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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 9, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at five: celebrations in mosul after the prime minister of iraq announces victory over is in the city. of iraq announces victory over is in the city. the parents of terminally—ill baby charlie gard deliver a petition to great ormond street hospital, calling on them to let him go to the us for experimental treatment. we have got to stay hopeful, and hope thejudge listens we have got to stay hopeful, and hope the judge listens to the seven experts we have got now who are saying this has a chance of working for charlie. they all agree he should have this opportunity, we agree he should have this opportunity, our supporters do as well. thousands of people gather in istanbul in turkey to protest against the government of president erdogan. government ministers say unacceptable amounts of drugs and mobile phones are being found in prisons. also in the next hour... going back to his roots — after 13 years away, wayne rooney rejoins his boyhood club, everton, as he says goodbye to manchester
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united. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the iraqi prime minister, haider al—abadi, has declared that the city of mosul has been liberated from so—called islamic state. the prime minister has travelled to mosul, where he's been meeting fighters ahead of a formal victory speech later. earlier, iraqi forces were fighting to capture the last small area of mosul where islamic state militants were holding out. jen smith reports. celebrations on the streets of mosul, a city once a stronghold of the so—called islamic state. the
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battle to retake the city from is started in october last year but today the iraqi pm visited the city today the iraqi pm visited the city to say it has been liberated, congratulating the army and the iraqi people. iraqi forces have been battling the remaining pockets of jihadists holding out in a tiny area near the old city. sporadic bursts of gunfire could still be heard, with plumes of smoke rising into the sky. the long battle for control has come at a cost. the extremists have occupied the city for three years. hunger, thirst, the and aerial bombardment. we lived in a cellar. look at this, our house was destroyed on top of us. thousands of civilians have been killed, a million have fled. much of the city has been destroyed during the fierce battle. charities have warned of the impact the war has had on those who remained, especially on the children. but the fall of mosul does
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not mean the end of is in the country. it still has territory areas elsewhere such as three towns in the western province of anbar server problem still remains. a short while ago, hanan razek from bbc arabic told me how the liberation of mosul would be perceived across the region. mosul used to be the second—largest city in iraq. it was the biggest city they could capture in the country. now, as they are defeated in the city they will have to retreat to some role, smaller areas and towns, so it means that the victory against islamic state is very eminent in the whole of the region, notjust iraq. i suppose it is hard to think of many advantages of them being in control in mosul, but at least it meant there was one place you could look to clear them out from. presumably, the nature of their militancy is once they are split up they vanish into the civilian population, nobody would know who is
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and who isn't a fighter. absolutely. this puts a big challenge for the government now. mosul was a very densely populated city, almost 900,000 people fled the fighting. we know that around 600,000 of those fled from the western part of the city, where the fighting was very intense and it was very difficult because it has narrow streets, so it was street by street, and a house by house kind of fight. many people fled. it will put an extra layer of challenge for the government to know who is who, and i think there will be some vetting processes and also as they rebuild the city and after the fighters went out. rebuilding the city will be a huge task in itself, never mind the next stage of political rebuilding and trying to get people to think again
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as iraqis and share the country rather than be at loggerheads with one another. absolutely. now the city is mostly in rubble. there are no buildings that have escaped the fighting and the shelling, or the destruction. now there will be a big and long process of rebuilding the city, which we understand might require up to $1 billion to rebuild. also, there is the political challenge because iraq is a country challenge because iraq as a country faces a lot of sectarian challenges and rebuilding the city and having a political process inside the city, that will be at the questioning that will be a big question and quite a long process, as well.
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and for the prime minister, how important is his liberation of mosul? it is a big victory for him politically, it enhances his position in the government, if it makes people regain trust in the iraqi government. i think he will use that victory to go forward with his policies. the parents of charlie gard have delivered a petition to great ormond street hospital in london, calling on doctors to allow their terminally ill baby to travel to the us for experimental treatment. the petition has been signed by more than 350,000 people. the ii—month—old boy's case is due to return to the high court tomorrow. a short while ago, our correspondent anisa kadri spoke to charlie's parents, chris gard and connie yates, and they told her what they have been going through. iam in iamina i am in a square down the road from great ormond street hospital, where charlie's supporters have been gathering, people who signed the petition you have been mentioning. charlie's parents thought they had run out of legal options but there
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will be appearing at the high court tomorrow about whether their son can get treatment abroad in america and a lot hangs on that hearing. joining me now is and connie —— chris and connie, can you tell me what you thought the petition would achieve? i believe it is 370,000 petitions and we have support from around the world that believe in charlie and believe he deserves this chance. you thought your son's life—support machine would be turned off, how worried about the hearing are you? there will be another later in the thereswillbeanother laterinthe and that will be the day we get week and that will be the day we get the result so we have got to stay hopeful, and hope that the judge listens to these seven experts we have got now saying this as a chance
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to work for charlie. they all agree he should have this opportunity, we agree he should, and our supporters do as well. did you think your battle would come to an end? explain what was going through your head at the time. yes, we did. it's very close. he is still fighting so we are still fighting, we believe he deserves this chance so we will keep going. is this fight taking you away from being with charlie? no, we spend all of our time with charlie, literally 2a hours a day. there is someone up literally 2a hours a day. there is someone up with him while we are doing this and we will go straight back afterwards. we have raised over 1.3 million now for his treatment. there's a lot of people that agree with us. parents know their children
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best but it's also about what other doctors think as well. we are not slating great orme and a —— great ormond street, the kids have had a chance and we want him to have a chance and we want him to have a chance as well. how relieved are you that the hospital put in this request at the high court for another hearing? we are relieved. theresa may said if any new evidence comes to light it will be looked at soi comes to light it will be looked at so i hope they do take into consideration that there is now seven doctors. there's 18 children on this medication, they are all getting stronger and better. it's a miracle what happens, there is one girl who was on a ventilator like charlie and one year later is riding a bike. it is only oral medicine with no major side effects, it's not
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even on operation or anything. there's nothing to lose. president trump has come out in support of view and there have been people from america here today including a reverend. tommy what it means to you to have that from america and from lots of parts of the world. it is amazing. there's a lot of people who agreed what we are doing is right. this can happen to anyone, we are just normal everyday people. we are not strong people but what is strong as our love for our little boy, he ke pt as our love for our little boy, he kept us going through this. we are with him 24 hours a day. people say i couldn't sit there and watch my child suffer, neither could wait. have parents got in touch with you going through similar things? we spoke to the king family previously, they ended up being right and they
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wanted to take their child to another country for the treatment and that treatment is now coming to the nhs this year so the same thing could happen to charlie. he could get the treatment, it might work, then they might bring it here. and how are you preparing for the hearing tomorrow? i don't think you can prepare their early. ijust want to say again, we are not slating great ormond street hospital, it is fantastic, with specialists in many areas and the nurses who have looked after charlie are amazing human beings. what we're asking to do is ta ke beings. what we're asking to do is take our son from great ormond street hospital to another hospital specialists in charlie's disease. we have been blocked from doing that soho finally we will get to do that and charlie gets the chance he deserves. thank you forjoining us. charlie's parents there speaking
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about their hopes to take charlie to america for treatment. a ceasefire backed by the united states and russia is being observed in south—western syria. early reports from the area say the truce appears to have taken hold, with local monitors saying there had been no air strikes or clashes. the us, the russians and thejordanians were all involved in brokering the agreement between the syrian government and its rebel opponents. the us secretary of state is in ukraine for a brief visit. rex tillerson is the first senior member of the trump administration improvement in relations between the us and russia. speaking alongside ukrainian president petro poroshenko, mr tillerson said russia must take the first steps to de—escalate the conflict in the east of the country. they have been very clear in my discussions on more than one occasion that it is necessary for russia to take the first steps to de—escalate the situation in the east pa rt de—escalate the situation in the east part of ukraine in particular, by respecting the ceasefire, by
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pulling back with the heavy weapons and allowing observers to carry out their responsibilities. this is necessary for us their responsibilities. this is necessary for us to make any movement in particular. thousands of people are attending a rally in the turkish city of istanbul to protest against the government of president erdogan. the event is being held to mark the end of a 280—mile march from ankara organised by the opposition to highlight the mass arrests and sackings since last year's failed coup in the country. we can speak to our correspondent selin girit, who is in istanbul. we were talking an hour ago about the significance of this protest, how unusual it is, particularly in the lights of events that have happened since the coup attempt last summer. happened since the coup attempt last summer. i wonder how extensively is this march being reported in the turkish media because there have
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been lots of questions about how free is taking now in terms of its reporting of dissent, never mind the opportunity for people to take part in anti—government protests. opportunity for people to take part in anti-government protests. here at this rally there are hundreds of reporters. they could hardly find a space to make this live report. now the speech is over... inaudible. whether the turkish media wanted everything reported, that is another question. people walking around were asking questions about why they were here, why they he said this should be a place of democracy and justice, and refugees should be set free. but will the
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hundreds of thousands of people from the opposition be enough? and queue for struggling through that noise to explain what has been happening there. our apologies for some of the sound quality but i think even without hearing every word, you could get a sense of the atmosphere and how that extraordinary rally of opposition supporters has been. the headlines on bbc news: the iraqi prime minister says the city of mosul has been liberated from the islamic state group. the parents of terminally—ill infant charlie gard deliver a petition to great ormond street hospital, calling on them to let him go to the us for experimental treatment. thousands of people gather in istanbul in turkey to protest against the government of president erdogan. the event is being held to mark the end of a 280—mile march from ankara, and has been organised by the opposition to highlight mass
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arrests and sackings since last year's failed coup in the country. the shadow education secretary, angela rayner, has made clear that jeremy corbyn‘s suggestion that labour would look at ways of writing off student debts is only "an ambition". during the election campaign, the labour leader said the party wanted to reduce the debts owed by those who had paid £9,000 a year in fees, as our political correspondent jonathan blake explains. up up to £9,000 is what you can pay as an undergraduate in england if you go to university and it was a key pa rt go to university and it was a key part of labour's campaign to promise to scrap that, but we heard jeremy corbyn also allude to helping people who currently are paying off their student debt. it didn't quite go as far as saying he would wipe it out altogether but this morning labour's
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shadow education secretary was asked about this on the andrew marr show and she made it clear that although it is not quite a policy yet it is definitely their aim and their ambition to wipe out that debt. definitely their aim and their ambition to wipe out that debtm isa ambition to wipe out that debtm is a big abacus i'm working on with that, it is a huge amount, 100 billion... a huge amount of money. they have got to start dealing with this debt crisis we are foisting on our young people. they are leaving university with £57,000 worth of debt, it is unsustainable and we have got to start tackling that. and you simply spraying around huge spending promises to recklessly? another hundred billion pounds on tuition fees, that is some sofa you have to find. jeremy said it is an ambition, something he would like to do. it is not something we will announce we are doing unless we know we can afford to do that. so to put that into context, it is more than
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double the uk defence budget, more than the government spends on education alone in total in england so we are education alone in total in england so we are talking about a vast sum of money and it is not possible to suddenly find that money to wipe out student debt. that is why i think we are seeing labour here happy to say that this is their ambition but not quite yet promise and the tories have come back and suggested labour is making a shambolic promise and the only way to pay for it would higher taxes. the newjustice secretary has pledged to tackle the problems of drugs and violence in prison after new figures revealed more than 200 kilos of drugs and 13,000 mobile phones were found in jails in england and wales last year. david lidington said the government was increasing the number of prison officers following cuts under the last, coalition government. here's our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani. london's pentonville prison late last year.
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orders from inmates for drugs and mobile phones being delivered by gangs on the outside. packages thrown or catapulted over walls and security netting. prisoners use makeshift hooks to recover them. it is big business. new figures from the ministry ofjustice show the industrial scale of what's happening. 225 kilograms of drugs seized last year, 13,000 mobile phones, 7000 extra sim cards. prison inspectors have repeatedly criticised jails for failing to stop the smuggling, which adds to violence inside. what i am determined to do is try to bring about improvements, to build on what my predecessor liz truss did in getting extra prison officers and putting in place effective measures to detect more accurately the problem we have with drugs, the new challenge we have with drones and mobile phones in prison, so they are more secure places. each jail in england and wales now has hand—held mobile phone detectors, and there are 300 more sniffer dogs looking for drugs.
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ministers have also pledged 2500 extra prison officers by the end of next year. critics say that is still fewer staff than in 2010 and the smuggling will continue to have a huge impact. the numbers are pretty eye watering, a huge number of fines for both drugs and mobile phones, that is a good thing because the trade in prisons is very dangerous, it causes bullying, violence and self harm inside the prison, and outside the prison families have money extorted from them to pay for all these drugs and phones. this is one of the biggest challenges, stopping gangs from using drones under the cover of night. walls cannot stop the airborne contraband so the police and prison governors are trying to identify the gangs behind them. so far 11 men have beenjailed for a total of 40 years, but most experts say many more are ou there determined to do the same, because there is big money still to be made. dominic casciani, bbc news. former prisoner, leroy skeete, has been speaking about his experiences inside prison, and says that drug use is rife. there is very little that excites
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people in prison. you go to the gym, you do other things but a lot of the time when people are stuck in a cell for 24 hours they are going to want escapism. to suggest drug addiction won't happen in prison is ridiculous. since the sentences have been increased, drug use has been ever more prevalent because you have got to look at it, someone goes into prison to serve a sentence, suddenly hit for 20 years, that person might not have taken drugs before but they going to a cell with someone and say, do you know what, i will have a go on that, and it's a vicious circle. researchers in leeds say that potentially harmful chemicals — used to waterproof raincoats, rucksacks and outdoor gear — are unnecessary and a source
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of environmental pollution. fluorochemicals are one of the most common treatments used to waterproof items. scientists say new coatings being developed are more environmentally friendly. our science reporter, victoria gill, has more. the great british summer. but with british weather, the chances are it won't be long before you're reaching for your raincoat — an unlikely source of pollution. one of the most common treatments used to make ourjackets waterproof, fluorochemicals, can pollute the environment. the problem with fluorochemicals is that they're very persistent. they stick around for a really long time, they don't break down and could last for hundreds of years. that's why these scientists are testing new, more environmentally—friendly waterproof coatings using indoor rain. this is the rain room here at leeds university, and apparently it's set to a manchester drizzle. this is the mannequin wearing a raincoat to be tested, so if we just switch on the rain... yeah, that is a pretty accurate artificial manchester drizzle, so i'm just going to leave.
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the team used industry—standard tests to see how waterproof fabric stood up to everything from drizzle to a simulated downpour. new repellent coatings that are not based on fluorochemicals are just as good as fluorochemical water repellents. the fluorochemicals are unnecessary. new non—fluorochemical coatings are still being developed, but the researchers now hope the industry will start to roll them out to protect us from the elements without damaging the environment. a ceremony has been held to remember the 843 men who lost their lives when hms vanguard sank off orkney injuly 1917. it was one of the worst naval tragedies of the first world war. to mark the centenary, a team of divers has been given special permission to document the wreck.
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our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon has more. in the cold northern waters of scapa flow, the final resting place of hms vanguard, a dreadnought battleship from world war i. the bow and stern almost entirely intact after 100 years under the water. this the first group of civilian divers to be given permission to document the wreck since it was designated a war grave. i think the loss of life was never very far away from my mind as we're diving on the ship. that said, we had a job to do, and an obligation to do thatjob to the best of our ability. so you got on with the work but, yes, parts of the wreck are very emotional. very emotional indeed. newsreel: ships were steaming into their war base at scapa flow...
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along with many other ships of the royal navy, vanguard had been anchored in the seas off orkney. she'd seen action at the battle ofjutland, but on a summer evening injuly 1917, the entire ship was destroyed after a magazine exploded. she sank almost instantly, with the loss of almost all her crew. 843 men died. only two of those on board at the time survived. the team of volunteer divers spent hundreds of hours surveying the wreck, piecing together its story. lying at a depth of around 100 feet, and among the many artefacts they discovered, the telegraph, a main anchor, cutlery lying half buried in the sand around the wreckage. as part of the commemorations, vanguard's white ensign was recently replaced by divers. a century on, honouring the many lives lost in what was a catastrophic accident. quite something to see.
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the lake district has been designated as a world heritage site. it was the third time the national park had submitted a bid to unesco, which was meeting in krakow. the decision means that the lake district becomes the uk's 31st such site. i don't think there will be much argument over that. let's look at the weather prospects over the coming couple of days. much of england and wales have seemed warm sunny spells today but in scotland and northern ireland it has been a wet affair. in england and wales we have seen some cloud developing, and this cloud in cambridgeshire. go into this evening there could be
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plenty of that through east anglia and the wash. this rain gradually edging south into parts of north—west england and north wales by the end of the night. a rather warm and muggy night but there are cooler, fresher night as we go through the week. monday morning is a mixture of weather on the weights with some sunny spells in northern scotla nd with some sunny spells in northern scotland but maybe the odd shower around. we still have this weather system by this stage through southern scotland, still with an area of cloud and northern ireland, some of these showers edging into north—west england. south of that, sunny spells, still some showers overnight in the far south—west of england. on monday umbrellas at the ready, scattered showers. catch one, they could be on the heavy side.
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they could be some intense downpours, into the wimbledon area as well. not quite as warm as it has been, still humidity here but onto the rest of the week the temperatures continue to edge down. there could be longer spells of rain moving through parts of england and wales in tuesday. it is sunny spells and scattered showers, but temperatures just into the mid—teens. on wednesday, the gap between weather systems and most will have a dry day. it is an up week, quite average, changeable certainly. some days wetter, sunday is better, but things cooling down especially where it has been very warm. hello. this is bbc news.
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the iraqi prime minister says the city of mosul has been liberated from the islamic state group. the parents of charlie gard deliver a petition to great ormond street hospital in london, calling on doctors to allow the terminally ill baby to travel to america for experimental treatment. thousands of people gather at an opposition event in istanbul to protest against the government of president erdogan. hundreds of kilograms of drugs and thousands of mobile phones were found in prisons in england and wales last year. the government has described the situation as "unacceptable." i have more from bbc news at the top of the other. now it's time for a look at the sport with him. thank you. and wayne rooney has returned to everton, manchester
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united 13 years after leaving. the record goal scorerfor united 13 years after leaving. the record goal scorer for england and united had become increasingly sidelined at old trafford in recent seasons so sidelined at old trafford in recent seasons so he joins sidelined at old trafford in recent seasons so hejoins his sidelined at old trafford in recent seasons so he joins his old sidelined at old trafford in recent seasons so hejoins his old boyhood club. and not just club. and notjust coming back because of the team i grew up playing for. i'm coming back because i feel this club can move forward and be successful and know there will be pressure there for me to perform but am ready in 30 to go. i believe i can help with this club forward and help the tea m with this club forward and help the team be more successful on the pitch. he says he has gone back to achieve success and now our sports news correspondent reflects on his career and his return home. he is quite simply one of the greatest strikers in english football history. that is absolutely fantastic! wayne rooney was 18 age prodigy and his
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goal—scoring exploits enjoyed. he leaves manchester united as their record goal—scorer but with his playing time increasingly limited under the current manager he is heading back to where his story started at everton. it will be a good thing, you know, to get another evertonians in through the doors, one as high—profile as wayne. he shows were everton are. he will give a real strength in depth in regards to the striking position which would not ha rd over striking position which would not hard over the last couple of seasons. he announced his incredible talent of the world with a stunning goal at the age ofjust 16. of the world with a stunning goal at the age ofjust16. you start for england, two and is the country's leading goal—scorer. ceramics ferguson has said he would have excelled in any year. but his relationship with him and the old trafford fa ns relationship with him and the old trafford fans wasn't always smooth. he came close to leaving manchester city on one occasion. there was talk about moving to
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china, maybe even america. but in the end he has opted to come back to where it all began for him as a young boy. the fans will be walking through these gates knowing that he's back in the blue of everton. the man who discovered rooney as the nature of playing for a junior team in liverpool says he remembers a boy who simply loved to score goals. the strength of him. use us a little lad. but that was young when. welcome home. with some critics believing he is a shadow of the player he once was, everton shadow of the player he once was, eve rto n fa ns shadow of the player he once was, everton fans will hope this new home can inspirea everton fans will hope this new home can inspire a return to his very best. perhaps for a player whose emotions are always close to the surface, there are be a sense of unfinished business at a club he's a lwa ys unfinished business at a club he's always held close his heart. wayne rooney back in blue, then.
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cycling now and it was a dramatic day at the tour de france. some cyclists crashed out. we have the action. preparing to take on the ha rd est action. preparing to take on the hardest stage of the tour so far, it certainly did not disappoint but fa ns certainly did not disappoint but fans of welsh cycling might prefer to look away now. thomas had started the day in second place but after winning stage one and wearing the yellow jersey for three days winning stage one and wearing the yellowjersey for three days has raced was finished by a broken collar bone. fruit will have to do without one of his key team—mates and soon had a technical problem of his own. the italian champion attacked, which usually isn't done when the yellow jersey attacked, which usually isn't done when the yellowjersey is in trouble. cycling has its own set of fair play and other rivals insured they waited. the pre—tour favourite's race ended on the final
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descent, crashing into another cyclist. he was conscious when taken to hospital. a dramatic day finished with a dramatic sprint. the race lead now 18 seconds. in the last few minutes the england captain has started his reign was a victory. they won their first test against south africa. they set a large target of 331. england lost seven 443 this morning as the wickets fell regularly. there was a half—century. it was a target the south africans didn't get near challenging. they lost three wickets. the wickets kept falling.
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england win by 211 runs at lord's and no wonder they're very happy. dingell and women were also in action today and they beat in the cricket world cup favourites australia by three runs in bristol. england posted 259 from their 50 overs. thanks largely to some hitting. the defending champions had a sniff of victory but they needed six on the last ball and couldn't manage it. it's theirfirst six on the last ball and couldn't manage it. it's their first defeat of the ship was like tournament and their first by england of the ship was like tournament and theirfirst by england in a of the ship was like tournament and their first by england in a world cup for 24 years. a history making victory. nottinghamshire bowler luke fletcher is expected to be released from hospital today after suffering
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a head injury in yesterday's t20 match against birmingham. he was hit bya match against birmingham. he was hit by a straight drive and was bleeding but managed to walk off the pitch with the help of a physio. was confirmed that he had concussion and was kept in hospital overnight as a precaution. not say they would continue to monitor him very closely. mercedes has won the austrian grand prix. the ferrari tea m austrian grand prix. the ferrari team second. lewis hamilton fought back from eighth and finished fourth. that'll extend his lead to 20 points. tom clarkson is in austria for us. this renders falling now we could have done with in the closing laps of the austrian grand prix because it was not a scintillating race. there was very little overtaking but it could yet prove to be a pivotal grand prix in this year's watch championship fight. nick reports. there was no mistaking pray you are when formula 1 comes to
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austria. though lewis hamilton looked like he'd rather be somewhere else. and who could blame him? stranded on an eighth on the grid thanks to a penalty for changing his gearbox it was a day for damage limitation. up front, gearbox it was a day for damage limitation. upfront, his gearbox it was a day for damage limitation. up front, his mercedes team—mate made the perfect start to stay ahead of championship leader sebastien battle. behind them, chaos. hamilton kept out of trouble, protest vote down and was soon up to fifth. a pit stop strategy saw him gain another place and on the penultimate lap yet golden opportunity to snatch third. that chance was lost, but all hope wasn't. bottas joined chance was lost, but all hope wasn't. bottasjoined the championship battle that the german now leads. in the beginning i could control the pace but in the end the backmarkers made it quite happy. thank you guys.
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in massive thank you to the tea making this possible. a really good pace. i was catching a little by little but then he obviously struggled to the last laps, it was getting really close. i think i need one more lap because he was really struggling to get up the hill. but he wanted to win, nevertheless a good result. ten won and vettel rightly satisfied and particularly bottas after that scintillating start at the beginning of the grand prix. lewis hamilton when he spoke to the media after the race was very downbeat and said it had not been a good grand prix for him and that's bottas was now really in this world championship fight. to one of us closer to hamilton in second place than hamilton is to vettel at the top of the world championship. the race is on now to get the formula 1 freight over to silverstone for what is going to be one of the highlights of the british
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sporting summer, the british grand prix next weekend. looking forward to the british grand prix. the british contenders for medals at the world championships prepare for. mo farah won the 3000 metres. the world championships will be his last track event before competing in road racing. having faced questions about doping, novara was quick to defend himself. i love my sports. a lot of what i do. never, ever will fail i love my sports. a lot of what i do. never, everwillfaila test. that's honestly, people who know me know who i am. and how hard i work. and you know, i do it year after year was a joy. i believe... there is not much more the can do other than run and do what you do and are lobbying on the podium and making so many people like these people happy and proud to be british.
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a personal best in the british mile but it wasn't enough to beat kenya. the double european champion has recently recovered from a stress fracture in her foot. recently recovered from a stress fracture in herfoot. in his last ever track faced the six time paralympic champion david weir, one confidently in the tv 54 800 metres. the stadium is of course the venue in which she won three paolo and pick the right —— paralympic gold backin pick the right —— paralympic gold back in 2012. afterwards, he was clearly emotional. it is hard to, you know, take it all in to be honest. ijust want to thank the crowd for supporting paralympic sport for years. it is has been a hard week for me but i just want to save an cute to everyone. they've helped me to my careerfor everyone. they've helped me to my career for 25 years everyone. they've helped me to my careerfor 25 years or everyone. they've helped me to my career for 25 years or more.
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that's all the sport for now. you can keep up—to—date with all the stories on the website. i'll have more attack seven. next, is time for click. go to amazon, and twitter are or many other sites you could be asked to wait for a slower connection or you could be blocked. thankfully these worries are not real. they're pa rt these worries are not real. they're part ofan these worries are not real. they're part of an internet wide protest with the aim of protecting net
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neutrality. net neutrality is the basic principle that protects our freedom of speech on the internet. it's the guiding rules that have made the internet into what it is today, and it prevents our internet service providers — so the cable companies like comcast, horizon and at&t — from controlling what we can see and do when we go online. under the net neutrality principle, all data should be treated equally by isps. that means they can't slow down companies who refuse to pay to have their data prioritised, and they can't charge customers for fast access to certain data. but the us federal communications commission, the fcc, voted recently to overturn rules from 2015 which enshrined these neutrality principles, and which meant telecoms firms could be fined for noncompliance. but the us federal communications commission, the fcc, voted recently to overturn rules from 2015 which enshrined these neutrality principles, and which meant telecoms firms could be fined for noncompliance. and that, says the organiser
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of the july 12th protest, will play right into the big cable companies' hands. if we lose net neutrality, you're going to start to see the internet look more like cable tv. you can imagine trying to go to a social media site and getting a notification from your internet service provider saying — oh, sorry, if you want to access this site, you need to upgrade to our social media package. you need to upgrade to our streaming video package. you need to pay us more, in order to access the same sites that you've been using day after day for years. they can also go to those sites and charge them extra fees in order to deliver their content to users. and, of course, those fees get passed on to all of us. so it's really an issue that affects every single person that uses the internet, regardless of your political views. it's gonna hit us in the pocketbook. and this won'tjust affect us internet users. if you use an american web service — which, let's face it, is most of us — it may affect the service that they provide to us.
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the fcc says that the 2015 rules are unnecessary and may have stifled investment in next—generation networks. and free—market think tanks agree. well, this fight could have been resolved ten years ago if it were reallyjust about net neutrality. this has really primarily been a fight about the fcc's power to regulate the internet. we had our first major update to our communications law 20 years ago, and that law made it unclear exactly how the fcc was going to regulate the internet, and that ambiguity has left the agency to wrestle with this issue for a decade. and in a nutshell, there were simpler, better ways of dealing with this issue. there were other agencies that could have addressed net neutrality concerns when they arose, starting back in 2008. and congress has three times tried to legislate,
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and both republicans and democrats, i think, share the blame for missing the opportunity to craft a solution that would resolve this issue. and that, unfortunately, has led us to where we are today, which is a thorough rule—making at the fcc to deal with this issue of legal authority, when the rules themselves — the core of net neutrality — have really never been controversial. well, i wonder what the original inventor of the concept of net neutrality would make of these changes. you know, it's...very disappointing, let's put it that way. so, you know, the obama administration had finally put net neutrality into law, done a good job with it, everyone was happy, but out of nowhere, the trump administration... and it's not been any public movement against net neutrality, it's really the cable and phone companies want to make more money, let's put it that way. and they have somehow kind of, under the cover of trump's madness, managed to start the process on net neutrality. the thing is making the government
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realise that there are severe electoral consequences for messing with net neutrality. it has to be understood as the third rail, that you mess with this and you're going to get people very angry and descending on constituents. but not everyone agrees that next week's protest will make much of a difference. well, whatever happens next week, i have a feeling it won't be the last word we hear on net neutrality. just a hunch! welcome to the royal society of arts, in london, which this week was hosting its annual summer science exhibition. for one week only, universities from around the country gather google is in the doghouse for a deal
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with the uk store that did not respect to deal with patients. the commission for that 1.6 million patient details were provided illegally. to help develop an apt to diagnose kidney failure. and kids tickets be replaced by an audible sounds? well, it seems maybe. ticketmaster has teamed up with listener, a company that uses ultrasonic sound technology to transmit information between devices. checking into a venue with an apple give up the sound and organisers could lock you within and where they are. unless your phone dies, of course. whether you love or loathe a trip to
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the shops, retail is changing. but there's more to it than people just shopping online instead. can i do seek what colours they are down there? here's an idea that takes shopping online a step further. one company's shopping online a step further. one com pa ny‘s software allows shopping online a step further. one compa ny‘s software allows you to go toa compa ny‘s software allows you to go to a shop that website and from there you can connect to a shop assistant in store who will be wearing a pairof assistant in store who will be wearing a pair of smart glasses. what we have thereon the right? there are some bags. can you please ta ke there are some bags. can you please take the queen bag of the shelf and kenny lebed and show me the compartments? the shop has actually found that the same experience being streamed through mobile has actually proved more popular than the smart glasses and although i found the experience pretty good, it does in
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have some limitations. if when shopping online you're worried about getting your site ‘s right, then these smart leggings could help. they aim to be able to measure you and tell you the exact bite size of genes that you should be buying. like a club hopes to measure up women for the right size and style of genes for their body shape. the stretchy measuring leggings connect toa stretchy measuring leggings connect to a smartphone up by your stats will be stored so that you can keep track of your body shape. oh, my waist measurement here seems to be about five inches larger than i thought it was under fair bit bigger than the gene size i normally wear. when i click through to the suggestions my size was as expected. the company say these measurements represent where the genes was set rather than actual measurements you would expect. it might upset a few people along the way, though. but another trend emerging is that we
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head back to the high book shop assistants, as we know them, don't. these online stores are open 24 hours a day with only a series of cameras and microphones keeping an eye on you. you gain access to your smartphone use it to scan your purchases and pay and then head off. their first branch opened in sweden last year, followed by another in shanghai recently. the launch of us on go's first store in seattle appears to have been delayed. but it aims to delays queues and checkouts by using computer vision, deep learning and state from sensors. it will see what you picked up in store and an ten charge your arms on account. but one us company has another idea about self—service. this just does look like an ordinary vending machine that happens to have atv vending machine that happens to have a tv screen on it but a machine like this could soon be selling alcohol,
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cannabis and even guns. let me explain more. the device uses biometric sensors to identify users by the veins in their fingers, meaning you can turn a standard machine into an apparently secure one only dispensing goods to the person with the right to collect them. and yes, the us that item could be a gun. the company claims the machine uses the same level of security employed by us military and large corporations to access facilities, but they do add. everything a stackable. where there are water there are sharks. weather is internet connectivity summoned to make their way in there, perhaps. we have jumped through every possible hoop would can do to make sure only the person standing in front that is able to get the product that they wa nt able to get the product that they want if it is that sort of eight related products. right. and there are guns and
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alcohol available, too. some fellas going out hunting and they've leave late from work and they've leave late from work and they rush out there to catch up with theirfriend and they rush out there to catch up with their friend and you get out then you say, oh, iforgot my their friend and you get out then you say, oh, i forgot my arm. their friend and you get out then you say, oh, iforgot my arm. in this situation you get their whiskey of one—sided and get their ammo of the other side and head out into a fine weekend of hunting. maybe this isn't solving a problem that many people have. suddenly the idea of shots without assistance doesn't seem so surprising. that is it for the short cut of click. more from us in the full—length version online player and you can find us on twitter. next for watching. time for a look at the weather.
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one sunny spells today but in scotla nd one sunny spells today but in scotland and northern ireland with a weather system closed by it has been cloudy and wet. for england and wells we have seen some cloud developing and threatening cloud. actually going into this evening there could be the odd heavy shower developing around parts of east anglia. this weather system stays with us to parts of scotland and northern ireland, edging a little bit further south into parts of north—west england and north wales at the end overnight. elsewhere, variable cloud must clear spells and a rather warm and muggy night across southern areas of the uk. some fresher nights on the way as we go through this week. let's take a look at things into monday morning. it is at things into monday morning. it is a mixture of weather on the way. there will be some sunny spells in northern scotland. maybe the odd shower about. this weather system through southern scotland with an
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area of cloud, into northern ireland. some of the showery bursts of rain heading towards north england and on to north wales. south of that some sunny spells. one of two heavy showers into east anglia after the overnight appearance of the showers into the morning. one or two into the far south—west of england. umbrellas on the ready. scattered showers. some of us will mist more together and stay dry. a few catch one could be on the heavy side. in south east england. there could be some intense downpours of rain. i threat of picking up the odd shower around london into the wimbledon area. not quite as warm as it has been but still someone and humidity here. to the rest of this because temperatures continue to edge down a few degrees. this is the picture through monday evening. another area of showers. they may merge to get some longer spells of rain. plenty of cloud with us as well and it will feel cool whereas for northern england, it is sunny
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spells, scattered showers but notice the temperatures here. just into the mid—teens. rain through tuesday night and on wednesday. threatening some southernmost parts of the uk. once that has gone, most of us will have a dry day. an up and down week. quite average, really, for summer weather. changeable, certainly. sunday is wetter, sunday's better, but things can need cool down especially where it has been very warm. this is bbc news. the headlines at 6:00: celebrations in mosul after the prime minister of iraq announces victory over is in the city. the parents of terminally—ill baby charlie gard deliver a petition to great ormond street hospital, calling on them to let him go to the us for experimental treatment. we've got to stay hopeful, hope that thejudge listens to
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we've got to stay hopeful, hope that the judge listens to the seven experts we've got now that are saying this has a chance of working for charlie. they all agree that he should have this opportunity. we agree he should have this opportunity and all of our supporters do as well. thousands gather at an opposition event to protest against the government of president erdogan. government ministers say unacceptable amounts of drugs and mobile phones are being found in prisons. also in the next hour, going back to his roots.
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