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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 2, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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oi’ or there are concrete concrete, or there are concrete walls to protect fans. this is bbc news. the headlines at 5.00. the environment secretary, michael gove suggests the government could support a lifting of the 1% pay cap for public sector workers. italy calls on other european countries to let in rescue ships — more than 80,000 migrants have arrived there since the start of the year. britain is withdrawing from an agreement which allows foreign countries to fish in its waters. also in the next hour... could battery powered planes be the future of flying? we'll take an exclusive look at an experimental electric plane. wimbledon fans soak up the sun as they set up camp in the queue for tickets ahead of the first day of play. and at 5.45 — how technology is being used to solve the world's food problems, in click. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. the environment secretary, michael gove, has suggested the government could support a lifting of the one per—cent pay the government could support a lifting of the 1% pay cap for public sector workers as calls grow for ministers to ease austerity measures. he told the bbc‘s andrew marr show the government should "respect the integrity" of the independent bodies that review pay for groups including nurses, teachers and the police. 0ur political correspondent emma vardy reports. complaining about seven years of austerity, "not one day more" was the slogan for protesters yesterday. the plan to drive down the deficit has meant year after year of pay freezes and caps for some 5 million public sector workers. but that could be about to change. the environment secretary, michael gove, said that
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if independent pay review bodies recommend a rise, then the government should accept it. i think we should listen to the pay review bodies who govern each individual area of public sector pay. public sector workers have effectively had a 1% cap on pay rises since 2013 and a two—year pay freeze before that. there are eight independent bodies which make recommendations to the government about the pay of public sector workers including teachers, police and nhs staff. but the government is not bound by these recommendations. it is up to the prime minister and the various secretaries of state to decide how to respond to their advice. there has been scepticism over whether the pay review bodies are truly independent. they work under the overall strategy set by the government? they take account of that, but they also take account of other questions as well, including the number of people who are entering the profession, and whether we need to increase pay
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in order to get the best people in the profession. these pay review bodies have been set up in order to ensure that we can have authoritative advice on what's required, in order to ensure that the public services on which we rely are effectively staffed, and the people within them are effectively supported. in march, the nhs pay review body warned the cap was putting stress on the health service. this month, we are due to find out the recommendations being made for the pay of police and teachers. we are saying to the pay review bodies, get rid of the 1% cap and give a fair pay rise. i think they should consider giving people a pay rise in line with earnings. it's no longerjust opposition parties who want an end to the long—running freeze on public sector pay. now, conservative backbenchers are also lobbying for a change. emma vardy, bbc news. more than 80,000 migrants, many fleeing war and poverty, have arrived in italy the first six months of the year.
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the united nations high commissioner for refugees has added his voice to those calling for italy to be given more support, as it deals with large numbers of migrants crossing the mediterranean. in two days, more than 12,000 migrants were picked up. this is higher than the same period last year. the figures have gone up a lot. the italians are very worried. there is a meeting taking place between the interior ministers of italy, france and germany. in which this issue will be discussed. italy is saying it cannot cope any more and it has to have more support from all the other members of the
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european union. it feels very much isolated, it's not getting the support it needs because financially and logistically, it is very burdensome and they need help. do they look specifically to other mediterranean coastal countries, spain, greece orfurther mediterranean coastal countries, spain, greece or further afield? no, it is everywhere. they look to germany for money in particular so they're looking across the whole european union. there is this meeting due to take place today but also there is another meeting later this week in estonia where there will be a broader group of interior ministers to thrash this out. because it says it cannot cope. there seems to be anecdotal evidence of this. i have been talking to an ngo who runs a rescue ship, a german organisation and they have picked up record numbers. they had far too many people on board the boat, but you have to rescue people, you cannot ignore them. it was beyond
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the safety limits of the boat and they need to to disembark those people onto a bigger vessel out at sea. they appealed for this and went to the communication centre in rome and spoke to them over the radio and said, can you get a boat to us? they said, can you get a boat to us? they said they would but nothing came. but the allegation is maybe this is deliberate, they don't want to bring more people into the ports. the other thing the italians have threatened apparently, is they may close their ports to any ngo starships bringing migrants into italy. the motivations for people making these treacherous journeys remained sadly wore in many parts, particularly the middle east obviously, and poverty in parts of africa? it is a mix. certainly what's they were saying is, they gave a list of nationalities and they said people from sub saharan africa, some of those are from conflict zones, but also from
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countries like syria, libya itself, bangladesh also, which is an interesting development. it is a real mix. i knew commissioner was saying, he believes the majority of them were irregular migrants, as they describe them. that was richard galpin. the irish government has criticised britain's decision to withdraw from the london fisheries convention, which gives boats from ireland, france, belgium, germany and the netherlands access to waters close to the uk coast. the irish agriculture minister, michael creed, described the announcement as "unwelcome and unhelpful." the government says leaving the london fisheries convention will allow the uk to take back control of access to its fishing rights. daniela relph reports. the uk fishing industry is a multi—million pound business. but the government says britain's exit from the european union is a chance to build a new domestic fishing policy. the withdrawal from the london fisheries convention will prevent vessels from france, belgium, germany, ireland and the netherlands fishing within 6—12 nautical miles of the uk's coastline. but it won't be a quick process.
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britain's departure from the convention will take around two years. environment secretary michael gove said triggering the withdrawal from the agreement would lead to a more competitive, profitable and sustainable industry for the whole of the uk. the london fisheries convention was signed “119611. it currently allows other countries to catch 10,000 tonnes of fish from uk waters, worth approximately £17 million. the government believes leaving the convention will allow britain to take back control of its fishing policy. well, a little earlier my colleague ben brown spoke to will mccallum, head of oceans at greenpeace uk, and asked him whether he thought this move would bring about more sustainable fishing in our waters. it could do, but the main reason we are excited about this
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is that this shows defra are prioritising fishing. there is a long list of deals to be struck, and we were worried that fishing would not be prioritised, and that those communities who wanted a new fishing policy and more access to fish would once again find themselves at the bottom of the pile. some people might say it is protectionist because if we can stop people fishing in our waters, then they can stop us fishing in theirs. yes, that is why we won't stop all countries. but fish don't respect borders. it will be a long, drawn—out process of negotiation and we need to develop a fair and sustainable policy. well, ben also spoke to mike cohen, chairman of the national federation of fishermen's organisation, who says that this move isn't solely about sustainability but all part
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of a much bigger picture. this is not really about creating sustainable fishing, this is about controlling fisheries management in the uk. of course we want sustainable fishing. the fishing industry has the most to lose if we don't have sustainable fishing. we have been catching these fish stocks for generation after generation, but we want to sustain that into the future. the best way to for ensuring that our fish stocks are sustainable is by having control over their management, not having that management dependent on rules which are created under the cfp, which takes a huge amount of time to respond to changes, biological changes on the ground. so this should be seen as a great step. because we really can start to rethink fisheries management from the ground up. that is a huge opportunity for us, to do it well this time. kensington and chelsea council is suspending rent for residents of buildings around grenfell tower,
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whose services have been disrupted because of the fire. meanwhile some campaigners say victims of the disaster could boycott the public inquiry, unless its scope is widened. 0ur correspondent simonjones reports. the devastating fire that claimed so many lives has opened up a gulf between residents and the council elected to represent them. is this the first good decision you have made? the leader nicholas paget—brown is on his way out but labour council member beinazir lasharie, who hasjust returned to her home in the shadow of grenfell tower, says change is needed quickly. now that he has resigned, who is taking responsibility? who will he palm this off too? yes, he should resign but he needs to take responsibility. people need to be in place to manage what is going on here. as the community mourns the dead, the government says the new leader will be chosen by the council itself. commissioners from outside will not be sent in. it is warning it will
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intervene if it needs to. the absolute priority remains looking after the victims, their family and friends, making sure they get everything they need and in doing so, when it comes to local council, nothing is off the table. the council insist the disaster was so huge any authority would have struggled to cope. but it says it wants to learn lessons. when that new leader has been elected, we have to revise how we have come across and we have to be more proactive. we have to listen more, we have to show the residents that we really are on their side. it is a tough task. and a warning from both the government and residents — you must get it right this time. simon jones, bbc news. a man has been arrested by police after a 16—year—old girl was killed
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bya car after a 16—year—old girl was killed by a car in croydon. a man has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. police are appealing for witnesses. reports suggest at least 19 people have been killed and many injured in a suicide bomb attack in the syrian capital of damascas. the attacker struck in tahrir square in the centre of the city. the bomber appears to have been in one of three cars that had been pursued by police. from beirut, sophie long reports. blown—out vehicles in the centre of the syrian capital. the suicide bomber detonated their device just before eight o'clock this morning. the streets near tahrir square in central damascus had been busy, as people here return for their first full day of work after celebrating the end of the holy month of ramadan. the car had been surrounded by the syrian authorities when it exploded, killing at least 19 people, injuring several others. the blast shattered windows and damaged buildings in the area, which has now been cordoned off.
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syrian authorities say they blew up two other would—be bombers before they entered the city. these state television pictures showed what they say is the damage caused on the main road heading into the city centre. residents are now clearing up the debris left from this, the bloodiest attack in the syrian capitalfor months. it is another day when people here can do little but try to carry on, as they come to terms with further loss of life. syria is still in the throes of a devastating civil war that has lasted more than six years, killed hundreds of thousands and forced more than a million people from their homes. at least 28 people have been injured following a shooting at a nightclub in the us state of arkansas. police say two people are in a critical condition following the incident, which took place around 2.30
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in the morning local time. iraqi forces say they have captured so—called islamic state's main base in mosul after days of intense fighting. the militants have been driven from a hospital compound where several senior is leaders were thought to have been hiding. campbell macdiarmid is a freelance journalist based in nearby erbil. he recently spent several nights embedded with iraqi government troops in mosul and says there are still pockets of resistance in the city. i think we've got tens of thousands of civilians still living under areas of isis control. they have taken a large hospital complex which they've been battling for for several weeks, that's the iraqi security forces. and they're well into retaking the old city, which is the last bastion of islamic state control. but what you're seeing now from the iraqi government is probably some premature celebration, which gives you an idea of what a big, much—needed propaganda victory this
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will be for the iraqi government, retaking mosul, which is iraqi's second—largest city and has been under their control for the last three years. there's maybe a third or a half of the old city still under control of the isis militants. the old city is just a small part of mosul, maybe 10% of the west side, so, certainly the battle is nearly over. it's a foregone conclusion now and it's a matter of time before they retake all of the territory. it's certainly a major blow to any pretensions they had of maintaining a caliphate. so, we're going to see in the next few months, as other areas of iraq and parts of syria get re—taken from isis, they're no longer going to control territory, and so they're goinbg to revert back to just being a terrorist group. they're no longer going to control territory, and so they're going to revert back to just being a terrorist group. and we're already seeing signs of that. we've seen suicide bombings
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being carried out in mosul and liberated areas, with ongoing suicide attacks in baghdad. so, whilst they're defeated on the battlefield, i don't think that means we're going to see the end of terrorist attacks in the middle east or further afield. the headlines on bbc news: michael gove says the government could support the lifting of a 1% pay cap in support of public sector workers. italy warns the influx of migrants into the country is unsustainable. britain is withdrawing from an agreement which allows foreign countries to fish in its waters. the northern ireland secretary is about to make a statement for the government's plans for stormont. the talks will pause today following deadlock over several issues.
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joining us from belfast is our correspondent. they are very far apart given northern ireland has been without a functioning devolved government since january. talks between the political parties in northern ireland to try and restore power—sharing resumed after the general election. since then it has been a bumpy road. the dup and sinn fein, as you say are unable to find a way forward in several major issues. one of those issues is the introduction of an irish language act, which would give official status to the irish language. the dup as opposed to that and sinn fein wa nt dup as opposed to that and sinn fein want it. they are unable to agree on issues like abortion, same—sex marriage. but recent deal with theresa may to essentially prop up the government, that has raised
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tensions as well. the talks process has crashed through two deadlines. 0ne has crashed through two deadlines. one in march and one last thursday with no agreed way forward. talks will pause today and the focus is very much on tomorrow whenjames brokenshire will address the house of commons. he has the option of extending the talks. he could call another assembly election or he could reintroduce direct rule from westminster. he was speaking yesterday in belfast. he did say he believes power—sharing is still possible, but over the weekend, the mood music hasn't been good. when you look at those options, election wouldn't necessarily change the overall make up a great deal. he is stuck in terms of what he can usually do? absolutely. it does seem like another election will not go down well. the other one was very polarising in northern ireland. james brokenshire is looking to the parties to make some sort of
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agreement. we have heard from the parties and the talks were pause. but the dup have said sinn fein cannot demand a ten to zero win in these talks. he says he seems to indicate that sinn fein demands where excessive. he says that's not the case, all they want is a quality. but both parties talk about a good deal, they want a fair deal. but with such different views of what fair and good means, it seems unlikely we will see any kind of deal struck by tomorrow. sarah, thank you very much. a huge fire has broken out in a camp for syrian refugees in neighbouring lebanon. one person is reported to have died and the entire camp in the bekaa valley was destroyed. it's not yet known what started the fire. lebanon hosts some 1.5 million refugees from syria, a million of them registered officially. tennis fans are queuing for tickets at wimbledon ahead of the first day
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of the championships tomorrow. hundreds are expected to camp overnight outside the all—england club for the chance to see britain's andy murray start the defence of his title. 0ur correspondent is at the wimbledon queue. i have never been to the tennis championships myself. this is the definition of britishness. the level of organisation gone into this queueing system. each of the people in these tents, the stewards will come and get them, take them to the white building over their where they will leave their suitcases after that they will come back here and the stewards will come back and march them along the golf course between here and the championships over there where they will buy their tickets. it is a level of commitment
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i have never seen before. it would make me think what this happen if it was cricket, rugby or football. let's me one of the fans who has come a long way. john mcenroe, it is good to talk to you. where have you come from? i have come from winnipeg in canada. why travel all the way? is itjust to see the queueing or is it the tennis? the atmosphere is so convivial and enjoyable, you might forget why you are here in the first place? it is both, part of coming to wimbledon is the experience of the queue, there is nothing like it. it isa queue, there is nothing like it. it is a totally unique experience. the other part of it is the tennis. i am a big rafa nadal fan. other part of it is the tennis. i am a big rafa nadalfan. you have been two other championships, how have they compared ? you two other championships, how have they compared? you have been to the french open, how does it compare to wimbledon? so far, this is your first experience? i haven't been inside the grounds yet, so it is
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ha rd inside the grounds yet, so it is hard to make a comparison. as far as organisation, the french is well—organised, but nothing beats british organisation. this is something else, it is a whole new level of organisation. i think wimbledon is probably the best of the grand slams to go to, because of the grand slams to go to, because of the tradition, the history, the people. as well as rafinha dell, who else are you hoping to see? on the women's side, i would like to see simona halep. but mainly rafael nadal. have you deliberately gone further log onjohn nadal. have you deliberately gone further log on john mcenroe nadal. have you deliberately gone further log onjohn mcenroe because he will be part of the bbc coverage? lama big he will be part of the bbc coverage? i am a big john mcenroe van, for real. but this is coincidental, it is the way it is. i didn't do anything special for that, i guess i am natural. i am lucky. anything special for that, i guess i am natural. lam lucky. i anything special for that, i guess i am natural. i am lucky. i think if you resemble anyone famous, you are
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lucky. many thanks. if you don't fa ncy lucky. many thanks. if you don't fancy queueing and undergoing this level of organisation, it is live across the bbc for the next two weeks on tv, radio and online. julian. paul hawkins, outside wimbledon. and on the subject of wimbledon... andy murray and his wife, kim sears, are expecting their second baby. the couple, who married in 2015, already have a one—year—old daughter, sophia. the news come as the 30—year—old prepares for his opening match at wimbledon tomorrow as defending champion. president trump has lashed out at a growing number of us stay to have refused to hand over personal information about voters to commission he set up investigate electoral fraud. commission he set up investigate electoralfraud. he accused commission he set up investigate electoral fraud. he accused them of having something to hide. laura bicker explains what might happen next. donald trump set up an
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electoral integrity commission in may. he wanted to look at claims, including his own, that voter fraud was widespread across the united states. he believes, for instance, many people who might have died in the past are still on the electoral roll and people are voting on their behalf. to that end, the commission sent out letters to all the states. they are asking for very personal information about the voters, the 200 million voters across the us. they want their names, addresses and birth dates and crucially, the last four digits of their social security numbers. but some states have real concerns. first of all, they wonder how this information can be kept safe. if they send it to washington and they send it to the commission. they say this information will be ripe for hackers. they said this cyber security on it is not safe. others believe this entire investigation is unnecessary and
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violate the privacy of those within their state. so that some of the reasons why they are saying they not comply. let me give you a couple of quotes, california, a democratic state, the secretary of state versailles, california's participation would only serve to legitimate the false claims made by the president. it is notjust democratic states, republicans are saying they will not comply. their most critical rebuff has come from the secretary of state of mississippi he is said to the commission, it can go and jump in the gulf of mexico and mississippi isa the gulf of mexico and mississippi is a great state to launch from. so they are not having much luck when it comes to getting this information. it is one of the reasons why donald trump has taken to twitter saying, what are they trying to hide. he can keep pushing and the states can keep pushing back. how this will end, we will just have to wait and see. electric airplanes could soon
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have a dramatic impact on the world. they're less noisy and less polluting than the ones flying around today, and plenty of experts believe electric engines are the key to building fleets of flying taxis in the future. the bbc‘s been given special permission to fly in an experimental electric plane, which is being shown in the uk for the first time. our transport correspondent richard westcott went for a ride. it's a plane that will revolutionise flight. not the spitfire — this. the efusion looks quite ordinary. until you see it being refuelled, that is. no tanker trucks and kerosene, you just change the batteries. runway 1—0, take off at your discretion. it's an experimental aircraft and the bbc has been offered a rare flight. i mean, the really obvious thing is how lovely and quiet it is. yeah. you don't get all the vibration. right. it's so comfortable and smooth and everything reacts so nicely. is electric the way it's going,
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are we going to have electric planes in the future, electric cabs? definitely. we are going to have hybrid electric planes of all different sizes, they go up to 50 seaters. maybe 100. the efusion can fly for about 30 minutes on one charge, something they want to improve. it will top 140mph, and has a range of around 60 miles. i'am going to try an experiment. i'am going to take my headphones off. normally you do that in an aircraft, and it's so noisy, you can't hear yourself think. let's see what it's like when i talk into the microphone. can you hear me ok? it's actually like being in a car on a motorway. it's a lovely way to see the world. but this isn't just about how we're going to be going on holiday, it's about how we're going to pop
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to the shops. electric engines are cleaner and quieter, making them perfect for flying taxis. seems far—fetched? well, look at this. dubai is testing an electric air cab later this year. and the giant taxi ride firm uber says it wants customers flying around in just six years. it's been seven decade since the jet engine changed the world. electric engines could have a similar impact on air future. richard wescott, bbc news, in an electric plane. thousands of people have been marking the end of ramadan, celebrating eid in trafalgar square. the london mayor sadiq khan, said that in light of the recent terror attacks in the capital and the fire at grenfell tower this year's festival
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is all about standing in solidarity. most of us have seen some decent sunshine today but what about the prospects for the week ahead? looks like we will have further spells of sunshine but a band of rain will affect central areas of the uk the tuesday. after that later in the week it will turn hot and humid, particularly across england and wales. this is the latest satellite picture. much of england and wales have had lots of sunshine. a bit cloudier elsewhere. beautiful skies in those all, cornwall, thank you for sending us these pictures. there will be some low cloud around,
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summerhill fog patches and temperatures between 11 and 15 degrees. monday morning starts off with a band of light rain which will continue to work its way southwards and eastwards through the day, turning into a lump of cloud with a few afternoon showers across southern and eastern parts of england. behind that front we will see increasing amount of sunshine. a much better day for scotland with some sunny spells. it will cloud up later in the evening and a good reason for that. all linked in with a much more active area of low pressure that will bring central. it begins through monday evening as the rain starts to spreading through northern ireland. overnight in the tuesday the wet weather will make its presence felt across northern england and at times we could see some rain. either side of the end of rain, decent weather. highs of 24.
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bhullar and fresher weather. on wednesday, some bigger temperature conditions through the weekend. temperatures getting into the mid—20s. still quite cool further north. there will be heavier showers across central areas, and some could turn out to be thundery. by thursday the weather gets a bit hotter again. temperatures into the mid to high 20s, even a 30 given some decent sunshine. sparking of some thundery showers. hello, good afternoon, this is bbc news. the headlines at half past five. theresa may comes under pressure to lift the 1% cap, on pay increases for public sector workers — the environment secretary michael gove says the government should listen to pay review bodies' recommendations. italy's interior minister has called on european partners to open their ports to rescue ships to relieve pressure on rome — more than 80,000 migrants have arrived in italy in the last six months.
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britain says it'll withdraw from an agreement that lets other countries fish in its territorial waters. the government says ending the agreement would help the industry with access to its fishing rights. and wimbledon fans soak up the sun as they set up camp in the queue for tickets — ahead of the first day of play. let's catch up with the evening sports news and james pearce. we know who many of those fans are queueing to watch. andy murray, the defending champion. andy murray says he'll be fit to start the defence of his title at wimbledon. he's first up on centre court tomorrow against the world number 134, alexander bublik from kazakhstan. that is the honour for the defending champion. murray goes into wimbledon fortnight desperately short of match practice. he's been struggling with a hip problem and pulled out of a couple of exhibition matches last week. it has been sore for a little while
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110w. it has been sore for a little while now. with each day that i was practising, it was feeling a little bit worse, and it was hampering my movement, and therefore i wasn't getting loads out of my practice sessions. so i had to make the decision with my team to take a few days break. to allow ittimetogo rest, and hopefully, spending a lot of time with my physio, you know, that it loosens up a little bit and that it loosens up a little bit and that it loosens up a little bit and that it eases off. and some of the inflammation dies down a bit. last few day's practices have been good. obviously i would have preferred to change the whole week and gets exhibition matches but the positive is that i am fresh. i have not played too much tennis but i will certainly have to work my way into
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the tournament. i probably won't play great strait off the bat. the women's british number one johanna konta also says that she's fit to play, after a very nasty fall at eastbourne last week. she's third up on court one tomorrow against the woman who beat her in the first round of the french open — hsieh su—we from taiwan. she is a wimbledon champion in doubles on the grass so she definitely can play in this surface, the first time i played i lost to heron the first time i played i lost to her on the grass. sol the first time i played i lost to her on the grass. so i am definitely going into the match, knowing that she will be playing very comfortably oi'i she will be playing very comfortably on the surface, and she will definitely look to make things difficult for me. i would like to think i am also better prepared. i would like to think i would be going back into the match with a clear game plan and trying to execute that as best i can. we will see how it goes. but that would to playing. -- wie i am looking forward to playing.
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britain's geraint thomas has held onto the leader's yellowjersey after the second stage of the tour de france. his sky team—mate, defending champion chris froome had a fall, but got back on his bike and safely made it to the finish amongst the peleton. mark cavendish was fourth in a sprint finish to the stage which took the riders from dusseldorf to liege. nick parrott reports. it was a moment chris froome's heart will have skipped a beat. treacherous conditions made the roads in belgium as slippery as an ice rink, with fewer than 20 miles to the finish in leovac, froome was fortu nate to the finish in leovac, froome was fortunate that this crash didn't end his tour. the briton's shorts were ripped, and his backside abroad, but it was only his bike that didn't make it to the finish. his skyped team—mate shepherded him back to the main contenders, and the yellow jersey of another team—mate, geraint thomas. ahead of them, the sprinters fought it out for stage glory. briton's mark cavendish on the far left was looking to add to his 30
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victories, but he couldn't find the power needed to get past germany's marcel kittel, who took the honours. there was no change in the overall lead with thomas keeping the yellow jersey. it turned out all froome lost was a bit of skin on a day when he could have lost a whole lot more. and britain's hannah barnes won stage three of the women's tour of italy. the only grand tour on the women's calendar ends a week today. a really impressive performance by england's women cricketers, who have had a very convincing victory over sri lanka in the world cup at taunton. the hosts, chasing a target of 205, won by seven wickets with almost 20 overs to spare. patrick gearey was there for us. taunton is a picture, a cricketing watercolour, a place for your sunday best, to dress up for the world cup. the smartness, you need a tailor. england's behind the stumps, sarah rarely drops a stitch, she accounted for two of laura marsh's forwarded.
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her quality was, well, catching. the flying wilson took the best. sri la nka flying wilson took the best. sri lanka never got left. when a round, england only need 205 to win. a sunday afternoon stroll, surely? there were a couple of unplanned divisions in lauren winfield's case, straight up, then out to 26. but england's captain heather knight made a century in her last match so isn't short of confidence. she was joined by taylor, tidy and tricky as ever, a player who has overcome struggles with depression to be at this tournament, and who deservedly smashed england over the finish line. the world's best await in the next few games but for now they will just enjoy summer's peak in somerset. we are well aware we have to ta ke somerset. we are well aware we have to take every game as it comes, and thatis to take every game as it comes, and that is from a team perspective, but also my mental health side of things as well. it is just nice to contribute. i felt like i
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as well. it is just nice to contribute. ifelt like i got starts and now it is nice to get a big score on the board as well. you just wa nt to score on the board as well. you just want to contribute for the team, so the fact we are winning is a bonus. so here's how the table looks with each team having played three games... the top four teams progress to the semi finals... india's 95 run win against pakistan today means they's currently top on net run rate. they're level on points with australia, who beat new zealand by five wickets. south africa are third, after they thrashed the west indies by ten wickets, with england fourth. the all blacks centre sonny bill williams will miss the deciding test against the british and irish lions, after a judiciary panel banned him for four weeks for the shoulder barge on anthony watson that saw him sent—off in yesterday's second test. lions flanker sean o'brien also faced the same panel, after being cited for dangerous play, but he was cleared of any wrongdoing and will be available for the final test. the lions won by three points yesterday, and their forwards coach says they will need to raise their game again in auckland. now these guys have won a line
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series and what excites the guises there is more in our game, more to come in our game. we have the best by come in our game. we have the best rugby players from the home nations. they have had a taste of it. as i say, first test they were down, they we re say, first test they were down, they were hurting after that, we got a reaction. they have had a taste of it, now, right, let's get this done, let's raise our game again. in birmingham, the final day of the british trials for next months world athletics championships have taken place. and nethaneel mitchell—bla ke won the men's 200 metres to guarantee selection for london in august. he clocked 20.18 seconds to beat danny talbot on the line — talbot qualifies as well though. but some big names missed out — most notably adam gemili and zharnel hughes. after her season's best during last weekend's european team championships, elidh doyle secured her spot in london, with a comfortable victory in the 400 metre hurdles. her time of was a second slower than her run in lille though... yes, that was really rubbish from my
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point of view, it was just really messy. i kind of lost my stride pattern for the last 200, but yes, thejob pattern for the last 200, but yes, the job today was to win and get the competition out of the way but i really need to just sort that race out, if i want to content with these girls in the world at the moment. there was a really impressive run from matthew hudson—smith in the 400 metres, his winning time rounded down to 44.99 seconds because of a slight headwind. another big name to miss out was martyn rooney, who could only come third. englishman tommy fleetwood, who was in contention to win the us open a couple of weeks ago, has today won the french open. a final round of 66 put him one shot clear of american peter uhlein and moves him to the top of the race to dubai standings. it's his second victory of the season after triumphing in abu dhabi injanuary. defending champion marc marquez has moved to the top of the moto gp standings, after victory
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in today's german grand prix. the triple world champion started on pole and held off a spirited challenge from rookiejonas folger to move to the head of the championship. britain's cal crutchlow finished tenth. salford red devils have moved up to second in rugby league's super league after a 36 points to 20 win over huddersfield giants. one other match to tell you about, champions, wigan, who by their usual standards, have endured a terrible season, beat widnes 28—12. that was only their eighth win of the campaign. an australian former school teacher, jeff horn, has stunned the boxing world by defeating the filipino world champion manny pacquiao. after an incredible 12 rounds, that included a number of deep he is happy. the future for 38—year—old pacquiao
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now looks unclear... controlling that gap, that distance, it really made it a lot easier to see his punches coming and i could just easily step back and dodge a few of them and then counter with my own. so that aspect, which isjust the size difference of both of us, was a big advantage. i believed in myself before, but now i have done something like this, i have climbed pacquiao mountain, as i like to call it. now i have to look at the other quys it. now i have to look at the other guys that are of there as well, which is cute sermon, earl spence, they are two targets on the list as well, i guess. that is a man who looks like he has been in a fight. that's all sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. and we'll have much more in sportsday at 6.30pm. now it is time for click. this is salad, growing the
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old—fashioned way, this is salad, growing the old —fashioned way, you this is salad, growing the old—fashioned way, you know, in shipping container is under led lights without soil in an optimised water and nutrient mix. as farmers call it, good old hydroponics. it is serious business. it has been suggested a type of intense farming going on here at local roots in los angeles could help solve the world's food problems in years to come. transport costs can be the juiced by growing plants wherever they are needed, even in areas of famine, with the land and climate are too harsh. you get higher volumes and many more crop cycles during the year. many more crop cycles during the yea r. letters many more crop cycles during the
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year. letters can be grown in 30 days instead of up to 90 outdoors and then a new crop can be grown immediately. all in all, one of these containers yields the same as five acres of land over the course of the year. it is very similar to the strawberry farm we saw in paris in the spring and in me a geek in japan in 2015, where the land had been ruined by the tsunami. but this project has much bigger ambitions, it is also using artificial intelligence to mix and quite unusual tweaks. but, before intelligence to mix and quite unusualtweaks. but, before we intelligence to mix and quite unusual tweaks. but, before we talk about the vegetables of the future, we are off to san francisco where catwalk and has been looking at the meat of the future. i have come to this lab in the heart of silicon valley to visit impossible foods. they claim to have invented the food of the future, a completely meatless meat, made entirely of plants. of the future, a completely meatless meat, made entirely of plantsm of the future, a completely meatless meat, made entirely of plants. it is big, it is light, it is remarkably
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important to get that from a state of mind perspective but it is also useful for interpreting the colour of meat. this is where the research happens. the aim is to reverse engineer the flavour and texture of meat using only plant extracts, and as someone who very much enjoys their meat tasting like meat, i wa nted their meat tasting like meat, i wanted to find out how they are doing it. what is it about the flavour of meat that makes it so delicious, what is it that makes it so crave the ball, that triggered your mindset to say, bacon, burger? there is a lot to go into that and it turns out that flavour is about 7596, it turns out that flavour is about 75%, 80% roma and about 20, 20 5% taste. impossible foods found the key ingredient that gives meet its characteristic iron taste is a molecule found in most living things and especially in animal wassall. luckily it is also found in plants
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—— animal muscle. so this is your magic ingredient. it provides the explosion of flavour that you get, the difference between white meat, chicken, with a beefburger. the company has recently flipped the switch on its meat—packing factory as it ramps up production. this will eventually make 4 million burgers a month, and the next aim is to move into chicken, pork and lamb. but it is one thing being a scientist in fraud by food tech, and another to bea fraud by food tech, and another to be a chef, using the ingredients produced on your carefully crafted menu. i think we eat way too much meat in general, so it is a good way to be as close as possible to what meat looks and tastes like. the impossible burgers now the only one rocco has on his menu and he sells 250 of them a week. it seems like at this stage it might be a novelty
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facility in valley diners with money to spend but of course, as always, the true test is in the tasting. ok, it is about to happen. it's really good. the texture is just like meat. it doesn't taste like minced beef. a bit like mushrooms. but i know there is no mushrooms. but i know there is no mushrooms in there. so i havejust tasted it, and it is delicious, but it doesn't taste quite like meat, to me. yes, it is a little leaner, like a bison meat. but it looks like it, it has got that kind of umami flavour, the irony part of the blood. close enough. it tasted nice asi blood. close enough. it tasted nice as i was eating it but afterwards
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left a slightly strange taste in my mouth, very strong, very irony. still, it is healthier than meat and has zero cholesterol so maybe it is worth it. what comes across talking to rocco is that what is important for his customers is that the flavour is close to meet while still being ethical. but what if you could serve up being ethical. but what if you could serve up actual animal flesh without a single creature being harmed? that is what several companies, including this small tech start—up in the heart of silicon valley, are working on. they planned to grow actual fish from stem cells. it might sound like an unnerving prospect but they believe this truly is the juju. fish consumption is rising, fish demand is rising but the production can't go any higher. 52% of all fisheries are fully exploited. 35% above that artem kalashian, they are over exploited, so we only have 20% of the world's fisheries left to increase production, so if we still wa nt to increase production, so if we still want to eat fish at the rate we are doing, we have to do this. finglas
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foods takes a small sample of fish and cultures it up. one cell can theoretically become one tonne of fish meat but we're not there yet. we will be in the market in three yea rs we will be in the market in three years with products that are a new version of fish that people haven't had before and then in five to six yea rs we had before and then in five to six years we will have stakes and fillets, just like you currently eat ata fillets, just like you currently eat at a supermarket, just like what is inside of a fish you normally see in the ocean. they are not the only company working on what some dub clea n company working on what some dub clean meat. just this week, hampton creek claimed they would hit the stores with their lab grown meat by 2018, and around the corner at memphis meets, they have already produced fry chicken and meatballs from stem cells, but at $80,000 for a pound of beef, there's a long way to go. scaling up will mean finding a new medium to help grow the stem cells will stop currently the blood of car foetuses is used, which is expensive and of course if you don't wa nt to expensive and of course if you don't want to hurt animals pretty
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self—defeating. with a population due to increase to 9.7 by 2015, many people feel current approaches to food production are unsustainable. cultured meat promises to reduce environmental impact and meat looks set to be the latest thing to be given the silicon valley overhaul. much like we're back from our phones and cars, better, cheaper, faster, safer, year by year, we should expect the same from our food. once you start thinking about food, a cow asa you start thinking about food, a cow as a piece of technology, and you apply the same technological insights we use elsewhere in our lives, we can start thinking about what food should be, what food could be. that was cat. i think i will stick to the salad for the moment, which is lucky because i am surrounded by the stuff. the thing that really hits you inside these containers is the smell. it is just lovely, all this concentrated, fresh lettuce. lovely, all this concentrated, fresh
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lettu ce. h e lovely, all this concentrated, fresh lettuce. he don't even get this i don't think in an open—air field because it all blows away but in here it is lovely, everything looks lovely and fresh. i am inside what is called a food computer, where every aspect of the plant's growth cycle, the temperature, nutrient mix, humidity and light is monitored and controlled. this kind of computer—controlled hydroponics is allowing food scientists to notjust replicate but improve on mother nature's recipes. so every plan that we grow has a finely tuned growing algorithm to optimise its growth, its yield and its flavour profiles and nutrient characteristics will stop not only does each parade to get its own unique growing conditions but artificial intelligence and computer vision are monitoring the plans, looking out for and treating any problems as on as they are spotted. local roots hopes to place between 20 and 50 of its so—called terra farms right next
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to supermarket distribution centres, which means the produce went out to travel so far and it will be fresher when it hits the shelf. i have a lwa ys when it hits the shelf. i have always needed a dressing on my cellar because i thought it tasted quite bland without it but this is really full of flavour. because it is so fresh. i could even eat an entire bowl of this without any dressing. but some researchers don't like the idea of individual companies doing research by themselves. putting life in a box is incredibly complex will stop it requires biology as much as chemistry as much as plant physiology and biochemistry and so right now it is being tackled by a lot of start—ups, and it is hard for those start—ups to have such a multidisciplinary approach. this is why all of our work is open source, the hardware and software, so we can get more people thinking on the
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issues, so we can ask the experts for advice. at mit's media lab, the open agricultural initiative wants to create a worldwide collection of food hackers. one of the things we call the personal food computer and it is like a hacker kit for plants. so what we have done is distributed all the plans, all of the tutorials, open source, and it exploded. we now have a community of over 40 countries, over 1000 people. the great thing is their experiences are being recorded by censors. artificial intelligence can look for patterns among these data points, which are the results of thousands of experiments, and the more wide ranging those experiments, the better. we might learn inside of a food computer what set of climate attributes cause the best expression of protein in a snow pea. now we might say hey, where in the world of these collection of attributes naturally occurring? and then we should plant that genetics, those
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snow peas in that place. so not only might food computers improve on nature, but they could also teach us more about how to get the best out of the earth that we have. and that is it for this short cut of click for this week from my little letters farm here in california. the full version is up on iplayer to watch right now and you can find us on twitter and facebook. thank you for watching and we will see you soon. most of us have seen some decent sunshine today, but what about the prospects for the week ahead? it
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looks like we will have some further spells of sunshine but a band of rain will affect central areas of the uk for tuesday. after that later in the week it will turn hot and humid particularly across england and wales. you can see much of inman and wales. you can see much of inman and wales. you can see much of inman and wales have had a fine day, lots of sunshine. it has been a bit cloudier further northern west for northern ireland and scotland. beautiful skies in cornwall, thanks to catching the weather for sending us to catching the weather for sending us that weather watchers picture in. as we go through that, a week with a front will slide southwards. there will be some low cloud, a few hill fog patches and temperatures between 11 and 15 degrees. monday morning sta rts 11 and 15 degrees. monday morning starts off with this band of light rain, which will continue to work its way southwards and eastwards through the day, just turning into a lump of cloud with a few afternoon showers across southern and eastern parts of england. behind that front, we will see increasing amounts of sunshine. so a much better day for
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scotla nd sunshine. so a much better day for scotland with some sunny spells, and sunshine too from northern ireland for a sunshine too from northern ireland fora time, sunshine too from northern ireland for a time, although here it will cloud up late in the evening. there isa cloud up late in the evening. there is a good reason for that. a week where the front on monday from a linked with an active area of low pressure to bring rain in the central areas of england on tuesday, it begins on monday evening. overnight into tuesday the wet weather will make its presence felt across northern ireland and at times we could see a bit of rain for scotla nd we could see a bit of rain for scotland —— for southern scotland. either side of the band of rain, decent weather on tuesday, sunny spells, quite warm to the south—east, highs of 24. cooler, fresher conditions in northern scotland, stornoway getting a high of about 16. through wednesday we get some bigger temperature contrasts building through the uk. it will turn a bit hot and humid across england and wales, temperatures getting into the mid—20s. still quite cool further north. one or two heavy showers across central areas, some could
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turn out to be thundery. by the time get thursday the weather gets a bit hotter again, mid—to high 20s, even a30, hotter again, mid—to high 20s, even a 30, giving some decent sunshine but heat and humidity sparking off some thundery showers. this is bbc news. the headlines at 6.00pm: the environment secretary, michael gove, suggests the government could support a lifting of the 1% pay cap for public sector workers. council tenants whose services have been disrupted by the grenfell tower fire have their rent suspended. italy calls on other european countries to let in rescue ships — more than 80,000 migrants have arrived there since the start of the year. the irish government criticises the uk's decision to withdraw from an agreement allowing foreign countries to fish in its waters as "unwelcome and unhelpful". also in the next hour: could battery powered planes be the future of flying? we'll take an exclusive look at an experimental electric plane. wimbledon
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