areas of sub judice which i find very offensive to backbench councillors. we know where the legal limits are and were prepared to stay within them. we are not asking, we we re within them. we are not asking, we were not seeking about needing to ask questions about the origin of the fire. we were looking to comment upon and to contribute to the things that have happened since the fire,
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the abysmalfailure that have happened since the fire, the abysmal failure of the council to provide services for my residence. we were clear as to what we could and could not talk about. and, anyway, there were legal officers present and they could have guided us and we strayed onto territory that should not have been discussed. they simply did not wish to speak to either the public or the breast or the rome backbench councillors. can you be clear forest now, what is it you want to see happen? -- for us now? i want the pmo to be done away with. i want the senior leadership of the council and the cabinet to resign. i want a new organisation in the council who can finally get to grips with the situation and make sure that my residence are properly housed and looked after. ten days after this disaster, and i remind you, we are only a few miles away from parliament, we are not in a third world country, ten days after this disaster my people are still not
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housed properly, still not being listened to and still not getting access to the money they have been promised. why do you think, given what you have outlined their, why do you think the council is still in place? are they... are they blind to the problems, the ongoing problems that people, the conditions that people are living in and, if you like, how they are compounding the problems? yes. they do not seem to have the capacity to grasp the scale of the problem. the organisations and other councils that have come in to help us have done a magnificent job and! to help us have done a magnificent job and i am not criticising the junior officers of the council. the officers of the council ‘s in very difficult circumstances are trying to get back to normal and to provide additional services to those who have suffered. but there is no leadership. they are running around like headless chickens and they are trying to pretend that they are in control of the situation when they cannot even organise a meeting in
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their own to make town hall. it demonstrates to the entire nation that they do not know what they are doing. thank you very much for your time this morning. we appreciate that. he is a labour councillorfor the kensington and chelsea council. let's talk to sarah now and find out what is happening with the weather. you will get better for us? that's right, we have brighter and drier weather on the cards by the time we get to the weekend. it has been unsettled. the whole month of june has been rather topsy—turvy. we've had high temperatures. last week we had the record—breaking heat and this week we've had the heavy rain. in fact, and this week we've had the heavy rain. infact,178 and this week we've had the heavy rain. in fact, 178 millimetres of rain. in fact, 178 millimetres of rain has fallen edinburgh, the wettest ju ne rain has fallen edinburgh, the wettest june on record. rain has fallen edinburgh, the wettestjune on record. we've beaten some records. this was the scene taken in edinburgh yesterday by one of our weather watchers. here is the
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recent radar picture. the heaviest rain is in parts of wales and the south—west of england, also drizzle further north. if you are heading out for the morning rush—hour there is heavy rain towards cornwall and pembrokeshire, combined with a risk wind. so not very nice conditions. quieter towards the midlands and the south of england. there will be a bit of sunshine breaking through as well. heading our way northwards there's low cloud and drizzle for there's low cloud and drizzle for the north of wales. although it should improve here late in the day. across scotland it's a rather grey picture. there will be some outbreaks of light and patchy rain, but most of the rain should ease through the day. quite windy in parts of scotland, northern ireland and wales and the south—west of england. with sunny spells developing in the south—east we could have a few heavy showers, especially in kent, sussex. if you catch one that could be heavy rain around here. temperatures towards the west about 14— 17 degrees. for
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central and south—eastern parts of the highs are up into the low 20s. this evening and tonight we will see wet weather moving down across parts of eastern and central england, but most other places become dry. the winds for light and we have this high pressure building on. that's what will bring us a better weekend. it will be drier and brighter than we have seen over the past few days. during saturday any early rain clears from the south—east and very sunny and dry weather for much of the country. into the afternoon more cloud and outbreaks of rain in parts of scotla nd cloud and outbreaks of rain in parts of scotland and northern ireland. ahead of that we could see temperatures up to 24 degrees. a pleasa nt temperatures up to 24 degrees. a pleasant day. still a chance of wet weather. on sunday, perhaps during the morning, in southern england, but most other areas having a dry day and temperatures up to 22 degrees. thanks very much! we are going to talk about
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appropriate closing hour, specifically these ties. the ongoing debate about when should a man wear a tie and when should he not? it isa a tie and when should he not? it is a bit ofa a tie and when should he not? it is a bit of a minefield at the moment. the —— the speaker of the house of commons has told male mps they no longer have to wear a tie, so are workplace dress codes going out of fashion? sean. you've got a little picture alongside you. you seem to be getting smaller, which is confusing. and you are levitating! but on the left you seem eager, but you are more formally dressed. yes, taller. are you wearing red trousers? yes, that can get controversial. if you are in london these days you will hardly see a normal pair of trousers. they are all bright and fluorescent. is that crossing the line? there's so much you need to consider. businesslike attire. but
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they were saying in the house of commons yesterday. it is the last bastions of formal dress in the house of commons. but times are changing. the speaker of the house allowing men not to wear a tie, saying "business—like attire" is all that's required instead. what does that mean? we've already got business casual and smart casual to deal with. we asked some workers if they'd want to give up the humble tie. where i work, in the office i work, i make sure people i work with all who work for me where a tie. in some professions it is appropriate to where attire. banking, even accountancy, added is appropriate. ifiam accountancy, added is appropriate. if i am going to a meeting or viewing i would probably put on attire, not just in viewing i would probably put on attire, notjust in the office, no. i've personally always found a button up shirt actually looks much more clean and tidy than a thai, which seems like an irrelevant piece of cloth —— tie. an irrelevant piece of cloth, i like that! lyn bromley is managing
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director of first impressions training. she's an image consultant. are we seeing this across businesses, but formal wear is going up businesses, but formal wear is going up the window? we are. for about the last 20 years things have been changing and dress codes have become more relaxed. i would say it varies depending on industry you are in and there are some quite traditional organisations that still do request them to wear ties and suits, but it has definitely changed over the past couple of decades. if we look at these, you've got a suit with no tyre. where do you start drawing the line about what is smart wear in the office? what is businesslike attire? it really depends on the organisation. i would also say it depends on the kind of clients you work with. in organisations where they are little bit more informal, such as technology companies and we've seen a massive change in at
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over the years with the increasing digitisation, so it is much more appropriate to be dressed as you are on the right hand side. whereas on the left it is really more formal organisations, perhaps like law firms, accountants, management co nsulta nts. firms, accountants, management consultants. even for those industries it has been and therefore wearing the our feed without a tie is considered to be perfectly ok. —— the outfit. i always quite like sleeves rolled up in the office. is that suitable? again, depends on the organisation and the kind of work. would it be considered smart? it's not as smart as the sleeves down, but actually gives much more prefera ble but actually gives much more preferable than having a short—sleeved shirt on in business, which isn't seen as quite as professional. i feel quite sorry for men in the summer, like last week when we seem to have had our summer. the guys are really warm in the office when they are still having to wear shirts and ties. so being able
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to roll sleeves up is unacceptable look, but again it really depends on the organisation. it is all about appropriateness for the industry you are in. thank you very much. there you go. i think ijust about pass, depending on who i am working for. you would always pass! it's 80 years since the 999 emergency call system was first introduced. ini 1937 it involved just 24 staff based at scotland yard, world's away from the vast operation that exists across the country today. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the headquarters of the london ambulance service for us this morning. he can tell us more about how it works. good morning. good morning. the london ambulance service welcoming us this morning, very nice of them to do that, because it's a busy place. on the 30th ofjune, the first 999 calls we re 30th ofjune, the first 999 calls were made and in that year around
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5000 calls were made for the metropolitan police. compared that today and the ambulance service in alone in london deals with 1.8 million calls, 10 billion 999 calls around the country. what's it like doing thisjob, receiving around the country. what's it like doing this job, receiving the calls here and not knowing what's going to happen? it is really rewarding. obviously it's a really fast moving job, so we always have to be switched on the whole time. enqueue. you never quite know what's going to happen. —— thank you. you are from south—east ambulance service. tell us south—east ambulance service. tell us about an extraordinary call you took recently. the three roles, the mom was unconscious, she called herself, no help, just on her own. let's have a listen to what happened. and extort recall made by a three—year—old —— extraordinary call. ambulance service. i had no idea that she even knew how to call the ambulance, the number to
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call, so we were really proud of her and she has been a little superstar. i was panicking, that you were on the floor. but everything was ok, wasn't it? yeah, it was all right. everything was fine, because you are such a big, brave girl. yeah. lovely to hear that it was a happy ending. what was that like?m definitely throws you. especially when they are that age, three years old and they don't necessarily know the process of what happens when you call 999, but she did amazingly well. the professionalism and the armpit debility, i guess that's what you need to demonstrate all the time? —— unpredictability. you need to demonstrate all the time? -- unpredictability. yes, you can't stick to a script, you have to go with the process. well done for handling it so well. 999 calls in
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london are first received here. this is where ambulances are dispatched from. of course it isn'tjust ambulances, you might need a policeman, a fire brigade. joanne is senior operating manager from london fire brigade. 999 callsjust change everything so much. what is it like and how have they changed over the yea rs ? and how have they changed over the years? they really have changed over the years and they have been a platform for establishing the emergency control rooms, the one we are now, where you can bring 999 still for free and get through to an operator who can give you life—saving advice, take the details of your emergency and get the fire engines or the ambulances, police ca rs engines or the ambulances, police cars there, immediately. with a disaster such as the one that happened at grenfell tower, it shows the chaotic situation which you need to manage so well. what kind of a challenge is that? it is a challenge and at times the control room can be very intense. but our operators are
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trained to deal with that pressure, to treat all callers calmly, to talk to treat all callers calmly, to talk to them, gathered information they need and we laid out to the responding officers on the scene. thanks very much. we will talk more later. one quick test and i am often asked, why acra one? —— 999? 000 was an option but it confused the operator, 111 an option but it confused the operator, 11! created a technical fault, so they decided on 999. thank you very much. people may remember that, that phone call made by the little girl, every time you hear it it is so compelling. and heart wrenching. what a smart little girl! time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. survivors of the grenfell fire, along with many others who witnessed the tragedy, are being offered free counselling and support.
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there are concerns about the long—term impact the fire could have on the mental health of those affected. among those being supported by the charity unity of faiths is one islamic teacher whose pupils lost friends in the disaster. when i leave them, i sometimes cry, when i hear their stories. but i try to, in order to keep them strong, not to not show them weakness. i try to tell them, yes, it's sad, but we need to overcome it. feltham prison and young offenders institution has been judged unsafe and one officer was even assaulted during the inspection. a new report says the younger boys eat all their meals alone, locked in their cells. there's said to be serious violence involving a number of different weapons. however, inspectors did describe mental healthcare at feltham as impressive. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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the district line has a beard allays eastbound twin towers hill and westminster. the metropolitan line has minor delays between rickmansworth and chesham. southern trains will have cancellations and reduced services today due to industrial action. there'll be no off peak service on the gatwick express between brighton and gatwick although a full service is expected to run to the airport from victoria. southeastern and thameslink trains have half hour delays via sevenoaks. this is how it looks on the a13. getting busy westbound from dagenham into barking. in dulwich, a water main's burst, the a205 south circular thurlow park road is flooded and down to one lane westbound time for a look at the weather now. good morning. once again there will be plenty of cloud around today, but there'll also be brighter spells, possibly spells of sunshine and also heavy showers,
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particularly towards southern areas of the capital through the morning. some of them quite sharp and fading away into the afternoon. so watch out for the showers towards the south. elsewhere, mostly dry and a fairly bright start. sunshine breaking through at times and a light breeze. top temperatures up to 21—23 celsius, so feeling warmer than yesterday. if you are headed out tonight, friday night, be aware that it could be raining by the time you get home. so dry for the first part of the evening, late brightness around and then a weather front is sinking down from the north. most of the rain will tend to be light and patchy. we start tomorrow on a bright and mild note, at about 14 celsius. so quite a pleasant day coming on saturday. there will be sunshine around through the morning and again for the last part of the day. possibly clouding over in the middle part of the day. but it should feel warm in the sunshine. a top temperature of about 24 celsius. sunday not as good — showers in the morning,
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but they will clear the sunny spells again in the afternoon. that's it for now. there's more from us in half an hour, here at bbc london news. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. new questions over the grenfell tower disaster, as pressure grows on kensington council. last night the first full council meeting, since the fire, ended in chaos, after a row over whether residents and journalists could attend. this morning it emerges that the cladding, originally due to be used on the tower, was downgraded in order to save money. good morning, it's friday 30thjune. also this morning: the parents of 10—month—old charlie gard — who lost their legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment — say his life support will be switched off today. today will be the worst day of our
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lives. we know today our son will die and we don't even get to say what happens to him. scams involving consumers being duped into buying "phantom goods" that never materialise are on the increase. that's according to the consumer body citizens advice. i'll be finding out how to avoid being caught out later. in sport — three days before wimbledon, the british number one johanna konta, recovers from a heavy fall at eastbourne, to beat the world number one, angelique kerber. and we'll hear the tale of menai the tropical sea turtle, found washed up on a north wales beach earlier this year thousands of miles from home. we'll find out how she's edging closer to a return to the wild. and sarah has the weather. good morning. some drizzle still today in the north and west where it will be windy at times. toward the south—east, sunny spells and
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scattered showers. a full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. there are fresh calls for the leader of kensington council to resign in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. a council meeting to discuss the tragedy was called off last night within minutes of starting after a row broke out over the attendance of members of the public and press. a document seen by the bbc has also revealed more details about the cladding used on the tower. our correspondent, dan johnson, is in west london for us this morning. dan, just start by telling us about some of those angry scenes at the council last night. there have been other developments? indeed, yes. as each day goes on, bit by bit we are learning more about this disaster, about the fire and the implications and the materials that may have contributed to the way that it spread so quickly. over two weeks on now we are still hearing about survivors who need help and we need somewhere
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properly to be re— homed. it is becoming clear that some of the people who are in authority, the figures who should be in charge, do not appear to be able to cope. a meeting of councillors ending in chaos. another sign of a council creaking under pressure. that is the reality. having failed to properly respond to the disaster, last night kensington and chelsea failed in a bid to ban reporters from this meeting. our reputation absolutely... (bleep) it. a high courtjudge had to remind senior councillors their discussions are supposed to be open. so the top team walked out. the leader of the council's labour group demands changes, not just at the top. i want iwanta i want a new organisation in the
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council who can finally get to grips with the situation. and make sure that my residents are properly housed and looked after. ten days after this disaster, i remind you, we are only a few miles away from parliament, we are not in a third world country, ten days after the disaster my people are still not being housed properly, they are not being housed properly, they are not being listened to, they are not getting access to the money they have been promised. before the meeting last night, the council leader accepted the criticism but said he was not going. the scale of this was absolutely enormous, unprecedented. i think any council would have found it difficult to have everything in place at once. it was a big challenge for a relatively small london borough and i am sure we could have done better and we will look at what we could have done quicker or better and that will be one of the things we learn from this tragedy. the panels stuck on the building, are a key area for investigation. the bbc has been told during refurbishment, zinc cladding was rejected in favour of an aluminium alternative,
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not as fire retardant, but it has the same official rating. it was chosen because it is cheaper. the council saved more than £290,000. how costly that decision could have been is one of many questions for the enquiry. london's mayor criticised the decision to council that meeting last night that he said it needed belief that the council had tried to shut out the press and public and then that they had not gone ahead with the meeting. he said that democracy needed to be open, that the council should be accountable and should be able to provide ounces. certainly, there are many people demanding those answers. the council said it was in the interest of not prejudicing the enquiry, it could not have the discussions amongst its senior leadership in the
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open last night. it reiterates that any decisions made during the refurbishment of this building were not about fire safety were about trying to keep costs down and that twice during the refurbishment of the was pushed up. the council says it will co—operate with all enquiry. jeremy corbyn has sacked three shadow cabinet ministers and a fourth has resigned. it's after 50 labour mps defied the party to back calls for the uk to remain in the single market following brexit. meanwhile, the government narrowly avoided its own rebellion over the queen's speech — by offering a last—minute concession on abortion funding for women in northern ireland. our political correspondent, alex forsyth joins us now. we have last—minute sackings and deals done in the final moments. is this the new style parliament that we have? it is. the new style parliament. a hung parliament which means parliament. a hung parliament which m ea ns every parliament. a hung parliament which means every vote counts and therefore every mp matters. as you
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say, we saw a number of labour mps last night defied the leadership, and vote for an amendment which says they want the uk to stay in the single market when we leave the european union. the official position of labour is that we should retain the benefits of the single market. a subtle difference at an important one. jeremy corbyn sacked three frontbenchers and another quick. he is asserting the authority he feels he has won since the election. on the conservative side, however, they have had to make concessions to stop their backbenchers from rebelling. some suggested they may back a labour idea which was to fund free abortion services in england for women from northern ireland. before that vote could happen, the government said we will find those services to stop them being any trouble from their backbenchers. this is now parliament looks like. boulder backbenchers who will push their party leaders and on the labour side we are seeing them deal with that by being more
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authoritative. theresa may is having to compromise. the parents of 10—month old charlie gard — who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment — say he . will stop receiving life support today. charlie has a rare genetic condition and brain damage. doctors at great ormond street hospital say the us treatment wouldn't help him. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. we should be over the road, sitting next to our son's bed, spending the last few precious hours with him. we just thought we would take five minutes out to tell you where we are. it is a video no—one should ever have to make. in a heartbreaking youtube post, 10—month—old charlie's parents say they are being denied their last hope for their baby boy. we promised our little boy every day that we would take him home. that is a promise we
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thought we could keep. we want to give him a bath, we want to sit on a sofa with him, we wa nt to sleep in a bed with him. we have a cot that he has never slept in. we're now being denied that. charlie was born with a rare genetic condition and severe brain damage. his parents have been fighting to keep his life—support switched on since march, despite doctors saying there is no hope for improvement. they took that fight all the way to the european court of human rights. but this week they lost, as judges agreed with the british courts it was most likely charlie was being exposed to continued pain. today, his life—support will be switched off. his parents say they are being rushed at the difficult time of their lives. today the tally was born was the best day of our lives. but today it
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will be the worst day of our lives. great ormond street hospital say they will not comment on specific details of patient care, but this is very distressing situation for charlie's parents and all the staff involved and focus remains with them. the american tennis player, venus williams — who is due to play at wimbledon next week — has been involved in a car crash, which led to the death of a 78—year—old man. a police spokesman told the bbc they were investigating the incident in florida, which happened earlier this month. williams‘s lawyer said the tennis star "expresses her deepest condolences to the family" affected. president trump has been widely criticised for launching a personal attack against a prominent female journalist on twitter. mr trump called her a low iq crazy meaker in response to disparaging remarks
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about him on her msnbc show. he also referred to her bleeding badly from the —— a facelift. a turtle found washed up in wales is one step closer to being released. taking a step released. menai's arrival at this turtle sanctuary in gran canaria marks a new chapter in her remarkable story. she has defied the odds in getting this far and will spend the next four weeks here. by her side, marine biologist frankie hobra who has helped nurse her back to health. here it is sunny and we saw the second day she was here she was basking quite happily, floating on the surface, relishing the sunlight on her shell. it is thought menai was swept off course, away from the south—western
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breeding grounds of africa, past the east coast of america and back across the atlantic, all the way to the uk in the gulf stream. when she was found last november, she was just minutes away from the anglesey zoo. the team there had to overcome hyperthermia, buoyancy problems and got herfeeding again. really, what we want to do was take her further south—west and release in slightly warmer waters where she is north of the breeding grounds and let her find her own way there. if that happens, menai will be back where she belongs, where experts hope she will breed and play a part in helping secure the future of this endangered species. your weekend weather is coming up in five minutes time. returning now to our top story. renewed calls this morning for the leadership team at
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kensington and chelsea council to resign, following big rental tower disaster. much anger remains within the community with residents displaced across the city as they struggle to find answers from those in power. we have been speaking to one family affected by the tragedy. this man lived on the ninth floor of g re nfell tower this man lived on the ninth floor of grenfell tower with his wife and two children. now, all four of them with a few miles away in a hotel. what is it like living in this room? it is small, you have a double bed and two single beds for your children. small, you have a double bed and two single beds for your childrenm small, you have a double bed and two single beds for your children. it is crowded. it is a nightmare, i tell you. it is a nightmare. i cannot sleep. i sleep and i wake up... maybe four hours a day, a night, and one room with two children who just wa nt to one room with two children who just want to get out, they want to get out. his family escaped from g re nfell tower out. his family escaped from grenfell tower with seconds to spare. safe on the ground, his wife
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called her brother who lived on the 21st floor. he, his wife and their three children, a 15—year—old, 21 21—year—old and an eight—year—old are all missing, presumed dead. a devastating reality that salaheddine's children are struggling to cope with. they are angry. my daughter is traumatised as well. if you are skirted paint something, she will paint the tower on fire and people jumping. something, she will paint the tower on fire and peoplejumping. seeing your daughter to draw something like how does it feel? it is crazy. it is not yet clear when the family will be able to leave this room and moved to their new home. they hope to stay in this area and at some point go on
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afamily in this area and at some point go on a family holiday. we will be talking later on about some of the problems faced by the people affected by this tower. time now to talk to sarah and have a look at the weather this morning. sarah, usually i give you guys a hard time when it rains when it is this time of year... i don't mind so much because you always know better weather is around the corner. it has been a pretty rollercoaster sort of month. if we take a look back, we had that record—breaking warmth, the warmestjune had that record—breaking warmth, the warmest june day had that record—breaking warmth, the warmestjune day in 40 years. this week it has been all about the rain. in fact, we broke records in scotla nd in fact, we broke records in scotland and in edinburgh with scene 178 millimetres in june, scotland and in edinburgh with scene 178 millimetres injune, the wettest june on record. this is how things looked yesterday, captured by one of our weather watchers. quieter today.
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the rain isn't as heavy. this is the radar picture, throwing wet —— showing wet weather in wales and the south—west of england. drizzly rain in northern ireland and scotland. some strong winds blowing down across pembrokeshire, cornwall as well, so combined with a wet weather not a very pleasant morning. further east it isn't as wendy and is drive—throughs midlands, towards east anglia and the south—east. sunshine is breaking through the cloud. thicker cloud for the north of wales and northern england, with a bit of drizzle here and fair. that drizzle continues in scotland and northern ireland. billy gray and windy, with the breeze coming from the north, dominic —— the north. still blustery inner west. there could be heavy showers by mid— morning and mid afternoon. especially in parts of kent, sussex and london. they will be hit and miss. averages 14— 17 under the
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cloud in the north and west. further towards the south—east we are likely towards the south—east we are likely to have highs of 23 degrees or so in london. this evening and overnight there will be a bit of rain sinking south across central and eastern parts of england, but elsewhere becomes largely dry and then what we are going to see is this high pressure but being in the bring us an improved weekend. it won't be dry everywhere, but compared to the last few days the weekend is looking brighter and there should be sunshine around. any early rain clears from the far south—east and then a return to sunnier conditions, perhaps rain in northern ireland and scotla nd perhaps rain in northern ireland and scotland late in the day. temperatures up to about 24 degrees. a largely dry day. they, perhaps a few showers in the far south—east and far north—west. we should all see at least one day of sunshine. thank you. going back to one of our main stories. the response after a
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meeting between kensington and chelsea council, in light of the g re nfell tower chelsea council, in light of the grenfell tower tragedy. we can talk to someone from a justice for g re nfell to someone from a justice for grenfell action group. they differ joining us. we will talk about the council meeting yesterday, where there was much discussion about whether journalists and members there was much discussion about whetherjournalists and members of the public should attend, but you went to a different meeting with survivors and residents of the tower? yes, that's correct. can i just say my name is caro. i went to a meeting that diane abbott posted yesterday at the house of commons. what happened at that meeting? and the survivors were there. well, the survivors told her the reality of their experience, as opposed to what their experience, as opposed to what the government has been saying has been going on. for example, diane
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abbott told the meeting of survivors and other people concerned that they had been told by the prime minister that everyone had been allocated a social worker. so she asked the people in the room to put their hands up if they had been allocated social worker and justjew hands up if they had been allocated social worker and just jew people put their hands up. we heard another story about one of the survivors, a teenage child, who tried to kill herself and was admitted to hospital yesterday, having ta ken herself and was admitted to hospital yesterday, having taken an overdose of ta blets. yesterday, having taken an overdose of tablets. we heard about survivors being put in hotel rooms with no windows. i mean the stories go on and on. the trauma these people have experienced and the way they are being treated is quite frankly disgraceful and all of these assurances that have been made by the government in parliament, the reality on the ground is totally different. this lack of care, or this level of care that seems to be lacking amongst those who need it,
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who do you think needs to be assigned the task of making sure that people are looked after? well, given that the council has com pletely given that the council has completely failed in every respect as far as this disaster is concerned, failing to put their emergency plans into action, failing to engage with people who have been involved, then obviously it has to be the government and the government has stepped into a certain extent, but actually all they've done is restricted their to one centre down here and there are lots of survivors all spread out all over the place and there is no co—ordination. we don't even have a list of who has survived and i think that in itself is very telling. and very distressing i imagine for people there. you have said the council has failed to put an emergency into action. do you think it is time for the council leader to go, or do you think this person needs to stay in
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thejob to think this person needs to stay in the job to make sure that there is some process at work? some continuity? there is no continuity provided by kensington and chelsea council. he is doing nothing as far asi council. he is doing nothing as far as i can see. the overwhelming feeling in the whole area, both in the better off parts of the borough and here, is that he should go. he and here, is that he should go. he and his deputy should step down. ultimately, face criminal investigation into their responsibilities. thank you very much for your time this morning. let's get the latest business news now from sean. a lot of people are thinking about going on holiday and british airways has got a strike coming up? they've put plans in place, so hopefully not too much disruption for people. good morning. a two week strike by
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british airways cabin crew is due to start tomorrow. it's part of a long—running dispute over pay and travel concessions. yesterday the boss willie walsh said qatar airways planes and crew will be used to fly all ba's passengers to their destinations over the next fortnight. an increasing number of people are being caught out by called phantom goods, where people are bought online but never delivered. consumers are involved in deals concerning everything from flights and gadgets. we will have more about that later. and it seems times are changing. the speaker of the house of commons is allowing them not to wear a tie of commons is allowing them not to weara tie in of commons is allowing them not to wear a tie in the house of commons, saying businesslike attire is all that's required. men would normally have to wear jackets and that's required. men would normally
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have to wearjackets and ties in chamber, now ties aren't necessary. we will talk about this later. so you could turn up for an interview with the slip on shoes, no socks! where did you draw the line? we will talk more about that later. in about 15 minutes we will have the sport. fewer people are taking their own life on the railways. the reduction is thought to be due to a ground—breaking partnership between the charity samaritans and network rail. one in six rail staff and transport police have been trained on what to do if they spot someone looking vulnerable. there has been an 18% reduction in the number of such deaths since the programme started last year. our transport correspondent, richard westcott, reports. every year more than 200 people take their own life on the railways. people of all ages, from all backgrounds. the initial shock after oscar died... you're just numb and then in the weeks and months afterwards you get hit with a tsunami of grief.
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carmel‘s son oscar was just 16 when he took his own life, in 2015. he was smart, fun, popular at school. there was no clue as to how he was really feeling. you feel like your heart has been turned into glass, shattered. you're so vulnerable yourself and at that point you could take your own life. carmel‘s now starting a charity in oscar's name, going into schools, encouraging children to speak out about their feelings. what we do know is that many people who are suicidal, one of the things they are feeling... you can learn how to prevent suicide. in recent years, nearly 15,000 rail staff and transport police have been on this groundbreaking samaritans course, showing them what to do if someone looks vulnerable. andy admits he was cynical before the lesson, but he soon relied on it to help a man in real trouble.
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i sat down, i spoke to him, asked him if i could help, asked him if he wanted to talk. he said to me he was a coward and that he wanted to die. so i asked him if he would come and sit in the van and let me talk to him. at the time it was the only safe place i could think to get him. he says one thing in particular came back to him. i can remember the instructor actually saying, don't say "i know how you feel". that's always stuck in my mind because it's the type of thing i probably would have said, so that's in your mind, not to say it. rail staff stepped in to talk to a vulnerable person an average of four times a day last year and the number of rail suicides is now going down. if it was you that was stood there, in a vulnerable position, how would you feel if someone didn't come up and talk to you and you were allowed to go
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and take your own life? you know, it's horrific, isn't it? you would want someone... you would want to be able to thank someone one day. that was carmel giansante, speaking to our transport correspondent, richard westcott. for details of organisations which offer advice and support, visit the address above, or call for free, at any time, to hear recorded information on 0800 066 066. still to come: we're looking back at 80 years of 999 calls. tim is with the ambulance service in london for us this morning. good morning. due the 30th, 1937, is when the emergency calls were first launched. fast forward 80 years, we are the headquarters of the london ambulance service. we take about 1.8
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million calls every year. a huge logistical operation. people working under pressure, they never know what will happen next. we will find out how it works and talk to some of the people making those calls. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. survivors of the grenfell fire, along with many others who witnessed the tragedy, are being offered free counselling and support. there are concerns about the long—term impact the fire could have on the mental health of those affected. among those being supported by the charity unity of faiths is one islamic teacher whose pupils lost friends in the disaster. when i leave them, i sometimes cry, when i hear their stories. but i try to, in order to keep them strong, not to not show them weakness. i try to tell them, yes, it's sad, but we need to overcome it. feltham prison and young offenders
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institution has been judged unsafe and one officer was even assaulted during the inspection. a new report says the younger boys eat all their meals alone, locked in their cells. there's said to be serious violence involving a number of different weapons. however, inspectors did describe mental healthcare at feltham as impressive. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the district line has cleared up. the dlr has minor delays between beckton and tower gateway and woolwich arsenal and bank. the good news is the problems on the metropolitan line have now cleared. southern trains have cancellations and reduced services due to industrial action. there'll be no off peak service on the gatwick express from brighton, a full service is expected to run to the airport from victoria. let's take a look at the a40. the westway, you may be able to make out a lorry is blocking a lane at the northern
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roundabout. there are londonbound delays. and the m25 has clockwise delays from the qe2 bridge towardsjunction 2 for the a2 at darenth after an accident. time for a look at the weather now. here's elizabeth rizzini. good morning. once again there will be plenty of cloud around today, but there'll also be brighter spells, possibly spells of sunshine and also heavy showers, particularly towards southern areas of the capital through the morning. some of them quite sharp and fading away into the afternoon. so watch out for the showers towards the south. elsewhere, mostly dry and a fairly bright start. sunshine breaking through at times and a light breeze. top temperatures up to 21—23 celsius, so feeling warmer than yesterday. if you are headed out tonight, friday night, be aware that it could be raining by the time you get home. so dry for the first part of the evening, late brightness around and then a weather front is sinking down from the north. most of the rain will tend to be light and patchy. we start tomorrow on a bright and mild note, at about 14 celsius. so quite a pleasant day
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coming on saturday. there will be sunshine around through the morning and again for the last part of the day. possibly clouding over in the middle part of the day. but it should feel warm in the sunshine. a top temperature of about 24 celsius. sunday not as good — showers in the morning, but they will clear the sunny spells again in the afternoon. that's it for now. there's more from us in half an hour, here at bbc london news. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. there are fresh calls for the leader of kensington council to resign in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. a council meeting to discuss the tragedy was called off last night within minutes of starting after a row broke out over the attendance of members of the public and press. a document seen by the bbc has also revealed more details
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about the cladding used on the tower. the leader of the council has said that it will learn from what has happened. the scale of this was enormous, unprecedented. ithink happened. the scale of this was enormous, unprecedented. i think any council would have found it difficult to have everything in place. it was a very big challenge for a relatively small london and i am sure we could have done better and we will look at what we could have done differently, quicker or better and that will be one of the lessons we learn from this tragedy. the parents of 10—month old charlie gard — who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment — say he will stop receiving life support today. charlie has a rare genetic condition and brain damage. doctors at great ormond street hospital say the us treatment would not have helped him. chris gard and connie yates say they've now been told they will not be able to take their son home to die. we promised our little boy every
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single day that we would take him home, that is a promise we thought we could keep. we want to give him a bath at home we want to sit on the sofa with him. we want to sleep in the bed with him. we want to put him ina court the bed with him. we want to put him in a court that he has never slept in fourth we are now being denied that. nurseries in england are warning that local councils are failing to provide enough money to fund more free childcare for three and four—year—olds. from september children will be eligible for 30 hours free nursery education a week — if both parents are in work. however the national day nurseries association say most won't be able to afford to provide the extra hours. more than a quarter of women — who are overdue for a cervical cancer test — don't know screening is available, according to cancer research uk. the charity found there was a particular lack of awareness among women who spoke english as a second language. around 3,000 new cases are diagnosed every year and the charity says more needs to be done to reach women who are missing tests. we were very surprised to find that some were completely unaware
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of the programme and that tended to be women from black, minority and ethnic groups, women from deprived backgrounds and those who did not have english as a first language. that's although all women in the country who are age eligible for screening are sent an invitation and information inviting them to take part, for some women that is not a good way to reach them. the american tennis player, venus williams — who is due to play at wimbledon next week — has been involved in a car crash, which led to the death of a 78—year—old man. a police spokesman told the bbc they were investigating the incident in florida, which happened earlier this month. williams‘s lawyer said the tennis star "expresses her deepest condolences to the family" affected. president trump has been widely criticised for launching a personal attack against a prominent female journalist on twitter. mr trump called mika brzezinski "low iq crazy mika" in response to disparaging remarks about him on her msnbc show. he also referred to her "bleeding badly from a facelift". senior us republicans were among
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those to denounce the comments. still to come on the programme we will have the weather but it is time to talk tennis now. injury worries us to talk tennis now. injury worries us well for both our big brute players. andy murray has a sore hip and johanna konta banged her head yesterday. we will find out if she is affected when she plays again. she fell over on court in her career—best win. she got over the injury and defeated the world number one. but sometimes it will take a couple of days before you feel the effect of the fall like that. johanna konta is, for the moment, through to the semifinals at eastbourne but her victory over angelique kerber came at a price. konta was already a set up when she suffered a heavy fall late into the match. following a lengthy stoppage while she received treatment, the british number one eventually
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took one of several match points to win the second set and booked her place in the last four. she'll play czech third seed karolina pliskova later today. i slipped and i hit my head so my head is a little sore right but we will see. it been a busy afternoon so... not just for myself but for many players. we played a lot of tennis today so definitely looking forward to recovering the best i can and playing again. heather watson is also into the last four at eastbourne, she'll play caroline wozniacki today. you can see that match on bbc two from 11 o clock. in the men's draw, novak djokovic kept his wimbledon preparations on course, after beating american donald young in straight sets. the serbian, won the first set easily, but had to survive, two set points in the second before, winning it in the tiebreak. djokovic, who's seeded second for wimbledon, plays daniel medvedev, in his semi final today. meanwhile andy murray, has withdrawn from an exhibition event in london today with a sore hip, denting his preparations for wimbledon.
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murray is the reigning champion and top seed for the tournament at the all england club, but has pulled out of two matches this week. and the world number 855 alex ward, will be in this morning's main wimbledon draw, he's the only british player, to come through the singles qualifying event. he beat russia's teymuraz gabashvili. ward had lost his previous seven matches, before this week. simon grayson says he wants to give sunderland fans a team they can be proud of after he was appointed as their new manager. he signed a three—year deal with the club. he replaces david moyes who resigned in may and joins after four years with fellow championship club preston. also signing a three—year deal is england strikerjermaine defoe who is making a return to bournemouth. he had a clause in his contract allowing him to leave for free following sunderland's relegation from the premier league. he is leaving sunderland. he scored 15 goals last season.
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one year before the world cup, the reigning champions germany are in frightening form. their reserves side cruised into the final of the confederations cup, thrashing mexico 4—1. they scored twice early on. how about this goal for mexico? look at the distance! it was a only a consolation but worth seeing again. germany will play chile in the final on sunday in saint petersburg. rangers won their first european fixture in six years with a 1—0 victory. defeats saint johnstone, however who lost 2—1 against their lives iranian opponents. full details of qualifying results on the bbc sport website. chris froome begins the defence of his tour de france title tomorrow. the three week race starts in dusseldorf with froome seeking a fourth win in five years. i'm as nervous as ever, given i have
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as much to skate for as they ever did before. this is my fourth this attempt. the challenge is bigger this year and the level of my rivals is bigger, on a difficult course as well. so i am here with... with all the motivation i have had previously, if not even more. finally, there is nothing a mother will not do for her son. even if you area will not do for her son. even if you are a grown man, playing a professional golf tournament. this chinese player through his putter into the water. a bit of a tantrum. 20 minutes later, this is his mother, knee deep in the water
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looking for the putter, attracting attention from other players. she found it but realised it was broken. her effort sent the players into fits of laughter. look, she wades out, realises how broken it is. throws it back in. she had to take it out a few more step and she could have handed it in. but is in the water for someone else to discover. if that had been a christmas present... i would have made him play with a broken putter by having a temper tantrum like that. you need to respect your clubs. when your children sit down to watch kids tv you can be safe in the knowledge they won't be bombarded with adverts for fizzy drinks and junk food. yet these days, young people often go online to access their favourite shows — where the same rules don't apply. well that's all about to change, because from this weekend all children's media will have
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to abide by the same regulations. but do they go far enough? joining us now is shahriar coupal from the committee of advertising practice and nutritionist kawther hashem, from action on sugar. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. can you tell us exactly what will change from this morning and it does it include programmes that have been on previously that had advertised in surrounding them ? previously that had advertised in surrounding them? well, the rules that we are introducing come through a background of concern over the rising cost of obesity in terms of society and media landscape. children are now watching, spending more time online than they do watching tv so against that concern we are now putting into place rules that will ban ads for products that are high in fat, salt or sugar in all media. so this is notjust a ban
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on all swedes and all food, it has to be deemed to be very high in fat and sugar. yes. and that is according to a department of health nutrient profile which looks at certain factors like saturated fat and salt and total sugar and looks on the other side of the equation at things like fruit and vegetables and fibre content and judges them to be either high in fat salt and sugar or not. what difference does obama this make? i think it will make some difference. a step in the right direction. i don't think it is enough because at the moment it has to be media that is consumed by the majority of children. if, for example, it has a population less than 25% of the audience that could be children, they will be exposed to it. some like social media, many companies advertise their product on social media and we know a lot of children have access to that and are
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signed up. i think within that space there will not be any recommendations. do you see, just on theissue recommendations. do you see, just on the issue of how people are affected by advertising, children in particular, you see a direct link between a child sitting in front of whatever it may be, possibly television, but now their computer, a direct link between what they see and what they eat? there are many different reports of evidence from world health organization and even from public health england about how exposure tojunk from public health england about how exposure to junk food advertise meant does influence the preferences of children and changes their food habits. yes, there is a direct link between looking at an advert and obesity but there isn't link of influence on eating habits. you want to respond on social media? we are very concerned to get the right level of protection in place for children but not at the expense of heavy—handed regulation that has adverse consequences. how can
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adverse consequences. how can heavy—handed regulation her children as they are not being exposed to high fat or high sugar foods was to mark how is that heavy—handed? high fat or high sugar foods was to mark how is that heavy-handed? isn't it sensible? it takes money away from broadcasters, money that broadcasters put into children content and that is a detriment that we need to take into account. we wa nt to we need to take into account. we want to put in the right level of regulation and we think we have the balance right and that balance is a ban on foods that are high in fat salt or sugar that is a drastic restriction in exposure to those products but, also, where children do see these ads, we have in place some very strict content rules that prevent ads from encouraging pester power, but not on social media? and on social media. our sister or organisation has been regulating ads for over 20 years. last year over
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half of the ads we banned were from the internet so we have a good track record of tackling ads. do people get fined? we don't find them. you just doesn't take them down? is that what happens? we tell them to take the ads down but we also call resources into our training and advice services to make sure that advertisers understand both the letter and of the law. there are no examples for companies to be able to see what is an ad that did not work. so, for example, your colleagues have not been able to produce any examples of websites that would not fall within this band, this remit of regulation. we need to leave it there for now. thank you very much for your time. i'm sure this is something that parents will be discussing this morning. time now for more about the weather. good morning. bit of weather through the weekend. if we look back at this
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month, it has been a month of rollercoaster weather. we had the extreme heat last week and this week it has been all about the rain. it's been the wettest june it has been all about the rain. it's been the wettestjune on record it and —— in edinburgh. this was the scene captured yesterday by one of our weather watchers. still some rain today, as it is more quiet. this image hasjust come in from one of our weather watchers in warwickshire. if we look at the satellite image, although most places are cloudy there is some cold in the cloud. through the midlands, east anglia and the south—east with got decent spells of sunshine. a lot of cloud elsewhere and drizzly rain, heavyin of cloud elsewhere and drizzly rain, heavy in the south—west of england and south wales. that will ease later. windy in the west. some cloud and rain affecting parts of scotland and rain affecting parts of scotland and the far north of england. a mixed picture through the course of the day. this afternoon we still have a few showers across wales and
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the south—west, with a northerly breeze around. less windy and dryer towards the south—east, but we have got the chance of some heavy showers from mid—morning until mid—afternoon will stop it could cause some localised surface flooding. more cloud in wales, northern england, where we have patchy rain. most of it will ease into the afternoon. northern ireland mainly dry and scotla nd northern ireland mainly dry and scotland too things will dry out in the day. into the evening for many it is looking dry, but there will be patchy rain sinking south across central and eastern parts of england through the night at becoming largely dry elsewhere. temperatures about 13— 14 degrees. into the weekend things will improve because we've got this ridge of high pressure building in. moving into saturday any early rain in the south—east should clear away. it is looking dry and brighter. there will be some rain heading into the north—west later in the day, so the breeze picking up later the northern
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ireland and scotland. but for much of the country it is largely dry, and it will feel a little bit warmer, up to about 24 degrees. similaron warmer, up to about 24 degrees. similar on sunday. again the chance ofa similar on sunday. again the chance of a few showers in the far south—east and in the far north—west, but for most parts of the country not a bad day. lighter winds, warmer and with the sunshine around a to about 22 degrees. what have we got? phantom goods. things you think you are buying and when it gets to the delivery they don't turn up. this is a new area that the consumer world has identified as a problem. a lot of us are buying more things through social media like facebook and online marketplaces like gumtree and ebay. there's been a a 20% increase in the number of people falling for scams like this. it's exactly what happened to michael from swindon.
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i saw isawa i saw a car advertised, which i'd a lwa ys i saw a car advertised, which i'd always wanted to get, really lovely. got through to the guide, very pleasant. yes, we can deliver the car on such and such a date, we need a 50% deposit and a £200 handling fee. it never turned up and in the end it was a scam. i felt that small, i really did. iwas end it was a scam. i felt that small, i really did. i was disgusted with myself that i let myself. we all think we are savvy, but this time it didn't work out. luckily michael did get his money back. but that's not always the case. let's talk to tom macinness, he's from citizens advice. how does that work? what happens is online, often on social media, you see a deal or a bargain that looks like a really great offer and it happens across a range of things. we've had calls aboutjewellery,
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cameras, airline flights, the lot. what happens is once you've paid for the goods they don't turn up and fed the goods they don't turn up and fed the seller just the goods they don't turn up and fed the sellerjust disappears. so it ends up that you've basically been scammed for the money. what can you possibly do? when you are looking at the listings, there's not much difference on the listings that will tell you if it's a phantom good or not. that's part of the problem because they do look genuine and often they copy reputable brands or organisations. if you pay the something of a website you should check that there is an address and an actual physical location for that company. you can also check the url to make sure the website address is attached to a real company. the third thing is if you are paying for something on my initial cheque for the padlock to make sure the payment is secure. the biggest piece of advice is if it looks to good to be true that should set alarm bells ringing. in terms of those companies
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we mentioned, ebay, gumtree, facebook, should they be doing more? they make a lot of money out of us using their websites to buy things. should they be doing more to figure out whether these goods are for real? because these websites look authentic and genuine, it can be difficult to take that kind of approach. given that people spend so much time online, it's a big part of everyone's life, and consumers themselves maybe have to take... be a bit more cautious when they are spending that money and making those purchases. thanks very much for that. it can be a bit of an issue and it has been growing, but hopefully if you follow that advice you would get caught out. certainly something that resonates with all of our viewers all the time. we've been getting a behind—the—scenes look this morning at the 999 service. it's been 80 years since the 999 emergency call system was first introduced. back in 1937, it involved just 24
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staff based at scotland yard, world's away from the vast operation that exists across the country today. tim has backstage access at the headquarters. it is fascinating being here at the headquarters of the london ambulance service. we've been hearing operators speak to people who have been undergoing dramatic circumstances. childbirth, cardiac arrest, a lot of pressure. before 1937 if you faced an emergency situation you would dial zero and then be put through to the correct service. 80 years ago the 999 service. 80 years ago the 999 service was introduced. you are the director of operations. how have things changed recently? we've got an incredibly busy. we are answering double the amount of 999 calls than ten yea rs double the amount of 999 calls than ten years ago. so colleagues here in the operation centre are answering about 5500 calls every day.“ the operation centre are answering about 5500 calls every day. if you
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call 999 and you need an ambulance you will be put through to this place here. what happens then? essentially the minute the call is connected to our control room one of our operators will first of all identify the exact location, where they are and what is the problem. what is it like dealing with this chaotic situations? when we have our most intense calls, our adrenaline is running at we don't really have the time to realise how it is maybe impacting us until after the call has happened, when we get a chance to really connect how we are feeling and put the dots together. you are effectively having to triage the situation? we triage the call. a lot of the time we stay on the line with the caller and provide help until the caller and provide help until the ability can get there. the caller and provide help until the ability can get therelj the caller and provide help until the ability can get there. i will let you carry on. technology has changed things a lot. this is footage from 1957. this is how scotla nd footage from 1957. this is how scotland yard's also be changed and introduced new technology. scotland yard has a brand—new
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information room. the centre of the 999 system. it is to take ten minutes for the police car to be sent out. now it takes less than a minute. i said, don't touch anything, we will get someone along! all right. the report speeds on its way. a squad car has already been selected from an electric indicator and the orders go out. the person has hardly put the phone down before the car is ready to give chase. about 140,000 calls come through the scotland yard room and the chance of the criminal escaping get slimmer all the time. it has all changed a bit since then. joanne, you are from the london fire brigade. it is different for you when it comes to the information you need from an emergency call? yes. a key information for us is finding out
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where the address of the emergency is. if the callers can give us that ina calm is. if the callers can give us that in a calm way than we can send our fire engines to that incident and stay on the call with a caller, gathering additional information that will help keep them safe and help as. because a fire engine or adlers can be dispatched while the call is ongoing? often callers panic because they think that we are taking too long, but actually to reassure everyone, we can respond immediately, as soon as we get the key pieces of information, the location and what type of emergency it is, and then while we are on the phone to them we can send someone there. as with all emergency services, the key thing is the only call 999 if it is an emergency? yes, it is still an issue. while hoax calls have reduced in recent years, through campaigning and a name and
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shame campaign, we are still able to receive those... inaudible... stockdale operators dealing with those real emergencies. thanks ever so much. it has been very interesting. as i say, this is the area from which the ambulances are dispatched. this morning we had lots of information. a quick look down here again. when you talk to the people here who are busy at work and find out from them what kind of situations they are dealing with, you get a sense of the training which they have to undergo. and it is all about being calm in those actual situations. so it has been interesting having an insight. if i could have a quick chat with you again. how can the service be improved, maybe in regards to response times? we want to use different kinds of technology. we know that a lot of people are accessing us through their smart phones, so we want to build on that
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technology, to see if we can get that information in a quick fashion. notjust through that information in a quick fashion. not just through the that information in a quick fashion. notjust through the telephone. and clearly our systems are being upgraded to get the help to people that they need as quickly as possible and we continue to work on improving our response times. rest of luck with that. as for having us this morning. we have been overhearing some very distressing conversations and the staff have been dealing with them calmly. it clearly must have an impact on them but they are saying how well looked after they are with the regular breaks, counselling if they need it as well. it has been a real insight. it really has been. thanks very much. we will talk to tim again later. i am sure people have questions about how emergencies are dealt with and the training. you can get it at with us in the usual way and of course we are in social media, twitter and facebook. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. survivors of the grenfell fire,
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along with many others who witnessed the tragedy, are being offered free counselling and support. there are concerns about the long—term impact the fire could have on the mental health of those affected. among those being supported by the charity unity of faiths is one islamic teacher whose pupils lost friends in the disaster. when i leave them, i sometimes cry, when i hear their stories. but i try to, in order to keep them strong, not to not show them weakness. i try to tell them, yes, it's sad, but we need to overcome it. feltham prison and young offenders institution has been judged unsafe and one officer was even assaulted during the inspection. a new report says the younger boys eat all their meals alone, locked in their cells. there's said to be serious violence involving a number of different weapons.
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however, inspectors did describe mental healthcare at feltham as impressive. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the good news is the problems on the dlr have now cleared up. it's all looking good at the moment. southern trains have cancellations and reduced services, due to industrial action. there'll be no off peak service on the gatwick express from brighton, although a full service is expected to run to the airport from victoria. in dulwich, a water main's burst. here's how it looks. the a205 south circular thurlow park road is down to one lane westbound by west dulwich station. the delays are now back through dulwich common towards forest h ill. and there are londonbound delays on the a40 westway where a broken down lorry is blocking a lane on the approach to the northern roundabout. time for a look at the weather now. here's elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. once again there will be plenty of cloud around today, but there'll also be brighter spells, possibly spells of sunshine and also heavy showers, particularly towards southern areas of the capital through the morning.
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some of them quite sharp and fading away into the afternoon. so watch out for the showers towards the south. elsewhere, mostly dry and a fairly bright start. sunshine breaking through at times and a light breeze. top temperatures up to 21—23 celsius, so feeling warmer than yesterday. if you are headed out tonight, friday night, be aware that it could be raining by the time you get home. so dry for the first part of the evening, late brightness around and then a weather front is sinking down from the north. most of the rain will tend to be light and patchy. we start tomorrow on a bright and mild note, at about 14 celsius. so quite a pleasant day coming on saturday. there will be sunshine around through the morning and again for the last part of the day. possibly clouding over in the middle part of the day. but it should feel warm in the sunshine. a top temperature of about 24 celsius. sunday not as good — showers in the morning, but they will clear the sunny spells again in the afternoon. that's it for now.
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there's more from us in half an hour, here at bbc london news. and there's plenty more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address or on our radio station, bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. new questions over the grenfell tower disaster, as pressure grows on kensington council. last night, the first full council meeting since the fire ended in chaos after a row over whether residents and journalists could attend. this morning, it emerges that the cladding, originally due to be used on the tower, was downgraded in order to save money. good morning. it's friday 30th june. also this morning. the parents of 10—month—old
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charlie gard, who lost their legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment, say his life support will be switched off today. it will be the worst day of our lives. we know what day our son is going to die and we don't even get a say in what happens. good morning. there's no need for men to wear a tie in the house of commons from now on, says the speaker of the house. so this morning, i'll be seeing if formal dress codes at work are on their way out. in sport, three days before wimbledon, the british no1 johanna konta recovers from a heavy fall at eastbourne to beat the world no 1 angelique kerber. and we're looking back at 80 years of 999 this morning with some amazing stories. aalen we will be at one of the uk's
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biggest emergency call centres, finding out about life on the front nine. and sarah had the weather. —— on the front line. a bit of sunshine for most today but most a bit of sunshine for most today but m ost pla ces a bit of sunshine for most today but most places fairly cloudy with drizzly rain in the north and west but the weekend promises some brighter weather. all the details in about 15 minutes. first, our main story. there are fresh calls for the leader of kensington council to resign in the wake of the grenfell tower disaster. a council meeting to discuss the tragedy was called off last night within minutes of starting after a row broke out over the attendance of members of the public and press. a document seen by the bbc has also revealed more details about the cladding used on the tower. our correspondent danjohnson is in west london for us this morning. good morning. really angry scenes at the council meeting last night. yes, another occasion when frustrations have boiled over and the focus is on kensington and
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chelsea council and the way that it has responded to this disaster but as the days have gone on, we have also learned more about this fire and about the materials that may have contributed to the way that it spread but certainly, there is a growing impression that the leaders of the local authority year can't cope with the aftermath of the fire. —— authority here. he wants answers, and the rest of us... a meeting of councillors ending in chaos. another sign of a council creaking under pressure. that's the reality. having failed to properly respond to the disaster, last night, kensington and chelsea failed in a bid to ban reporters from this meeting. our reputation is absolutely... theyjust don't give a bleep . ..in the gutter. a high courtjudge had to remind senior councillors their discussions are supposed to be open so the top team walked out. the leader of the council's labour group is demanding changes and notjust at the top. i want the senior leadership of the council and the cabinet to resign.
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i want a new organisation in the council who can finally get to grips with the situation and make sure that my residents are properly housed and looked after. ten days after this disaster, and i'll remind you, we are only two or three miles away from parliament, we're not in the middle of a third world country, ten days after the disaster, my people are still not been housed properly. are still not being housed properly. they are not being listened to. they are still not getting the access to the money they've been promised. how are you doing? not too bad. you all right? how are you? before last night's meeting, the council leader accepted the criticism but said he was not going. the scale of this was absolutely enormous, unprecedented. i think any council would have found it difficult to have everything in place at once. this was a very big challenge for a relatively small london borough and i'm sure we could have done better and we will look at what we could have done differently or quicker or better and that will be one of the lessons that we learn from this tragedy. the panels stuck on the building are
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a key area for the investigation. the bbc has been told that during refurbishment, zinc cladding was rejected in favour of an aluminium alternative, not as fire retardant, although it has the same official rating. it was chosen because it was cheaper. the council saved more than £290,000. how costly that decision could have been is one of many questions for the inquiry. ina in a statement, kensington and chelsea borough council has said safety would not have been compromised to manage budgets and they have reiterated that during refurbishment, the budget actually increased by £1 million and then another £1 million. they say that any cost—cutting was just to try to deliver value for money, not to deliberately downgrade fire safety. but we have also had a reminder of
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the fact that there are survivors of this fire is still struggling, two weeks on, still without anywhere proper to live. it is a very difficult time still for those people affected by the fire. difficult time still for those people affected by the firem difficult time still for those people affected by the fire. it is a nightmare. i can't sleep. i sleep andi nightmare. i can't sleep. i sleep and i wake up. i sleep may be four hours a night. and to stay in one room with two children, they are just trying to get out. london's mayor said the decision last night to cancel the council meeting was madness. he said the council needed to be open and needed to give a nswe rs to be open and needed to give answers and that is certainly what people are still eager for. they wa nt to people are still eager for. they want to know they can have confidence in these enquiries and they want to know exactly what went on. in the build—up to the fire and why the response hasn't been better. thank you forjoining us. dan johnson in west london. jeremy corbyn has sacked three shadow cabinet ministers and a fourth has resigned. it's after 50 labour mps defied the party to back calls for the uk to remain in the single
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market following brexit. meanwhile, the government narrowly avoided its own rebellion over the queen's speech by offering a last—minute concession on abortion funding for women in northern ireland. our political correspondent alex forsyth joins us now. last—minute deals and sackings — we're getting a sense of the new reality for british politics? i think we probably are getting used to this as the new style of parliament. this is a hung parliament so the vote and views of every single of the matter and mps know that say they have become maybe a little bit bolder. as you say, a number of labourmps a little bit bolder. as you say, a number of labour mps defied the leadership, went against it, and supported the amendment saying the uk should stay in the single market when it leaves the eu, jeremy corbyn sacked three frontbenchers and another one quit, i think he's asserting the authority he has now he's done better than many people
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expected in the general election. on the other side, theresa may, because she has no overall majority, has to make compromises and concessions with her backbenchers. the government has now pledged to fund abortions for women from northern ireland to come to england because they didn't want their tory backbenchers to defeat them over that. this is what a hung parliament looks like, bolder mps, prepared to cause some trouble for the party leaders and it is going to continue with big battles in parliament for some time. alex, thank you for the moment. the parents of 10—month—old charlie gard, who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment, say he will stop receiving life support today. charlie has a rare genetic condition and brain damage. doctors at great ormond street hospital say the us treatment wouldn't help him. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. we should be over the road, sitting next to our son, charlie gard's bed, spending the last precious few hours with him.
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but we just thought we would take five minutes out to come and tell you where we are. it's a video no one should ever have to make. in a heart—breaking youtube post, ten—month—old charlie gard's parents say they're being denied their last hope for their baby boy. we promised our little boy every single day that we would take him home, because that is the promise we thought we could keep. we want to give him a bath at home, we want to sit on the sofa with him, we want to sleep in the bed with him, we want to put him in a cot that he's never slept in, but we are now being denied that. charlie was born with a rare genetic condition and is severely brain—damaged. connie yates and chris gard have been fighting to keep his life support switched on since march, despite doctors saying there's no hope for improvement. they took their fight all the way to the european court of human rights. but this week, they lost, as judges agreed with the british
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courts it was most likely charlie was being exposed to continued pain. today, his life support will be switched off. his parents say they're being rushed at the most difficult time of their lives. fourth august 2016 was the best day of our life, the day charlie was born. but 30thjone, 2017, is going to be the worst day in our lives. great ormond street hospital said they won't comment on specific details of patient care, but this is a very distressing situation for charlie's parents and all of the staff involved and their focus remains with them. after six years of war, fighters of the so—called islamic state group are under siege in raqqa, one of its last strongholds in syria. us—backed forces say they have fully surrounded the city. our correspondent gabriel gatehouse sent this report. if and when raqqa falls, it will be in large part thanks
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to the american military and allies including britain the american presence has been going. we have cleared out 60,000 square kilometres of territory and liberated over 4 million people. as the coalition advances into always, many offering. many live in this town. under the harsh rule of the group that causes of exam expect, not all against their will. one corner of the camp is reserved for the wives and children of is fighters. this woman left lebanon on for raqqa two years ago to join her husband, a jihadis. when he was killed, she married a tunisian and sojoined the killed, she married a tunisian and
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so joined the ranks of a relatively privileged group, the wives of foreign fighters. american troops in syria number in the hundreds. they won't say exactly how many. their special forces are involved won't say exactly how many. their specialforces are involved in won't say exactly how many. their special forces are involved in the fighting on the ground, their planes are bombing raqqa from the air. isis is certainly not defeated. when mosul is liberated, or raqqa is liberated, there's a lot of hard work left to do. i asked the general if he knew the whereabouts of abu bakr al—baghdadi, the self—decla red leader of the caliphate. man, i was hoping you knew! if you know, please tell me and we will kill him forthright. reports from the front line today suggest us backed forces have raqqa surrounded but as we learned in mosul, capturing the city itself will likely prove a long, ha rd itself will likely prove a long, hard fight. a brill gatehouse, bbc news, northern syria. —— gabriel gatehouse. the american tennis player venus williams, who is due to play at wimbledon next week,
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has been involved in a car crash, which led to the death of a 78—year—old man. a police spokesman told the bbc they were investigating the incident in florida, which happened earlier this month. williams‘ lawyer said the tennis star "expresses her deepest condolences to the family" affected. those are the main street. all the sport coming up a bit later. if you knew a simple test could help save your life, you'd think most people would take it. but when it comes to cervical cancer screening, many women are delaying check—ups or simply missing them altogether. around 3,200 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. early detection and treatment through screening can prevent up to 75% of cervical cancers from developing. and yet a cancer research uk survey found that 15% of women who were overdue a test had decided never to go for one. we're joined by suzette mcquie, who was diagnosed with the disease in 2012, after delaying her smear test for 15 years. jessica kirby from cancer research uk also joins us from london. thank you forjoining us. what we
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said there was that some women who are overdue a test, so who perhaps have had a test or were scheduled one, it is every three years, every five years, decided theyjust didn't wa nt five years, decided theyjust didn't want one and you can relate to that, can't you ? want one and you can relate to that, can't you? absolutely. you had a test in australia first of all. yes, soi test in australia first of all. yes, so i hada test in australia first of all. yes, so i had a test when i was around 30 andi so i had a test when i was around 30 and i let it go for 15 years before i had another one purely out of fear. i had built it up in my head that it was, you know, mentally uncomfortable and so out of absolute fear, idid uncomfortable and so out of absolute fear, i did not go for another one for 15 years. and what persuaded you to have the next test?|j for 15 years. and what persuaded you to have the next test? i lost a bet! it isa to have the next test? i lost a bet! it is a bet that i'm glad i lost because it absolutely saved my life. just explain that. how did that work? what was the bet?|j
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just explain that. how did that work? what was the bet? i bet a friend that he wouldn't go for a dental checkup because he was afraid of going to the dentist and my friend reminded me that i had not been for a smear test for a similar reason. so i said if he went for a dental checkup, then i would go for a smear test. i was pretty confident he would not go. but he sent me the bill. i kept my end of the bargain. so you did have the test what happened subsequently?” so you did have the test what happened subsequently? i was diagnosed with cervical cancer and treated very swiftly the nhs. i had my cervix removed. i had three quite painful surgeries. i temporarily lost the use of minor leg and for somebody who thought they were perfectly healthy, it really illustrates why the test is so important. i had no symptoms whatsoever. how are you now? i'm fine. i'm five
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yea rs cancer—free. how are you now? i'm fine. i'm five years cancer-free. if you were told if you had the test the outcome may have been different? there is a lot of information available about the tests a nd of information available about the tests and i ignored all of it, even with my own mother having had cancer. i felt so with my own mother having had cancer. ifelt so normal, that once i was diagnosed i ran the manchester 10k to prove how fine i felt. this story is one told with experience she had had a bad experience but the research shows that women aren't aware of how important this test is, regardless of whether they have had it in the past, some are avoiding ever doing it. yes and one of the main findings of the study was that a third of these women who were overdue with their tests had never even heard of the test. which is
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quite surprising, considering in the uk women should be invited every three years with a letter to their home, with all the information. i think what that really shows is there is room for more tailored approaches to raising awareness and to providing information that is in a format which people can engage with and which people understand.” shouldn't women be sent a notification that they're due a test any way? yes, if women are registered with a gp and within the screening age, every three years they should be sent an invitation with a leaflet explaining the process and what the results might be. anecdotally are you still meeting people who are like you were there and are in denial about this? yes. and you know what i would say
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to them is to just do it, because yes. and you know what i would say to them is tojust do it, because it can save you so much more trauma of surgeries or chemotherapy or radiotherapy, what you could face if you don't do the test is so much worse. there is talk about home testing kits, particularly bearing that some women say the experience isjust so that some women say the experience is just so unpleasant that some women say the experience isjust so unpleasant it might be a better alternative. there is a lot of research going on for home sampling kits. at the moment that is not at an advanced stage as the tests that are used for cervical screening, it is not available on the nhs at the moment, but it is being investigated as an option for women who can't or don't want to go and geta women who can't or don't want to go and get a sample taken at the gp's
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surgery or the family planning clinic. it is not as effective as having the sample taken by a proeggs fl. but it -- having the sample taken by a proeggs fl. but it —— professional but it could be an option for women who don't want to go. my last question to you, i asked this slightly cautiously, what role do you think men have in the business of women going for tests? you know, you mentioned you had a bet with a man, is that right, about going to dentist. it could be anyone. if you have a male partner who can lend you support to go to appointment, that could be a great thing. men are cautious about saying, you know, have you... get involved. have you had the test. you should because of the things you talked about, because it is difficult and it not. people should feel free to talk about it
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with anyone really. but particularly somebody who is close to them like a partner. but they can also research on their own through cancer research uk's site, there is a lot of information available. but partner support is important. thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: it's emerged that the cladding originally due to be used on grenfell tower, was downgraded in order to save money. the cladding is thought to have contributed to the rapid spread of the blaze. the parents of charlie gard — who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment — say his life support will be switched off today. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. some sunshine on the way this weekend? yes it is an improving picture. it has been an unsettled
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week and it is the last week of june, it has been a months of extremes. last week we had the hottestjune extremes. last week we had the hottest june day extremes. last week we had the hottestjune day in 40 years. this week our attention has turned to the rain. and in parts of scotland we have broken records. in edinburgh the wettest june there have broken records. in edinburgh the wettestjune there on record. this was how things looked yesterday in edinburgh. but it is a drier picture for most of us today. there is some rain, but you can see blue skies and sunshine captured by a weather watcher in warwickshire. you can see there are some holes in the cloud, showing the sunshine in the midlands and south—east england. but a lot of cloud elsewhere and some rain. particularly for parts of western wales, south—west england, where you have rain and brisk northerly winds. further north some rain in northern ireland and scotla nd rain in northern ireland and scotland and northern england. in the south—east some heavy showers.
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so4in the south—east some heavy showers. so 4 in the afternoon, still breezy and damp in pembrokeshire down to devon and cornwall. brighter skies in central and south—east england, but there could be some isolated but heavy showers. it should feel pleasa nt heavy showers. it should feel pleasant in the brighter spells. but a grey afternoon in northern england and northern ireland and in scotland the rain will ease, but we could keep some drizzle into the afternoon. this evening the rain pushes across central and southern east anglia earn. it should get out of the way quickly on saturday morning. leaving most of us with temperatures in the mid teens. it will improve, we have this ridge of high pressure building in. there is low pressure approaching, so it won't be dry across the board. but compared to the past few days the
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weekend is looking drier and a little warmer. any early rain clears on saturday from the south—east and then a return to sunnier drier weather. some cloud and rain in northern ireland and scotland during the afternoon. but ahead of that we could see highs of 24 degrees. sunday again largely dry. a few showers in the south—east. but they should clear away. temperatures around 15 to 22 degree.” should clear away. temperatures around 15 to 22 degree. i would like to say you look lovely today as usual. we are talking about clothing. the speaker of house of commons said mps don't need to wear ties all the time. what do you think is the best dressed male presenter today? i couldn't choose between our
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three well dressed presenter. sean has been playing with his tie and experimenting with knots. hold on, it is easy to say at least one person. just say it. what that it's you. it's not that hard. maybe because he knows it is not you. you can give me that £10 note later. that is the apps. tell —— that is the answer. this is from the house of commons. yes, it is one of the smartest places in the count which are wigs and robes, but yesterday, the speaker, one mp turned up without a tie and the speaker said, thatis without a tie and the speaker said, that is all right. nobody has to wear a that is all right. nobody has to weara tie. that is all right. nobody has to wear a tie. but is that representative of changes that are going on in the work place? representative of changes that are going on in the work place7m representative of changes that are going on in the work place? it has sparked discussions about how you tie your tie. yes. whether you wear one. we have been getting grief for
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socks, type of shoe. can you roll up. what issure favourite. -- what is your favourite. i like rolling sleeves up. you would be of the four seans you would be the sean on the far right. yes looking at it now, possibly with smarter shoes. we asked a few workers in london whether they would get rid of their tie. where i work in the office, i make sure the people i work with wear a tie. there are some professions that it is appropriate to wear a professions that it is appropriate to weara tie, professions that it is appropriate to wear a tie, the legal and banking profession and accountancy. i think it is appropriate. if i'm going to a meeting i will put on a tie. in the office, i don't see the point.” found like a button up shirt looks much more clean and tidy than a tieshgs which seems an irrelevant piece of cloth. julie said she is a
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fan of ties, but they shouldn't be compulsory in hot weather. carl said it doesn't make you do yourjob better. without one it is more relaxing. william, have a look at him, where is he? he said, he is dressed like this for 42 years of his working life and being very successful. he says, i'm a character andl successful. he says, i'm a character and i would never do business a man not wearing a tie. he has got the waste coat and everything. that is a lot of effort every morning. but he has been successful. do you think the day will come where we don't, or men don't have to wear ties on the sofa ? men don't have to wear ties on the sofa? it is not for me, for me i think, i sort of feel like it's appropriate and business—like.
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think, i sort of feel like it's appropriate and business-like. you didn't wear one chatting to steve. look at you being observant. andy murray. everyone is watching. thank you sean. tell us what you think. good morning. it has been very wet over the last few days and in edinburgh, you have had your wettest june on record. the rain yesterday was incessant. we have had a bit of localised flooding in edinburgh, thatis localised flooding in edinburgh, that is from one of the weather watchers and for today, we have some
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patchy rain affecting scotland, for northern ireland, into wales and the south—west of england but it is much lighter than it has been recently. through today, we will continue with the patchy rain, particularly in the north—east of scotland, south—eastern scotland and a bit of rainfor south—eastern scotland and a bit of rain for wales and the south—west but brighter skies developing towards central and south—eastern areas. this is the scene at 4pm, still low cloud and a bit of drizzle in devon and cornwall. a few showers developing in the south—east of england, in between bright skies in the afternoon, temperatures about 23. for northern parts of england and wales, quite cloudy with a few showers through the course of the afternoon but mostly dry. mostly dry in northern ireland and for most of scotla nd in northern ireland and for most of scotland but in the north—east corner, with the onshore breeze, more clout and still some outbreaks of rain. through this evening and the night, rain continuing to move further south, could turn heavy for a time across parts of lincolnshire and the south—east but going into
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saturday, the weather front bringing the rain will clear away to the south and then this little ridge of high pressure starts to move in for saturday and when you have a ridge of high pressure, you generally have fine weather. early morning rain clearing away and plenty of dry and bright weather expected on saturday for most parts of england and wales. more rain spreading into scotland and northern ireland during the day. temperatures here about 16 or 18 but for england and wales, worn with light winds and highs of 19—24. on sunday, a few showers possible across southern areas, rain and showers in the far north—west but in between again, a largely dry day with bright and sunny spells. more details available online but that is it for me. this is business live from bbc news with rachel horne and susannah streeter. more trouble on the radar for british airways as cabin crew prepare to strike, just weeks after an it crash that stranded thousands. live from london, that's our top story on fridayjune 30th. scores of flights will be cancelled
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over the 16—day walkout, with many asking if the cost—cutting is worth it. also in the programme: as the week draws to a close, we assess the fallout of the major cyber attack that hit businesses around the world. and the markets? yesterday, europe had its worst day for about nine months and today, not looking
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