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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 8, 2017 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. claims that firefighters didn't have the equipment needed to tackle the blaze at grenfell tower. crews say radio problems, low water pressure — and a lack of tall ladders hindered their rescue attempts. good morning, it's saturday 8july. also ahead: doctors apply for a fresh court hearing for charlie gard, as experts claim there's a treatment that could help prolong his life. theresa may will come face—to—face with president trump at the 620 quite happy with today's outcome. we are hopeful and confident that charlie may get a chance. theresa may will come face—to—face with president trump at the 620 summit — with brexit and climate
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change at the top of the agenda. in sport, two britons remain in the singles draw at wimbledon — johanna konta and andy murray make it through to the second week here at the all england club. the lions‘ pride. we'll be live with fans as britain and ireland try to create history in today's decider against the all blacks. and helen has the weather. good morning. a little more clout in the south today at a little less in the south today at a little less in the north, it essentially it looks like a decent day, all the weekend details for you if you join me in around 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. low water pressure and insufficient equipment are among a number of failings bbc has uncovered which may have hampered firefighters efforts to stop the grenfell tower blaze. newsnight has learned a tall ladder did not arrive on site for more than half an hour, which has led to a change
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in london fire brigade procedures. john sweeney reports. firefighters say they experience problems with water pressure and equipment that was either lacking ordered not arrive a scene before the fire got out of control. they also described with radio reception inside the tower and that they lacked enough of the extended duration breathing apparatus they needed, especially when reaching the higherfloors of needed, especially when reaching the higher floors of the building. needed, especially when reaching the higherfloors of the building. 1 firefighter described conditions on some flaws as: newsnight has learnt the so—called aerial or high ladder did not arrive until more than half an hour after the 1st fire engines we re an hour after the 1st fire engines were dispatched, at 1255 in the morning. an expert said having a high ladder available earlier would have given firefighters a better chance of stopping the blaze. when itjumped chance of stopping the blaze. when it jumped from the chance of stopping the blaze. when itjumped from the 11th floor flat and began to race at the side of the building. i have spoken to aerial appliance operators in london who
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operate those appliances and who attended the incident, who think that having that on the 1st attempt might have made a difference because it allows you to operate a very powerful water tower from outside the building. the london fire brigade said that following the g re nfell tower brigade said that following the grenfell tower fire it had changed its procedures, and an aerial would 110w its procedures, and an aerial would now automatically be sent to a fire in the tower. thames water said any suggestion: it isa it is a truth worth retelling, that firefighters rushed into harm ‘s way on that terrible night. they were heroes, no question. but was the kid up heroes, no question. but was the kid up to scratch, and did arrive in a timely fashion. we won't know the full a nswers timely fashion. we won't know the full answers until a public enquiry but already it is safe to say that those in charge of keeping the capital safe from fire have serious questions to answer. newsnight‘s john sweeney with that
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report. the case of the terminally—ill baby, charlie gard, will return to the high court after great ormond street hospital applied for a new hearing. seven clinicians and researchers wrote to doctors at the hospital saying experimental therapy may be able to help him. simonjones is outside the hospital. simon, what exactly does this hearing mean? we have heard from charlie gardposmac mother, it is the lifeline they have been hoping for? his family had a meeting with medics here, and after that meeting, charlie's mother said this perhaps might give him a chance. this has been a hugely emotional case pitting on the one side charlie's family, against the is from this hospital. charlie's family wanted to send him over to the united states for experimental treatment, charlie has a red genetic condition which means he cannot breathe without a
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ventilator —— rare. he cannot live on his own —— breathe on his own and have significant brain damage. but the doctors at the hospital say it is unproven, they are against it and it cannot do any good. the case has been through the courts and the last ruling was that agreement with the hospital, that his life support should be withdrawn so he could die with dignity. but that decision was challenged or questioned by people like president donald trump who said he would like to do what he could, and also the pope who said he would like to see charlie gard transferred for treatment over in rome. and now this dramatic intervention from seven medics who have written to the hospital here to say that this treatment has actually been used on other patients, not with the same condition as charlie, but a similar condition as charlie, but a similar condition and it has had dramatic results. and that is why the hospital has asked the courts to
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look at it again, although they are insisting that they stand why their original decision. simon, thank you. we'll be talking to a professor of medical ethics about the case in just over an hour, that's at 7:10. lots of people are talking about which side they are on. theresa may is due to meet president trump at the g20 summit in hamburg this morning to discuss a post—brexit trade deal with the us. the prime minister will also urge the president to reconsider his decision to take america out of the paris agreement on climate change. it follows another night of protests in the city, as greg dawson reports. another night of violence on the streets of hamburger. —— homburg. a number of demonstrators were set on confrontation with police. chancellor merkel‘s insistence on bringing controversial world cities —— world leaders to a city centre,
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not a countryside retreat, has come ata not a countryside retreat, has come at a cost. the sound of rioting was drowned out by the music of beethoven in a special concert last night. but this is far from a relaxed atmosphere with major disagreements on trade and climate change. those are the two topics likely to dominate the one—on—one meetings teresa may well have with donald trump later, as the trimester seeks to work on a deal for a post— brexit prison. the president's decision to withdraw from the paris treaty on climate change is also set to be discussed. —— post— brexit britain. i believe the collective message that will be given to president trump around the table is the importance of america coming back into that agreement. and i hope we will be able to work to ensure that will happen. but it is notjust conversations around the summit table that have attracted attention in hamburg. for more than two hours yesterday, the us and russian president discussed terrorism, syria and cyber security during the first
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face—to—face meeting. the alleged russian hacking of last year's us presidential election also came up. mr president worle you raise the election hacking? the president saying it unlikely that president petra cca two saying it unlikely that president petracca two countries will agree on what happened. police officers in england and wales now have to fill out a 10—page form every time they use any kind of force — including using handcuffs, cs spray or drawing a baton. the police federation has likened it to "writing an essay". but the home secretary, amber rudd, says the new rules will create will create "unprecedented transparency". train passengers across england are facing three days of strike action from today. it's part of an ongoing row over driver—only—operated trains. the rmt union says it would be unsafe and lead to widespread job losses.
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arriva rail north staff will walk out for three days from today, while merseyrail staff will strike today and on monday. southern workers also plan to walk out at the start of the working week. the rmt union says it has the support of the public. i reassure the travelling public, this is not about money, it is not about terms and conditions. the public up when we have engaged with the public are very supportive of the public are very supportive of the position. police in florida say new evidence shows venus williams was driving lawfully when she was involved in a car crash in which a man died. an initial police report had described her as being at fault. a 78—year—old man, jerome barson, died in the collision. his family have filed a lawsuit against ms williams, alleging she was "negligently operating" her vehicle. the rspca has confirmed it is seeking new powers in england and wales to allow its inspectors to enter private property and seize pets. it says it wants to be able to rescue animals in distress without having to wait for the police and a vet. similar laws are already in place in scotland and northern ireland. members of the emergency services will officially launch the pride parade in london today.
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tens of thousands of people are expected to join the march through the capital which will mark half a century since the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality. for the first time in the event's its—year history, a rainbow flag will be projected on to the palace of westminster. some people are telling me is a big day today in sport. in history! the british and irish lions take on the all blacks in new zealand. the series is poised at 1—1 and the deciding test kicks off injust over two hours. 0ur sports correspondent katie gornall is at the eden park stadium in auckland. there is often a lot of hype around sporting occasions, but this is rather special. everything is poised, it is a bit of potential history in the making. it is
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absolutely huge, you're right. tens of thousands of lions fancier. they arejust of thousands of lions fancier. they are just starting to stream into the stadium, there are talk of lions fa ns stadium, there are talk of lions fans outnumbering all—black supporters here at eden park. i was in the auckland city centre earlier and it was overwhelming, just read everywhere, and you just wonder whether that might hand the lions a bit ofan whether that might hand the lions a bit of an advantage in terms of the atmosphere inside there. as the odds are certainly stacked against them when you considerjust how dominant new zealand usually are, they are the double reigning world champion is the reason, they have not lost hot —— not lost here since 1954, and they are unlikely to make the same m ista kes they are unlikely to make the same mistakes that cost than the second test. i spoke to former international shane williams about this, he was on the tour to new zealand in 2005 and he summed up the scale of the challenge facing the lions here in auckland. new zealand are the best international team in the world and have been for a long
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time. and to beat them in new zealand, to be premat eden park with such a great statistic and record that they have, would be massive, currently one of the biggest upsets in world rugby, like we have mentioned it is like a world cup to some of these players. so really just to be in this position for the lions is an achievement in itself, when you think of —— think back to 2005 when it was unclear whether the lions would ever return, such was the humiliation they suffered at the hands of the all blacks, and now here they are one win away from making history and we will find out very soon if they can do that a lot, we can't wait. we will chat you throughout the morning, thank you very much caty. a 30 5am throughout the morning, thank you very much caty. a 30 sam is kick—off time in auckland. —— 8:35 a.m.. i will enthuse you gradually throughout the programme. it is 23 yea rs, throughout the programme. it is 23 years, the all blacks have not lost in that stadium to 23 years, which is amazing. just to let you in on
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what we have been talking about, you area big what we have been talking about, you are a big rugby fan, you are selling the case to me about, we will look at the papers, but if you look at the back pages, there you go, that is what you are saying. and this is the story that has gripped me this morning, withjust the story that has gripped me this morning, with just that match i watched the andy murray match yesterday and saw him edge through and you were on the edge of your seat, at what i will give you credit for is this is a one—off, but we have another week of william —— will the —— boldon. i am have another week of william —— will the —— boldon. iam not have another week of william —— will the —— boldon. i am not comparing the —— boldon. i am not comparing the two. —— wimbledon. there was real drama playing at yesterday, the rollercoaster emotions, michael will explain more about what happened yesterday. some of the other front pages? the daily mail, new change for charlie. some more medics have put their case forward for this treatment, that charlie gard's pa rents
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treatment, that charlie gard's parents making to have him get treatment in the united states. we 110w treatment in the united states. we now understand the hospital has asked for the case to be heard again on monday and the daily mail is saying that it is "a new chance for charlie." this time yesterday we we re charlie." this time yesterday we were looking ahead to the g20 summit and this meeting between two presidents, we were talking about what the body language would tell us, what these pictures would say, and we have those pictures this morning. we will be discussing this a little more with some of those who know the diplomatic world well, but quite a lot of people surprised by just how long president trump and putin were talking yesterday, about the areas they touched on. we will talk more about that throughout the morning. the daily telegraph front—page picture of andy murray, and the headline is a story we have mentioned this morning. the rspca seeking police powers to allow hundreds of inspectors to enter private property and sees pets. talking to police chief and the government about new powers that will allow its agency have access to
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sheds and outhouses, not homes, but outhouses, without police, without a police officer. it is 6:15 a.m., you are watching bbc news breakfast. the main stories this morning: there are claims firefighters were under—resourced as they tackled the grenfell tower fire. reports say a high ladder took 30 minutes to arrive and there were problems with water pressure. the case of the terminally—ill baby, charlie gard, will return to the high court after great ormond street hospital applied for a new hearing into the decision not to treat him. let's have a look at the weekend weather forecast. good morning! iwant weather forecast. good morning! i want to share this beautiful sunrise. it was taken about half an hour ago. lots of lovely pictures this morning. the story is a fairly decent one. a decent weekend for most of us, which is what we expect at this time of
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year. we probably won't see the 30 degrees we had yesterday at heathrow. we still have the same air mass in the southern half of the country and in the north, but it will be warmer, with more sunshine in the northern half of the uk, because first thing this morning we've had clear skies in the north and it has been chilly, but we still have a lot of cloud in the south, so quite muggy. that means there's a lot of moisture around, so the cloud could give the onslaught of drizzle where it is lowest on the coast and the south—west of england. more cloud generally in the southern half of the country this morning, but it is bright and there will be decent spells of sunshine working its way through the cloud. we will have more sunshine to northern ireland, scotla nd sunshine to northern ireland, scotland and northern england. drizzly near the east coast initially and later in the day we replace that brighter weather for strengthening winds off the atlantic and rainforthe strengthening winds off the atlantic and rain for the highlands by the time we get to teatime. not quite so bright year. for most of us we might
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have more cloud across wales and the south—west later, so it turns the sunshine more milky. 22— 26 in the south and into the high teens, low 20s in the north, given we've got more sunshine. we should stay dry today for wimbledon and indeed one day. looking at a bit more unsettled on monday. through this evening and overnight we will pick up more cloud. as a result it will be another warm night, probably comparable to last night in southern areas. the weather front moving southwards, which means tomorrow we should have some brighter weather, returning the northern scotland. instead it looks like parts of northern ireland, central scotland might seem —— the more cloud. a cloudy start for england and wales but gradually the sunshine comes through and tomorrow will be warmer than today. temperatures are little higher, more sunshine around. still cool with the rain band in the
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north. thank you. we'll be back with the headlines at 6:30. now on breakfast, time to join jane hill and mark kermode for this week's film review. welcome to the film review on bbc news. taking us through this week's releases is mark kermode. what have we got? this week we have it comes at night, which is a very creepy thriller. the midwife, a low—key character drama, with catherine deneuve and catherine frot. and spider—man: homecoming. the friendly neighbourhood spiderman is back again! it comes at night. i've read enough to know that this is your kind of film, and so not mine.
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you have two minutes to persuade me. it's not what the trailers suggest — it's not a jump—scare horror so if you expect that you will be disappointed. it is a creepy thriller. it is set after the outbreak of one unspecified plague—like incident, which has pretty much done for civilisation. there's a family, mother, father, son living in a remote woodland. the windows are boarded up, there is a corridor with a red door which is the only door to the outside world. when an intruder tries to break in, they have to make a decision about whether or not to accept another family into their home. they would bring friendship and food supplies, but also bring suspicion and paranoia and desire, and mysterious sleepwalking. here is a clip. angela was in grandpa's room. and he was having a nightmare, so i woke up. i brought him to your room.
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then i went to the back hallway, i saw the door open, i heard something. andrew was in the other room? yes. is that true, baby? i can't remember. you tell mummy what you remember! i can't remember. how can he not remember? does he sleepwalk? no, it doesn't make any sense. it's all that claustrophobic, is it? it is and you get the sense of people starting to distrust each other and being suspicious of each other. if you think of a film like the witch or the survivalist, they have deep themes, they are creepy, but not full of jump scares. they make you feel very worried and uncomfortable. you can hear a bit there.
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the sound effects and score work in favour of this film. i thought it was terrific. it occupies a realm between being awake and being asleep. the screen very slightly contracts during certain sequences to imply what we're watching is a dream sequence. maybe we are, maybe we're not. it's what happens when you lose track of objective reality and you just start to trust your fears. it's like that classic horror movie with a cold hand on the back of the neck. it's not the film the trailers make it look like. they make it look like a slam—bang horror movie. it's not that, but if you want something that is going to cause you to lose sleep, you should see it. i think you would not enjoy it, but admire it. and the director is only in his 20s. horribly talented. incredibly talented. it is a really fine piece
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of work and it is all about atmosphere and attention and what is implied, rather than what is actually shown. which is the sort of film that is the most frightening. i hearyou, in terms of the skill that went into it. 0nto the midwife, a film about a growing friendship between the two main characters. catherine deneuve's beatrice, herfather‘s lover, has had a medical diagnosis, suddenly she reappears. why? what do you want? it turns out maybe she wants friendship, closure, maybe financial support, who knows? during the film these two characters start, one of these characters drinks and gambles. the other more responsible. the key distinction between them is that one of them has been involved in bringing children into the world. the other says,
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absolutely not for me. what i like about this was it has well—observed characters. it has people in professions that you actually believe in. it has life stories that are credible and you think, yeah, i can understand all of those things that happen and i can think that they really have these stories. has a rather over—emphatic and tingling score. it tells you things are moving, when you didn't need to be taught. it was played with some very fine performances. i like that it's understated. for the most part, it allows you to observe the characters. and most importantly to believe in them. and that's important, to have characters that you can absolutely believe in. that's on my list, without a doubt. and that, oddly enough, brings us to spider—man: homecoming. we spoke before logan. i said that this was a low—key character study posing as a superhero movie,
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but this is like ferris bueller‘s day off with added webbing. that's going on the poster! he's a geeky teen and he wants to fit in and impress the girls. he also happens to have the superpowers, and he wants to become an avenger. he's said to go back to school and learn his lessons, but what he is desperately trying to do is to punch above his weight, whilst also keeping his identity absolutely secret. what are you doing in my room? you're the spiderman!
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are you an avenger? basically. you can't tell anyone, you've gotta keep it a secret? this is the craziest thing that has ever happened to me. we are both chuckling. this is tom holland, of course, who won the bafta rising star, young brit. we've seen many reincarnations of spiderman. you think, how many times can you reboot this? they are playing to the adolescent story, the school boy story, the high school story, so there is all the action stuff, web spinning and dealing
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with criminals, but really what makes it work is the high school stuff, the stuff about wanting to fit in and being awkward, about wanting to be grown up when yoiu're not yet, and what he has actually got to do is hang out in the canteen. i liked it very much. i went in thinking, do we really need to go here, all over again? but what this does do is something different. i think he's great. he's really very good. he's very charming in a very kind of oddball way. only one false step in the film, there's a lovely sequence which is a direct reference to ferris bueller‘s day off, and then they show you a clip from it and it's like, it's ok, we have got it. it sounds good. it sounds different. and the best out — i know what your best out is. anyone following you on twitter knows, ba by driver. it's a car chase movie which is actually a musical.
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everything in it is cut to a fantastic selection of pop tunes. i think the joy of it, for me, is this. it's really brilliant cinema. see it on a big screen, with a good sound system. but it's witty, clever, poignant and nostalgic and it was made by somebody who was going to direct the ant—man movie and then walked away because it wasn't a film he wanted it to be. and he's clearly now made exactly the movie he wanted then the a pleasure to see a director like edgar wright a pleasure to see a director like edgar wright saying, this is the film i want to make. i have seen it three times. it is like an american in paris meets the french connection. i hear you, see it on the big screen. that said, a quick thought for anyone not wanting to see on the big screen, what is out on dvd? i mentioned it early on, logan.
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it's a superhero movie, but it's also something else. it's a film about ageing, about regret, about losing the powers that you once had. it has terrific performances. really well directed. it demonstrates that you can do something really interesting with the superhero theme, as long as we get movies like that and spider—man, there will always be new life in something which people keep saying, haven't we had enough of this? but as long as people keep reinventing it, it will not die out. that is a good week. yes, but you must go and see it comes at night. it'll get under your skin and you will appreciate it. people are laughing in my ear! that said, still lovely to see you, as ever. mark kermode, thank you. a reminder that you can find all the film news and reviews online at the usual address. and you can find all of our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. that's it for this week. enjoy your cinema going. whatever it is you're brave enough to see.
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goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up before seven helen will have the weather for you. but first a summary of this morning's main news. a series of failings which may have hampered firefighters' efforts to tackle the grenfell tower blaze have been uncovered by a bbc investigation. newsnight has learned a tall ladder did not arrive on site for more than half an hour, while crews reported low water pressure and insufficient equipment. the london fire brigade has confirmed a longer ladder will now automatically be sent to any fire in a tower. great ormond street hospital has applied to the high court for a fresh hearing into the care of the terminally ill baby, charlie gard. judges had ruled against the child's parents who wanted to take him to america for treatment. but the hospital now wants the case reopened to consider new evidence about a potential treatment. theresa may will speak with donald trump this morning, at the g20 summit. the prime minister will discuss a post—brexit trade deal with the us and raise president trump's decision to pull out of the paris climate accord.
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the meeting comes after a second night of violence in hamburg with demonstrators throwing stones, looting shops and burning cars. police officers in england and wales now have to fill out a 10—page form every time they use any kind of force — including using handcuffs, cs spray or drawing a baton. the police federation has likened it to "writing an essay" — but the home secretary amber rudd says the new rules, which were introduced in april, will create "unprecedented transparency". train passengers across england are facing three days of strike action from today. it's part of an ongoing row over driver—only—operated trains. the rmt union says it would be unsafe and lead to widespread job losses. arriva rail north staff will walk out for three days from today, while merseyrail staff will strike today and on monday. southern workers also plan to walk out at the start of the working week. the rspca has confirmed it is seeking new powers in england and wales to allow its inspectors
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to enter private property and seize pets. it says it wants to be able to rescue animals in distress without having to wait for the police and a vet. similar laws are already in place in scotland and northern ireland. police in florida say new evidence shows venus williams was driving lawfully when she was involved in a car crash in which a man died. an initial police report had described her as being at fault. a 78—year—old man, jerome barson, died in the collision. his family have filed a lawsuit against ms williams, alleging she was "negligently operating" her vehicle. members of the emergency services will officially launch the pride parade in london today. tens of thousands of people are expected to join the march through the capital which will mark half a century since the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality. for the first time in the event's 45—year history, a rainbow flag will be projected on to the palace of westminster. those are the main story, this morning, there is one of big event
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happening today. it is a big rugby match. the lions of course in action in aboutjust over two hours, mike is at wimbledon this morning, there was lots of drama there. bracing ourselves for that lions game in a few hours. rather calm here this morning after last night's drama. full of danger and that swashbuckling italian fognini. just one point away from taking the match into a deciding set. it was a very important test for andy murray to come through, it was his biggest challenge and he is now finding his rhythm, he has a couple of days a or a much easier match, on paper at least. as forjohanna konta, she had a much easier match, but we are in doubt —— we are now down to just two
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brits. and then there were two. we started the week with four brits, now they are onlyjohanna konta and andy murray remaining. murray showed off his finest work in the amphitheatre. he was bending the ball like... well, him. his opponentjavier fognini with skulls on his/her bandanna and skills on his racquet pushing hard, within five times of pushing hard, within five times of pushing them at. murray's empire was at about to crumble. the four set win and murray through to round four fullerton here in a row. hopefully have myself in a good place for the weekend and can play some good tennis on monday. 0bviously weekend and can play some good tennis on monday. obviously i am happy to get through the first week and anything can happen from there. familiar territory for murray but against greece's maria sakkari, johanna konta was diving into the
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unknown. she has never carried bishops as far. on court one she dropsjust bishops as far. on court one she drops just five games and showed why she is favourite to win the whole thing. everyone is a potential winner here, so i'm here to hopefully be involved until the very end, but one matter time, hopefully be involved until the very end, but one mattertime, i'm hopefully be involved until the very end, but one matter time, i'm very happy to have come through today and i will have another battle coming up next. if she wins that match she could beat —— she could meet victoria azarenka in the finals, in only her match back from having a son, aljaz but then is also getting through. rafa nadal continued his solid form — he's yet to drop a set after beating russia's karun khachenov on centre court. he didn't drop a set when he won
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the french open either. 0ne face we're used to seeing in the second week at wimbledon is venus williams. the tenth seed came through against japan's naomi 0saka. aside from the tennis, we're only two hours away from the deciding test between the british and irish lions and the all blacks. lions assistant coach rob howley, says they will unleash some new attacking moves in auckland, as they attempt to upset the odds and seal a first series win in new zealand since 1971. there is a glint in their eyes, since saturday night in wellington. that glynde has not gone away, because they know they can create history on the weekend, and that is the challenge. the realisation of where we are at it this moment in time. england's cricketers are just about on top heading into the third day of the first test at lords. moeen ali and stuart broad took two wickets apiece as south africa's batsmen struggled in reply to england's 458 all out.
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and a late wicket from james anderson left them trailing by 244 runs with five first innings wickets left. lewis hamilton already knows he faces a five place grid penalty for tomorrow's austrian grand prix after making a gearbox change. he did set the pace in practice though — just ahead of championship rival sebastian vettel. chris froome is still wearing the leaders yellow jersey as the tour de france heads towards thejura mountains. he finished safely in the peleton on stage 7, with marcel kittel — in blue — winning the sprint finish byjust six millimetres. manchester united have competition for the signature of romelu lukaku — his former club chelsea have matched united's bid of around £75 million . but chelsea say they aren't willing
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to pay the same fees to his agent. scotland's women go into the european championship in high spirits after beating the republic of ireland 1—0 in theirfinal warm—up match — christie murray scoring four minutes from time. the euros start in less than two weeks — and scotland's opening match is against england. it isa it is a huge weekend of athletics as well, you have the anniversary games live on the bbc tomorrow, all building up to the world championships at the london 0lympic stadium early next month. the mo farah, he is getting ready for an emotionalfew weeks as farah, he is getting ready for an emotional few weeks as he prepares to run on the track at least in front of his home fans for the last time. he was back in london yesterday and he gave at first an exclusive look at him as he joined a school in battersea therapy class. —— he gave breakfast an exclusive look. the luckiest pe lesson in london. with mo farah dropping in on his return to his home city. some warmup tips and five laps of the
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playground. take us back to your school playground days when you were young, do you render this? school playground days when you were young, do you renderthis7|j school playground days when you were young, do you render this? i do, i couldn't wait for lunchtime, around 11 o'clock or 1045, to get a little break, to run around and playful wall, and it always kicking the ball. he is back for the anniversary games tomorrow and in the world championships at london's x 80 next month. where he won his first 0lympic double. —— 0lympic stadium. 0ne 0lympic double. —— 0lympic stadium. one last run before he says goodbye to his home fans as his track racing career comes to an end, he hopes, with more gold. it has been an amazing journey, it has been incredible there is no word to really describe it. ijust have to go out there, take that moment, enjoy it, do what i can. mo farah! the great britain! it is gold! to be able to step in that stadium one more time, and that's it. tears? who
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knows. who knows. back in the playground, for once, he is left behind as those he inspired were determined to put him to show. very exciting. it is like the best day of my life. i think that was great and i think he is my biggest celebrity. he told me that if you go on and be resilient, never give up, it would be easy to do everything you want. beyond the summer, mo farah plans to focus on longer road races like marathon, which will mean fewer actual races per season, and more time for family things. if the ball with my son, going swimming, just being with my kid and enjoying family life. i see them growing up and pictures and stuff like that, and pictures and stuff like that, and you want to be there. it is not all child places returning home, after the hacking group leaps in
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humans that some of his test results once aroused suspicion. the actual data later showed his results were normal. i was telling my age and the other day, it has been quiet for a couple flees, what is happening? and in this comes out. i'm never going to fail the test, i know that, and everybody knows that, who knows me. and as long as i keep working hard, no one can take my ability away, thatis no one can take my ability away, that is what i do, and i have to keep working hard, keep grafting, and go out there and do it well for my country. determined to the end, and as he gets ready to switch from tractor road, the message to all aspiring athletes is the same. —— from track to road. thank you so much guys, it has been fun. keep doing what you're doing, keep believing in yourself, keep working hard, yeah? what a day for the kids there, they will never forget it. you can watch mo farah run live on bbc tomorrow afternoon at around 330
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p-m-, bbc tomorrow afternoon at around 330 p.m., andi bbc tomorrow afternoon at around 330 p.m., and ijust hope he remembers to tie his laces up for the big race tomorrow. thank you so much we will have more from you later in the programme. teach our collection and the complete works of dick francis, probably not the first you associate with the poet philip larkin. but they're all part of a new exhibition of his belongings which opened this week. for the first time, the complete contents larkin's house is on show as part of hull's city of culture celebrations. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been to have a look. when getting my nose in a book, due at most things short of school. philip larkin's poem "a study of reading habits". now we know more about his own reading habits, because his personal book collection has gone on display and there is a lot of agatha christie, billy bunter and beatrix potter. here we have got 3700 of philip larkin's own books. they are part of an exhibition of
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his personal objects at the university of hull library, where he worked for more than 30 years. but what do neckties, a lawnmower and his tiny animal figurine collection tell people about one of the nation's great as the poet? what they will learn is what they cannot learn in books. lots of words have been written about larkin, but what you can see here are the things he surrounded himself with in his life. because he librarian who catalogues everything, he has even catalogue who he has received christmas cards from and who is sending them to.“ he sends one but does not get one back? he will be gone. in 1979 he received a christmas card from andrew motion, that he has not set one. his biographer and literary executor. in 1980, yes, larkin sent a christmas card back. he sent one in1979, he a christmas card back. he sent one in 1979, he doesn't get —— he doesn't get one, he writes down, he
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sent on back the next year. the exhibition also includes super 8s film from the 19605 and exhibition also includes super 85 film from the 19605 and 705. it is clear why philip larkin became a poet and not an actor. you have not 5hied poet and not an actor. you have not shied away from the darker side of his personality? no. this figure of hitler was bought by his father on one of his visits to germany. and he gaveit one of his visits to germany. and he gave it to his son. and philip kept it. i never thought about hull until i was it. i never thought about hull until iwas here. it. i never thought about hull until i was here. hull's year of the city of culture has already helped to change sections of the place. in the currently larkin'5 old job is certain he would have approved. currently larkin'5 old job is certain he would have approvedlj think certain he would have approved.” think he would be appreciative. would he have suspected of philip larkin exhibition? i'm not sure he would have been comfortable with that. but as the exhibition shows, larkin wa5 5eldom entirely co mforta ble larkin wa5 5eldom entirely comfortable with anything. the exhibition is open until the first
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of october. le55 look at the weekend weather. good morning. a beautiful start here. a super weather watchers photo. a little bit cloudy in suffolk, because we have the weak weather front acro55 suffolk, because we have the weak weather front across the southern half of the country. more cloud in the south than yesterday. le55 cloud to come and more 5un5hine further north. it is the early satellite picture. still cloud in eastern scotla nd picture. still cloud in eastern scotland giving if you like and drizzly shower5, but essentially it will be a nice weekend for most of us. will be a nice weekend for most of us. the cloud lowest around the coa5t us. the cloud lowest around the coast of the irish sea at the moment. especially the odd spot of drizzle. more cloud acro55 moment. especially the odd spot of drizzle. more cloud across southern areas. still warm. about 18— 19 at the moment and humid. we will have 5un5hine the moment and humid. we will have sunshine and warmth coming through. the north wales, more than england, scotland, more 5un5hine than
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yesterday. but we have this blog of rain, coming into the north—west. for the hebrides and later the northern isles, especially 0rkney, and the north—west highlands, we have the cloud and strengthening breeze. mo5t have the cloud and strengthening breeze. most of scotland, northern england and northern ireland will have a warm day and not as warm as yesterday in the south, where we have 30 degrees for example in london. it will be warm and i am hopeful wimbledon will stay dry. just an outside chance of a shallow in auckland, new zealand, for the lions. we then pick up more cloud again overnight so the chance of a drizzly shower and the weather front i spoke about earlier coming into scotla nd i spoke about earlier coming into scotland creeps further south. temperatures are held up. warm again in the south. eventually we will lo5e in the south. eventually we will lose the muggy air next week, but not through sunday. high pressure is with us, the weather front in the north. we still have the remnants of a weather front in the south. we
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will have the odd sharp shower in the afternoon. but, again, they are the afternoon. but, again, they are the exception. a decent day for most of us. southern scotland and northern ireland compared to today we have more cloud. in the sunshine further south and east we could be warmer. good plain weatherfor wimbledon if you are heading up there, if you are lucky enough to be. next week look5 there, if you are lucky enough to be. next week looks a little bit cooler, with more cloud and getting more unsettled. relief for some of u5, more unsettled. relief for some of us, even if you don't like the humid weather. next time we see you can we 5ee weather. next time we see you can we see what the weather is like for the lion5 game? ican tie lion5 game? i can tie to get a chart up for that. just the outside chance of a shower. not like last weekend, probably similar to the first test. and she very much! —— thanks very much. we'll be back with the headlines at 7:00. now it's time for click. on july 12th, the internet,
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as we know it, will change. go to amazon, twitter, reddit or many other sites and you could be asked to wait on a slower connection, or pay extra, or you may be blocked altogether. thankfully, the5e warnings aren't real. they're part of an internet—wide prote5t, with the aim of protecting net neutrality. net neutrality is the basic principle that protects our freedom of speech on the internet. it's the guiding rules that have made the internet into what it is today, and it prevents our internet service providers — so the cable companies like comca5t, horizon and at&t — from controlling what we can see and do when we go online. under the net neutrality principle, all data should be
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treated equally by isps. that means they can't slow down companies who refuse to pay to have their data prioritised, and they can't charge customers for fast access to certain data. but the us federal communications commission, the fcc, voted recently to overturn rules from 2015 which enshrined these neutrality principles, and which meant telecoms firms could be fined for noncompliance. and that, says the organiser of the july 12th protest, will play right into the big cable companies' hands. if we lose net neutrality, you're going to start to see the internet look more like cable tv. you can imagine trying to go to a social media site and getting a notification from your internet service provider saying — oh, sorry, if you want to access this site, you need to upgrade
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to our social media package. you need to upgrade to our streaming video package. you need to pay us more, in order to access the same sites that you've been using day after day for years. they can also go to those sites and charge them extra fees in order to deliver their content to users. and, of course, those fees get passed on to all of us. so it's really an issue that affects every single person that uses the internet, regardless of your political views. it's gonna hit us in the pocketbook. and this won'tjust affect us internet users. if you use an american web service — which, let's face it, is most of us — it may affect the service that they provide to us. the fcc says that the 2015 rules are unnecessary and may have stifled investment in next—generation networks. and free—market think tanks agree. well, this fight could have been resolved ten years ago if it were reallyjust about net neutrality. this has really primarily been
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a fight about the fcc's power to regulate the internet. we had our first major update to our communications law 20 years ago, and that law made it unclear exactly how the fcc was going to regulate the internet, and that ambiguity has left the agency to wrestle with this issue for a decade. and in a nutshell, there were simpler, better ways of dealing with this issue. there were other agencies that could have addressed net neutrality concerns when they arose, starting back in 2008. and, er, congress has three times tried to legislate, and both republicans and democrats, i think, share the blame for missing the opportunity to craft a solution that would resolve this issue. and that, unfortunately, has led us to where we are today, which is a thorough rule—making at the fcc to deal with this issue of legal authority,
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when the rules themselves — the core of net neutrality — have really never been controversial. well, i wonder what the original inventor of the concept of net neutrality would make of these changes. you know, it's...very disappointing, let's put it that way. so, you know, the 0bama administration had finally put net neutrality into law, done a good job with it, everyone was happy, but out of nowhere, the trump administration... and it's not been any public movement against net neutrality, it's really the cable and phone companies wanna make more money, let's put it that way. and they have somehow kind of, under the cover of trump's madness, managed to start the process on net neutrality. the thing is making the government realise that there are severe electoral consequences for messing with net neutrality. it has to be understood as the third rail, that you mess with this and you're going to get people very angry and descending on constituents. well, whatever happens next week, i have a feeling it won't be
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the last word we hear on net neutrality. just a hunch! welcome to this week's tech news. volvo announced they'll only make electric and hybrid cars from 2019. formula one racing team williams unveiled a carbon—fibre baby carrier that can transport critically ill newborn infants by ambulance or helicopter. the ba bypod protects against vibrations and can be kept at a constant temperature. they are to introduce a robot cop and autonomous patrol cars. the vehicles will use 360—degree surveillance technology to identify suspicious objects, launch a mini drone, and even give chase to suspects. google's in the doghouse again — this time, for a deal with a uk hospital that didn't respect the privacy of patients. the uk's information commissioner ruled that 1.6 million patients' details were provided to google's deepmind illegally,
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to help develop an app to diagnose kidney failure. and could tickets be replaced by inaudible sounds? well, it seems maybe. ticketmaster has teamed up with listener, a company that uses ultrasonic sound technology to transmit information between devices. checking into a venue with an app would give off the sound, and organisers could lock who was in and where they are — unless your phone dies, of course. whether you love or loathe a trip to the shops, retail is changing, but there's more to it than people just shopping online instead. can i just see what colours there are downloaded? here's an idea that takes shopping online a step further. o ne com pa ny‘s software allows
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you to go a shop's website and, from there, you can connect to a shop assistant in store, who'll be wearing a pair of smart glasses. yeah, what do we have there on the right? there are some bags. can you please take the cream bag off the shelf, and can you open it and show me the compartments? the shop has actually found that the same experience being streamed to a mobile has actually proved more popular than the smart glasses. and although i found the experience pretty good, it does of course have some limitations. oh, i see, i wasn't expecting that. i thought it was going round your waist. i'm glad i asked you. if, when shopping online, you're worried about getting your size right, then these smart leggings could help. they aim to be able to measure you and tell you the exact right size ofjeans that you should be buying. hmm! likeaglove hopes to measure women for the right size and style of jeans for their body shape.
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the stretchy measuring leggings connect via bluetooth to a smartphone app, where your stats will be stored, so you can keep track of your body shape. oh, my waist measurement here seems to be about five inches larger than i thought it was and a fair bit bigger than the jean size i normally wear. when i clicked through to the suggestions, my size was as expected. the company say these measurements represent where the jeans would sit, rather than actual measurements you would expect. might upset a few people along the way, though! but another trend emerging is that we head back to the high street, but shop assistants as we know them don't. these online stores are open 24 hours a day, with only a series of cameras and microphones keeping an eye on you. you gain access to your smartphone, use it to scan your purchases and pay, then head off. their first branch opened in sweden last year, followed by another in shanghai recently.
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the launch of amazon go's first store in seattle appears to have been delayed, but aims to replace queues and checkouts by using computer vision, deep learning and data from sensors. it will see what you've picked up in store and, in turn, charge your amazon account. but one us company has another idea about self—service. well, on first view, this does just look like an ordinary vending machine that happens to have a tv screen on it, but a machine like this could soon be selling alcohol, cannabis and even guns. let me explain more. the device uses biometric sensors to identify users by the veins in their fingers, meaning you can turn a standard machine into an apparently secure one, only dispensing goods to the person with the right to collect them. and, yes, in the us, that item could be a gun. the company claims the machinery
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uses the same level of security employed by us military and large corporations to access facilities, but they do add... everything is malleable. if it's connected to the internet, they say ‘where there's water, there's sharks‘. where there's internet connectivity, somebody can make their way in there, perhaps. we've jumped through every possible hoop we can do to make sure that only the person standing in front of it is able to get the product that they want. it's that sort of regulated product. right, and there are guns and alcohol available too? so some fellas are going out hunting and they leave late from work, and they rush out of the kitchen to catch up with their friends. usually, you're far outside the city limits, you've made a whole plan, you've made your trip, you get out and you say, "oh, i forget my ammo". in this situation, a secure machine would allow you to pick up some ammo, or even a replacement gun, if you're in the system.
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maybe get their whiskey off the one side, get their ammo off the other, and head on into the camp and have a fine week of hunting. ok, maybe this isn't solving a problem that many people have. and suddenly, the idea of shops without assistants doesn't seem so surprising. that's it for the short version of click. more from us in the full—length version, which is on iplayer, and you can find us on twitter as well. thanks for watching and see you soon. firefighters tell the bbc that they didn't have the equipment needed to tackle the blaze at grenfell tower. crews say radio problems, low water pressure —
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and a lack of tall ladders hindered their rescue attempts. good morning, it's saturday 8july. also ahead: doctors apply for a fresh court hearing for charlie gard, as experts claim there's a treatment that could help prolong his life. quite happy with today's outcome. there is a chance that charlie may get a chance now. theresa may will come face—to—face with president trump at the g20 summit, as protests continue in hamburg.
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