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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 30, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 8pm — after weeks of criticism and a stormy council meeting last night the leader of kensington and chelsea council finally steps down. as council leader, i have to accept my share of responsibility for these perceived failings. residents celebrated his resignation, describing it as a step in the right direction. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, calls on theresa may to broaden the scope of the inquiry into the disaster, in which at least 80 people died. the families of the young men who drowned off camber sands last summer express their anger about safety on the beach. even back home there's lifeguards everywhere. there was no warning, there's no signs. i cannot believe this is happening in the uk. nurseries in england say councils are failing to provide enough money to fund free childcare for three and four—year—olds. and donald trump — in trouble again. we get a phone call saying
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the national enquirer is going to run a negative against you guys. two tv presenters attacked by the us president on the social media site accuse him of lying and suggest the white house tried to blackmail them. and good news for cricket fans. live cricket is returning to bbc television for the first time in decades. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the leader of kensington and chelsea council, the borough where the grenfell tower fire happened, has resigned. nicholas paget—brown said he had to accept responsibility for his role in response to the fire and in particularfor the decision to ban the public and press from a council meeting last night.
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the bbc has also obtained documents that show that cheaper, less fire resistant cladding was chosen for the tower block. 80 people are believed to have died in the fire and there is no suggestion a deliberate decision was made to cut fire safety. kensington and chelsea council says safety would not have been compromised in order to manage budgets. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds has more. were you pressured by number 10 to resign? the pressure simply got too great. the leader of the council, criticised for failing to cope with the crisis in his backyard, couldn't hold on. chanting last week, his council offices were invaded. last night he couldn't even hold a council meeting. it was the last straw. in particular my decision to accept legal advice, that i should not compromise the public enquiry by having an open discussion in public yesterday, has itself become a political story.
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it cannot be right that this should have become the focus of attention, when so many are dead or still unaccounted for. his housing chief has also gone. investigations by the bbc and the times newspaper into decisions made when the council refurbished grenfell tower added to the pressure. the big change, the addition of aluminium cladding to improve the look of the building. we've been investigating that refurbishment and whether it played a part in the tragedy. this development in north london includes cladding made, not from aluminium, but zinc. documents passed to the bbc reveal that the zinc panels were originally proposed for grenfell. in 2012 the architect's designs show this clearly, residents were told there would be zinc. but there was pressure from the council to reduce costs. by 2015 they were given amendments
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to the original tender and order aluminium panel, which is cheaper. the saving — more than £293,000. did the change make a difference to fire safety? this panel is similar to the ones eventually used. it's an aluminium sandwich with a plastic filling which isn't fire resistant. the original zinc panels were marketed as capable of being able to resist fire. both panels have the same safety rating under european testing. 0n current evidence, it's not clear the change would have made a difference. however, even the fact there was pressure to cut costs has infuriated those affected by the fire. those affected and the wider community are utterly sick of this lack of value ascribed to human beings who pay their council tax, who pay these people's wages. meanwhile, cladding from 149 tower blocks has now failed government tests. the process has been criticised
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as pointless because only the cladding is being tested and not insulation, which also burns. pointless 7 no, says the testing body. it is critical to do the screening tests, just to see whether there is a risk or not, to see whether the buildings have this flammable cladding or not. many of them do and the question now is what can we do about it, and are there other risks or materials we need to consider? there is an immediate crisis to deal with, an ongoing police investigation, a public enquiry, again today described as too narrow. grenfell tower casts a long shadow. well, our correspondent frankie mccamley has been at kensington town hall for us this evening. this is no surprise really. the
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announcement that the council leader here, nicholas paget—brown has stepped down, soon after that, his deputy also announced he would be stepping down. i've been speaking to people in the area. residents of g re nfell tower people in the area. residents of grenfell tower and people in the surrounding area over the past two weeks who feel extremely let down by the council. they blame them for the fire. i've spoken to some of those soon after that resignation announcement and some say they are happy with this, they are welcoming what they want is a new team to take control of the situation. 0ther people say this could just be a pr stu nt people say this could just be a pr stunt and they are worried things may not change. i am joined by the labour councillor robert atkinson. you have been instrumental in campaigning for this resignation. what is your reaction? one of relief because now the council leadership has gone, with any luck, we can get
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down to the real task which is to provide these services and support for the residents of north kensington and which they have not been getting because of the vacuum in political leader in this council. some people are concerned of this possibly being a pr stunt, at the end of the day, it is still the same people working in this building. can this really be sorted out? some of those people have been working very ha rd those people have been working very hard and there have been some results. i would say for example, family and children's services has stepped up to the plate and are providing decent services in a difficult situation. i have not at any point attacked the local government officers who have worked very ha rd government officers who have worked very hard in a difficult situation. but they can only go so far without political direction. it is a true question, let'sjudged by results and see if they are capable of rising above it. if they are not, we
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need decisive action and as i was calling for earlier today, the government should consider sending in commissioners to run the council. the government has never hesitated to send in commissioners to other failing london borough is and this is by far worse than anything else that has happened in failing burrows. we have had a number of resignations. some people are calling for all leaders to resign, would you do that if it came to that? is that gave the people of g re nfell tower still that? is that gave the people of grenfell tower still is? if you saw what happened last night, the leader of the council tried to brazen it out and then abandoned the meeting. he was surrounded by his cabinet, not one of whom dissented, just nodding dogs who went along with what he wanted to do. i think the cabinet also needs to go. we need a clean sweep. if the conservative
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group could pull itself together, possibly it should be given a chance, but looking at the way they reacted last night, i don't think they can and may be commissioners is they can and may be commissioners is the way to go. there are a lot of people affected by this. do you think this is going to give them finally a chance to get some sort of justice? that is our task. you have got labour councillors in the north of the borough working day and night and have been out in the community talking to people and have been trying to improve the situation. that's why labour councillors turned up that's why labour councillors turned up to that meeting last night, because we wanted to make a contribution and ask our questions and bring forward our suggestions. that's why we reacted with such outrage when they tried to turn it into a outrage when they tried to turn it intoa pr outrage when they tried to turn it into a pr stunt. thank you, robert atkinson. clearly welcoming this announcement that not only the leader of kensington and chelsea borough council, nicholas
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paget—brown, has resigned, but also his deputy rocky fielding melon. 0ur political correspondent, iain watson, is in westminster now. tell us what the political reaction has been the nights to those resignations which for some people have taken a long time to come at kensington and chelsea council. reaction coming in thick and fast. nicholas paget—brown was saying ten days ago that he had overwhelming support a stake in the post. that seems to have evaporated. that council meeting last night, the council meeting last night, the council tried to exclude the press, he said, on legal advice. those lobby journalists he said, on legal advice. those lobbyjournalists reporting on politics, downing street could have thrown him a lifeline and they didn't. thrown him a lifeline and they
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didn‘t. sajid thrown him a lifeline and they didn't. sajid javid has said, it is clearly a personal matter of the leader of the council to step down but given local people had lost confidence in him, it is right that he step aside. the government at every level saying it is right that he goes. the question is, what else happens next? the mayor of london sadiq khan is suggesting the whole administration should be pushed aside until the local elections next year and unelected commissioners should take over because they are not up to responding to the scale of the crisis. andrew gwynne has recently endorsed but call from sadiq khan, welcoming the resignation of nicholas paget—brown but also saying they should be a full review of what has happened in kensington and chelsea with a view to bringing in unelected commissioners, experts if you like, to run the council. theresa may
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under pressure from a number of quarters. not leastjeremy corbyn and the scope of this enquiry. jeremy corbyn in this letter to the reason makes is trying to keep her very much in the firing line, not simply the local leadership in kensington and chelsea. in this letter, he effectively criticises the scope of the enquiry, saying it has been potentially too narrow and then effectively even where there is a consensus that the premise that has issues, he pushes things a little further. she says she wants to see an early interim report on what happened and he says, that report must come by september 2000 and i7. report must come by september 2000 and 17. she says there is an issue with cladding and perhaps they should be a wider investigation into this and he says, yes, they ought to be an enquiry into this but building regulations must be reviewed first,.
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she said officials wouldn't check the immigration status of anyone caught up in the fire and he is calling for immigration amnesty. i think it is trying to look as if he is seizing the initiative and siding with the local residents. 0ne specific part of this letter they have responded to, jeremy corbyn perhaps giving the impression that the concerns and questions of local residents might be overlooked, and they themselves want to see a broader scope to this enquiry. they are saying clearly in downing street that local people will be involved, their voices will be heard throughout the enquiry process and it will have an input into drawing up it will have an input into drawing up its terms of reference. let's speak to david sibert from the fire brigades union. he joins us via webcam from warwickshire. thank you forjoining us. it is
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quite technical, all of the fire safety rules and regulations. caliph what the difference is now after 2005, compared with before? responsibilities changed quite a lot? in 2005, a new piece of fire safety legislation was introduced and prior to that, fire safety was addressed by an act called the 1971 fire cautions act. since 2005, we have had the regulatory reform fire safety order. what changed really was under the 1971 act, if somebody was under the 1971 act, if somebody was building a new building, the standard fire safety that had to be maintained in that building was picked out of a book. the fire service had a series of books and we picked out a list of what fire precautions need to be applied. we
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put them in a fire certificate and gave the fire certificate to the occupier. today, what happens, since 2005, the occupier themselves have to carry out a fire risk assessment and they decide what fire precautions need to be applied. what was the purpose of the change?m was the purpose of the change?m was quite sensible in that the idea was quite sensible in that the idea was to make fire precautions more appropriate to the risk within the building. toa appropriate to the risk within the building. to a certain extent, the way the fire precautions act was applied, it was a1 size fits all. in some cases, they were not adequate and in some cases, they were over the top. the risk assessed regime is that you are fire precautions that address the risk within the
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building. what the fire brigade union is concerned about is that that change was used as an excuse to reduce the number of inspecting officers the fire and rescue services had. where do building materials fire safety aspects of building materials come in these new regulations? the building process, the fire safety of building process is divided into two very clear parts. the first part is the construction phase of the building. that is controlled by a building control body. when deconstruction is finished, there is an assumption that the finished building applies with the building regulations. from our point of view, that it is safe
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from fire. after it is handed over, it is up to the fire and rescue services to manage the ongoing, to oversee the ongoing fire risk management of the occupied building. where things fall down is the division between the building process and the occupier process that sometimes things slip through the net. very briefly, is that the gap you think will have to be looked at? absolutely, yes. there are a number of areas that need to be looked at. the current practice we use will have to be looked at and that the handover process from the building phase to the occupied phase, we need to have some kind of system that we can be absolutely sure that a building is right at that point so we can move on. thank you. very complicated, thank you for
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explaining it so clearly. we and we'll find out how this story, and many others, are covered in the papers at 10.a5pm. the guestsjoining me tonight are david wooding, political editor of the sun on sunday, and katie martin from the financial times. the headlines on bbc news — after weeks of criticism and a storming council meeting last night, the leader of kensington and chelsea council has finally stepped down. a coroner has concluded that it's not possible to establish whether seven men — who drowned off camber sands in east sussex last summer — might have survived if lifeguards had been on the beach. nurseries in england say councils are failing to provide enough money to fund free childcare for three and four—year—olds. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's damien. andy murray's says he's feeling good
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despite limping through much of practice three days before he's scheduled to begin the defence of his wimbledon title. he pulled out of his final warm—up match at hurlingham club with a a sore hip. the defending champion did manage to work with his coach ivan lendl at the all—england club today. there were some ominous signs as he was clearly moving gingerly but he remains hopeful he'll be fit for monday. british no 3 heather watson has missed out on a place in the final of the aegon international at eastbourne after defeat to sixth seed caroline wozniacki. wozniacki took the first set 6—2 before treatment to an abdominal injury in the second saw watson storm back to take it 6—3. the decider was the tightest set by some way as both players dug in for victory — the dane eventually took it 7—5 with a break in the final game of the match. wozniacki will play karolina pliskova next becausejohanna konta should have been playing in the second semi at eastbourne after the watson match
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but withdrew with a back injury this morning, after a nasty fall in her quarter—final tie against angelique kerber yesterday. we were doing the best we could recover well for today but it wasn't quick enough. i am still sore, my thoracic spine. it is a big tournament for all of us next week and it is something i have got to disregard when it comes to my health. my health must always come first and i am definitely doing everything i can to be ready for wimbledon but definitely taking it one day at a time and whatever is best for my health. coach andy farrell says the british and irish lions need to man up if they're to win the second test in wellington tomorrow and remain in the series with new zealand. the lions have made three changes from the team that lost the first test last weekend in auckland. jonny sexton is at fly half and owen farrell moves to inside centre. tour captain sam warburton returns at flanker and mauro 0toje comes into the second row for a match the tourists simply must win. bleep
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it is about character this week for us. it is about manning up. and putting everything on the line, because it is that situation, isn't it? it is do or die for us. britain's chris froome has signed a new contract on the eve of the tour de france with sky. the 104th tour de france with sky. the 104th tour de france with sky. the 104th tour de france gets underway with the grand depart tomorrow and chris froome is hoping to complete his third straight victory and fourth victory in five years. he faces stiff competition. the level of riders and of course we are racing on this year, it will be a much more open race. it is going to be the biggest challenge for me, for sure. it will be right up there, to win a fourth tour de france would be incredible. i don't want to jinx
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fourth tour de france would be incredible. i don't want tojinx it. it would just be... unreal. good news today for cricket fans, live matches will be returning to bbc television for the first time in 21 years, after a new free to air, digital and radio rights deal was done with the ecb between 2020 to 202k. it includes tv highlights of all of england men's home internationals. the ecb's chief executive tom harrison believes it will help the sport to attract more youngsters. it isa it is a great deal for the game, it is a great dealfor the game, a game changing deal really for cricket in this country. the key elements we have already brought to bear on this are massively increased reach, massively increased revenue and a complete transformation of the support and promotion of the game. in the future. a real focus on participation and a desire for us, to get together and get as many children playing cricket as we can. it's an exciting moment for the game. that's all the sport for now,
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we will be reunited in the next hour. studio: i am so pleased, i can't tell you! president xi jinping insisted that hong kong has a stable future under chinese rule, as he arrived in the territory to mark 20 years since its handoverfrom britain. hong kong police have now released all 26 activists who were detained for staging a protest in advance of the visit, calling for more political freedom. 0ur correspondent in hong kong stephen mcdonell reports. the president of china, xijinping, started the day with a troop inspection at the people's liberation army garrison in hong kong. since this former british colony was returned to china two decades ago, the military has kept a pretty low profile here and is only on show for special occasions. the city itself is also being dressed up for the 20th anniversary, with light shows and performances planned. strong development in the future is one of the key messages being pushed by the central government. in 1997, hong kong was handed back to the mainland, along with guarantees
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of an independentjudiciary, free press and freedom of expression. yes, this would be part of china but under the banner of one country, two systems, it would be a region with special privileges. yet the last british governor says he now worried that beijing is not keeping its end of the bargain. the mood has got much more sour in the last few years because while president xi jinping has been in office, just as there has been a crackdown on dissidents on mainland china, so the chinese have been increasing their grip on hong kong's windpipe. a failure to introduce promised democratic elections for hong kong's leader brought hundreds of thousands of protesters into the streets three years ago, paralysing the cbd. and more demonstrations are planned for this weekend, to mark xi jinping's historic visit. it would be a mistake to think that the bulk of this city's dissent now revolves around independence. far from it.
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on this 20th anniversary, if the opinion polls are to be believed, most people in hong kong still want to be part of china as long as their freedoms are guaranteed. but wherever president xi is, there will be no talk of misgivings or dissatisfaction. instead, he told a banquet with hundreds of selected guests that he remained confident in this city. steven mcdonnell, bbc news, hong kong. as we just heard — president xi has been touting the success of the !one country, two systems" arrangement in hong kong, but back on the mainland — there's been a different message from china's foreign ministry — let's take a listen. translation: the china and british joint declaration no longer has any practical significant and it does not at all binding for the central government's management of a hong kong. the uk has no sovereignty, no
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power to rule or supervise hong kong after the handover. joining me now via webcam is professor steve tsang — director of the china institute at soas, the school of oriental and african studies. thank you forjoining us. as we heard, two different messages depending on the audience. why is it so important for china to mark this 20th anniversary? the president of china, xijinping, has decided to make this into an occasion and we have to bear in mind that for president xijinping, the most important event in the political calendar this year is the 19th party congress of the communist party in the autumn, when he is going to make major changes to the government arrangements in china. he wanted a tremendous, successful event to mark the occasion of the return of hong
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kong to chinese sovereignty. we have seen kong to chinese sovereignty. we have seen protests, we have heard there had been some people detained and now released. how great are those tensions and what are they over? the tensions and what are they over? the tensions are absolutely enormous. the people of hong kong, in particular the younger generations, wa nted particular the younger generations, wanted democracy. democracy, as we understand that in the united kingdom. the chinese government under xijinping will kingdom. the chinese government under xi jinping will not accept hong kong becoming a democracy. and this is where the basic tension lives. how much more liberal is the attitude in hong kong compared with china even 20 years on? the basic attitude between people in hong kong and in china, very different. hong kong, having been a british colony for 143 years, believed in
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democracy, human rights and an independent judiciary. democracy, human rights and an independentjudiciary. those are not values that are generally shared and believed on the mainland of china and certainly not by the chinese government. what do you see happening next in how is this deal that was signed between britain and china might change, given what we just heard from the foreign ministry? what happened on the ground in hong kong perhaps will not change the order much by a statement from the chinese foreign ministry. what has changed, in a fundamental way, is how the rest of the world will look at how the chinese government deals with international agreements. if the chinese government ever did sign international agreements with the united kingdom and when it no longer
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looks to the chinese government, they would naturally announce that agreement no longer applies. 0ther countries who then have to think about whether they have agreements with the chinese government, will be honoured when it no longer suits the chinese government. how inclined will britain feel to try to influence china any further? the british government, we will have to to reiterate the joint agreement of 1984 is an international agreement, registered in united nations. therefore, it remains in force as much today as it was 30 years ago when it was signed. but in reality, the british government has not tried to interfere with how events happened in hong kong, it is simply paying a benevolent interest in the element in hong kong and trying to speak to the chinese government to make sure the terms of the original
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agreement subsequently are enacted into chinese law, called the hong kong basic law, will be enacted. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather now with darren bett. july isjust july is just around the corner but today was quite cloudy. not as much rain around today, it is pushing southwards across england and wales. the cloud is breaking further north into scotland and northern ireland. in england and wales there will be more cloud, but it will break up and clear. sunny spells in many parts of the country. western scotland and northern ireland turning to cloud
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and we will see some light rain. 20 degrees in eastern scotland, is high as 25 degrees in southern england. some rain that will go and before it pulls away. it will be warm in the sunshine. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: the conservative leader of kensington and chelsea council, nicholas paget—brown, has announced he'll resign, following the grenfell tower tragedy. it comes after criticism of the council's response to the disaster, in which at least 80 people are known to have died. as council leader i have to accept my share of responsibility for these perceived failings. in particular, my decision to accept legal advice that i should not compromise the
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public inquiry by having an open discussion in public yesterday has itself become a political story. local residents have celebrated the resignation, describing it as a step in the right direction. the council's deputy leader, rock feilding—mellen, responsible for housing, is also standing down. jeremy corbyn has written to theresa may with a call to broaden the public inquiry into the disaster, after the judge appointed to lead the inquiry warned it may be too narrow in its scope to satisfy all the survivors. it's emerged that the cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version, saving nearly £300,000. documents seen by the bbc show that zinc cladding, originally proposed, was replaced with an aluminium type. a coroner has concluded that the deaths of seven young men who drowned in two separate incidents off camber sands last summer were all due to misadventure. there are lifeguards everywhere but
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there were no signs. i cannot believe this is happening in the uk. the funeral has taken place of martyn hett, a coronation street superfan, who was killed in the manchester arena bombing. a coroner has said that it is unable to know whether and not the men may have survived in a drowning accident if there had been lifeguards. 0ur correspondent reports from hastings. it is the beach where generations of families have made their summer holidays. three kilometre islam, cambuslang is normally a place where happy memories are created. but for
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these five men it became a place of danger and death. tonight at the end of their inquest, the men' family spoke about their anger at their last. it was five boys playing on a beach. they made no effort to find the rest of them. they were in the water for the rest of them. they were in the waterfor six hours. the rest of them. they were in the water for six hours. they the rest of them. they were in the waterfor six hours. they didn't make any attempt to find those boys. my make any attempt to find those boys. my brother was in the water for six hours. the family said that the council had been wrong to suggest that people from ethnic minorities could not swim and they were hurt by that. i doesn't know if your family can go to the beach. that is why we
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are fighting, to change something, but not for us. my son is gone and he will never come back into my life. the father of two of the brothers said that families have two here the children blamed for their own deaths. this was the moment last summer own deaths. this was the moment last summer it became clear the men had drowned. the council said they had not put in lifeguards before because it did not have the money. tonight the council was asked why it'd never apologised to the families. the council sends their condolences to the families and it is a tragic event that we do not want to see happening again on any of our beaches. the coroner has taken a lot
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of information from this will be raising it on national level. just a month earlier, these two men also drowned. for the family of all the men who died in an appalling sequence men who died in an appalling sequence of tragedies there is anguish and build world and how this could happen in such a benign and familiar setting. kensington and chelsea borough council leader nicholas paget brown has said he is stepping down following criticism of the council's response to the grenfell tower disaster. well, i've been getting reaction to this evening's developments from joe delaney from the grenfell residents action group. i suspected that something like this was going to happen but i see it as another cynical move. if they were genuinely concerned they would resign as counsellors and trigger by
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elections. what would you say to the argument that they should stay to oversee this being sorted out? given the fact there is an ongoing investigation and the inquiry is about to start i think it is a mistake for them to remain in place because that could be a conflict of interest. the man was responsible for housing for several years so i don't think it is feared that he has the advantage of internal documents and resources when he needs to call upon them, when the residents can't even call on services from the cancelled that they require it. the mayor of london has called on theresa may to appoint independent commissioners to run the cancelled. how helpful with that the? —— to run the council. how helpful with that the? i think that would serve
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theresa may more than the residents. theresa may more than the residents. the council staff themselves go by the policies that are set by the cabinet. i would the policies that are set by the cabinet. iwould not the policies that are set by the cabinet. i would not consider them as culpable as much as the cabinet. while i can see the logic kind of being independent people coming in, i think that will waste valuable time and tried to coordinate the relief effort. more of their front—line staff should be promoted to roles that are responsible for overseeing things and they should involve more local groups, such as the humanity that have been underground since the first moment. the mayor of london said that not only does the need to be a change in leadership but also in leadership style, a different approach and have a counselling gauges with the people that it serves. i would not say how a council engages, i would say how
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this council has engaged. if you look at the response in camden, it has been the complete opposite. their councillors have been underground meeting people from day one, their staff are right on the ground... there was criticism of that, because people said it was sprung upon them last week on friday night when it was a bit late in the day and some people had to leave in the middle of the night. the response was not perfect, but slight incompetence is better than the whole of the difference that residents have faced up until now. i think i willjust call them can think i willjust call them can think and in chelsea because i do not think they deserve to be referred to as a royal borough. documents seen by the bbc shows that the decision was taken to use cheaper, less fire resistant
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cladding, saving hundreds of thousands of pounds. it is not said that a decision was made to cut fire safety, but it was cheaper. they knew that this other material was safer but they thought it was a risk worth taking. i doubt they would ta ke worth taking. i doubt they would take the same risk in their own homes or the buildings that they work on. another issue is the scope of the inquiry. as soon as the judge was appointed there was concern about whether she was the most appropriate person to chair it. jeremy corbyn has said that he was to see the scope widened. what kind of scope do you think that it needs? i met of scope do you think that it needs? imet sirmartin of scope do you think that it needs? i met sir martin yesterday morning at 10am i met sir martin yesterday morning at10am andi i met sir martin yesterday morning at 10am and i think it was the first meeting that he held that residents and re—raised serious concerns about the scope of the inquiry and his background, whether he is someone
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thatis background, whether he is someone that is competent to handle an investigation of the magnitude and scope that we were hoping for. i was somewhat sceptical but after meeting several residents groups he said that he did not think he would be able to do anything that would satisfy us because of the terms of reference, which supposedly have not been agreed jet. there has been a statement from ten downing st saying that a minister mac will respond to jeremy corbyn's letter in due course. “— jeremy corbyn's letter in due course. —— saying that theresa may will respond. it also says that residents will have their voices heard. you are laughing? the letter that we issued to theresa may she did not bother replying to before sirmartin did not bother replying to before sir martin was appointed. her reply was given in the daily telegraph, she did not reply to a letter
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directly. she can talk but nothing she says carries any weight or respect with any of the residents in the area. we are told it was a couple of hundred thousand parents that was shaved off the bill, theresa may seems willing to pay £1.5 million to stay in her home in downing street. this is the money that has been promised to northern ireland as part of the agreement she has reached with the dup. yes. what should be added to the terms of reference ? should be added to the terms of reference? if we stick with those times it will become a debate about cladding. while the 100% failure rate of every block that has been
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tested as horrifying, particularly for those who live there, i think there are wider issues of concern here. people in the local area, the g re nfell tower here. people in the local area, the grenfell tower action group, they we re grenfell tower action group, they were complaining about the regeneration since 2011—2012. any cancelled the issue is a consultation says what they should think should happen, or pen it to the public for input, and then the conclusions the reach at the same as what they proposed in the first place. that needs to change. that needs to be part of an inquiry? yes, it does. it is about resident engagement. we warned this would happen we were told we were scaremongering. none of the residents of the building wanted the cladding. the main concern seemed to be to make the building more
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beautiful rather than to make any substantial changes to its structure. in terms of the inquiry, some of what residents appear to wa nt some of what residents appear to want some martin to cover will be dealt with by the criminal investigation, and necessarily to ensure that isn't prejudice and in his sister away from that.” ensure that isn't prejudice and in his sister away from that. i do not think it does. we had an inquiry into the london riots at the same time as people were locked up for writing. there are lots of inquiries that have run parallel with criminal investigations in the past and as long as they are properly handled and there is political will behind them these things seem to be able to run quite competently. i do not see what the differences here. you would not be worried about a potential criminal investigation been prejudice? the hell 's bra inquiries
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actually lead to criminal charges being brought against various people. the police investigations did not lead anywhere. i would rather there was focus and attention on this matter. we can work out the details afterwards. i don't think one has to originally prejudice the other. the bbc has seen documents that show cladding fitted to grenfell tower during its refurbishment was changed to a cheaper version. the zinc cladding originally proposed was replaced with an aluminium type, which was less fire resistant, saving nearly £300,000. the cladding is thought to have contributed to the spread of the fire that killed at least 80 people. joining me now via webcam is niall rowan from the association of specialist fire protection, who can give us some insight in to the regulations covering this type of material. thank you forjoining us. we know
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that there are fire regulations and building regulations. there are inspections at a place in work is being carried out. where are the gaps in these frameworks that have led us to this position? there are a number of possible gaps. the first is that the inspection regime under local authority building control, if the building was erected or converted under that regime, may not have been as thorough as one would have been as thorough as one would have liked. in this case inspection is probably not the issue, the issue is probably not the issue, the issue is probably not the issue, the issue is probably the approval of a design that was not adequate under the circumstances. how is it then that something like the cladding used on the grenfell tower could have been
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allowed to go through? environmentally and aesthetically it may be an acceptable, but it clearly didn't meet the combustibility standards that you would expect to be imposed on the building of that type. no, but there are ways around the recommendations. there is some confusion. if you look at the approved document, the guidance for the building regulations, it specifies for surfaces of buildings but they have to be one below limited combustibility, but even if you assume the limited combustibility is the required standard, one can undertake a desktop study to justify cladding panels offer different performance. it would not have to be put to a fire test? not necessarily. a desktop study can be used to test
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evidence and it has undertaken by a suitably qualified fire safety expert. it is not specify who or what can do it. to what extent only technologies and materials leaping ahead of the regulations in place? there are two issues there. firstly, we have changed the way we building and shall lay buildings in the last ten years, but we're not had a proper review of the approved materials for at least ten years, which is something the fire federation has been calling for for a number of years. the recently launched another appeal to get the regulations updated. secondly, even if the regulations are perfect there is? 0r compliance. unsafe designs or
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products can somehow slipped through the net. the scrutiny and the rigour is not there. how big of a job is to put it all right? it is quite a big job for the public inquiry. we hope that will not kick the review of approved document sent to the long grass for another 3—4 years, and that this review will go along in parallel with the public inquiry. we know that the judge who has been appointed as been requested by the prime minister to provide an interim report in a few months and we called that will assist. it is quite a big job because we have to look at the level of fire safety and it also matters that there are issues relating to compliance. thank you
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for talking to us. thank you. two tv presenters attacked on twitter by president donald trump have accused him of lying and suggested the white house tried to blackmail them. meeka brezinski and joe scarborough, the hosts of msnbc morning joe said they were warned a tabloid would run a negative story on them unless they said sorry for their coverage of mr trump. joe scarborough spoke about the subject on the show. we got a call that the national enquirer is going to run a negative story against you guys and it was donald with his friends and the guy who runs the national enquirer. they said that if we called up the president and apologised for our coverage then he will pick up the phone and spike the story. we have in speaking to our
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correspondent in washington. this erupted just today when president trump suddenly launched a twitter attack on a female reporter, carling her iq low and saying she was crazy and saying that he would not have her to dinner because she was bleeding from herface—lift. that did not go over very well, even with republicans who said it was below the dignity of the office of the president. joe scarborough and his co—presenter went on air and made the allegations you have heard there, that this is an ongoing problem that they have had with the president, they have known him for many years and their relationship has changed. they have become more
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critical, culminating in the allegation thatjoe critical, culminating in the allegation that joe scarborough critical, culminating in the allegation thatjoe scarborough made that a senior white house official called him to tell him to apologise to the president and he would have a story that was about to appear in a tabloid spiked. joe scarborough said no. donald trump tweeted that it was not true and thatjoe scarborough called him saying please have the story spiked and donald trump said no. who do you believe? it is not for me to say. this will die down? there will be nothing more said? if you look at the pattern of these stats it probably will. this is not the first time that donald trump has engaged in these very high—profile spats on twitter. he uses a lot of
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betrayal and he is very insulting. people express outrage and then the world moves on. his twitter behaviour does not seem to be held accountable. there is a more serious allegation that he potentially abused his power, or the white house did, ifjoe scarborough‘s allegations are true. in that they basically threatened a television reporter the details about his personal life would be exposed if he did not toned down his criticism. that is a serious allegation that these are made all the time and nothing seems to happen. the bigger problem for the republican party in congress is that while donald trump engages in this behaviour he is distracting them from trying to get health care will reform through. donald trump is not helping with the
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agenda. thank you. these are not the onlyjournalists that have clashed with donald trump. today things got a little rowdy in the white house. you may say something. easy. easy now. during a press co nfe re nce something. easy. easy now. during a press conference with the south korean president, journalists were heading into here from the two leaders and the nearly broke some of the presidentialfurniture. leaders and the nearly broke some of the presidential furniture. jostling the presidential furniture. jostling the cameras at the same time. nurseries in england say local councils are failing to provide enough money to fund the additional free childcare for three and four—year—olds promised by the government. from september, children will be eligible for 30 hours of free nursery education if both parents are in work. but the national day nurseries
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association say most nurseries can't afford to provide the extra hours. 0ur education correspondent, gillian hargreaves, reports. you know the routine, dropping the kids off before you go to work. the constantjuggling for parents. which is why the government's offer of 30 hours of free childcare for three and four—year—olds in england looked so good. but this nursery says it can't afford to provide more free hours, because the money they get from the government won't cover their bills. every nursery is totally different, so the shortfall is huge. the government says it is spending £1 billion on this. that is enough money to make it work. the government say it's free childcare, it's only free if we are prepared to foot the bill and pay for it. unfortunately, that would mean lowering standards which are not prepared to do. when the national day nurseries association asked 128 local
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authorities in england how much they will pay nurseries for subsidised from september, they found there would be an increase ofjust 40p. seven councils are offering less. just over two months to go before free childcare is extended in england, it now looks like the government is in direct conflict with day nurseries. there's a risk that parents might find they've been promised something that they won't be able to take advantage of. people come to this nursery because they want to come to this nursery. if they can't get the funding through the nursery, it's going to be very frustrating. my concern is that fabulous nurseries like this may struggle. it's a shame the government are not able to support those nurseries that need the extra money.
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the government has invested extra cash and says there's plenty to go around but nurseries say the investment is less than the price of a second class stamp. if neither backs down, it's mums and dads who will be caught in the stand—off. time to tell you some breaking news we're getting from the work. we are hearing that shots had been fired in a fire hearing that shots had been fired in afire in hearing that shots had been fired in a fire in the bronx. a gunman is inside the building. according to local media reports to people have been shot, both believed to be men, but no word on their condition at the moment. police officers are going for it for looking for the
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suspects. the public are told to avoid the area around the hospital in the bronx. a situation still being dealt with there at the lebanon hospital in the bronx. time for a look at the weather. 18 degrees in glasgow. 22 in london. most of us have had a cloudy day. some rain on the north sea coast heading southwards across england and wales. it is patchy. as it clears away from scotland and northern ireland the cloud should break up, possibly into northern england as well. temperatures more 9-10. england as well. temperatures more 9—10. when the cloud breaks up we will see some good of sunshine. we will see some good of sunshine. we will see some good of sunshine. we will see patchy rain coming into
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northern ireland. eastern scotland likely to be dry. temperatures 15—17 degrees, 20 possible in eastern scotla nd degrees, 20 possible in eastern scotland and 24 in the south—east of england. the rain will take a few hours to clear away on sunday. feeling warm and the sunshine. a strong when and some showers. this is bbc world news today. i'm kasia madera. our top stories — there are reports of a shooting incident inside new york. a man dressed as a doctor opened fire at the bronx lebanon on hospital. the council leader responsible for g re nfell tower council leader responsible for grenfell tower in london where 80 people died in a fire has resigned. nicholas paget—brown's council was criticised for its response. germany legalises same—sex unions — bringing it in line with most other european countries — although angela merkel voted against it.
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she changed the lives of women in france — simone weil, the holocaust survivor who became a politician has died. we'll have a tribute.

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