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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 11, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. the government has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s, which led to the deaths of more than 2,000 people. president trump's son has released emails which show he was offered information on hillary clinton by a russian national with links to the kremlin. a major review of working practices has called for more rights for self—employed people on zero hours contracts. the un has said almost 3,000 civilians remain trapped in the iraqi city of mosul, despite claims of victory over so—called islamic state. and in the next hour, history made on centre court. johanna konta has become the first british woman to reach the wimbledon semi—finals for nearly a0 years. i know that going into the match against simona that she really wasn't going to give me much for free so i had to be the one out
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there to create my own chances and i think i did that. but can andy murrayjoin her? the british number one is first up on centre court tomorrow where he'll face big—serving american sam querrey. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at 8pm. an appalling tragedy that should never have happened, that's what the prime minister called the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s. the government today announced an inquiry into the worst treatment scandal in the history of the nhs. 2,400 died. 7,500 patients infected. and 7,500 patients were infected with viruses, hepatitis c and hiv among the viruses after being given
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blood products by the nhs. our health editor huw pym reports. it's been called the worst disaster in the history of the nhs. patients trusted the service to deliver safe treatments, including haemophiliacs needing blood clotting treatments, but they were given products tainted with life—threatening viruses. these are medications for hiv. i take one of those in the morning and one of these, both morning and night time. andy has had a life on medication because he was given contaminated blood. at the age of five, he was infected with hiv and hepatitis c. at 16, he developed aids. since then, all he is wanted is answers. i'm very worried there was deliberate acts behind these infections. at the very minimum, we were let down. at the worst, i think there are people to blame for a lot of the infections that occurred. much of the enquiry is focused
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on whitehall and what was happening here more than 30 years ago. victims and their families have long argued that senior government officials were aware of the dangers with contaminated blood products and allow patients to continue receiving them. and after that, they say, there was a cover—up. a scottish enquiry byjudge lord penrose, was dismissed by victims as a waste of time and they showed what they thought of it. an earlier enquiry in england was privately funded with no official status. today, a labour mp who's campaigned on the issue told the commons those affected by the scandal were owed a debt ofjustice. they deserve to be told what went wrong. why it went wrong and who is responsible for what happened. the story of the injustice they have suffered also needs to be set out and told to the wider public. their voices need to be heard. and a minister citing allegations that medical records were tampered with announced a new public enquiry.
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in light of these concerns, and a report of new evidence and allegations of potential criminality, we think it is important to understand the extent of what is claimed and the wider issues that arise. the former health secretary, andy burnham, who alleged there was a criminal cover—up cover says victims were failed by successive governments. all political parties have let down those who've suffered as a result of contaminated blood. and all parties must now put differences aside, work together and give them truth and justice without any further delay or obstruction. and for this campaign, who has hepatitis c, there's only one thing which really matters. nobody here is going away, we are staying, we're going to fight and we want to know the truth. we just want the truth, that is all. that is all. whether that full truth emerges after this long campaign, will depend on what sort of enquiry is convened and its powers.
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joining us now from south east london is caroline wheeler, deputy political editor of the sunday times. she's been campaigning on this issue for a number of years. it is good to see you and thanks for being with us. first of all, this is obviously a good day, was it expected? i think we could feel a sort of sand shifting moment a little bit when the letter came out on sunday, a letter that was signed by six opposition party leaders which obviously was significant given the state of play at the moment with theresa may leading a minority government. 0bviously, moment with theresa may leading a minority government. obviously, a sense that if we could bring forward a vote on the floor of the house of commons, which was the intention today, that that would inflict a defeat on the government, one that
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theresa may realised she wasn't going to win which is why shortly before midday today, i received a text m essa g e before midday today, i received a text message informing me the campaign had been successful and we would get that inquiry. so it has been a momentous day. but the scope and range of the inquiry, its terms, have not been set out yet. jeremy hunt will meet the campaign is to discuss the best way forward, what do you hope for? i think that is important that he is actually realised that this has been a campaign which has been led by those affected, and the fact he's going to meet with them and let them have a voice in determining how that campaign and how that inquiry is set out is significant. what andy burnham has been saying consistently now about the idea we have a hillsborough led style independent panel conducting the inquiry is where many of the victims hope it will go. the alternative is a judge leading quarry but i think over the
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coming days, weeks and months, there will be lots of debates about this. it is really important now. these people have waited decades for a nswe i’s people have waited decades for answers and we need to get an audience and a way of getting to the truth now and actually finding out what went wrong. and in inquiry that has subpoenaed power and could potentially lead to prosecutions? yes, exactly. there was a great deal of disappointment when lord penrose conducted his inquiry in scotland that actually the scope couldn't subpoenaed people to come and give evidence. in fact, subpoenaed people to come and give evidence. infact, many subpoenaed people to come and give evidence. in fact, many people complained afterwards that even though it had gone on for many years it didn't offer any answers they'd sort. i think it is very important people be compelled to give evidence. and, yes, ultimately, just like hillsborough, if there is wrongdoing found, prosecutions can be brought. the tragedy is that some of the campaigners who fought so ha rd of the campaigners who fought so hard for this day, a lot of them are
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not with us any more. that's right. they think 2500 have died during the course of this scandal. i myself in the course of running the stories i've run have come into contact with families who have seen loved ones die in the process, and even running a story, i remember one family of michael, who was featured prominently in some of the coverage, he collapsed shortly after the lord penrose inquiry and never made a recovery. he is not alone. there have been several deaths every month that goes by so every month that goes by somebody else has died as a result of this tragedy. you and i know and many others what can happen to some enquiries, they do not inquiry into social care pushed into the long grass, didn't get anywhere. is there a fear this could happen with this inquiry as well? there is a lwa ys with this inquiry as well? there is always a fear that will happen but i
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think getting this far, i mean, this is further than we ever imagined we would ever get. it's a really good step in the right direction and i think there is now an understanding within government, and having had several conversations today, there was a sense this was the right thing to do finally and they realise this needed to be done in the correct way which is why i think we've seen now this whole statement about how they will liaise with those affected and make sure the terms of the inquiry is going to be done in a way giving the best possible outcome. the hope is positive. let's hope this is a real step change we are actually going to see things happen now. we can't pre—empt what might happen in the future but just pre—empt what might happen in the future butjust say, wow, paid tribute to diana johnson who has been a tireless worrier in this campaign and equally to andy burnham, and to those groups who have been fighting on this issue for so
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have been fighting on this issue for so long. caroline, thanks for joining us. the sunday political editor of the sunday times. and we'll find out how this story, and many others, are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 this evening in the papers, our guestsjoining me tonight are alison little, deputy political editor of the daily express, and the guardian columnist hugh muir. president trump's eldest son has published a chain of emails about his meeting last year with a russian lawyer who's been linked to the kremlin. in the emails, released on his twitter feed, donald trumpjunior is told by a publicist that the russian government wants to offer official documents that would "incriminate" hillary clinton and be "very useful" to his father's presidential campaign, information said to be "part of russia and its government's support for mr trump." the email exchange was with this man, rob goldstone, a music publicist and former british tabloid reporter who was arranging the meeting. mr goldstone represents the russian pop star emin agalarov.
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his father is aras agalarov, a russian oligarch, who teamed up with donald trump in 2013, to take the miss universe pageant to moscow. he is close to president putin. donald trump jnr, jared kuschner the president's son in law, paul manafort the former campaignj meeting with the russian lawyer, natalia veselnitskaya. that meeting was set up by goldstone the british publicist, his contact the russian singer and his father aras agalarov, the putin associate, who has had business dealings with president trump. donald junior claims he had no knowledge of who he was meeting or what information was being supplied. the russian lawyer who is now back in moscow spoke to nbc news today to deny she is a kremlin stooge. have you ever worked for the russian
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government? do you have connections to the russian government? translation: no. they had the impression it appears they were going to be told some information that you had about the dnc. how did they get that impression? translation: it is possible they we re translation: it is possible they were looking for such information, they wanted it so badly. this is what rob goldstone promised in his email to donald trump jr: let's take a closer look at the contents of the email. 0ur senior north america reporter anthony zurcherjoins us now. it looks damning and put into context vladimir putin's comments to donald trump at the g20 meeting last week that he had nothing to do with trying to mess around in the american election. yes, it does.
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0bviously, american election. yes, it does. obviously, we don't know whether rob goldstone was trying to blow smoke donald trump jnr‘s way goldstone was trying to blow smoke donald trumpjnr‘s way by overpromising or he was serving as a conduit for the russian government to pass on damaging information to hillary clinton. we are seeing rob goldstone's e—mails here but donald trump junior seems very interested in whatever rob goldstone has to say and the possibility that the russian government itself could be providing help to his father's campaign. he took the meeting, but only that but he invited the chair of the campaign, paul manafort, and jared kuschner, donald trump's son—in—law, to sit in as well. it is quite explosive. we had word of these e—mails last night in the new york times but to see the actual words and exchange between these people, and exchange between these people, andi and exchange between these people, and i noticed to see jared kuschner and i noticed to see jared kuschner and paul manafort were cc to at the
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end of the e—mail so they knew about them, all of that has to be very concerning to the trump administration. yes and jared kuschner and paul manafort claim they did know about the meeting but that seems to be disproved. rob goldstone could just be blowing all this up in order to look big in front of the trump campaign but the fa ct of front of the trump campaign but the fact of the matter is that even if he was blowing all this up, jared kuschner, paul manafort and donald trumpjnr kuschner, paul manafort and donald trump jnr turned kuschner, paul manafort and donald trumpjnrturned up. kuschner, paul manafort and donald trump jnr turned up. they kuschner, paul manafort and donald trumpjnr turned up. they took the meeting, they were actually there, and that calls into question the suggestion collusion, conspiracy? who knows? that's exactly right. there was a willingness to entertain this proposal. in a traditional presidential campaign, this sort of approach from someone purporting to bea approach from someone purporting to be a representative of a foreign government with opposition research, that should set off all sorts of alarm bells in a campaign. it would
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require notifying the fbi, for instance. it didn't happen in this case. they seemed willing, donald trumpjnr in case. they seemed willing, donald trump jnr in particular, case. they seemed willing, donald trumpjnr in particular, seemed willing to hear them out. he claims its traditional opposition research but it isn't traditional, even for an untraditional presidential campaign, the way the trump one was run. we've got to leave it there. thank you. the headlines on bbc news. the government has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s, which led to the deaths of more than 2,000 people. president from's sun has released e—mails showing he was offered information incriminating information incriminating information on hillary clinton by a national from russia with links to the kremlin. a major review of working practices has called for more rights for the self—employed on zero hours contracts. sport now.
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wimbledon is happening in the world of sport, jo konta is happening in the world of sport! another day, another moment of history forjohanna konta. she's become the first british woman to reach the wimbledon semi—finals for 39 years. and in what is becoming something of a theme, whe made the centre court crowd suffer. hugh woozencroft is there for us jo konta likes these 3—set thrillers, doesn't she? jo konta likes these 3—set thrillers, doesn't she ?|j jo konta likes these 3—set thrillers, doesn't she? ithink jo konta likes these 3—set thrillers, doesn't she? i think the centre court crowd might be used with thanks to the history of andy murray but it was an incredible win forjohanna konta. it was a rainy day but those british fans that braved the hell out there and the conditions went home with smiles on theirfaces. ehand conditions went home with smiles on their faces. ehand konta conditions went home with smiles on theirfaces. ehand konta with probably the win of her career so far, becoming the first british woman since virginia wade back in 1978 to make it back to the last fourin
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1978 to make it back to the last four in wimbledon. she had to come from a set down against the second seed, simona halep, to do so and it was watched by ben croucher. how is this the service? not every wimbledon would finalist brings muffins to the locker room. she's the first british woman to get to the first british woman to get to the quarterfinals in 39 years. a shaky the quarterfinals in 39 years. a s ha ky start the quarterfinals in 39 years. a shaky start against simona halep, dropping her opening service game. soon enough, parity was restored, as had a familiar weapon. well, it is her trademark. with konta's backhand blooming, the two were baking something sweet on centre court. they are bringing the best out of each other. a bitter taste for konta, though, losing in the first set. cracking the romania was proving a challenge. break points came and went. another tie—break.
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centre court comes into its own in such moments. anything to make a difference. it worked. this wasn't even the point that won the second set. this was. most people standing. look at that! somehow, konta has forced a final set! she was used to breaking new ground. the crucial breaking new ground. the crucial break in the decider secured, that crucial camden rock—solid. aiming to become the first british woman in the semifinal since virginia wade in 1978. virginia has moved to the edge of her seat right now. aykroyd and a nation expected just one more point. british tennis history is made! johanna konta, a wimbledon semifinalist. just the five—time wimbledon champion next. venus williams. i filled very humbled and excited to share the court with her
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again. she got the better of me before but we've had many great battles are hopefully we will create another battle. she will be back on thursday. two more matches to put the icing on the cake. so, venus williams is next. the highest seed apart from konta left in the drawer and you'd accept the biggest challenge, to? konta has been seeded six, venus williams, down at ten, but venus williams has won five wimbledon champion so she has the pedigree going into that one. she had a very good win today, beating the french open champion, jelena 0stapenko in straight sets and 37 yea rs 0stapenko in straight sets and 37 years old, she becomes the oldest wimbledon semifinalist in 23 years so wimbledon semifinalist in 23 years so she really is rolling back the yea rs so she really is rolling back the years in the women's singles. she said afterwards she felt she had her sister serena williams, who is missing this year, right beside her in that match. so, a good result for
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her. a big test for konta. that was ever on centre court. the play was held up on court one because of this bad weather but garbine muguruza was out there earlier. a match was interrupted but she managed to beat kuznetsova in straight sets. she's the number 1a seed, garbine muguruza. she was beaten finalist in 2015 here and she will look to go one better here. she will face ribeiro kovar next. she'sjust finished her match on centre court. she was taking on coco vandeweghe states. the world number 87 is now into the last four of the women's singles. an extremely good result for her and could be an unlikely winner if she made all the way through this year ‘s tournament. briefly, attention tomorrow turns to the men's quarterfinals and novak djokovic booked his place today for that. yes, there was that one match
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left from the fourth round in the men's draw. novak djokovic. because of the match between nadal and giles moller, he was facing the frenchman adrian mannarino this morning. he came through quickly in three sets. very good win for him. critical of the court afterwards and he will be back tomorrow to face tomas berdych in the next round. he will be looking for his fourth title here so novak djokovic, a good win for him today. many thanks. find herself some shelter. that's all the sport from me for now. much more coming up in the next hour. workers in the uk employed on contracts that don't guarantee any hours should qualify for sick pay and holiday pay, and their employers should make national insurance contributions. those are some of the recommendations in a major report, commissioned by the government which is calling for changes to the running of the so—called "gig economy." theresa may has welcomed the report, saying it makes a major contribution to the debate about work practices in britain. but she says she doesn't want to stop the clock.
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here's our economics editor kamal ahmed. it was the prime minister who made the point, the vast majority of us spend more than half of our waking hours working. whether steady or insecure, full time or self—employed, singlejob or multiple, the world of work has changed. appearing alongside theresa may, matthew taylor said it was time for a reset. yes, the country has been very good at creating work, employment levels are at a record, he said it was time to focus on quality. our national performance on the quantity of work is strong. the quantity alone is not enough for a thriving economy and for a fair society. we believe now is the time to complement that commitment in creating jobs with the goal of creating better jobs. this man likes hisjob for uber. flexible, no guaranteed hours and few benefits. i love to drive my
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car, i love people. i like to chat to interesting people and the money and the ratio with my time, it is decent. for felicity, it is a different story from the world of zero—hour contracts. it is insecure because a lot of the problems i had, sometimes if there was a lot of work, i would work too much and i'd get really, really tired. so, what does this new world of work look like? one big point, the majority of us, 63%, are in full—time work. about 26% are in part—time work and 15% of us are self—employed. there are many new ways of working and the enquiry focuses on two. the gig economy, food delivery drivers, minicab drivers, there are about 1.3 million people in that part of the economy. and people with no guaranteed hours of work, on zero—hours contracts,
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there are about 905,000 people on those. then, there is what the report calls the hidden economy. that is the cash in hand payments to your window cleaner that avoid tax and official records. the report says that is worth £6.2 billion a year and should be brought to an end. mr taylor said in his review, much of this new world of work is good work, but for those being exploited, some solutions. sick and holiday pay benefits, a right to an enhanced minimum wage because the work does not guarantee hours. then there's talk of better enforcement of the present laws and higher taxes for those gig firms. paying national insurance for the first time, which many of them avoid at the moment. the big question — will any of this happen, given the conservatives lack one important thing — a majority. you cannot give any guarantees that you will be able to pass a report like this and the recommendations it
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has had through parliament? i would hope, as i said in my speech, people will see across the political world, will see the importance of addressing this as an issue. it isn'tjust a here and now. it is about the future of our economy. there seems little chance of consensus. labour said the report was a huge missed opportunity, particularly when it came to not banning zero—hours contracts. we have to get rid of zero—hours contracts. obviously, we have to get rid of the gig economy and the bogus self—employment which actually is a wonderful way for a minority of employers to avoid paying national insurance contributions. remember this guy, sir philip green? he published a government report on efficiency — or him. sir andrew dilnot, a review of social care. reports published with a fanfare of publicity that then gently gathered dust on a whitehall shelf.
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the fear for mr taylor is that his report could suffer a similarfate. kamal ahmed, bbc news. well, we can now speak to nick hurley, who's an employment lawyer and head of employment at crs. he joins us live via webcam from guildford. thanks forjoining us. first of all, what do you make of the report, does it make sense? it does make sense. there is an element of anticlimax, i think, to the report. we have been waiting nine months for the detail of this. there's been quite a few decisions that have already gone to try and clarify particular in relation to those working in the gig economy, how those people get classified in terms of workers or employees. the report gives us a lot more detail on this but as euphoria talked about the result out as to what will end up on the statute
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book. that is the big question because theresa may says she doesn't wa nt to because theresa may says she doesn't want to turn the clock back while she welcomes the report. does that suggest she's just saying, yes, it make sense and it sounds good, but i'm not going to push for any of the recommendations, what do you think? yeah, ithink recommendations, what do you think? yeah, i think there is a balance to be struck. clearly, the government doesn't want to stymie these new businesses, these new platforms that are creating jobs and work for individuals but, at the same time, they are aware and conscious there isa they are aware and conscious there is a great deal of scope for exploitation by these firms. so it is getting the balance right. it is quite interesting, i think, that the taylor report talks about the dependent contractor. it is something that has been around for a long time in canada. in canada in the 30s this thing was coined as an intermediate term between an employee and someone that was self—employed. and we have borrowed
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from that. what he is talking about goes a lot further than the principle in canada, which is more about ensuring reasonable end of notice, but it is interesting he's borrowed that and is now trying to present this as a remedy to the modern working practice that we are seeing. what do you also think of the recommendations about the hidden economy, the black economy that some suggest is worth £6.2 billion a year but none of it goes to the exchequer and taxes? that is quite right. i think one of the drivers probably for this review, as well as looking at how people work, is also making sure the tax take in relation to how these people work is being properly monitored and that the exchequer is getting its fair share. i think clearly these proposals around ensuring people pay in order to avoid the economy are clearly
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sensible. but the suggestion that those people working in the gig economy who do believe at some point after a few months or whatever that they should get sick pay and holiday pay, and that bosses should be paying national insurance contributions, that makes sense?” think it does. i think it is quite right that in a modern economy, like ours, the fifth largest economy in the world, we make sure there are appropriate measures in place to ensure the most vulnerable workers are protected. thank you forjoining us. we can return to the news about president trump's sob. in e—mails released on his twitter feed, president trump's sob. in e—mails released on his twitterfeed, donald trump junior is told released on his twitterfeed, donald trumpjunior is told by a publicist russian government wants to offer
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official documents that would incriminate hillary clinton and be useful to his father's presidential campaign. we are joined useful to his father's presidential campaign. we arejoined by the american legal theorist. campaign. we arejoined by the american legaltheorist. what campaign. we arejoined by the american legal theorist. what do you think of these e—mails? i think they are much ado about nothing. i am not sure it reports anything new we did not know from the day before. much ado about nothing. a foreign power might have incriminating evidence on a candidate to the american presidential election, that is nothing? that is right. we have known that 2a hours before the latest story, that was the initial reporting that they understood this russian lawyer had dirt on hillary clinton and that is why they agreed to meet with her. i will point out
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that after the beginning of 2017 politico ran stories reporting a democratic committee staffer, dnc is an arm of the hillary clinton campaign, met with officials at the ukrainian embassy for the express purpose of getting the dirt on donald trump and i think this happens with regularity and if you send someone to a foreign entity that potentially has good intelligence, you want to be a mid—to high level individual receiving it. he said i love it if you have information relating to hillary clinton. are you saying that his turning up to the meeting in the belief he was going to get incriminating information that could help his father's campaign in the middle of the presidential election from a foreign power does not amount
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to anything, there is nothing he did wrong in that? that is right, absolutely. think about how it normally happens. we would be naive to think it does not happen with every campaign. with a foreign power, that is the key. absolutely. a lot of information incriminating on individuals probably has its genesis somewhere in foreign intelligence and it gets passed on and eventually reaches the campaign. it does not matter how many layers of the cake it goes through before it reaches the campaign because the genesis would be some sort of foreign intelligence. if it is all ok, foreign intelligence. if it is all 0k, why is donald trumpjunior, who changed his story twice, why has it taken the new york times reporting on this, dogged reporting of the new york times, to get the e—mail out their? why did he not release it first of all? when i heard this
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break last night i thought, and? because i had read it 2a hours before when the story broke. that was in the initial reporting that the trump campaign did believe that initially this veselnitskaya had dirt on hillary clinton and that is why they agreed to meet with her. all that broke last night was the fa ct all that broke last night was the fact there is an e—mail that memorialises that understanding and if you see the e—mails there is nothing new. again, getting opposition research is fine and the genesis of it could lie anywhere. another thing to keep in mind, it is not collusion with the russian government. collusion with the russian government in a legal, nefarious manner, would be if a campaign decides to mislead the american public by publishing inaccurate information, or somehow rigging the voting or election process to throw the election
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results. simply receiving dirt on your opponent, whether from a foreign government, agents, just a foreigner, anybody, is nothing illegal and frankly i think it happens all the time. that is exactly what two congressional inquiries and a federal prosecutor are looking into. thank you. you are welcome. type the weather. anyone with a garden is happy across england and wales because there is welcome rain. not the case for those at wimbledon because rain stopped play. sunny spells and scattered showers further north but through the night, temperatures falling away and it will be cold. at the same time, rain moving south and east with heavy bursts before it clears. 0vernight low temperatures, single figures in
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the sheltered spots of scotland. a north—easterly breeze making it feel cool north—easterly breeze making it feel cool. a gloomy start across the extreme south—east. cloud will break and sunshine will come through. warmer to the west. high temperatures of 23 degrees. cooler on the east coast with a breeze coming in off the sea. quiet on thursday into friday, dry, pleasa ntly thursday into friday, dry, pleasantly warm. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines. the prime minister has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and ‘80s, which led to the deaths of nearly 2500 people. many were haemophiliacs, who died from hepatitis c and aids—related illnesses. president trump's son, donaldjr, has released emails showing he was invited to a meeting with a russian lawyer to discuss information that could be damaging to hillary clinton's campaign.
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us officials are currently investigating alleged russian meddling in the us election. and the author of a government review into working practices, says he'd like to see an end to the cash—in—hand economy. matthew taylor, who's a former adviser to tony blair, is recommending a new legal status of "dependent contractor", with workers able to get benefits such as holiday and sick pay. and johanna konta has become the first british woman to reach the wimbledon semi—finals for nearly a0 yea rs. let's return now to the announcement from the government there will be a uk—wide inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal, following a long campaign on the issue. at least 2,400 people are thought to have died after being given nhs blood products infected with hepatitis c and hiv during the 1970s and 1980s. joining me from cardiff is michael imperato, the solicitor for haemophilia wales.
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this is the day i think many people have been waiting for. yes it is fantastic news. to a certain extent there is a new legal battle to fight. the people, victims will now wa nt to fight. the people, victims will now want to assure the enquiry is as wide—ranging as possible and that the truth will out. that is the key. jeremy hunt is meeting campaigners to try to get a sense of the scope of the enquiry and how wide it should be, should it have subpoena power and all that and possibly whether or not it could lead to public prosecutions. yes, and what has raised the anti—in the last few months has been the campaigning work of people like andy burnham where
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they have made allegations. allegations of a serious cover—up and maybe criminal activity. i think that has increased pressure and pushed it over the finishing line. these allegations of a cover—up and baby people not being truthful in the evidence they presented in the past. why do you think the enquiry has been pushed forward now?” past. why do you think the enquiry has been pushed forward now? i think thatis has been pushed forward now? i think that is part of the reason, political pressure. from all parties. and legal pressure. i was on the verge today of issuing proceedings in the high court. a combination of things and without doubt the brave and hard work of the victims and families and supporters. i think it has been a coalition of people and, as i say, new allegations coming forward of serious cover—ups, not just allegations coming forward of serious cover—ups, notjust the actual treatment itself, but people trying to cover their tracks. that
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has raised the anti—totally. you expect prosecutions potentially?” think it could be a possibility. what people will hope is the inquest is not shy away from questions and issues you are raising now. what about the suggestion that it is all very well having an enquiry but it must be followed up on? there have been big inquiries in the past, the dilnot enquiry into social care, that have not been acted on by governments and the authorities. that have not been acted on by governments and the authoritiesm there a danger it could happen here? you touch on an important point which is the remit of the enquiry because what people will want to see is the enquiry makes recommendations about how the victims and families get proper levels of support in the future because that again is one of the major problems. that these families have not got a fair support
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from the state thus far. again, that will be the important aspect of the inquiry, what is there in future to support and compensate these victims? we will leave it there. the solicitor for haemophilia whales. —— wales. a 24—year—old british man has been killed fighting against the so—called islamic state in syria. luke rutter was from merseyside. he's said to have died five days ago during the campaign to capture the is stronghold of raqqa. he'd been in syria since march — fighting for a kurdish militant group. he's the fourth british man to be killed while fighting against is in syria. the united nations say as many as 3,000 civilians remain trapped in the iraqi city of mosul, despite government forces declaring victory there, over the weekend. skirmishes continue between iraqi troops and so—called islamic state. those trapped are mostly young or elderly and are thought to have become separated from theirfamilies. from mosul, our defence correspondentjonathan beale sent this report.
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this is an orphan of the battle for mosul, a baby whose parents are missing. he was just left at this clinic malnourished and without even a name. they called him marino after the italian doctor who's kept him alive. the iraqi army says there are many more like him. this is not new for us. we actually receive a lot of orphans. i don't know what's going on out there, i think isis or the females after their husbands, isis fighters, they die, they run away empty—handed so they leave their babies behind. iraq's prime minister may have declared victory, but there's still pockets of resistance and streams of civilians trying to make their way to safety. they often collect the children of others along the way. there are dozens of women and children here waiting to be
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taken to safety and they're notjust war weary, they are weak through lack of water and food. if you listen, the only sound you can hear is babies crying. at west mosul‘s main hospital, they're just about coping. they're still having to treat the wounded as well as the weak. this man is barely alive after being found in the rubble. and there are more orphans here too. this is galeb, who's crying out, "where's my father"? he only stops when they manage to distract him with a game. it's difficult to manage him. he is crying, asking for his father, mother, it's disaster. something which i can't replace, i can't be his father, i can't be his mother. what do i do? even trying to identify the dead
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is proving difficult. search and rescue teams are looking out for any forms of identity as they sift through the debris of war. iraq will notjust have to rebuild this city, but mend broken lives too. jonathan beale, bbc news, mosul. her a man has appeared in court over an acid attack on a woman and her cousin on her 21st birthday in east london last month. john tomlin, who's 24 and from canning town, is accused of throwing acid at resham kham and jameel muhtar through their car window. both suffered severe burns to their face and body. an aristocrat who wrote an online post offering £5,000 for the businesswoman and campaigner, gina miller, to be run over, has been found guilty of two charges of menacing communications. rhodri colwyn philipps, the fourth viscount st davids, wrote the message four days after gina miller won a brexit legal challenge against the government.
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philipps, who called his comments "satire", faces a custodial sentence. just four days after the businesswoman gina miller won her historic victory forcing the government to seek a vote of parliament before triggering article 50, the fourth viscount, who holds titles lord hungerford and others, posted on facebook the words "five thousand pounds for the first person... he said essentially £5,000 to the first person to accidentally run overgina to the first person to accidentally run over gina miller. he referred to her as run over gina miller. he referred to heras an fing run over gina miller. he referred to her as an fing votejumper. he said
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immigrants should be sent back to their stinking jungles. immigrants should be sent back to theirstinkingjungles. he immigrants should be sent back to their stinking jungles. he offered £2000 to a man who turned down the offer of a council house to be carved into pieces. in court, the viscount said it was a joke, it was satire, political debate. he said the phrase f—ing votejumper was a statement of fact and tried to brush it off as light—hearted which did not impress the chief magistrate. she found him guilty of the offence of sending menacing communications that were racially aggravated and said he should expect a custodial sentence when sentenced on thursday. the headlines on bbc news. the government has ordered an inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal of the 1970s and 80s, which led to the deaths of more than two thousand people. president trump's son has released emails showing he was offered information on hillary clinton, by a russian lawyer, with links to the kremlin.
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a major review of working practices has called for more rights for the self—employed, on zero hours contracts. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. plans to almost double the number of welsh speakers have been set out as part of a target to get! million people speaking the language by 2050. the welsh government have set out plans for more welsh—speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools. 0ur wales correspondent sian lloyd reports. at ysgol glan morfa, children's lessons are taught through welsh and members of the welsh government came here to spread
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the word about their new goal for the language, supported by a guest popular with the pupils. we've laid down the gauntlet, if you like. it's a big task, but it's achievable. if we really want to do it, we can do it, that's what we'll do. expanding welsh medium education is at the heart of the strategy. it includes creating 150 welsh language mercenary groups over the next decade and increasing the number of welsh speaking primary and secondary school teachers. but it's recognised there must be opportunities to learn and use welsh outside of schools. there's also a recognition that they need support from parents. it's in there amongst the vast majority of people but of course for some parents, they need to be encouraged. some parents will say, well, if my kids go to a welsh medium school, can i help them with their homework? will all the correspondence be in welsh from the school? of course that isn't the case. we want to take parents with us. the welsh language has equal status with english, but while people may be used to seeing signs in both languages, how will these plans be received?
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if you are living in wales and stuff, you know, it's voluntary, there's no reason... it makes sense, doesn't it, to keep the language alive? born in a family in wales but i don't speak welsh. never wanted to. it was forced on me, so i didn't want to do it. sings in welsh. the welsh language is celebrated every year at the national eisteddfod, a cultural festival which welcomes non—welsh speakers alike. the welsh government wants more people to be able to communicate in welsh, but the public‘s appetite for change remains to be seen. a former chief executive of the welsh language board. this is an excellent development for the them to take us back to where we
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we re the them to take us back to where we were about 100 years ago. there is no major new funding for this and one has to be mindful of what the conservative spokeswoman on the welsh language said, the idea has cross— party welsh language said, the idea has cross—party support but she said that success will depend on persuading different communities, individuals, why it is so valuable to be bilingual and have skills in both our languages. it is clear that matching or trying to aspire to these proposals is going to mean a reduction in some english language in schools. i think it is worth remembering around 600,000 people speak welsh and in terms of general support, from the public, there is a high level of support in wales for the welsh language. there is a great deal of support the government can rely on in terms of moving forward. with regards to funding what the government has said is if they
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mainstream the welsh language through all elements of government they can develop plans, economic, political, health, through both languages and the cost would be absorbed in that structure which is absorbed in that structure which is a good idea. you do not think there will be potential friction because of the shift in language from english to welsh in some establishment? i don't think so. we have seen over the last 50 years a shift in attitudes towards the language and we have had legislation and strategies in the past and see them implemented in a smooth and even a mental way. welsh has been a pa rt even a mental way. welsh has been a part of the curriculum for most children in wales since 1990. the whole thing embedded in and was taken on board. the important thing is the government emphasises this is a matter of persuasion and not compulsion. that is a key point. you are a
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former chief executive of the welsh language board, were there moments when you believed the language might actually die out? i don't think so. if you look at the data it shows welsh people who speak welsh like speaking welsh. most people who speaking welsh. most people who speak welsh speak welsh everyday. you are talking about many hundreds of thousands using the language every day. we can see an increasing number of parents wanting children to speak the language. it has a healthy future. it is just about widening it. when q. at least 2400 people are thought to have died after being given blood products infected with hepatitis c and hiv in the 70s and 80s. in the last few minutes the prime minister theresa may outlined why she
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announced the enquiry. the contaminated blood scandal of the 70s and 80s was an appalling tragedy that should not have happened. thousands of patients expected world —class thousands of patients expected world—class care from the nhs it is famous for butler failed at a least 2400 died and thousands more were exposed to hepatitis c and hiv. 0ften exposed to hepatitis c and hiv. often with life changing consequences. the victims and their families who have suffered pain and hardship, they deserve answers and the enquiry i announced today will give them those answers, so they will know why this happened, how it happened. it was an appalling tragedy that should never have happened. some people say it should not have ta ken happened. some people say it should not have taken a parliamentary debate and you should have called for the enquiry sooner. what guarantees can you give on the swiftness of the enquiry to victims? will we see it this year.” swiftness of the enquiry to victims? will we see it this year. i want to
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ensure this enquiry will provide the a nswe i’s ensure this enquiry will provide the answers victims and their families wa nt answers victims and their families want as to how this was able to happen and it has affected so many people and they have waited too long for these answers. what we want to do is talk with the families about the shape this enquiry should take and say we ensure it is able to provide the answers and justice they wa nt provide the answers and justice they want and deserve. the prime minister speaking about the enquiry into the scandal surrounding tainted blood products. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has suggested the uk has no intention of paying the eu what he said were extortionate sums as a brexit bill. he also told mps there is no plan b if a deal isn't agreed with the eu, because the government is confident of securing a strong settlement. here's what he said in the commons earlier. the sums that i have seen that they propose to demand from this country seem to me to be extortionate. to "go whistle" is an entirely appropriate expression. we just saw you speaking to the
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prime minister and boris johnson made it clear he believes theresa may is going to come up with a fantastic strong settlement in the negotiations with the eu for brexit. he made the point there is no plan b if they do not get a fantastic super deal. absolutely. a slightly mixed reaction from downing street to borisjohnson, because, reaction from downing street to boris johnson, because, his colourful turn of phrase, he gave them a problem when it came to how much we might pay to secure a deal. you have to effectively get agreement on the divorce bill from the eu before you can have discussions the government really wa nts to discussions the government really wants to have on trade. they might have upset the backbenchers if they contradicted boris completely so downing street tell me, they said
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the days of giving vast sums of money to the eu are over but they made the point britain would meet its legal obligations when it comes to coughing up. elsewhere they were slapping boris down when it comes to the idea of a no deal. he said it was vanishingly small. what the prime minister said was that no deal is better than a bad deal. brexit secretary david davis has said the government is planning for all contingencies and it is clear downing street sided with the less colourful language of david davis and they said not only was it right to plan for every contingency but that planning was already going on across government departments, very different from the phrase boris johnson used in which he said there is no plan for no deal because we are going to get a great deal. that was not the message from number 10. thank you. we drink 55 million cups of coffee
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every day in this country — but there is still confusion about the impact it has on our health. two studies out today suggests coffee drinkers have longer life expectancy — but others have urged caution, saying there's no proof coffee—drinking is good for you. 0ur health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. it's estimated that more than 2 billion cups of coffee are drunk each day around the world, but is it good for you? today, two studies published in thejournal annals of internal medicine claim an association between drinking more coffee and living longer. sounds like good news? if these effects were really due to the coffee and carried on throughout your life, they would estimate that every extra cup a day would extend a man's life by about three months and a woman's life by about one month. but the larger of the two studies, which examined data from half a million europeans, excluded people who'd had heart attacks, cancer and diabetes. and both studies, which lasted 16 years, only asked people once how much coffee they drank.
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just because people who drink coffee live longer, that doesn't mean it's the coffee that's causing it. there may be other explanations, like their income, physical activity, and although the studies try to take these things into account, it's very difficult to make sure there's not some other explanation. so, what do we know about coffee? some studies have linked it to heart risk factors such as raised cholesterol or blood pressure, while others suggest it may offer some protection for the heart, but there is no conclusive evidence either way. confused? well, too much coffee is bad, and pregnant women are advised to limit their intake. otherwise it seems drinking coffee is fine, but then so is abstaining. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. good evening, anybody with a garden quite happy across england and wales
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because there is welcome rain but thatis because there is welcome rain but that is not the case for those at wimbledon because rain stopped play. sunny spells and scattered showers further north but through the night, here we see temperatures falling away and it will be a cold night with the rain pushing south and east at the same time. 0vernight low temperatures, single figures in sheltered spots in scotland. a north—easterly breeze making it feel cool on the east coast. they do we start in the extreme south—east. the sunshine will come through and not a bad day. warmer to the west. the high—temperature of 23 degrees. feeling cooler on east coasts with the breeze coming in off the sea. quiet thursday into friday. dry, pleasa ntly quiet thursday into friday. dry, pleasantly warm. hello, i'm karin giannone, this is 0utside source. donald trump's son has released emails implying he knew about russian efforts to influence the us elections as early as june last year.
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it was revealed in a series of messages he posted online from last year showing he was eager to accept incriminating information about hillary clinton promised by a russian source. in a white house statement donald trump has said his son is a high quality person, and he applauded his transparency. a day after the iraqi prime minister proclaimed mosul liberated, bbcjournalists on the ground find that fighting is still ongoing. the sound of music is mixing with the sounds of bombing coming from the sounds of bombing coming from the western side, where there are still
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