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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 30, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version, documents seen by the bbc suggest. a council meeting to discuss the tragedy was called off last night within minutes of starting after a row broke out over the attendance of members of the public and press. an absolute fiasco, this is why i'm calling for your resignation, not because of what happened with the fire but the sheer and ongoing incompetence that this council has shown ever since it happened. the parents of ten—month—old charlie gard, who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment, say he will stop receiving life support today. it's going to be the worst day of our lives. we know what day our son is going to die and we don't even get a say in what's going to happen to him. parts of president trump's controversial travel ban have
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come into force today, affecting refugees and visitors from six mainly muslim countries. the german parliament has voted to legalise same—sex marriage, granting gay and lesbian couples full marital rights including child adoption. also the welsh turtle who is now having fun in the sun. a rare sea turtle called menai who washed up on an anglesey beach is taken to gran canaria to an anglesey beach is taken to gran ca naria to be an anglesey beach is taken to gran canaria to be released. and british world number one tennis player andy murray will begin the defence of his wimbledon title against a qualifier or a lucky loser on monday. good morning. it's friday the 30th ofjune. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a version which cost nearly £300,000 less, a document seen by the bbc has revealed. at least 80 people were killed when the tower block in west london was destroyed by fire two weeks ago. a council meeting to discuss the tragedy was called off last night within minutes of starting after a row broke out over the attendance of members of the public and press. dan johnson reports. he wants answers, and the rest of us... a meeting of councillors ending in chaos. another sign of a council creaking under pressure. that's the reality. having failed to properly respond to the disaster, last night, kensington and chelsea failed in a bid to ban reporters from this meeting. 0ur reputation is absolutely... theyjust don't give a bleep . ..in the gutter. a high courtjudge had to remind senior councillors their discussions
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are supposed to be open, so the top team walked out. the leader of the council's labour group is demanding changes and notjust at the top. i want the senior leadership of the council and the cabinet to resign. i want a new organisation in the council who can finally get to grips with the situation and make sure that my residents are properly housed and looked after. ten days after this disaster, and i'll remind you, we are only two or three miles away from parliament, we're not in the middle of a third world country, ten days after the disaster, my people are still not being housed properly. they are not being listened to. they are still not getting the access to the money they've been promised. how are you doing? not too bad. you all right? how are you? before last night's meeting, the council leader accepted the criticism but said he was not going. the scale of this was absolutely enormous, unprecedented. i think any council would have found it difficult to have everything in place at once.
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this was a very big challenge for a relatively small london borough and i'm sure we could have done better and we will look at what we could have done differently or quicker or better and that will be one of the lessons that we learn from this tragedy. the panels stuck on the building are a key area for the investigation. the bbc has been told that during refurbishment, zinc cladding was rejected in favour of an aluminium alternative, not as fire retardant, although it has the same official rating. it was chosen because it was cheaper. the council saved more than £290,000. how costly that decision could have been is one of many questions for the inquiry. well, we saw at the beginning of that report some of the scenes from inside the cabinet meeting as it was adjourned. council leaders refused to hold their meeting in the presence ofjournalists. let's take a look at some more footage which has emerged from among the media present, including an exchange
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between council leader nick paget—brown and labour councillor robert atkinson. we can't have an unprejudiced discussion in this room with the public inquiry that's about to take place with journalists recording and writing our comments. clearly they are. who let them in? you've spent a day talking about the security of this meeting, and then five minutes before it starts, the press are here. and now you're telling us we can't have a proper meeting. i'm told the press are here because of the result of legal intervention, and that therefore means that we cannot have a discussion as we were intending to have, because that will prejudice the public inquiry. what are you so afraid of? that is the legal advice i've received, and i therefore have to declare the meeting closed. so what you've done is you've actually used this as an opportunity for you to make a statement, and nobody else gets to say anything at all. you could have issued a statement, in fact you should have issued that statement eight days ago. clapping. i would like to have had
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a conversation, but i'm advised that we can't do that because we would prejudice... an absolute fiasco. this is why i am calling for your resignation. not because of what happened with the fire, but the sheer and ongoing incompetence that this council has shown ever since it happened. we can talk now to our correspondent nick beake in north kensington. we will come back to that meeting in a moment. what reaction has there been to the news that the original cladding was selected for the refurbishment was replaced with a cheaper cladding? ever since the fire, we have heard from survivors, families here, who say that they feel they are undervalued, they feel that they are poor people living in a rich borough, and for them, this revelation that money has been saved
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during the refurbishment of this block really underlines that suspicion, certainly in their eyes. we know that the refurbishments of g re nfell tower cost we know that the refurbishments of grenfell tower cost some £10 million, and initially residents here were told that the cladding on the side of the building would be to improve insulation and to approve the appearance of the place. crucially they were told that it would be zinc, and these documents seen by the bbc from 2014 show that a £293,000 saving was made possible because they went to the aluminium option, cheaper, less fire resista nt, option, cheaper, less fire resistant, and there is anger here when people see that decision that has been made. we have also heard from the chairman of the local government association today, lord porter, who has been suggesting that the tests that are carried out, being carried out on cladding on buildings in the wake of the grand —— grenfell fire are failing, and
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thatis —— grenfell fire are failing, and that is a cause for concern. 137 test of ta ken that is a cause for concern. 137 test of taken place, and in each of them, the cladding is found to be failing the test, and he says, what is the logic of this? he has asked the government to notjust look is the logic of this? he has asked the government to not just look at the government to not just look at the core panel, he says the whole unit should be looked at, and he is concerned that at the moment the tests don't go far enough. and yes, the government experts are being brought in to deal with this, but they should be talking to more people. this isn't a political issue, it is conservative, labour, administrations up and down the country whose tower blocks are affected by this, and he thinks the government shug overhaul rethink. and on the issue of the money being saved here, there is no suggestion that a deliberate incision was made to reduce fire safety at the block, at the bbc has been told the fact that money could be saved was a key consideration during the deliberations some years ago. back to that abandoned council meeting
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from last night. a lot of people are wondering why the suggestion was made that a public inquiry could be prejudiced by the presence of journalists at that meeting, who of course are very well aware of the law regarding prejudice and so on. absolutely. a great degree of anger there, because as you say, journalist initially were banned from going in, and there was this court order banning people from going into listen to what the council had to say. more discussions on this, particularly over the saving of money on the cladding. some people making the point of course that if you have a distinguished formerjudge not city with a jury, how could you prejudice someone with a jury, how could you prejudice someone of such a legal mind? but the council have been quite clear
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certainly from their point of view that they didn't want to say anything last night that could be going into the public domain. that isa going into the public domain. that is a controversial decision as we have heard today, and in terms of the cladding here and this development overnight, the council say they would not have done anything to reduce fire safety, and they will corporate clearly with any police investigation. and the questions arise about why couldn't an open and transparent meeting be held? an open and transparent meeting be held ? 0bviously an open and transparent meeting be held ? obviously you an open and transparent meeting be held? obviously you have explained the council has said it had taken legal advice, a lot of people are saying that this discussion should have been open and transparent to all. absolutely, and we heard from the leader of the council yesterday, he has come underfire in recent weeks, certainly members of the council we saw in the days after the tragedy were explaining what they we re tragedy were explaining what they were doing to help, but there is anger among people here that there was for a week or two a spell where they were not able to talk to some
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of those elected officials, people who they want answers from, and certainly that allegation that people haven't been here to listen to their concerns was underlined by that decision last night. the council was saying that they were concerned about possible trouble in allowing people into the council, they were probably mindful of what happened on that friday after the fire when people stormed into one of the kensington buildings. but yes, the kensington buildings. but yes, the performance of the council is under scrutiny. we heard from the council leader yesterday saying he wasn't going to resign at this time, but we will see what happens in the coming days and weeks. nick, thank you very much for that. nick beake. meanwhile, a man has been charged with fraud after allegedly claiming he lost family members in the grenfell tower fire. ann noo nuen, who's 52 and of no fixed address, faces five charges. he will appear in court later today. the parents of ten—month—old charlie gard, who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america
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for experimental treatment, say he will stop receiving life support today. charlie has a rare genetic condition and brain damage. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital say the us treatment wouldn't help him. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. we should be over the road, sitting next to our son, charlie gard's bed, spending the last precious few hours with him. but we just thought we would take five minutes out to come and tell you where we are. it's a video no one should ever have to make. in a heart—breaking youtube post, ten—month—old charlie gard's parents say they're being denied their last hope for their baby boy. we've promised our little boy every single day that we would take him home, because that is the promise we thought we could keep. we want to give him a bath at home, we want to sit on the sofa with him,
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we want to sleep in the bed with him, we want to put him in a cot that he's never slept in, but we are now being denied that. charlie was born with a rare genetic condition and is severely brain—damaged. connie yates and chris gard have been fighting to keep his life support switched on since march, despite doctors saying there's no hope for improvement. they took their fight all the way to the european court of human rights. but this week, they lost, as judges agreed with the british courts it was most likely charlie was being exposed to continued pain. today, his life support will be switched off. his parents say they're being rushed at the most difficult time of their lives. the 4th of august 2016 was the best day of our life, the day charlie was born. the 30thjune, 2017, is going to be the worst day in our lives. great 0rmond street hospital said they won't comment on specific details of patient care,
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but this is a very distressing situation for charlie's parents, and all of the staff involved and their focus remains with them. the world's chemical weapons watchdog has said that the banned nerve agent sarin was used in an attack in syria which killed dozens of people. the gas was dropped in april in on a town in the north of the country, and drew condemnation around the world. despite denials of responsibility by syria's assad regime, the foreign secretary borisjohnson says there is no doubt that they were behind the attack. well, this is a first step on a process that the uk has obviously been trying to lead, to hold to account the people who are responsible for dropping chemical weapons on april 4th, and i'm pleased, although i must say, not surprised, that the 0pcw, the chemical weapons inspectorate, in fact confirmed that this is indeed sarin.
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the exact responsibility for dropping the sarin will now go to a joint investigative mechanism to be confirmed, but i've got absolutely no doubt the finger point at the assad regime, and we've got a european council coming up where we will drive on with the uk campaign to impose sanctions on those responsible. the us has already brought out sanctions on 300 people as a result of this. people who drop chemical weapons on innocent people should be held to account. the headlines now: cladding fitted to g re nfell the headlines now: cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version, documents seen by the bbc suggest. the parents of
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ten—month—old charlie gard who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to ta ke fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment say he. receiving life—support today. and parts of president trump's controversial travel ban have come into force of affecting refugees and visitors from six mainly muslim countries. s more on that story now. president trump's temporary ban on refugees and travellers from six mainly muslim countries has now come into effect. the us supreme court has allowed parts of it, after a five month battle in the courts. the trump administration says the ban is intended to stop terrorists from entering the country — many have argued that it's unconstitutional as it singles out muslims. this from neda tawfik in new york. these were the scenes at airports across the country when president trump's original travel ban was imposed without warning in january. it was called unconstitutional, a ban on muslims.
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and despite months of legal challenges, president trump once again has his travel ban, at least parts of it, in place after a victory at the supreme court. this has been one of the president's top issues. he has talked consistently about how he believes the united states needs to do more to enhance our screening procedures and to take a better look at people who will be coming into the united states, because the safety and security of americans comes first. from thursday, those travelling from six predominantly muslim countries could be barred from entering the united states for 90 days, and refugees for 120 days. on monday, the supreme court offered broad guidelines on who could be exempt from president trump's ban, saying visa applicants had to prove the bona fides relationship with a us person or entity. the trump administration has narrowly interpreted that to mean that those with close family
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relationship such as a parent or child qualify. so, too, anyone with a business or educational tied to the united states. but the relationship must be formal and documented, not made up to evade the executive order. but extended family, such as a grandparent, grandchild, aunt or uncle will be denied visas. the ban also means refugees, even those working with the resettling agency, will face the same restrictions. civil rights and immigration activists have found lawsuits, saying it is arbitrary and discriminatory, and many rushed to the airports. the world is watching the united states of america. and what they are saying is, we thought that that was a country for opportunity and justice for all, but it does not seem that way. i mean, this administration is redefining what a family is. i was raised by my grandparents, so the idea of grandparents not being part of the family is very foreign to me. already, the state of hawaii has
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challenged the administration in court, arguing the federal government is violating the supreme court by excluding people with an extended family relationship to the united states. neda tawfik, bbc news, new york. live now to washington to talk to immigration officer allen 0rr. how long do you think that this temporary ban will hold up? the ban is not the problem, the definition of what a family is is the key issue. what we saw yesterday, early on, right before the travel ban went into effect at 8pm, the government came back that they included fiances, which were
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originally excluded, so i think the challenge now is not so much the greater travel ban but more an understanding of what bona fides relationship is and what a definition of a family is, because all modern families have been excluded, which is problematic for refugees, because in some cases, maybe the grandparent or uncle or aunt is the only people they may still have or may still exist, so it is important that that is the focus right now. so you are saying the particularly in countries that have been subject to famine, war, other people, the definition of close family is too narrow? very narrow, and not modern, just not modern at all. the government processed this through a green card scenario, the function of the regulations with regards to getting a green card, but just coming to the us, you don't need as strong a relationship, so it
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isa need as strong a relationship, so it is a very narrow definition of family, and it probably won't stand. why'd you think the supreme court has allowed this partial ban after months of the courts batting it away? i believe that it really doesn't impact that large a group of people, and just saying that it is minimal in the impact doesn't mean that those people are not important, because most people do have a family relationship here in the us. but it is hugely symbolic, isn't it, for a country that has traditionally welcomed such a mix of people from all around the world ? welcomed such a mix of people from all around the world? absolutely, and right before the 4th ofjuly where we celebrate who we are, it is not a great statement for us to going with these new family definitions. i was looking at your twitter account and you mentioned a white house briefing at which officials had conceded immigrants do not commit more crimes than native—born americans. so it seems that even within the white house, the premise that this is somehow
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going to stop terrorists getting through has question marks over it. it is an absolute fiction. as of 8pm, i should feel safer, and they don't. it really has imposed some sort of fiction that should have happened, because all the things that they want to look at for 90 days or 120 days can have already happened, so there is no magical cure that will happen by making people wait 90 or 120 days to receive the benefit of coming to the united states. but in a line, do you think this ban, its days are numbered? i think the family definition‘s days are numbered. i'm not sure what the supreme court will say at the end, because we were troubled that there was this partial enforcement although the numbers we re enforcement although the numbers were small. but i really think that the impact overall is going to be small, so by the time the supreme court hears the case, everything the government said they should have done will have already been done, because it is 106 to gaze into the new administration, which is way past the longest, so everything that
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we do to secure it they should have already done. so why is the ban needed at all? allen orr, immigration lawyer, thank you very much. breaking news, downing street has rebuked the failure of the kensington and chelsea council meeting, saying that the meeting should have been open and we would expect the council to respect that. the council said it had taken legal advice that having an open meeting might prejudice the public inquiry into grenfell tower, but lots of people have been saying it wouldn't have prejudiced that inquiry, and now downing street has rebuked kensington and chelsea council over that aborted meeting last night. we are alsojust that aborted meeting last night. we are also just getting some more detail on that. we are hearing that
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149 high—rise buildings in 45 local authority areas have now failed those safety tests that were ordered in the wake of grenfell, so that is a 100% test failure rate, 149 high—rise buildings in 45 local authority areas, a 100% test failure rate according to a test spokesman for the prime minister, theresa may. those are the latest lines just coming into us on grenfell. we will be looking into that throughout the programme, of course. germany has joined most other european countries in legalising same—sex marriage. parliament passed the measure by a majority of 300 and 93 votes , to 200 and 26. it happened after the german chancellor angela merkel changed her position to allow a free vote on the issue — though she herself, voted against. translation: for me, marriage in the
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basic law is marriage between a man and a woman, and that is why i voted against the bill today. it's true what was said in today's debate. it was a long, intense debate, and for many, and emotionally moving discussion. this also goes for me personally. that's why i hope the vote today not only promotes respect between different opinions, but also brings more social cohesion and peace. let's get more on this from our berlin correspondentjenny hill. how crucial was it for angela merkel to allow the mps to vote on that they'll even though she was against it? absolutely vital. she may have voted against it herself but she will go down in the history books as the german chancellor who made this possible. for years now, the political left have been trying to bring a measure like this before parliament, but mrs merkel has a lwa ys parliament, but mrs merkel has always stood firm against the issue
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of same—sex marriage. until earlier this week, she gave an interview during which she appeared to drop position, saying that she had met a lesbian couple in her own constituency who had fostered eight children, and following that meeting, she had a bit of a change of heart, and went on to say that she would now allow her conservative mps to vote with their conscience and not have to follow the party line. that in effect allow the political left to bring, very hurriedly, because today is the last parliamentary session before they all go off on their summer break, to bring that bill to the floor, and because conservative mps were now able to vote freely, enough support was there to secure the legislation. i must say, there was a lot of cheering and clapping as the vote was announced. it's not often you see confetti thrown on the floor of the german parliament, but that is what happened this morning. but interestingly, the politics behind this. by voting against the
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legislation, angela merkel has made sure that when it comes to the election here in september, she can say to the more conservative elements of her electorate that she has stood firm on those conservative issues. on the other hand, by in effect allowing this vote to happen, and to go through, she is not only cementing her reputation as some people call her, one of the west's last defenders of liberal values, she is also seeing off a problem that might have occurred showed her party win a majority in the autumn, and that is that she is very likely to have to build some kind of coalition. the partners that she was looking at had already indicated that they would have made same—sex marriage legislation a condition of coalition, so mrs merkel, whether by accident or design, has managed to head that off at the pass. it is also worth noting that the lesbian couple who apparently changed her mind have now invited mrs merkel, reportedly, to their wedding. jenny, thank you very much. jenny hill in berlin. hong kong is officially marking 20
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yea rs hong kong is officially marking 20 years since the end of colonial rule. the chinese president is visiting the territory for the first time since he became leader in 2013. he inspected the people's liberation army barracks, and applauded the government for what he described as handling major political and legal issues. and we are going to have more on that anniversary little later this hour. the american tennis player, venus williams, who is due to play at wimbledon next week, has been involved in a car crash, which led to the death of a 78—year—old man. a police spokesman told the bbc they were investigating the incident in florida, which happened earlier this month. williams's lawyer said the tennis star "expresses her deepest condolences to the family" affected. the time is 28 minutes past 11. a rare sea turtle found washed—up on a beach in anglesey has been taken to gran canaria ahead of her expected release.
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menai, named after the section of water which separates anglesey from mainland wales, is an olive ridley turtle. the species would normally be found in warmer waters close to the equator — as our wales correspondent, sian lloyd, reports. taking a step towards home. menai's arrival at this turtle sanctuary in gran canaria marks a new chapter in her remarkable story. she's defied the odds in getting this far, and will spend the next four weeks here. by her side, marine biologist frankie hobra, who has helped nurse menai back to health. here it is sunny and we saw the second day she was here she was basking quite happily, floating on the surface, relishing the sunlight on her shell. it's thought menai was swept off course, away from the south—western breeding grounds off africa, past the east coast of america and back across the atlantic, all the way to the uk in the gulf stream. when she was found last november, she was just minutes away from the anglesey sea zoo.
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the team there helped her overcome hypothermia, buoyancy problems and got herfeeding again. really, what we want to do was take her further south—west and release in slightly warmer waters where she is north of the breeding grounds and let her find her own way there. if that happens, menai will be back where she belongs, where experts hope she'll breed and so play a part in helping secure the future of this endangered species. sian lloyd, bbc news. and good luck to menai. time now for a weather forecast. weather is certainly warmer in rank and area, by anglesey and the rest of england and scotland, grey and cloudy, this is the sea in north—west wales, grey skies. —— warmer in gran canaria. we have some sunshine, in the isle of wight, sunny spells breaking through, with
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that, if you have a share was developing in county east sussex, could see the odd rumble of thunder. further north and west, cloud continues, patchy rain and drizzle, temperatures of 14, 15 degrees. highs of 20 degrees. through the evening and into tonight, the rain will be a bit heavier across parts of northumberland, lincolnshire, yorkshire, eventually spreading into the south—east. that rain clears away as we go into saturday, we can see it there. for many of us, looking dry and fine, feeling quite warm, with light wind. tad chilly for scotland, northern ireland, more cloud, and a bit of rain. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: 149 high—rise
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buildings in 45 local authority areas have now failed safety tests. it comes as documents seen by the bbc suggest cladding fitted to g re nfell tower was bbc suggest cladding fitted to grenfell tower was changed to a cheaper version. downing street have said the kensington and chelsea council meeting on grenfell tower tragedy last night should have been open to the public. there were angry scenes when the presence ofjournalists meant the meeting was cancelled. this is why i am calling for your resignation. not because of what happened with the fire but the sheer and ongoing incompetence that this council has shown ever since it happened. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard say his life support is to be turned off today, in a video statement they thank supporters for their help and pay tribute to their son.
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the german parliament has voted to legalise same—sex marriage, granting 93v legalise same—sex marriage, granting gay and lesbian couples full marital rights including child adoption. we start with out big news this morning. that live cricket will be returning to the bbc for the first time in 21 years with a brand new deal with the ecb struck from 2020. what exactly can we expect from this agreement? big news for cricket fans, sky sports 1 carry on showing the vast majority of cricket, for the vast majority of cricket, for the first time since 1999, there will be live cricket on bbc television, from 2020, the bbc will show live coverage of three england t20 international, two men's matches, and one women's match, live coverage of the ecb new city —based
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t20 tournament, ten men's matches and eight women's matches. also prime—time television highlights of england's men's home international matches, on top of that, test match special will continue with radio commentary, and is digital clip highlights online. it is inexpensive cricket package across bbc television, radio, and online. what exactly will this deal mean for the bbc, why would the ecb choose the bbc, why would the ecb choose the bbc and not competitors? in a statement, the chief executive, tom harrison, talk about the bbc commitment to taking the game to even wider audiences, that is key. when the ecb decided to take cricket away from terrestrial television and sell it exclusively to sky, 2005, that was good for the game ‘s finances but not its profile, it has become much less visible, but as a patient rates among youngsters have fallen. tom harrison said last year
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he has no interest in quote being the richest, most irrelevant sport in this country, the bbc will point to its coverage of the fa cup in football as way that it can generate interest, among white audiences. ecb will hope it can do the same for cricket, particularly with t20 tournament, designed to appeal to young audiences they are so desperate to attract. now to tennis and despite two very good wins at eastbourne yesterday, british number 0nejohanna konta has been forced to pull out of the aegon international at the semifinal stage due to a spinal injury picked up in her win over world no1 angelique kerber yesterday. having won the first set comfortably konta slipped on match point in the second, needing around 10 minutes of treatment before eventually recovering to take the match. that means today's opponent karolina pliskova goes straight into the final. where she'll face either britain's heather watson of former world no 1 caroline wozniacki,
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that semi final is live over on bbc two or on the bbc sport website. caroline wozniacki is currently leading 4—2, she has broken twice. the draw‘s been made for wimbledon this morning and number one seed andy murray will face a qualifier or a lucky loser in the first round. murray pulled out of his last warm up game today in london ahead of the tournament at wimbledon but he has been practising on the courts at the all—england club this morning. murray's been drawn in the same half as french open champion rafael nadal meaning they could meet in the semi finals. full details of the draw on the bbc sport website. now to rugby union and a crucial game coming up for the british and irish lions. warren gatland's selection for the second tesst against new zealand has been criticised somewhat. former wales international jonathan davies thinks gatland is using his "last roll of the dice" by pairing jonny sexton and owen farrell together, former lionjeremy guscott thinks the decision is "ambitious" calling it "a gamble." the lions must of course win tomorrow morning in wellington
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or they will hand the all blacks the series win. that is all the sport for now, we will be back with more in the next hour. the latest news that we have for you on grenfell tower, we have heard from a spokesman for theresa may, that 149 high—rise buildings in 45 local authority buildings have failed fire safety tests ordered in the wake of grenfell, that is a 100% test failure rate, downing street has rebuked kensington and chelsea council over the decision to abort a meeting about grenfell last night, saying that the high court ruled the meeting should be open and we would expect the council to respect that. having the meeting open to the public, the council said, and members of the media, might
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prejudice the public enquiry into g re nfell prejudice the public enquiry into grenfell but downing street has rebuked them for that decision. labour councillor robert atkinson's ward includes grenfell tower, he has been highly critical of the council leadership and he has been speaking with our reporter, danjohnson, about what happened at the meeting. it was utter chaos, we went with the idea that we would be briefed as to what the council is proposing to do for the residents housing needs, not just of the victims but the people in the surrounding area. we had a series of questions on which to have a genuine debate. the leader of the council read a statement which he should have done ten days ago. and then once we became aware that the media were present, he sought to change the meeting, which, of course, to close the meeting, which we challenged, and we tried to ask our questions. it ended in a com plete our questions. it ended in a complete farce. would you rather the meeting had gone ahead without the press and public there? well,
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initially, we were told that it would be a private meeting and we could be frank with each other but we ended up with the worst of all worlds. the residents have a right to meet with the leaders of the council, the leaders of the council have been hiding from the residence for the last week. they are... they should have the courage to meet with people and answer questions. the least we can do is face residence face—to—face, and they are not prepared to do it. why not? i think they are frightened, i think they are ina they are frightened, i think they are in a panic and they wish to give the impression that they are in control, and clearly they are not, as the entire nation saw. i cannot even organise a meeting in the basement of their own town hall. what should happen next? the leadership of the council and the cabinet needs to resign, the tmo organisation, which is completely collapsed and failed to do anything over the last ten days, needs to go,
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they need to grasp hold of the housing and care needs of the residents and they need to do something. i am residents and they need to do something. iam now residents and they need to do something. i am now appealing to tory backbenchers who have seen themselves the way their cabinet is not coping, to get a grip and organise themselves. wouldn't a wholesale change of leadership at the top of the council caused more problems? we thought that there might be more chaos but we are now ina might be more chaos but we are now in a situation where the other local authorities who have been supporting us authorities who have been supporting us want to pull out, but they are not able to pass responsibility, particularly not for the housing needs back to the council, because the council is not functioning. that is why, at the end of the day, yesterday, i urged the government to sendin yesterday, i urged the government to send in commission is to run it for us. send in commission is to run it for us. it is not often that a councillor called for the abolition of his own counsel! but at the end of his own counsel! but at the end of the day, as every soul, something else needs to be done. —— as
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everybody saw. it took the government last week to get rid of the chief executive, the council could not even sack its own chief executive, now i say to the government, the council itself cannot function, the government needs to step in and appoint commissioners. councillor robert atkinson. there is continuing anger within the community, with residents displaced across the city and struggling to get answers from those in power. frankie mccamley has been speaking to one family affected by the tragedy. voiceover: v0|ceover: seller dean lived on the ninth floor, with his wife and two children, now, all four of them live a few miles away in a hotel full of what is it like —— a few miles away ina what is it like —— a few miles away in a hotel. —— saladeen. what is it like living here? it is crowded... it is cried crowded, it is a nightmare. i cannot sleep. i sleep,
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then i wake up, i sleep forfour hours. the childrenjust then i wake up, i sleep forfour hours. the children just want to get out. saladeen's family escaped with seconds to spare, safe on the ground, his wife called her brother who lived on the 21st floor, he, his wife, and their three children, are all missing and presumed dead. a devastating reality that saladeen's children are struggling to come to terms with. my son becomes hungry. my my daughter, if you ask her to paint
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something, she will paint a tower on fire. what is it like being a father and seeing your daughter draw something like that? it is crazy. it is not yet clear when the family will be able to leave this room and move into their new home. they hope to stay in the area and at some point go on a family holiday. studio: fewer people are taking their own life on the railways. the reduction is thought to be due to a ground—breaking partnership between the samaritans charity and network rail. one in six rail staff and transport police have been trained on what to do if they spot someone looking vulnerable. there has been an 18 per cent reduction in the number of such deaths since the programme started last year. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, reports. every year more than 200 people take their own life on the railways. people of all ages, from all backgrounds. the initial shock after 0scar died...
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you're just numb and then in the weeks and months after you get hit with a tsunami of grief. carmel‘s son 0scar was just 16 when he took his life, in 2015. he was smart, fun, popular at school. there was no clue as to how he was really feeling. you feel like your heart has been turned into glass, shattered. you're so vulnerable yourself and at that point you could take your own life. carmel‘s now starting a charity in 0scar‘s name, going into schools, encouraging children to speak out about their feelings. what we do know is that many people who are suicidal, one of the things they are feeling... you can learn how to help prevent suicide. in recent years, nearly 15,000 rail staff and transport police have been on this ground—breaking samaritans course, showing them what to do if someone looks vulnerable. andy admits he was cynical before the lesson but he soon relied on it to help a man in real trouble. i sat down, i spoke to him, asked him if i could help, asked him if he wanted to talk.
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he said to me he was a coward and that he wanted to die. so i asked him if he would come and sit in the van and let me talk to him. at the time it was the only safe place i could think to get him. he says one thing in particular came back to him. i can remember the instructor actually saying, "don't say ‘i know how you feel‘". that's always stuck in my mind because it's the type of thing i probably would have said, so that's in your mind, not to say it. rail staff stepped in to talk to a vulnerable person an average of four times a day last year and the number of rail suicides is now going down. if it was you that was stood there, in that vulnerable position, how would you feel if someone didn't come up and talk to you and you were allowed to go and take your own life? you know, it's horrific, isn't it? you would want someone...
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you would want to be able to thank someone one day. that was carmel giansa nte that was carmel giansante speaking to our transport correspondent, richard westcott. for details of organisations which offer advice and support, visit bbc.co.uk/actionline. 0r support, visit bbc.co.uk/actionline. or call for free, support, visit bbc.co.uk/actionline. or call forfree, at support, visit bbc.co.uk/actionline. or call for free, at any time, to hear recorded information on 0800 066 066. hong kong is officially marking twenty yea rs hong kong is officially marking twenty years since the end of british colonial rule. the bbc‘s stephen mcdonell is in hong kong and joins us live. does hong kong still feel like a place in transition two decades on? as this spectacular city yea rs decades on? as this spectacular city years up for the 20th anniversary of the handover from britain years up for the 20th anniversary of the handoverfrom britain to china, there are some misgivings here as to
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there are some misgivings here as to the direction of the place. right now, events taking place in the turtle shaped building behind us, the president is in there with other selected guests, watching performances, having a big banquet. there is quite a battle going on for the hearts and minds of the people that live here. looking at the newspapers from today, this is an idea. look at the headline. it says, she vows support for hong kong. china's president would not allow that kind of coverage. here is another, he would choke on his brea kfast, another, he would choke on his breakfast, that is because that is a question asking xi jinping, breakfast, that is because that is a question asking xijinping, can breakfast, that is because that is a question asking xi jinping, can you hear us? this is the nobel peace prize winner, recently released from jail because he has terminal cancer, he is under guard in hospital, covering a protest last night, the writing says, we stand with you. so, this is not the type of coverage that the president is used to. and
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that the president is used to. and thatis that the president is used to. and that is why there will be protests to mark his visit here. there is quite a division here about what hong kong wants. some people are calling for independence but if opinion polls are correct, most in hong kong are happy to remain part of china as long as those liberties they have come to expect are still on it. cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version, documents seen by the bbc suggest. the parents of 10—month old charlie gard, who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment, say he will stop receiving life support today. parts of president trump's controversial travel ban have come into force, affecting refugees and visitors from six mainly muslim countries. british consumers have
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suffered the longest decline in their spending power since the 1970s according to data from the office for national statistics. disposable income has dropped for the latest three quarters and the percentage of income set aside for savings has fallen to 1.7% which is an all time low. consumers are facing the double whammy of rising inflation, caused in large part by the fall in the pound since the brexit vote, and slowing wage growth. british airways has requested permission from the civil aviation authority to use qatar airline crew and planes to fly customers to destinations, during a strike by unite union members over pay and disciplinary action. crew working in the mixed fleet, serving long and short haul, are walking out forjust over two weeks from tomorrow. some services may be merged but ba says it plans to operate close to a full schedule. germany has passed a law that obliges social media sites to delete illegal content within 24 hours or face fines of around £43 million.
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it'll apply from october to websites that have more than two million users in germany, including facebook and google. the companies say the time frames are unrealistic, and will lead to accidental censorship. some human rights campaigners say it leaves the task of determining what constitutes hate speech to private companies. we have had the latest snapshot of the health of the uk economy and it's pretty bleak — particularly in terms of dwindling disposable incomes. the amount of money people have to live on after paying tax has declined by 1.4% in the first three months of the year, falling for the third quarter in a row and it has meant many people have started to use up their savings pots. the office the national statistics has confirmed that the economy grew by just .2% in january confirmed that the economy grew by just .2% injanuary march period compared with white 7% during the previous three months. that sudden slowdown meant that britain went from being one of the fastest growing economies of the group of seven rich nations to the weakest
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performer. we can speak with charlotte harrington, an analyst. let's talk about these dwindling savings pots, the savings road show, 1.7% for the first three months of the year, lowest level for 15 years. why is that? it has moved significantly lower, in part it is a reflection of what had been a period of very strong what had been a period of very strong consumer what had been a period of very strong consumer confidence. really, as the labour market has been quite strong, but also borrowing costs have been very low, and so it has been accompanied by this increase in borrowing, particularly with credit cards and auto loans. that is certainly affecting consumer confidence, affecting just how wealthy people feel. really, their capacity to continue to take out such loans. that could cause the economy to slow down further, or, do
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you think, there are other signs on the horizon. we expect consumption to slow down, but the bright spot could mean business investment, we are starting to see that picked up, thatis are starting to see that picked up, that is because of a strong global backdrop, perhaps, you're going strongly, the us, exports doing very well. looks like business investment is going to be flying the flag. lots of big corporations have been sitting on piles of cash, not willing to invest, that is partly to blame for low productivity in the uk. already signs that companies are willing to invest in machinery, in new staff. we look at things like the bank of england survey of investment intentions by business, that really took quite a hit after the vote to leave the european union, but it has recovered. investment has picked up. off the back of what has been synchronised roads across the globe. we still
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have the uncertainty surrounding brexit, and what will happen as regards to trade, and trading relationship, do you think that is weighing on investors minds as much consumers? i think it will weigh on investors minds, but also, the outcome of the elections, political uncertainty, this idea of no deal being better than a bad deal... that risk is probably receded somewhat given the politics. in other business stories we've been following: the micro computing company raspberry pi has won the macrobert award, a top innovation prized run by the royal academy of engineering. the device was created to get children interested in computer programming but the cambridge based firm has now become the uk‘s largest computer manufacturer. 14 million have been sold around the world with the us the compa ny‘s sold around the world with the us the company's biggest market. new rules banning junk
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food advertising across all children's media including online and social will coming into effect tomorrow as part of efforts to tackle childhood obesity. the changes also bring print and cinema ads into line with television, where strict regulation prohibits the advertising of unhealthy food to children. a consignment of the cereal weetabix has reportedly been impounded by new zealand customs officials, after complaints from rival weet—bix that it could confuse customers. the 300 boxes had been ordered in for a shop in christchurch, specialising in uk products. according to the guardian, weet—bix owner sanitarium said it would only release the cereal if a sticker was placed over the weetabix label but the shop's owner said it was bullying and that she was holding firm. we will watch that story. shares in game digital plunged by 30% after it issued a profit warning following low supplies of the new nintendo switch device into the uk. the video games retailer said that although demand was strong for the console, stock availability was
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lower than expected. the ftse 100, the blue chip index is trading slightly lower today, pushed down by energy companies after the price of oil slid to a seven—month low. trinity mirror shares were up by around half a per cent after its trading update indicated it had set aside another seven and a half million pounds to cover phone hacking claims. some resolution therefore investors, drawing a line under that. a statement from the independent expert advisory panel, appointed, on the cladding tests being conducted following the grenfell tower fire, this advisory panel was announced on tuesday of this week i the communities secretary, sajid javid, it is quite technical but it says the tests currently conducted our
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screening tests to identify which aluminium composite material panels are of concern. it tests the filler, the core of the panel, to check whether it is of limited combustibility or not, in line with a wyman of the building regulations guidance. we heard from the chair of the local government association saying he was concerned that the type of tests carried out were not actually sufficient. —— in line with the building regulations guidance. we will have more coming up on grenfell, but first, the weather forecast. a lot of rain over the last few days but things are gradually improving as we go through today, and into the weekend, some sunny spells, breaking through across parts of the midlands, eastern and south—east england. further west, predominantly
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cloudy, and outbreaks of rain, this was the scene in conway, north wales, lots of cloud there hugging the mountains, not particularly nice. as i mentioned, as we go to the weekend, it will turn dryer and brighter. if we had been fed up with this rain. wet across northern and western parts, as we go through the afternoon, heavy showers developing across the far south—east, maybe the odd rumble of thunder. at 4pm, still pretty cloudy, some rain and drizzle across parts of devon and cornwall, west wales as well, strong northerly wind making it feel a little bit chilly. for south—east england, wind making it feel a little bit chilly. forsouth—east england, by this stage, showers should ease off a bit. still, they will be around. for the midlands, eastern and northern england, fair amount of cloud, could be the odd spot of rain, largely dry, dry for northern ireland. it is going to stay quite cloudy here and again, still some drizzle and a bit of rain. through the evening and tonight, the
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rainfall will become more extensive across northumberland, into lincolnshire, some rain into east anglia, the midlands, and into the south—east of england. further north and west, largely dry, temperatures getting down to around ten, 14 degrees. start of the weekend, and this weather front has been bringing the rain, clearing away to the south, and we will put this ridge of high pressure, building in across the uk. i remember talking about high pressure, we are talking about settled conditions, drier weather, some sunshine, that rain will scoot off into france, for most of england and wales, sunshine developing into the afternoon, light wind, feeling pleasant, temperatures up to 20 degrees. for scotland and northern ireland, there will be cloud, outbreaks of rain starting to move in as well, temperatures more like the mid—teens. 0n in as well, temperatures more like the mid—teens. on sunday, if you showers developing across southern areas, and there will be one or two showers affecting the far north—west
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of scotland. another dry day elsewhere, sunny spells, temperatures around 17 to 21 degrees, more details online, that is it for me. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at noon. cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version, documents seen by the bbc suggest. downing street criticises kensington and chelsea council after a meeting to discuss the tragedy was cut short because journalists were there. an absolute fiasco, this is why i'm calling for your resignation, not because of what happened with the fire but the sheer and ongoing incompetence that this council has shown ever since it happened. the parents of ten—month—old charlie gard, who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment, say he will stop receiving life support today. it's going to be the worst day of our lives. we know what day our son
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is going to die and we don't even get a say in what's going to happen to him. parts of president trump's controversial travel ban have come into force today, affecting refugees and visitors from six mainly muslim countries. funerals take place today for 29—year—old martyn hett and 60—year—old megan hurley who died in the manchester bomb attack. the german parliament has voted to legalise same—sex marriage, granting gay and lesbian couples full marital rights including child adoption. also: the poorly welsh turtle who's now having fun in the sun. a rare sea turtle called menai who washed up on an anglesey beach is taken to gran canaria to be released. and british world number one tennis player andy murray will begin the defence of his wimbledon title against a qualifier or a lucky loser on monday. good afternoon.
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it's friday the 30th ofjune. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. downing street has rebuked kensington and chelsea council over the way it handled the cancellation of a cabinet meeting last night to discuss the grenfell tower fire. council leaders had wanted to hold the meeting behind closed doors, but a last—minute court order allowed journalists to attend. the cabinet was then cancelled. number 10 says the meeting should have been open. meanwhile a document seen by the bbc revealed that cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a version which cost nearly £300,000 less. let's take a look at the document itself. here it is.
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and if we zoom in a little closer, we can see some of the financial detail under "post—tender amendments". including the phrase "aluminium cladding instead of zinc cladding", at a saving of over £293,000. the development piles yet more pressure on council leaders to explain their handling of what's being seen as the worst tragedy to hit london since world war ii. dan johnson reports. he wants answers, like the rest of us... a meeting of councillors ending in chaos. another sign of a council creaking under pressure. that's the reality. having failed to properly respond to the disaster, last night, kensington and chelsea failed in a bid to ban reporters from this meeting. 0ur reputation is absolutely... theyjust don't give a bleep . ..in the gutter. a high courtjudge had to remind senior councillors their discussions are supposed to be open, so the top team walked out. the leader of the council's labour group is demanding changes, and notjust at the top.
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i want the senior leadership of the council and the cabinet to resign. i want a new organisation in the council who can finally get to grips with the situation and make sure that my residents are properly housed and looked after. ten days after this disaster, and i'll remind you, we are only two or three miles away from parliament, we're not in the middle of a third world country, ten days after the disaster, my people are still not being housed properly. they are not being listened to. they are still not getting the access to the money they've been promised. how are you doing? not too bad. you all right? how are you? before last night's meeting, the council leader accepted the criticism but said he was not going. the scale of this was absolutely enormous, unprecedented. i think any council would have found it difficult to have everything in place at once. this was a very big challenge for a relatively small london borough and i'm sure we could have done better and we will look at what we could have done differently or quicker or better
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and that will be one of the lessons that we learn from this tragedy. the panels stuck on the building are a key area for the investigation. the bbc has been told that during refurbishment, zinc cladding was rejected in favour of an aluminium alternative, not as fire retardant, although it has the same official rating. it was chosen because it was cheaper. the council saved more than £290,000. how costly that decision could have been is one of many questions for the inquiry. danjohnson, dan johnson, bbc news. well, we saw at the beginning of that report some of the scenes from inside the cabinet meeting as it was adjourned. council leaders refused to hold their meeting in the presence ofjournalists. let's take a look at some more footage which has emerged from among the media present, including an exchange between council leader nick paget—brown and labour councillor robert atkinson. we can't have an unprejudiced
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discussion in this room with the public inquiry that's about to take place with journalists recording and writing our comments. clearly they are. who let them in? you've spent a day talking about the security of this meeting, and then five minutes before it starts, the press are here. and now you're telling us we can't have a proper meeting. i'm told the press are here because of the result of legal intervention, and that therefore means that we cannot have a discussion as we were intending to have, because that will prejudice the public inquiry. what are you so afraid of? that is the legal advice i've received, and i therefore have to declare the meeting closed. so what you've done is you've actually used this as an opportunity for you to make a statement, and nobody else gets to say anything at all. you could have issued that statement, in fact you should have issued that statement eight days ago. clapping. i would like to have had a conversation, but i'm advised that we can't do that because we would prejudice... an absolute fiasco.
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this is why i am calling for your resignation. not because of what happened with the fire, but the sheer and ongoing incompetence that this council has shown ever since it happened. that footage from the beginning of the meeting, which was subsequently abandoned last night. earlier i spoke to our correspondent nick beake at the scene of the fire, and i started by asking him what reaction there had been to the news that a cheaper, less fire—resistant cladding had been used on grenfell. ever since the fire, we have heard from survivors, families here, who say that they feel they are undervalued, they feel that they are poor people living in a rich borough, and for them, this revelation that money has been saved during the refurbishment of this block really underlines that suspicion, certainly in their eyes. we know that the refurbishment of grenfell tower cost some £10 million.
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initially residents were told that the cladding on the side of the building would be to improve insulation and to approve the appearance of the place. crucially they were told that it would be zinc, and these documents seen by the bbc from 2014 show that a £293,000 saving was made possible because they went to the aluminium option, cheaper, less fire resistance, and there is anger here when people see that decision that has been made. we have also heard from the chairman of the local government association today, lord porter, who's been suggesting that the tests that are carried out, being carried out on cladding on buildings in the wake of the grenfell fire are failing, and that is a cause for concern. 137 tests have taken place, and in each of them, the cladding is found to be failing
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the test, and he says, what is the logic of this? he's asked the government to not just look at the core panel, and he's concerned that at the moment the tests don't go far enough. and he's saying, yes, the government experts are being brought in to deal with this, but they should be talking to more people. this isn't a political issue, it is conservative, labour, administrations up and down the country whose tower blocks are affected by this, and he thinks the government should go for a whole rethink. and on the issue of the money being saved here, there is no suggestion that a deliberate incision was made to reduce fire safety at the block, at the bbc has been told the fact that money could be saved was a key consideration during the deliberations some years ago. nick beake. meanwhile, a man has been charged with fraud after allegedly claiming
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he lost family members in the grenfell tower fire. ann noo nuen, who's 52 and of no fixed address, faces five charges. he will appear in court later today. the parents of ten—month—old charlie gard, who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america for experimental treatment, say he will stop receiving life support today. charlie has a rare genetic condition and brain damage. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital say the us treatment wouldn't help him. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. we should be over the road, sitting next to our son, charlie gard's bed, spending the last precious few hours with him. but we just thought we would take five minutes out to come and tell you where we are. it's a video no one should ever have to make. in a heartbreaking youtube post, ten—month—old charlie gard's parents say they're being denied their last hope for their baby boy. we've promised our little boy every single day
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that we would take him home, because that is the promise we thought we could keep. we want to give him a bath at home, we want to sit on the sofa with him, we want to sleep in the bed with him, we want to put him in a cot that he's never slept in, but we are now being denied that. charlie was born with a rare genetic condition and is severely brain—damaged. connie yates and chris gard have been fighting to keep his life support switched on since march, despite doctors saying there's no hope for improvement. they took their fight all the way to the european court of human rights. but this week, they lost, as judges agreed with the british courts it was most likely charlie was being exposed to continued pain. today, his life support will be switched off. his parents say they're being rushed at the most difficult time of their lives. the 4th of august 2016 was the best day of our life, the day charlie was born. the 30thjune 2017 is going to be
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the worst day in our lives. great 0rmond street hospital said they won't comment on specific details of patient care, but this is a very distressing situation for charlie's parents and all of the staff involved, and their focus remains with them. president trump's temporary ban on refugees and travellers from six mainly muslim countries has now come into effect. the us supreme court has allowed parts of it, after a five month battle in the courts. the trump administration says the ban is intended to stop terrorists from entering the country — many have argued that it's unconstitutional as it singles out muslims. this from neda tawfik in new york. these were the scenes at airports across the country when president trump's original travel ban was imposed without warning in january. it was called unconstitutional, a ban on muslims. and despite months of legal challenges, president trump once
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again has his travel ban, at least parts of it, in place after a victory at the supreme court. this has been one of the president's top issues. he has talked consistently about how he believes the united states needs to do more to enhance our screening procedures and to take a better look at people who will be coming into the united states, because the safety and security of americans comes first. from thursday, those travelling from six predominantly muslim countries could be barred from entering the united states for 90 days, and refugees for 120 days. on monday, the supreme court offered broad guidelines on who could be exempt from president trump's ban, saying visa applicants had to prove a bona fide relationship with a us person or entity. the trump administration has narrowly interpreted that to mean that those with a close family relationship such as a parent or child qualify. so, too, anyone with
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a business or educational tie to the united states. but the relationship must be formal and documented, not made up to evade the executive order. but extended family, such as a grandparent, grandchild, aunt or uncle will be denied visas. the ban also means refugees, even those working with the resettling agency, will face the same restrictions. civil rights and immigration activists have found lawsuits, saying it is arbitrary and discriminatory, and many rushed to the airports. the world is watching the united states of america. and what they are saying is, we thought that that was a country for opportunity and justice for all, but it does not seem that way. i mean, this administration is redefining what a family is. i was raised by my grandparents, so the idea of grandparents not being part of the family is very foreign to me. already, the state of hawaii has challenged the administration
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in court, arguing the federal government is violating the supreme court by excluding people with an extended family relationship to the united states. neda tawfik, bbc news, new york. meanwhile, president trump has been widely criticised for launching a personal attack against a prominent female journalist on twitter. mr trump called mika brzezinski "low iq crazy mika" in response to disparaging remarks about him on her msnbc show. he also referred to her "bleeding badly from a face—lift". senior us republicans were among those denouncing the comments. it is exactly a quarter past 12.
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the headlines on bbc newsroom live: cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed the parents of ten—month—old charlie gard, who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america life—support today. and parts of president trump's controversial travel ban have come into force, affecting refugees and visitors from six mainly muslim countries. it's time for the sport. good afternoon. good news today for cricket fans. live matches will be returning to bbc television for the first time in 21 years after a new free to air digital first time in 21 years after a new free to airdigitaland first time in 21 years after a new free to air digital and radio rights deal was done with the ecb between 2020 and 2024. it includes tv highlights of england's men's home test, one—day internationals and t20 is. andy swiss explained to me why the bbc was chosen. in a statement, the bbc was chosen. in a statement, the chief executive of the ecb, tom harrison, talked about the bbc‘s commitment to taking the game to
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even wider audiences, and that i think is key. when the ecb decided to ta ke think is key. when the ecb decided to take credit away from terrestrial television in 2005 and sell it to sky, it was good for the games finances, but not so good fruit profile. it has become much less visible. participation rates have fallen. tom harris said he had no interest in being, quote, the richest, most irrelevant sport in the country. they point to the fa cup in football as to show the way it can generate wider interest. the t20 tournament designed specifically to appeal to the young audiences they are so desperate to attract. now to tennis and despite two very good wins at eastbourne yesterday, british number 0nejohanna konta has been forced to pull out of the aegon international at the semifinal stage due to a spinal injury picked up in her win over world number one angelique kerber yesterday.
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having won the first set comfortably konta slipped on match point in the second, needing around ten minutes of treatment before eventually recovering to take the match. today's opponent karolina pliskova goes straight into the final. where she'll face either britain's heather watson or former world number one caroline wozniacki — that semifinal is live over on the bbc red button or on the bbc sport website. wozniacki took the first set 6—2. but watson is now 5—2 ahead, a very good recovery in the second set. the draw has been made for the first round of wimbledon, which starts on monday. world number one and number one seed andy murray begins the defence of his title against a qualifier or lucky loser. he's been drawn in the same half as two time champion rafa nadal — with three times winner novak djokovic and roger federer in the other half. with the defending women's champion serena williams missing due to the impending birth of herfirst child, angelique kerber opens her campaign on tuesday.
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assuming she's fitjohanna konta will face hsieh su—wei in the first round. and that is all the sport now. i will be back with a full round—up at around 1:30pm. the proportion of uk residents' disposable income that goes into savings has fallen to a new record low. the savings ratio, which measures the outgoings and incomings that affect households, has been falling sharply for more than a year. with me is our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. how has this statement been arrived at, that has all savings are at their lowest in half a century? viewers will be familiar with what is going on, prices rising, wages not going in up enough to compensate, people having to use credit cards to pay the bills, and
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there isn't much left to save. what there isn't much left to save. what the office for national statistics has done is taken overall view of this. imagine the whole country as one person, what is their disposable income, take off what we spend and what we spend on tax and interest as well, and what's left is available to spend. that's the number which has been squeezed, and if you look in recent years, that has been running at over 20 billion every three months, but this last three—month period, it wasjust three months, but this last three—month period, it was just 5 billion, so a big drop. funding growth through consumer spending has been quite important for the uk, hasn't it? so with the news that savings are falling to their lowest level for 50 yea rs, savings are falling to their lowest level for 50 years, what does that say about the prospects for growth? shops will tell you they are seeing difficult times at the moment. it is difficult times at the moment. it is difficult to get shoppers to spend, and there are two things there, on
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the one hand, how much money have you got going into the shop, and on the other hand, that is what you haven't saved. can you borrow more to do that? and both of those things will be difficult now. if nothing is being saved, there is a limit to how much you can borrow. vince cable, probably the next lib dem leader, says this is down to brexit, it is starting to bite. is he overstating things? his argument would be that after the referendum the pound plummeted, that is one of the reason prices have gone up, but this has to be put in a longer context, because savings ratios have been falling since the financial crisis. they only got below 5% last summer after the referendum, so that would back his argument. now they are down to just over 1%. his argument. now they are down to just over1%. simon, thank his argument. now they are down to just over 1%. simon, thank you very much. germany has joined most other european countries in legalising same—sex marriage. parliament passed the measure by a majority of 393 votes, to 226. it happened after the german chancellor angela merkel
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changed her position to allow a free vote on the issue — though she herself voted against. translation: for me, marriage in the basic law is marriage between a man and a woman, and that is why i voted against the bill today. it's true what was said in today's debate. it was a long, intense debate, and for many, an emotionally moving discussion. this also goes for me personally. that's why i hope the vote today not only promotes respect between different opinions, but also brings more social cohesion and peace. 0ur berlin correspondentjenny hill explained how angela merkel allowing bravo was crucial in allowing the bill to pass. absolutely vital. she may have voted against it herself but she will go down in the history books as the german chancellor who made this possible. for years now, the political left have been trying to bring a measure like this before parliament, but mrs merkel has always stood firm against the issue
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of same—sex marriage. until earlier this week, she gave an interview during which she appeared to drop position, saying that she had met a lesbian couple in her own constituency who had fostered eight children, and following that meeting, she had a bit of a change of heart, and went on to say that she would now allow her conservative mps to vote with their conscience and not have to follow the party line. that in effect allowed the political left to bring, very hurriedly, because today is the last parliamentary session before they all go off on their summer break, to bring that bill to the floor, and because conservative mps were now able to vote freely, enough support was there to secure the legislation. i must say, there was a lot of cheering and clapping as the vote was announced. it's not often you see confetti thrown on the floor of the german parliament, but that is what happened this morning.
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but interestingly, the politics behind this. by voting against the legislation, angela merkel has made sure that when it comes to the election here in september, she can say to the more conservative elements of her electorate that she has stood firm on those conservative issues. 0n the other hand, by in effect allowing this vote to happen, and to go through, she is not only cementing her reputation as some people call her, one of the west's last defenders of liberal values, she is also seeing off a problem that might have occurred should her party win a majority in the autumn, and that is that she is very likely to have to build some kind of coalition. the partners that she was looking at had already indicated that they would have made same—sex marriage legislation a condition of coalition, so mrs merkel, whether by accident or design, has managed to head that off at the pass. it's also worth noting that the lesbian couple who apparently changed her mind have now invited mrs merkel, reportedly, to their wedding. jenny hill in berlin. staying with new laws in germany. the bundestag has approved a plan
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to fine social networking sites up to 50 million euros, that's around £44 million, if they fail to quickly remove hateful posts online, despite concerns the law could limit freedom of expression. germany has some of the world's toughest defamation and threats of violence laws, with prison sentences for holocaust denial or inciting hatred against minorities. but few online cases are prosecuted. with me is our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. rory, this certainly seems like quite a statement. is this the toughest sanction anywhere in the world ? toughest sanction anywhere in the world? certainly anywhere in the western world but i can think of, anywhere in a democracy. it is part of the growing effect, we have seen this in this country with the government concerned about extremist content on places like youtube and facebook, and wanting companies to do more. we have not had talk of a law in the uk about this, but the germans have gone a lot further. it is fairto germans have gone a lot further. it is fair to say a very bitter debate
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about this. the german justice minister said the law was overdue, said it is a measure to end the internet law of the jungle. you can't just say anything goes on internet law of the jungle. you can'tjust say anything goes on the internet. but the counterpoint to that has been that we are actually asking social networks to become censors, to decide what is hate speech, what is illegal and what is not, and they have been very relu cta nt to not, and they have been very reluctant to have that responsibility thrust upon them. and some people are saying, in a funny kind of way, it gives them too much power to decide what kind of material we are allowed to see. as we mentioned in the introduction to you, few of these online cases have been prosecuted. perhaps it has been to do with a lack of powers. but now that this new law has been approved, could we expect a case pretty quickly? will they be looking for someone quickly? will they be looking for someone to set an example with? maybe not so much the government will be looking, but various groups
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have been expressing concern. there has been a talk from the central council of people jewish has been a talk from the central council of peoplejewish people saying it is all right well to it volu nta ry, saying it is all right well to it voluntary, but groups like that are seeing this as a way to clean up the internet and get rid of the worst excesses. but the debate about the balance between safety and hate online, and free speech, is going to continue. rory, thank you very much. a rare sea turtle found washed up on a beach in anglesey has been taken to gran canaria ahead of her expected release. menai, named after the section of water which separates anglesey from mainland wales, is an olive ridley turtle. the species would normally be found in warmer waters close to the equator — as our wales correspondent, sian lloyd, reports. taking a step closer to home. menai's arrival at this turtle sanctuary in gran canaria marks a new chapter in her remarkable story. she's defied the odds in getting this far, and will spend
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the next four weeks here. by her side, marine biologist frankie hobra, who has helped nurse menai back to health. here it is sunny and we saw the second day she was here she was basking quite happily, floating on the surface, relishing the sunlight on her shell. it's thought menai was swept off course, away from the south—western breeding grounds off africa, past the east coast of america and back across the atlantic, all the way to the uk in the gulf stream. when she was found last november, she was just minutes away from the anglesey sea zoo. the team there helped her overcome hypothermia, buoyancy problems and got herfeeding again. really, what we want to do was take her further south—west and release in slightly warmer waters where she is north of the breeding grounds and let her find her own way there. if that happens, menai will be back where she belongs,
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where experts hope she'll breed and so play a part in helping secure the future of this endangered species. sian lloyd, bbc news. beautiful, and back where she belongs. let's check out the weather forecast. as is often the case, some pretty big contrast across the uk. sunny spells across parts of the midlands, east anglia and the south—east, as we see here on the satellite. different story further west, more cloud, some rain, and a little rain further north as well. top temperatures this afternoon on the cool side once again, aberdeen around 14 degrees, but could reach the low 20s in the south—east which could spark a few thunderstorms. through this evening, we start to see the cloud and patchy rain working its way south, drier conditions following along behind but still quite cloudy. not a cold
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night by any stretch, but on into the weekend, it looks like some pretty good prospects were getting out and about, dry and bright weather, particularly across england and wales. then a decent day, light wind, patchy cloud, a different story for scotla nd wind, patchy cloud, a different story for scotland and northern ireland, a little more cloud and a bit of rain moving through, but it should be warm in aberdeenshire, and quite warm in the ninth south—east. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines:
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cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version, documents obtained by the bbc suggest. downing street criticises kensington and chelsea council after a meeting to discuss the grenfell fire tragedy descended into chaos after a row over the presence ofjournalists. an absolute fiasco. this is why i am calling for your resignation. not because of what happened with the fire but the sheer and ongoing incompetence that this council has shown ever since it happened. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard say his life support is to be turned off today, in a video statement they thank supporters for their help and pay tribute to their son. president trump's travel ban comes
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into force — people from six mainly muslim countries and all refugees now face tougher entry into the us. the german parliament has voted to legalise same—sex marriage, granting 93v legalise same—sex marriage, granting gay and lesbian couples full marital rights including child adoption. the funeralfor two of rights including child adoption. the funeral for two of the manchester bombing victims are being held today, a service for 29 new old martin hett is taking place, and another funeral martin hett is taking place, and anotherfuneralfor martin hett is taking place, and another funeral for 15—year—old megan hurley from merseyside. —— 29—year—old martin hett. let's return to the grenfell tower fire, and so far 149 high rise buildings in 45 local authority areas have failed safety tests , a failure rate of 100 percent. meanwhile, kensington and chelsea council has been rebuked by downing street after its first cabinet meeting since the disaster was called off
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after just 20 minutes after the council was forced by a court order to admit the press and public. labour councillor robert atkinson's ward includes grenfell tower, he's been highly critical of the councils leadership, and he's been speaking to our reporter danjohnson, about what happened at the meeting. it was utter chaos, we went with the idea that we would be briefed as to what the council is proposing to do for the residents housing needs, not just of the victims but the people in the surrounding area. we had a series of questions on which to have a genuine debate. the leader of the council read a statement which he should have done ten days ago. and then once we became aware that the media were present, he sought to change the meeting, which, of course, to close the meeting, which we challenged, and we tried to ask our questions. it ended in a complete farce. would you rather the meeting had gone ahead without the press and public there? well, initially, we were told that it would be a private meeting and we could be frank with each other but we ended up with the worst of all worlds. it ended in a complete farce.
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would you rather the meeting had gone ahead without the press and public there? well, initially, we were told that it would be a private meeting and we could be frank with each other but we ended up with the worst of all worlds. the residents have a right to meet with the leaders of the council, the leaders of the council have been hiding from the residence for the last week. they are... they should have the courage to meet with people and answer questions. the least we can do is face residence face—to—face, and they are not prepared to do it. why not? i think they are frightened, i think they are in a panic and they wish to give the impression that they are in control, and clearly they are not, as the entire nation saw. i cannot even organise a meeting in the basement of their own town hall. —— they cannot even organise a meeting in the basement of their own town hall. what should happen next? the leadership of the council and the cabinet needs to resign, the tmo organisation, which is completely collapsed and failed to do anything over the last ten days, needs to go, they need to grasp hold of the housing and care needs of the residents and they need to do something. i am now appealing to tory backbenchers who have seen themselves the way their cabinet
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is not coping, to get a grip and organise themselves. wouldn't a wholesale change of leadership at the top of the council caused more problems? we thought that there might be more chaos but we are now in a situation where the other local authorities who have been supporting us want to pull out, but they are not able to pass responsibility, particularly not for the housing needs back to the council, because the council is not functioning. that is why, at the end of the day, yesterday, i urged the government to send in commission is to run it for us. it is not often that a councillor called for the abolition of his own counsel! but at the end of the day, as every soul, something else needs to be done. —— as everybody saw. it took the government last week to get rid of the chief executive, the council could not even sack its own chief executive, now i say to the government, the council itself cannot function, the government needs to step in and appoint commissioners.
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councillor robert atkinson. there is continuing anger within the community, with residents displaced across the city and struggling to get answers from those in power. frankie mccamley has been speaking to one family affected by the tragedy. v0|ceover: salaheddine lived on the ninth floor, with his wife and two children, now, all four of them live a few miles away in a hotel. what is it like living here? it is small, a double bed and two single beds for your children. it is crowded... it is cried crowded, it is a nightmare. i cannot sleep.
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i sleep, then i wake up, i sleep for four hours. the children just want to get out. salaheddine's family escaped with seconds to spare, safe on the ground, his wife called her brother who lived her brother who lived on the 21st floor. abdulazziz, his wife, fauzia, and their three children, are all missing and presumed dead. a devastating reality that salaheddine's children are struggling to come to terms with. my son becomes hungry. nervous. he has changed. my daughter, if you ask her to paint something, she will paint a tower on fire. what is it like being a father and seeing your daughter draw something like that?
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it is not easy. it is not yet clear when the family will be able to leave this room and move into their new home. they hope to stay in the area and at some point go on a family holiday. funeralfor two of funeral for two of the manchester bombing victims are being held today. 22 people were killed when a suicide bomber detonated a device as crowds left in ariana grande concert. a service is under way for 29—year—old martyn hett at stockport town hall, which will also be screened onto the street outside for members of the public. we can speak tojudith moritz members of the public. we can speak to judith moritz who's just outside the service in stockport for us. the screens are there, as expected, not eve ryo ne screens are there, as expected, not everyone who wanted to pay their respects could fit in to the town hall, and among the mourners,
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members of martyn hett‘s favourite television soap, coronation street. yes, it is incredible, when you say they cannot all fit inside, because there are 600 seats inside the town hall. as you can see, crowds are outside watching, on the big screen. inside, the congregation, it is not a funeral, his family have been very careful to make sure they understand, they say this is a celebration, this is how they are pitching this, they say it is a celebration of the life of martyn hett. he was a huge fan of coronation street. we are just seeing the arrival of one of the coronation street stars, as you speak to us, it is helen worth. one of those here alongside other cast members, antony cotton, debbie mcalpine and kym marsh have all come as well, and that is because martyn
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hett said that he was coronation street's biggest fan, superfan, his coughlin is covered in images of coronation street as well, and the congregation who were invited here today, to be part of the celebration, were told to wear a black and something fabulous. —— his coffin. people have taken to heart, lots of sequins, cheerleaders. in the last few minutes we have heard from the father of martyn hett, he told us that martin loved being in the limelight, he would have loved every fabulous moment of this celebration. we have also been told that at the age of 29, martin planned this funeral, he decided, sometime ago, that he wanted to make sure that every detail of his life was organised and planned it down to
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the last detail. —— martyn. those wishes, including a horse—drawn carriage with two white horses, the way everyone is celebrating life, thatis way everyone is celebrating life, that is very much a part of martyn hett‘s character, that is what his family have wanted to make sure, that the general public have the chance to see. that is why there are so chance to see. that is why there are so many people here, 200 members, family and friends, but an extra 400 inside, and yet more outside the town hall. thank you very much. the funeral is also being held for megan hurley, aged 15, from merseyside, who was also killed in a suicide bombing. megan's parents described their daughter as "fun—loving, sincere, caring and beautiful" and said she had "waited so long" to attend the ariane grande concert where she was killed. megan had been given tickets for the concert as a birthday surprise. her elder brother,
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bradley, 20, was seriously injured in the attack. councils are being urged to introduce "no idling zones" outside buildings such as schools, hospitals and care homes, to discourage people from leaving car engines running unnecessarily. proposals from public health england and the national institute for health and care excellence, or nice, suggest that by—laws could be used to enforce fines for drivers who don't switch off. with me is paul lincoln from the uk health forum, and the chair of the committee producing these guidelines. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. what are the key recommendations of this report? we have looked at the evidence from around the world, and suggested proposals, considerations, for how they can reduce harmful traffic related air pollution, a whole range of measures they could consider. clea n of measures they could consider. clean air zones introduction, basically moving to low or zero emissions. looking at procurement of
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public transport vehicles, licensing of taxes, commercial fleets. public transport vehicles, licensing of taxes, commercialfleets. trees, shrubbery, a whole range of measures that they can choose from which we have shown our evidence based and will contribute to the reduction of air pollution in the areas. one of the things you have mentioned is pa rents the things you have mentioned is parents leaving engines running outside school gates, and i know in london, sadiq khan, the mayor, is very concerned about this, there are a number of schools where the air pollution levels exceed the limits or the guidelines by some margin. what difference would it make? the air pollution can build up quickly, if there are hotspots, if this has an impact on the development of young children is lungs, it
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contribute asthma attacks. also parking around hospitals and care homes as well. this can trigger heart attacks and stroke in people with underline conditions to is of to it can to. it is to series of to the air pollution itself, it is not just reducing air pollution, it is reducing greenhouse gases so it is good for the planet. 0ne reducing greenhouse gases so it is good for the planet. one must not assume that being in a car you are not exposed to the abolition. do we need to move to fines straightaway or is there an argument for advice being issued, for a softer touch approach, if people don't seem to be responding, we moved to fines? is speed of the essence? it is a progressive approach, many people are not aware of the harm that is being called, both to themselves and externally, particularly in these areas, in the population. a
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progressive approach, making people aware, any that can discourage, young people in schools are very conscious of the planet and climate change, so i think you build up over time. whatever local authorities do, they must consult with the public. i suspect we could quickly get a mandate for this. in terms of score is, you need to get into them, bubble be not much convincing to convert students and get them to pester their parents. and we all know how powerful that is! laughter thank you very much for speaking with us. the headlines: cladding fitted to g re nfell tower the headlines: cladding fitted to grenfell tower during refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version. —— change to a cheaper version, documents seen by the bbc suggest. the parents of 10—month old charlie gard — who fought an unsuccessful legal battle to take him to america
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for experimental treatment — say he will stop receiving life support today. parts of president trump's controversial travel ban have come into force, affecting refugees and visitors from six mainly muslim countries. more than a quarter of women who are overdue for a cervical cancer test don't know screening is available, according to cancer research uk. the charity found there was a particular lack of awareness among women who spoke english as a second language. around 3,000 new cases are diagnosed every year, but the charity says 75% would be preventable through early detection. our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, has more. backin back in 2008 /9, at the time of the illness and death of reality
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television celebrity jade goody from cervical cancer, there was a small increase in the number of people being screened. since then it has tailed off again. today's survey of more than 3000 women commissioned by cancer research uk and published in the european journal of cancer research uk and published in the europeanjournal of cancer found a significant proportion of women, 28%, were not even aware that they we re 28%, were not even aware that they were eligible for screening. it also found that 51% of women who fail to get tested said they intended to go ina get tested said they intended to go in a future and these were likely to be younger women. we were very surprised to find that some were completely unaware of the programme and that tended to be women from black, minority and ethnic groups and those who did not have english as a first language. that's although all women in the country who are age eligible for screening are sent an invitation inviting them to take part, for some women that is not a good way to reach them. the researchers have suggested a more creative approach to awareness campaigns, using social and
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broadcast media, and face—to—face visits instead of posting reminder letters in order to save lives. studio: kate sanger is a spokesperson atjo's cervical studio: kate sanger is a spokesperson at jo's cervical cancer trust, and she joins spokesperson at jo's cervical cancer trust, and shejoins us on spokesperson at jo's cervical cancer trust, and she joins us on the line now from south london. thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us. one in three women do not attend for whatever reason their appointments to have a smear test. first of all, on the women who don't know screening is available, what can you do to make sure that they do know? there is a wide range of reasons why women do not attend screenings, and it is very fierce that there is no one size fits all approach will stop so there needs to be really different targeted campaigns, trying to look at different barriers that exist for different barriers that exist for different groups of women. young women, women whose big difference
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language, old women. we need outrage, working in communities. social media campaigns. outrage, working in communities. social media campaignsm outrage, working in communities. social media campaigns. if you look at how to address the fact that some women do not know screening is available, what do you then do about the women who know about screening but who are reluctant, for whatever reason, to attend? it is about understanding what the reason is. why they don't attend. maybe they are embarrassed. it is worth trying to reduce that embarrassment. it is really important that women understand it is not a test for cancer, it is a test that can bend cancer, it is a test that can bend cancer, and if not detected, they may develop cancer. so it is very important that we look at the individual reasons why they don't attend. with this type of cancer, if those early signs are picked up, it
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is entirely treatable, isn't it. it can be treated, in the early stages. it can also be prevented. it is really important that women are aware of the sentence, bleeding, effects beerens that, they should go toa effects beerens that, they should go to a doctor to get checked out. what will you do next, then, now you have this study, and you are getting the message out there, in the media, what are the next steps to turn this around, to try to increase the percentages of women who do attend these regular tests? well, we will keep going, with a range of campaigns. we work in the communities, we do outreach work. also, we work in communities. inaudible we try to work with politicians and
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with parliament to raise awareness. inaudible and national campaigns as well. thank you very much for that, spokesperson from jo's cervical cancer trust. next year, russia will play host to the biggest event in world football. hundreds of thousands of fans will descend on moscow for the world cup. with the majority unable to speak russian, staff on the capital's metro russian, staff on the capital's m etro syste m russian, staff on the capital's metro system a re russian, staff on the capital's metro system are being trained up to provide a fan—friendly welcome. 0ur moscow correspondent, sarah ra i nsfo rd , moscow correspondent, sarah rainsford, has been to take a look. probably
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less worried about the architecture than making it to the match. this is the new football friendly face of the new football friendly face of the metro. they are training dozens of caches to operate in english. we are trained to meet everyone. and hope to give some happiness. don't be afraid, we tried to speak english. we are welcoming everyone near. for those still baffled by the cyrillic squiggles, there is more help at hand. the new system is getting a dry run at the confederations cup, some visitors are still struggling. lets ask for a return... the booth says the lady speaks english, let's see how we go. we found the lost man of the moscow metro, and asked him to film his next trip. normally when you go
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abroad you can make out groups of words, here, obviously, with the alphabet being different, very difficult. you have to guess, sometimes, and trust you have got it right. luckily, most russians are not nearly so unfriendly as they are painted. do you know how to get to spartak? three stations. as for the metro staff, there is a year to go forfine tuning metro staff, there is a year to go for fine tuning before the world cup will stop studio: more now on president trump's temporary ban on refugees and travellers from six mainly muslim countries has now come into effect. the us supreme court has allowed parts of it, after a five month battle in the courts. the trump administration says the ban is intended to stop terrorists from entering the country, many have argued that it's unconstitutional as it singles out muslims. allen 0rr is an immigration attorney
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in washington and explained the challenges this ban is now likely to face. the ban is not going to be the problem, more the key issue is the definition of what is a family, what we saw yesterday, early on, right before the travel ban affected, the government came back, included fiances, originally excluded as family members in the original definition of what a family is. the challenge now is not the greater travel ban but the definition of a family and what is a relationship, modern families have been excluded, problematic for refugees because in some cases may be the grandparent is the only parent they may have, or the only parent they may have, or the uncle or aunt is the only people who still existent and it is important to understand that as the focus now. particularly in countries that have been subject to famine, war, other upheaval, the definition of close family is too narrow. very narrow, and not modern, not modern
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at all. the supreme court left a broadway for the government to interpret what this in racing chip is. —— left a broad way. —— what this relationship is. just coming to the us, you do not need a stronger relationship to offer a green card. it isa it is a very narrow interpretation of family, it will not stand. how has the supreme court, why has the supreme court, allowed this partial ban, after months of it being batted away? it is not impact a large amount of people, just saying it is minimal does not mean those affected people are not important. ina in a moment the news at one with jane hill. first the weather with jay big contrast across the uk, as is often the case, lovely sunshine in the clouds in kent, and across the
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south—east, brighter picture than in the south west. this is one of our weather watchers. take a look at the satellite sequence. you can see the best of the breaks in the south—east. the west and south—west where we see the cloud, and outbreaks of rain. a little bit of rain further north, eastern side of scotland, drips and grabs, western side, that bit drier, staying fairly cloudy, dry afternoon essentially in northern ireland. northern england, some outbreaks, light and magic, quite grey, a view than the storms breaking out in the south—eastern corner, fairly well scattered. —— light and patchy. quite windy across the western side of wales and the far south—west of england. patchy rain will slip south, leaving dry conditions behind. and with a lot about overnight, temperatures not dropping away too far, nine, 10
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degrees, 13, 14, maybe 15 degrees further south you happen to be. sta rt further south you happen to be. start of the weekend, we see this little area of rain is clearing away, another area of rain pressing into the far north—west but in between, a lot of dry and bright weather to be had, and so some good opportunities for getting out and about. early rain from the south—eastern corner, starting across england and wales, not particularly windy, more of a breeze, western scotland, northern ireland, and some outbreaks of rain as well, moving ever east. 15 degrees in glasgow, 19 in aberdeen. 24 degrees in south—east. then on sunday, similar day, early rain clearing away from the south—east, dry and bright, variable clouds, more of a breeze, and again, with a little rain moving through. that is the weekend, looking pretty good, what about the start of next week. wea k what about the start of next week. weak weather front moving from the north and west, little bit of breeze, little bit of rain, the
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further south and east you go, it should stay fine and dry and relatively warm. 24 degrees in london, 16, 17 in the north—west. the cladding, fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment, was changed to a cheaper version, saving nearly £300,000. documents, seen by the bbc, show that zinc cladding, originally proposed, was replaced with an aluminium type. meanwhile, downing street has criticised kensington & chelsea council, after it cut short a meeting to discuss the tragedy, because journalists were present. we'll have the latest from west london. also this lunchtime. a coroner will record conclusions shortly about the death of seven men, including five young friends, who drowned off camber sands last summer. the parents of charlie gard — who lost their fight to take him to america for experimental treatment — say his life support will be switched off today. it's going to be the worst
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day of our lives. we know what day our son dies, but we don't even get a say over
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