Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 3, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

4:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at four. children may still be at risk injersey‘s care system — that's the warning from a long awaited report into child abuse on the island. the panel have identified systematic failings at government and management level which still u nfortu nately management level which still unfortunately look like they still exist to this day. a teenage girl admits killing seven—year old katie rough injanuary — the little girl was found with fatal injuries in a park in york. four senior barclays bankers have appeared in court the first time, accused of conspiracy to commit fraud. downing street insists there is no change to government policy on the public sector pay cap, and the continuing pressure to lift it. a coach carrying elderly tourists crashes in germany and bursts into flames — 18 people are missing, feared dead. also in the next hour: trying to
4:01 pm
restore power—sharing in northern ireland — sinn fein has said it is unlikely there will be a deal in the talks at stormont in the short term. the northern ireland secretary is due to give a statement shortly. and andy murray is through to the second round of the men's singles at wimbledon. the number one seed beat alexander bublik, of russia, in straight sets. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a long—awaited report into seven decades of child abuse in the care system injersey has warned that children may still be at risk. the independentjersey care inquiry describes a government seemingly "ignorant, uncaring and unwilling" to deal with issues facing vulnerable
4:02 pm
people, and services which are still not fully fit for purpose. the inquiry has heard from more than 600 witnesses over three years. here's what we know so far: the inquiry found that there have been failings at ‘all levels ofjersey‘s children's sevices. there was no political interest in defining and promoting standards of care and performance in residential care and no will to invest the resources required in child care services. it recommended that the notorious haut de la garenne home should be demolished. the inquiry found children in care were subjected to cruel and degrading punishments, including beatings, humiliation and being locked in confined spaces. one victim told how live electrical wires were used to abuse children. the panel recommended that a children's commissioner should be appointed, to give vulnerable young people a voice. and it said jersey's services
4:03 pm
for children remained not fully fit for purpose, and that children may still be at risk on the island. our correspondent is in st helier in jersey and joins us now. the most shocking aspect of this is that it seems to suggest that children are still at risk. indeed, yes, anyone who has been involved with this enquiry over the last three years could not have mistaken the level of abuse and neglect that existed here over the past decades. what has really shocked people here in the last hour as they have absorbed the summary last hour as they have absorbed the summary of this report is the fact that the authors, the independent panel that conducted this enquiry, found that just as panel that conducted this enquiry, found thatjust as they concluded gathering their evidence last year, they reviewed some of the care homes on the island and child protection procedures that are in place, and they found that they are still not good enough, and they feel that there may still be children in the
4:04 pm
system here injersey who are not being adequately protected by the authorities, children who could still be at risk, and the potential that abuse is still not being dealt with as seriously as possible, because politicians still have not got to grips with this issue. it calls for a new approach to tackling child protection on this island. the politicians would say that they have already done a lot, and the report does recognise that things have improved in recent years, but it identifies one particular care home where they found a prison — like regime, something they said was a sign of the cultural malaise on this island toward vulnerable young people who needed care and attention, who needed to be supported in their lives, needed help, but instead were just locked
4:05 pm
away and, some of them, tormented and abused while they were in care. a very angry response, really, and quite a lot of shock from the people who have been involved in this enquiry, the young people who were abused as young people, they have been surprised by how damning this report has been about the state of child protection services here on the island now, but they are pleased that there is an acknowledgement of the decades of abuse that went before, the things they have suffered before, and report makes the point it has had a long—lasting effect on so many of their lives. let's speak tojon brown, who is the lead on tackling child abuse at the nspcc. hejoins me from our plymouth studio. this report talks about a culture of malaise, and how young people on the edge of society were not treated properly. do you recognise this as
4:06 pm
an issue? element absolutely. the culture is critical, and it goes to the heart of the problems that have existed in jersey. the heart of the problems that have existed injersey. —— the heart of the problems that have existed in jersey. -- absolutely. the culture is critical... one would have expected that the states of jersey would have done everything possible during the course of this three—year enquiry to ensure that systems were improved to a standard where all children could be adequately and properly protected, so adequately and properly protected, so the fact that that is not the case is concerning. it is critical that this culture is addressed and that this culture is addressed and thatjersey‘s legislation that this culture is addressed and that jersey's legislation and that this culture is addressed and thatjersey‘s legislation and policy is brought into the 21st century. we will come to howl we achieve that and what needs to happen. i will give you a couple more quotes from the report. it says: social protections have been that —— have meant that at times there has been insufficient challenge to poor practice. attempts to maintain the
4:07 pm
island's international standing at lead to failure to acknowledge the nature of some of the abuses perpetrated on children in the care of the authorities here. we have heard repeatedly in this report that protection standards on the island did not match up to those in a comparable country, such as the uk. is that a problem with a culture likejersey? is that a problem with a culture like jersey? that does appear to be the case. getting the culture right, valuing children and ensuring that children have an independent voice, and that when they are worried and scared about something, they can speak to this —— they can speak up at the earliest opportunity and those concerns will be taken seriously and acted on, that page simply wasn't happening injersey. where that is ignored, u nfortu nately, where that is ignored, unfortunately, you end up with abuse getting embedded within the culture and becoming overlooked, even when
4:08 pm
people attempt to speak out about concerns they have got. so, how do the politicians, the child protection professionals on this island, sort this out? i think the eight recommendations of this enquiry are sound. it needs to start at the top, in terms of the states ofjersey looking at legislation to make sure that safeguarding and welfare are paramount and enshrined in legislation. having an independent voice for children, and we reckon the welcome the recommendation that there was a commissionerfor the recommendation that there was a commissioner for the states of jersey. ensuring that staff are properly trained and supported, having a good understand of child protection and how to act on concerns at the earliest opportunity. and crucially, that there is help for victims and survivors of child abuse, and we are
4:09 pm
contributing to that. thank you. i will read you a couple more quotes from this report that detail how bad things got. there is detail of one orphanage that was taking in children who were put into care, and for 70 years, there was no independent, external scrutiny of the standards of care provided in the standards of care provided in the orphanage. there was a place that was described as having workhouse conditions. in the late 19505, workhouse conditions. in the late 1950s, a care home that was still operating under rules drafted in 1924, operating under rules drafted in 192a, so you get this picture of standards of care that really lagged way behind what they should have been, and an indifference at the highest level of authority here, really, to getting that situation sorted, to taking abuse seriously
4:10 pm
and listening to the concerns of young people, and they're taking the action needed to make them safe. until we get a response from the island's chief minister in the next hour or island's chief minister in the next hourorso, we island's chief minister in the next hour or so, we don't know what he thinks were at the root of these failings of what he will do to address them, but everyone today was prepared for a damning report about history and what had gone on in the past, but what has surprised people is that there are still issues of child protection outstanding here. the politicians are professionals need to address those urgently, this report says, and we wait to see what they are going to say. thank you, dan, in st helier. some news coming from the old bailey. we're hearing that a teenage terrorist has been jailed for life, with a terrorist has been jailed for life, witha minimum terrorist has been jailed for life, with a minimum term of 60 years and six months, for plotting to bomb an
4:11 pm
eltonjohn concert on the anniversary of the 911 attacks. that news just coming anniversary of the 911 attacks. that newsjust coming in — a life sentence for a newsjust coming in — a life sentence for a man newsjust coming in — a life sentence for a man who was plotting to bomb an eltonjohn concert. more on that later. a 16—year—old girl has pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of seven—year—old katie rough. the little girl died injanuary, after being found seriously injured on a playing field in york. she later died in hospital. our correspondent phil bodmer has been following the case at leeds crown court. katie rough died from severe lacerations to her neck and chest in a playing field in the woodthorpe area on the south—western outskirts of york in january. she was attended to by paramedics and taken to hospital, later dying of those injuries. a 15—year—old girl was subsequently arrested and charged with murder. today, at leeds crown court, the girl, who is now 16 and cannot be named, pleaded guilty to manslaughter through diminished
4:12 pm
responsibility. my colleague, danny savage, has the story. katie rough, an innocent, sweet, much—loved schoolgirl, killed in an attack close to her home. her life was taken by another child. it was a school day afternoon and just getting dark when katie rough was found fatally injured at the end of an alleyway on the edge of a playing field here in york. the seven—year—old died a short time later in hospital. it then emerged that a 15—year—old girl had attacked her with a knife. katie's parents were quickly told what had happened and dashed to the scene. we found her at the same time as a police officer found her. i cradled her. i saw her injuries, i knew she was gone. and... i don't know, it's impossible to describe.
4:13 pm
we just held each other, didn't we? today the teenage girl who killed katie admitted what she had done here. she's too young to be publicly identified and has been in custody ever since. what happened to katie shocked so many people in this city. things like that don't happen in york. such a safe city, such a safe place, such a lovely, beautiful place. people come from all round the world to see york. for this to happen here was just unbelievable. the full reasons why this seven—year—old was killed cannot be told because of legal reasons. katie rough will be remembered as a kind and thoughtful child whose life was taken away in the most dreadful circumstances. the court heard the defendant had been suffering from mental illness, and indeed, a number of medical assessments were read out to the
4:14 pm
court, which had been carried out by psychiatrists and doctors. thejudge was told about disturbing thinking and how the defendant had become socially isolated due to deteriorating mental health. at one stage, the girl was said to have referred to people as robots rather than humans. after the murder in january, police found books and comics of a violent nature that had belonged to the girl. she told detectives that she heard voices in her head that gave her bad thoughts. the hearing continues. downing street insists that the government's position on the public sector pay cap hasn't changed, despite calls from several cabinet ministers for it to be scrapped. number 10 says some pay review bodies will be reporting later this year, and the government will respond to them in due course. theresa may is under pressure to end the cap which has meant that public sector workers like nurses, teachers and police officers
4:15 pm
have had their pay rises limited to one per cent, even though the cost of living has risen by more than that. here's our political correspondent chris mason. has the government been underpaying nurses and teachers, foreign secretary? no response from borisjohnson this morning, but we do know what he thinks. his team told us... mrjohnson is just the latest cabinet minister to say something similar. i think that we should listen to the pay review bodies who govern each individual area of public sector pay. this is obviously something we have to consider not just for the army, but right across the public sector as a whole. we will not make our decision on public sector pay until the pay review body has reported. and we will listen to what they say, and we will listen to what people in this house have said, before making a final decision. so how do these pay review bodies work? professor alistair smith has
4:16 pm
sat on several of them. they look at evidence, especially where there is difficulty in recruiting people into thejob, where there were lots of people leaving. they listen to what the government says about what it can afford. and balancing factors like that, they come up with an overall judgment about what is the right level of pay increase. crucially, while the government can ignore the recommendations of a pay review body, there is clearly pressure now to ensure that they don't. but pushing up public sector pay comes with a big bill for the treasury. and it is yet to say explicitly that its policy has changed. i think the chancellor is being placed in a very awkward position by everybody ganging up on him. and saying, you've got to loosen the purse strings. he is the person who has to make the judgment. he needs to have the backing of the prime minister, which i'm sure he will get. public sector workers will hope with the cost of living rising, their pay cap will now be ditched.
4:17 pm
so it's up to theresa may to decide to do, and how to pay for it. the headlines: failings at all levels for many decades — a long—awaited report gives a damning verdict into the mistreatment and abuse of children in care injersey. four senior barclays bankers have appeared in court for the first time charged with conspiracy to commit fraud. in sport, andy murray puts aside injury concerns to ease into the second round at wimbledon, winning in straight sets. tit british players are already out. laura robson was beaten in straight sets, and cameron norrie lost to
4:18 pm
jo—wilfried tsonga. john terry hasjoined jo—wilfried tsonga. john terry has joined aston villa, signing a one—year deal. more on those stories that have passed. —— at half past four. our economics correspondent has been following the case of four barclays bankers accused of conspiracy to commit fraud. it is the first time we have seen senior bankers facing criminal charges since the financial crisis, and the only time we have seen any crisis, and the only time we have seen any banker facing charges for actions they took during the crisis. it is also the only time we have
4:19 pm
seen a it is also the only time we have seen a chief executive face criminal charges. john varley, the former chief executive, together with three senior directors, has been charged with conspiracy to commit fraud by misrepresentation. it goes back to 2008, when barclays was afraid that it would be nationalised and forced to a cce pt it would be nationalised and forced to accept taxpayer money, and the taxpayer becoming a shareholder, which they didn't want, so they went to qatar and abu dhabi and raised more than £11 billion there. the serious fraud office alleges that in that capital raising, certain representations that were made were false. it also alleges that there was an unlawful assistance of the capital raising, with barclays lending money to qatar which was then used to fund the capital raising. all four deny the charges. the magistrate accepted by all for all four, though there were conditions on the bail of two of the
4:20 pm
men, because they live abroad, in the united states, and they had to put up £500,000 security. for the first time in nearly a decade, more nurses and midwives are leaving the profession in the uk thanjoining it. the nursing and midwifery council says working conditions, workload and poor pay are among the reasons given by staff for quitting. our health editor hugh pym reports. recruitment and retention of nurses and other nhs staff has been a problem for a while now. today's figures show it's as difficult as ever. for the first time in nearly a decade, more nurses and midwives left the profession than joined in the latest year. attention has focused recently on nurses from other eu countries being less keen to work here. but the figures show the trend was more marked among british staff. there was a fall of nearly 1800 nurses and midwives on the official uk register over 12 months. the total of above 692,000 in march 2016 had fallen below 688,000 by may of this year. quite what the answer is, i don't know, but it's
4:21 pm
telling us something. we need to respond to that. government needs to respond to that, employers need to respond to it, because what we do know is that we need nurses and midwives to care for us in gp practices, care homes, hospitals, maternity units, whereever, across the uk. the nursing and midwifery council also carried out a survey asking why people were leaving the profession. reasons given apart from retirement include working conditions and staffing levels, personal circumstances and disillusion with quality of care for patients. the pay issue was less significant. demand is going through the roof and we have to find a way to tackle demand and then we can make jobs more manageable. it's notjust an isolated focus on the workforce, we need to look at all the pressures facing the nhs system. a department of health spokesperson said, "we are making sure we have the nurses we need to continue delivering world—class patient care. last week we launched a national programme to ensure nurses
4:22 pm
have the support they need to continue their vital work." but health unions argued that patients were paying the price for the government's failure to plan for the future and that introducing tuition fees for student nurses in england would make matters worse. hugh pym, bbc news. in the last hour, james brokenshire has made a statement to the commons on restoring power—sharing at stormont. deadlines have passed without agreement so far. the mood music is not looking good, chris?m has not been here at stormont, where the northern ireland parties are based. the tour continued over the weekend but no sign of a breakthrough deal that would restore the devolved government here in northern ireland, which collapsed almost six months ago. in the last half an hour or
4:23 pm
almost six months ago. in the last halfan hourorso, almost six months ago. in the last half an hour or so, james brokenshire has been speaking in the house of commons about where he sees things going. he is encouraging the parties to talk some more and says he is prepared to put in place new legislation, the legal deadline for an agreement having passed on thursday. if the parties reach a deal this week, he says he can do it that quickly. he acknowledges that there are pressures resulting from there are pressures resulting from the fact that there is no power—sharing executive in place, treasures in particular on health and education, the two areas he spoke about the most, and he said there was no resolution in the coming days, the government would have to consider passing some measures that would enable those departments to keep spending money to deal with those pressures on public services. mr brogan shire was at pains to state that he thought the parties could reach a deal. let's hear some of what he has had to say. in the past few days, since the passing of the deadline, some progress has continued to be made,
4:24 pm
including on the most challenging issues, such as language, culture and identity. but gaps remain between the parties on a defined numberof between the parties on a defined number of issues. the government remains committed to working with the parties and the irish government to find a way to close these gaps quickly in order to reach an agreement that will pave the way for the restoration of devolved government. the prime minister has been actively involved following on from her meetings with each of the parties, including speaking to arlene foster and michelle o'neill on friday night. i continue to believe that a deal remains achievable and if agreement is reached, i will bring forward legislation to enable an executive to be formed, possibly as early as this week. but time is short. james brokenshire, still pushing hard for
4:25 pm
a deal here. the parties here at stormont haven't reacted yet to his statement, but earlier in the day, arlene foster of the dup accused sinn fein of grandstanding and said they had a shopping list that seem to get longer any time the dup met with them. sinn fein said that in their view the dup still had not moved on the right space issues that they say cause the collapse of power—sharing in the first place. it still seems the parties are a long way apart, particularly on the issue of the irish language will stop sinn fein wanta of the irish language will stop sinn fein want a stand—alone piece of legislation to protect the gaily town, while the dup want broader legislation that will include cultural issues important for unionists. negotiating will go on and it looks like there will be no resolution to this deadlock today. james brokenshire says the point is not quite arrived where the westminster government will have to ta ke westminster government will have to take over some of the functions of stormont in order to keep the cash
4:26 pm
flowing to public services, but it has said that this absence of a devolved government here can't go on much longer. another measure that james brokenshire ratners was that donations to political parties in northern ireland, which have been anonymous up until now, will no longer be. all donations and loans given to parties in northern ireland will have to be published. that is something that will be a change in politics here. still no sign at the moment of way out the deadlock. 18 people have died after a coach crashed and burst into flames in germany. the vehicle collided with a lorry on a motorway close to the bavarian town of stammbach, in the south of the country. police say 30 passengers have been taken to hospital,
4:27 pm
some with serious injuries. daniela relph reports. the terrible scene of the crash on the a9 motorway near stammbach in bavaria. firefighters fought a desperate battle to put out the blaze that engulfed the vehicles. it is believed the tour bus was heading to nuremberg when it hit a lorry in a trafficjam on the motorway. it caught fire immediately and was ablaze by the time the emergency services arrived. on board were a tour group from saxony, a state in the east of germany. as well as those still unaccounted for, rescue helicopters have taken others to a number of hospitals. many have serious injuries. a spokesman for the german chancellor angela merkel said there was great dismay about the crash and said her thoughts go to the victims and family members as well as the injured. daniela relph, bbc news. a 19—year—old man has beenjailed
4:28 pm
for life are planning a bomb attack that may have targeted an eltonjohn concert or london's oxford street. the man admitted to preparation of terrorist acts after trying to source weapons including a suicide bomb and machine guns. our home affairs correspondent is outside the old bailey and joins us now. ring us up—to—date. old bailey and joins us now. ring us up-to-date. this is the case of haroon syed, 19 years old. it is a very serious case, and probably the most significant and major sentencing since this awful period of terrorism attacks we have had in london and manchester. what haroon syed wanted to do prior to his arrest late last year was to find a contact online, a jihadist contact, who would work with him either to
4:29 pm
acquire machine guns or build some kind of suicide bomb device and then basically attack somewhere in london. he was searching for crowded places, and indeed considered the eltonjohn concert, places, and indeed considered the elton john concert, a places, and indeed considered the eltonjohn concert, a bbc radio two special in hyde park last september. how he was found was remarkable intelligence work by m15. they had a tea m intelligence work by m15. they had a team of people online posing as fellow jihadistss, and it team of people online posing as fellowjihadistss, and it was these people that haroon syed came in contact with last april, when he was trying to find someone who could source the materials to build this device. they kept talking over a period of months, the m15 officer refusing to supply a gun, saying it would be too difficult. they eventually met and talked about our bomb, where haroon syed handed over
4:30 pm
£150, and there, he talked about targeting oxford street and seeking paradise because he wanted paradise. in the following days, the m15 officers confirmed that the device could be made, and then the defendant began searching for possible targets, including the eltonjohn concert. the qc did not mince his words, saying, you remained committed to the ideology ofa remained committed to the ideology of a brutal organisation that has sought to hijack and corrupt a venerable religion for its own purposes. you remained committed to carrying out an act of mass murder and you posed a significant risk to the public. he said, you were not duped oran the public. he said, you were not duped or an trapped. he took all the steps, proving in court that he effectively wa nted steps, proving in court that he effectively wanted to carry out this attack. he indeed did plead guilty.
4:31 pm
the home secretary had previously withdrawn his passport amid evidence that he may have been thinking about travelling abroad to fight. and in another twist, his older brother was jailed for life last year for his role in attempting to carry out some kind of plot on remembrance sunday in 2014. the defence said these were opportunities to intervene in this young man's life, and they said they believed that he could be turned around. but the judge said believed that he could be turned around. but thejudge said he believed that he could be turned around. but the judge said he simply wasn't certain, and that is why he has that life sentence today. thanks, dominic. in british ticket holder has come forward to claim the euromillions jackpot. we are not bitter. some sunshine in the forecast. temperatures will be on the rise as
4:32 pm
well. a very serene scene in wick, worcestershire. we have had some showers coming out of that cumulus cloud, particularly eastern england and scotland but elsewhere some long spells of sunshine with that peppered nature of the cloud. moving through the rest of the afternoon, a bit more cloud works in across northern ireland, bringing some rain, some low cloud across parts of south wales. overnight, we see the rain pushing out of northern ireland. to the south—east, quite mild and muddy, 15 or 16 the overnight low but through the day tomorrow, this weather front will be slow moving across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england, so a bit of a wet day under that frontal zone. to the north of that, slightly fresher with some sunshine, 13 to 15 degrees for the south of the weather front, we are looking at a warm day, top temperatures in the london region around 25 celsius. hello, good afternoon, you are
4:33 pm
watching bbc news. the headlines at just gone half past four. an independent inquiry into child abuse in thejersey care system has found that children may still be at risk. the inquiry heard from more than 600 witnesses over the last three years. 19—year—old haroon syed has been jailed for life at the old bailey for plotting to bomb an eltonjohn concert on the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, said he believes a deal to restore a power—sharing government in the province is achievable. talks between the democratic unionists and sinn fein were supposed to have been completed last week. a 16—year—old girl has pleaded guilty at leeds crown court to the manslaughter of seven—year—old katie rough. katie was found seriously injured on a playing field in york injanuary. she died later in hospital. four senior barclays bankers have appeared in court for the first time, charged with conspiracy to commit fraud. a huge sigh of relief across the
4:34 pm
country because andy murray has got through the first round. let's get the sport. good afternoon to you. andy murray has put aside concerns over his fitness to ease into the second round at wimbledon. the defending champion beat alexander bublik from kazakhstan in straight sets in the opening match of the tournament. and so begins the most quintessentially british fortnight of the sporting summer, courteous queueing, an excuse for fancy dress, and two weeks of a chap named murray putting us through the ringer. he already started before hitting a ball. just how would that hip injury stand up against alexander bublik, renowned for his unpredictable style ? just renowned for his unpredictable style? just fine. indeed it was the kaza khsta n style? just fine. indeed it was the kazakhstan who was floored by the occasion, murray showed few ill effects of his troubled build—up. bublik was being given the
4:35 pm
runaround. bublik was being given the ru na round. this was bublik was being given the runaround. this was murray in a hurry, tennis in the fast lane. commentator: there is a little bit of good fortune in that but even more superb touch. and it wasn't just the net when murray excelled in breezing to the first two sets. of course wimbledon wouldn't be wimbledon without the british weather saying hello, cherished by some, more than others. it was the only respite bublik would get, as murray was in no mood to go easy on the debit on. less than two hours on court, straight sets, straightforward, the defending champion safely through. yes, i feel pretty good, the last few days, like i have been saying, i was feeling better each day, obviously getting out on the match court is a little bit different, the intensity is a bit different, the intensity is a bit higher, but also with the adrenaline and staff, it sort of helps, you know, numb some pains that you might have, and i moved well today. and coming yep, i
4:36 pm
thought i did pretty well for the first match was. german dustin brown awaits in the second round. if only the next two weeks prove this simple for murray. looking ahead, murray could meet former champion rafa nadal in the semi—finals, these are live pictures against australia's john millman. the man from bresnan tah brisbane. two times lady champion, petra kvitova, is a setup on sweden's johanna larsson on centre court, watched by the duchess of cambridge. looking like she is heading to round two. the first seed out in the men's singles was 20th seed, australia's nick kyrgios, who was forced to retire with a hip injury when he was two sets down to france's there is. laura robson, the former british and
4:37 pm
one lost 6—4, 6—2 to brazil's pitch was had at my, and admitted she had let herself down. i am very disappointed to be honest, i thought idid not disappointed to be honest, i thought i did not play anywhere near my best tennis and coming into the match i felt very confident, and happy with the way i was playing, so yes, frustrating that i could not loosen up frustrating that i could not loosen up out there. ijust frustrating that i could not loosen up out there. i just felt frustrating that i could not loosen up out there. ijust felt really nervous. just let myself down. away from the tennis, aston villa have signed former chelsea and england captain, john terry. the 36—year—old defender has signed a one—year deal with the championship club. terry turned down offers for more money to play in the premier league, because he didn't want to play against chelsea. the history is huge, the stadium itself, that is why i like the training ground and the facilities here. when you look at the players that have been here over the players that have been here over the years, the trophies behind this, incredible. so it is a big football clu b incredible. so it is a big football club and for me deserves to be back
4:38 pm
in the premier league, and that is the reason why i am here. one other line of football for you. everton's busy summer has continued with the signing of spanish striker sandro ramirez from malaga. he joins goalkeeperjordan pickford, midfielder davy klaasen and striker henry onyekuru as new arrivals at goodison park. and in the last few moments world champion peter sagan of slovakia has won the third stage of the tour de france. britain's geraint thomas keeps the leader's yellow jersey. britain's geraint thomas keeps the leader's yellowjersey. more in the next hour. a man from sunderland has been jailed next hour. a man from sunderland has beenjailed for 15 months next hour. a man from sunderland has been jailed for 15 months after pulling a niqab veil of a woman's face and racially abusing her. newcastle crown court heard that peter scott called her a stupid muslim. let's go to our correspondence, fiona trot, outside newcastle crown court with the latest. this happened exactly a year ago. the 29—year—old woman was out shopping with her husband and their
4:39 pm
nine—year—old son. we were shown cctv pictures in court, it showed peter scott are going to water, pulling her veil so hard it almost brought her to the ground, she received whiplash type injuries we are told. she told police it made her scared, shocked and disgusted, comments i can deal with, but this goes beyond actions i can accept just because of the clothing eyewea r. just because of the clothing eyewear. she told them she is scared to go out, disgusted her nine—year—old had to see it, and she also said because of our religion and colour, we put up with a lot of abuse in our lives, and this upsets me, she told the police. we also heard that peter scotter was shouting at her in front of everybody at the top of his voice. he saidi everybody at the top of his voice. he said i am just taking my country back, in our britain we stand by our rules. i would back, in our britain we stand by our rules. iwould pull the back, in our britain we stand by our rules. i would pull the veil off every time. we also heard that after his arrest he said she could have been a bomb. his barrister tony hawks told the judge that scott was
4:40 pm
hopelessly drunk that day. he also said perhaps it is no coincidence it happened a week or so after the brexit referendum. the judge happened a week or so after the brexit referendum. thejudge stephen earl said very simply it was appalling abusive behaviour, grounded in religious bigotry. earlier, peter scotter admitted racially aggravated assault by beating and racially aggravated harassment. he was sentenced to 15 months injail, harassment. he was sentenced to 15 months in jail, and harassment. he was sentenced to 15 months injail, and he gave the thumbs up as he left court. fiona, thank you. fiona trott there. downing street insists that the government has no position on the public sector pay cap hasn't changed, despite calls from several cabinet ministers for it to be scrapped. let's get more now on that and speak to our chief political
4:41 pm
correspondent, vicki young, who is at westminster. what can you tell us? it seems the conversation has changed since the general election, we now have cabinet ministers falling over each other to come out and say they think the cap on public sector pay should be lifted. the question is does the chancellor agree with all of that? he has said very often that the country must live within its means, so if there is to be more pay for those working in the public sector, how will it be funded? labour of in the public sector, how will it be funded ? labour of course in the public sector, how will it be funded? labour of course say it is the general election and the performance of labour in that election that has changed things here in parliament. justin madders from labour's health team is here. so, you think, presumably, that the cap should be lifted for public sector workers? yes, that is something we have been saying for a long time now. we have been exit —— at last we have a cabinet ministers as you say falling over each other to start advocating this, a shame
4:42 pm
they did not put that into practice with a vote next week when the heavy opportunity to lift the pay gap. the big question always asked notjust of the conservatives but of you as well, how will you find this pay rise? public sector workers, there are millions of them, it would cost an awful lot of money, what do labour's plan say about that? we set out in our manifesto a fully costed set of proposals. the important thing here is that we allow the independent pay review bodies to actually be independent of government, take on board the views of both government. we will work with them whatever they come up with. what we have heard so far is a really pointless exercise where they have been taking representations from all round but have been told they can't increase pay for more than two years and that is not good enough. but how would you pay for it? you have talked about higher taxes for those that are most? they
4:43 pm
go £80,000, those earning more than 123,000 will pay an extra 20 in the pound. we have reversed the corporation tax cuts, which the government are still pressing ahead with, even though we will be showing the lowest corporation tax in the civilised world. that is what we have put to the electorate. they are things that are affordable and manageable in a growing and prosperous economy and people have responded. the government have accepted that argument but need to put it into action sooner rather than later before we see more damage done to our public sector. there are some who say those changes would not raise enough money to cover everyone in the public sector. would you target a pay rise, those in the front line for examples? if you are going to lift it from you have to ta ke going to lift it from you have to take it across—the— board going to lift it from you have to take it across—the—board but you also have to listen to what the independent pay review bodies are saying. it is fair to say this government can find money when they
4:44 pm
wa nt government can find money when they want to. the £1.5 billion that according to the theresa may was not available cover of weeks ago. part of her magic money tree. it is a question of will rather than way. that is the view from labour and i have to say some conservative mps too agreeing with that, saying certainly privately the fact that money seems to have been found for more than ireland —— northern ireland, means there will be public sector workers saying, why can't you find the money for us? the us president donald trump has made a late intervention in the case of terminally ill baby charlie gard by offering help to save him. president trump has treated, saying he would be delighted to help the family. earlier today, pope writes is called for charlie gard's parents to be allowed to accom pa ny for charlie gard's parents to be allowed to accompany and treat their child until the end. let's go to gary o'donoghue in washington who has been following this. do we know
4:45 pm
how much president trump knows about this case? no, we know what he said on twitter this morning, and that is about as much as we now so far about his knowledge of the background of the case. clearly, it has taken some leverage over here, this has been covered to some extent in this case, and some of the more if you like right—wing media elements have actually slightly politicised it, and talked about it as being the result of what happens with socialised health care systems, in terms of not being up to pay for what you want. so it has been politicised in that sense, but it is not clear really whether he understands that there has been a legal process through the high court, the appeal court, the supreme court, the appeal court, the supreme court, the appeal court, the supreme court, the european court of human rights and that all of those legal avenues are over, and the courts
4:46 pm
will not allow charlie gard to travel to the us to be helped, if donald trump is offering it. travel to the us to be helped, if donald trump is offering itm travel to the us to be helped, if donald trump is offering it. it is fairly unusual for even he to intervene in such an emotive case as this. perhaps he doesn't realise just how emotive it has been over here? i think that's probably true. we don't know to what extent he has followed this, it is certainly the first time he has talked about this particular case. clearly the pope's intervention has made this a much more significant story around the world. clearly those pictures of the protests in london last week, when charlie gard's life support was due to be turned off, those will have travelled around the world too, but, yeah, it doesn't seem like it is an
4:47 pm
offer of help that really can be delivered in any sense, i suppose, at this late stage. but, of course, you know, donald trump, like everybody else, will no doubt feel the tragedy of the situation. indeed. thank you, gary o'donoghue in washington. in a moment, a look at how the financial markets in europe close the day but first the headlines. failings at every level. for many decades. a long—awaited report gives a damning verdict into the historical abuse and mistreatment of children injersey. historical abuse and mistreatment of children in jersey. 19—year—old heroine saili has beenjailed for life at the old bailey for plotting to bomb targets like an eltonjohn concert in hyde park or oxfordshire. a teenage girl pleads guilty to killing seven—year—old katie rough during a vicious attack in york.
4:48 pm
let's have a look at how the markets in europe have ended the trading session. european shares have had a great start of the week, helped by energy prices. the price of crude oil touching $49 and barrel. the pound jumped off during the morning following the release of manufacturing data for june. shares in the owner of superdry have risen after it reported a big rise in profits and plans for stand—alone sports stores. supergroup said it would expand its superdry sportswear business through shops in shops, franchise outlets and more online options. shares in the company were up 3.5% growth in the uk's manufacturing output unexpectedly slowed in june, according to the latest survey of purchasing managers working in the sector. while the survey pointed to an expansion for the 11th consecutive month, the rate of increase slowed as businesses reported smaller increases in new orders from domestic
4:49 pm
and export markets. the energy regulator, ofgem, says it's considering introducing a price cap on gas and electricity — aimed at bills for households on low incomes. it would be similar to a cap already in place for people who use pre—payment meters. ofgem will focus on whether some families with young children — and pensioners who receive the warm home discount — should be protected. let's get detailed analysis of all those stories with george godber, fund manager, polar capital. george, let's start off with energy. how are energy companies reacting to this idea of a price cap? the price cap has often been talked about as a way of helping struggling households, and obviously the pressure the indian —— the industry get is that they are very transparent in terms of the profit they make, and when you break down
4:50 pm
they make, and when you break down the bill, the majority of the cost is subsidy towards green energy, towards wind, biomass, and that is really where the big change can come in our energy bills, so i think there will be continued pressure politically to try to put in place a cap but also to continue to encourage customers when they come offa encourage customers when they come off a deal to always be put onto the cheapest deal and not then flicked onto a more expensive deal. this is a political issue that won't go away but the control to reduce bills actually sits with the government, rather than the regulator. george, we will have to leave it there, thank you forjoining us. that is all from it, a round—up of all the other top business stories on the website. sajid javid, the communities secretary, making a statement in the house of commons about the grenfell fire. with permission, mr speaker, i would like to update the house on the
4:51 pm
government's response of the g re nfell tower government's response of the grenfell tower tragedy and the safety inspection of cladding in other buildings. almost six weeks have passed. progress have been made in helping the survivors and people and surrounding buildings who were affected. landlords across the country have been taking measures to make their buildings say. sir martin moore bic has been appointed to lead a full public enquiry and an independent panel is advising my party on any immediate action required. mr speaker, the disaster at grenfell tower should never have happened. the police investigation and will find out why it did. right now, the immediate aim is to provide assistance to those who were affected and to take every precaution to avoid another tragedy in buildings with similar cladding. the grenfell tower victims
4:52 pm
association is providing a simple single point of access into government. staff from across government. staff from across government offer support. almost £2.5 million has been distributed from the paul pull £5 million residents to scratch and fun. each household affected is receiving £5,500 to provide immediate assistance and so far payments to 112 households have been made. there has been much speculation about who was in grenfell tower on the night of the fire and it is vital that we find out. as i announced yesterday, the director of public prosecutions has made it clear that there will be no prosecution of tenants at g re nfell tower no prosecution of tenants at grenfell tower and grown for walk who may have been illegally subletting their property, so all te na nts ca n subletting their property, so all tenants can be confident about coming forward with information for the authorities. there may have been people living in flats that were
4:53 pm
illegally sublet to have no idea about the true status of their tenancy. their families want to know if they perished in the fire. his other sons, their daughters, their brothers, their sisters. they need closure and it is the least they deserve. but that cannot happen u nless we deserve. but that cannot happen unless we have the information we need, so we are urging anyone with that information to come forward and to do so as quickly as they can. mr speaker, the immediate response to the grenfell disaster is being coordinated by the grenfell response tea m coordinated by the grenfell response team led byjohn barrow dale. supported by calling strong from london councils, the wider government sector, the voluntary sector, police, health and fire services, as well as central government. their expertise and hard work is making a huge difference, but this is only a temporary measure. it is also vital we put in place long—term support for the longer—term recovery. it was right that the leader of the royal borough of kensington and chelsea took the
4:54 pm
decision to move on. i look forward to working with the new leader of the council, and i will look at every option to ensure that everyone affected by this tragedy has the long—term support they need. mr speaker, the prime minister promised that every family who lost their home because of the fire would be offered a good quality temporary home within three weeks, and the deadline is this wednesday. i have been monitoring the progress of free housing, and we will honour that commitment. every home offered will be appropriate and of good quality. what we will not do is compel anyone to a cce pt what we will not do is compel anyone to accept an offer of temporary accommodation that they do not want. some families have indicated that they wanted to remain as close as possible to theirformer they wanted to remain as close as possible to their former home, but when they received their offer, took a look at the property, they have decided it would be easier to deal with their breed and if they moved further away. some families have decided that for the same reasons
4:55 pm
they would prefer to remain in hotels for the time being. other households have indicated that they would prefer to wait until permanent accommodation becomes available. every household will receive an offer of temporary accommodation by this wednesday. but every household will also be given the space to make this transition at their own pace, and ina this transition at their own pace, and in a way that helps them recover from this tragedy. mr speaker, the people affected by the disaster at g re nfell tower people affected by the disaster at grenfell tower need our assistance and they are receiving it, but they also want answers. sir martin moore—bick has been appointed to lead a full public enquiry. he has visited kensington, met with victims and survivors, as well as members of the community. after consulting with the community. after consulting with the community, sir martin moore—bick and advise on the terms of the enquiry and we will ensure there is little support for victims, so they can play their full part. we little support for victims, so they can play theirfull part. we must
4:56 pm
allow that enquiry and the criminal investigation to run their course. each must have the space to follow the evidence, wherever it takes them. we must all be careful not to prejudge or prejudice either of them, but what we can do right now is take sensible precautions to avoid another tragedy. the building research establishment is continuing to test the combustibility of cladding from councils and housing associations, as well as private landlords. so far, all of the samples of cladding tested have failed, 181 out of 181. it is obviously disturbing that there are such large numbers of buildings with combustible cladding, and the priority now is to make those buildings say. where appropriate mitigating measures cannot be implemented quickly, landlords must provide all tenants of accommodation while the remedial work is carried out and that is exactly what happened in the four tower blocks in camden. our primary concern has been loading is over 18 metres or six
4:57 pm
stories, where people stay at night. hospitals and schools are also being assessed. mr speaker, we ourselves have asked questions about the testing regime, after discovering the 100% failure rate so far. last week, i asked for the test process itself to be independently reviewed. this was done so by the research institutes of sweden, and they have confirmed they believed the process to be sound. a full explanatory briefing note on the testing process has been made available on gov.uk. it means the panels are unlikely to be compliant with the building regulations guidance. this has been confirmed by legal advice and the advice of the independent expert panel, which was established last week. for use of the panels to be safe, landlords need to be confident that the whole wall system has been tested and shown to be safe. we are
4:58 pm
not aware of any such system having passed the necessary tests. we are listening to the communities secretary, sajid javid, he has been addressing mps in the house of commons about the grenfell tower fire. he said the disaster should never have happened, and reiterated the commitment already made that no one will be prosecuted for illegally subletting their flats. he says he will honour the pledge to offer g re nfell tower will honour the pledge to offer grenfell tower resident acceptable temporary accommodation by this wednesday. he also said it was right the leader of kensington and chelsea council to resign over the disaster. more at 5pm, now the weather news. sarah keith—lucas. a lot of dry weather through the remainder of the day, some spells of sunshine too, this was taken by one of our weather watchers in worcestershire. a bit of cumulus cloud around, one or two showers
4:59 pm
further east across parts of the south—east of england, eastern scotland. there was a passing shower at wimbledon that has now cleared away, so largely dry to end the day. into this evening, more cloud bringing somewhat weather across parts of northern ireland, so rain here the which will eventually push across southern scotland in the north—west england, perhaps if you spot of light rain for wales too. elsewhere, largely dry, quite maddie, tim pitcher is holding up —— quite humid, 15 or 16 degrees. —— temperatures holding up. pressure to the north of the weather front with some sunny the north of the weather front with some sunny spells and temperatures in the mid teens, whereas further south quite warm and humid. today at 5:00, a long—awaited report into child abuse injersey calls
5:00 pm
for the notorious haut de la garenne home to be demolished. the independent inquiry into seven decades of abuse also said children may still be at risk in the island's ca re system. for many children who were removed from home situations deemed harmful or unsatisfactory, the states ofjersey proved to be an ineffectual and neglectful substitute parent. the inquiry heard from more than 600 witnesses, about the how vulnerable youngsters were beaten, sexually abused, and humliated. we'll have the latest from jersey. the other main stories on the bbc news at 5:00 — a teenage girl has admitted killing seven—year—old katie rough injanuary. katie was found with fatal injuries in a park in york. her mother was one of the first on the scene.

31 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on