Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 12, 2017 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

1:30 pm
it has getting some ideas of where it has broken, and we see the crack in the satellite images. you know icebergs stand more above the water than they do below, actually, the other way around, it is 30 metres above the surface, 200 metres below. in the top three, four orfive in surface, 200 metres below. in the top three, four or five in the satellite era, we think this is, but backin satellite era, we think this is, but back in the 19505 the us navy spotted one that they set for something like 35,000 square kilometre5, something like 35,000 square kilometres, the size of belgium. imagine that. but no satellites then to confirm it. a quick thought about significant? this is the natural order of things, other places have been warming and melting, we do not think that in this instance this is that case. it is probablyjust what theice that case. it is probablyjust what the ice does, it carves icebergs sometimes, and that is what we are seeing. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. a wet 2a hours across england and
1:31 pm
wales, the rain pouring down, the largest rainfall totals concentrated in the south. 0ver largest rainfall totals concentrated in the south. over half a month's rein in the space of 2a hours, it led to large puddles, dangerous driving conditions earlier today around greater london. you can see how the weather system drove east across england and wales, ringing the heavy rain, butjust as quickly as it has pushed away, we have seen the sunshine come out, the sky in scotla nd the sunshine come out, the sky in scotland looking like this, glorious weather in the highlands. the sunshine is becoming increasingly widespread. we have patchy cloud left over from the weather system across the south of england, but the cloud will could he be to break up through the afternoon, with spells of sunshine coming through. barely a cloud in the sky for the midlands. for northern ireland, another dry
1:32 pm
day, more sunshine than yesterday. showers yesterday in scotland, but todayit showers yesterday in scotland, but today it is dry and sunny. there will be no interruptions to play caused by the weather at wimbledon. we keep the sunny spells for the afternoon. it will feel pleasantly warm. as we go through the night, we have got high pressure in charge, and with the clear sky, the temperatures will fall away quickly. it could get cold enough for a touch of ground frost, but the temperatures in the towns and cities hold—up. high pressure still with us for thursday, but this complication from the atlantic will bring some rain late in the day for the northwest. the morning will stay dry, but we. to see showers developing for the afternoon across england and wales. avoiding east anglia and the south—east and eastern scotland. some of the showers could be heavy, and we see
1:33 pm
the band of rain moving into western scotla nd the band of rain moving into western scotland and northern ireland. the rain could be quite heavy in western scotland. by the time we get to friday, it is largely dry, with sunny spells. there could be one or two isolated showers. a weather front will bring a spell of wet weather overnight to the north and west of the uk, with freshening wind, and it will leave a legacy of cloudy skies as we work on into the weekend, with showers mainly in the north—west, but if the sun comes out in the south, it could become warm and humid. a reminder of our main story this lunchtime. the new leader of the council says it will take a generation for survivors of the tower fire to trust the council again. that is all from the bbc news at one, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. hello, i'm leah boleto, welcome to the bbc sport centre.
1:34 pm
andy murray continues the defence of his wimbeldon title this afternoon with a quarterfinal match against sam querrey on centre court. that is happening right now. hugh woozencroft is live at wimbledon for us. hugh, another big day andy murray, how is the defending champ looking? hello. it is another big day here at wimbledon. joanna hunter —— after johanna konta ‘s exploits yesterday, the batten passes to andy murray. this could be the first time since 1967 that britain had two semifinalists in the singles here at wimbledon. we could take a look at the andy murray match who is taking on sam querrey. he started very well indeed with the double break in the opening set. he leads 5—3 at the moment which is a very good start
1:35 pm
from andy murray. sam querrey had a big five set match in the fourth round on monday and andy murray is looking to capitalise on that immediately. a very good start and he will now hopefully serve out for the first set in that one. a good search —— a good start from him. he came through in straight sets in the last round. what about the rest of the action today? andy murray is on centre court on a blustery day and he will be followed by roger federer who is aiming for his eighth title here. he is taking on my last round itch. the beaten finalist. there are british high hopes. they
1:36 pm
are two sets down and taking on these seeds in the men's quarterfinal. the first two sets when 7—6— 6—4. british voices will have to be very high indeed. they are done in that match on court well. andy murray has made a very good start and he is leading against the american sam querrey. england's women are aiming for their fifth consecutive win at the cricket world cup today. they're facing new zealand in derby after their impressive win over australia at the weekend. tammy beaumont watched as wickets fell around her but reached her 50, from 58 balls. there was a disappointing end to her innings though, falling seven runs short of a century. that's all sport for now.
1:37 pm
you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. i'll have more in the next hour. a man has won a landmark ruling which will give his husband the same pension rights as a wife would receive. the supreme court, the uk's highest court, unanimously ruled that as long as they remain married, ifjohn walker dies his husband is entitled to a spouse's pension. speaking after the ruling, mr walker made a statement outside the supreme court, saying he now wants a commitment from the government to continue protecting the pension rights of same—sex spouses after brexit. it is to our government '5 great shame that it has taken so many yea rs, shame that it has taken so many years, huge amounts of tax payers money, and the uk ‘s years, huge amounts of tax payers money, and the uk '5 highest court to drag them into the 21st century. in the years since we started this legal challenge, how many people have spent theirfinal legal challenge, how many people have spent their final days uncertain about whether their loved ones would be looked after. how many people have left unprovided for, having already suffered the loss of their partner? what i would like
1:38 pm
from theresa may and her ministers todayis from theresa may and her ministers today is a formal commitment that this change will stay on the statute books after brexit, and i would just, if i may, very quickly, nike to thank the people that have made this possible. as an old grey—haired pensioner, i wanted to take on £1 billion a year large super chemical company, not a chance in the world, but thanks to liberty, who are here to support little people like me, we went out there and took them on. after round one, a classic david and goliath, goliath decided he actually needed a bit of help so he brings in the department for work and pensions, her majesty government, quite a big lot to take on, but thanks to these people we were able to do it. through liberty, they
1:39 pm
found two amazingly talented, incredibly hard—working, found two amazingly talented, incredibly ha rd—working, very professional, and beyond anything else really passionate barristers. 0ne else really passionate barristers. one of them is here today, max. maxim martin. they have won this case today. it has taken a 5.5 years to get here and it has been a long journey but those people have made it possible with liberty for a little person like me to take on her majesty ‘s little person like me to take on her majesty '5 government. we can all do it. there is one other person out there somewhere, you know who you are, who has actually made sure that i was able to come to the supreme court. thank you. and i would finally like to thank my family, many of my family have been incredibly supportive over many yea rs, incredibly supportive over many years, and my husband, who was not here today with a family sadness, but thank you, thank you very much. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc news: as police continue their search of grenfell tower, the new council leader promises money from reserves to build more homes in the borough. the eu's chief brexit
1:40 pm
negotiator says britain must recognise its financial obligations after borisjohnson suggested it could "go whistle". one of the biggest icebergs ever recorded, weighing in at a trillion tonnes, has broken away from antarctica. in the business news this afternoon... uk unemployment fell by 64,000 to 1.119 million in the three months to may, meaning the unemployment rate fell to its lowest since 1975, at 4.5%. but no improvement for real wages — that's wages taking into account the rate of inflation. excluding bonuses, average weekly earnings grew at 2%. fees for unplanned overdrafts are to be scrapped for the 20 million customers of lloyds banking group, which includes the halifax and bank of scotland. from november this year, any customer going over their overdraft limit will face no fees at all, but the bank may continue to block payments from the account
1:41 pm
until the overdraft is paid off. the proposed purchase by supermarket giant tesco of wholesaler booker is to be subjected to an in—depth probe. the competition and markets authority says there are concerns over the proposed £3.7 billion tie—up as the deal could be bad for shoppers in those areas because of reduced competition. fees for unplanned overd rafts are to be scrapped for the 20 million customers of lloyds banking group. from november this year, any customer going over their overdraft limit will face no fees at all. but the bank may continue to block payments from the account until the overdraft is paid off. previously lloyds customers taking out unauthorised overdrafts faced interest payments at an annual rate of 19.89%, a daily charge of up to £10 or a monthly charge of £6. we're joined now by personal finance
1:42 pm
expert. this is quite drastic, considering some customers faced £10 a day if they went over their ove rd rafts. a day if they went over their overdrafts. should customers now sit back and not worry about it? overdrafts. should customers now sit back and not worry about mm overdrafts. should customers now sit back and not worry about it? it is a radical change and it will affect different people in different ways so different people in different ways so the good part of it is that the costly unauthorised fees, the unpaid fees monthly fees have gone, so that will really help some people. but the actual charge that you do encounter now goes up the actual charge that you do encounter now goes up from 19% interest to this new 1p per £7 per day, which works out at nearly 52%, so for some customers it will actually be more expensive. in terms of borrowing, where do overdrafts sit in the product range of loans and other types of borrowing? an overdraft is meant to be just for short—term use, perhaps a week or so before you get paid, and then your account is backing to credit again. what the banks probably don't want
1:43 pm
you to do is remain in overdraft the whole time. then it is profitable but it looks as though it could be a risk in that you are overspending. this scrapping of these, will other banks follow? i think they will. the financial conduct authority and the cma have both been looking at the banking industry quite closely for a while now and particularly at the cost of short—term borrowing so expect other banks to follow in the next few months or so. very quickly, what is your advice to people who are looking to short—term borrowing money from banks, would you advise them to go into overdrafts or other options? an overdraft is still an options? an overdraft is still an option for only a few days orjust a week every month but if you find your borrowing more and more days every month and perhaps it is time to look at rescheduling it onto a loa n to look at rescheduling it onto a loan or something. thank you very much. now for some other business stories. uefa tv income has helped premier league clubs' revenues rise 9% to a record £3.6bn in the 2015—16 season.
1:44 pm
according to analysis from deloitte — broadcast earnings of £1.9bn accounted for more than half of the top flight clu bs‘ total revenues. more people are taking out so—called drawdown pensions without taking advice. the financial conduct authority said 30% of consumers go in to it without getting guidance or shopping around. drawdown pensions allow people to withdraw as much money as they like at any one time. burberry has reported increased sales in the three months tojune, helped by demand from china. they are famous for those trench jackets. the fashion retailer started the 2017—18 year with a 4% increase in sales. it is the first set of results to be reported under new chief executive marco gobbetti. and aldi has overtaken marks & spencer and waitrose as the best—performing supermarket for customer satisfaction in a survey of 10,000 shoppers. the institute of customer service ranked 2115 organisations from various sectors on factors such
1:45 pm
as staff professionalism and complaint handling. let us have a look at the markets before we go. burberry added more than 4% after it reported those healthy sales over three months to june. premier oil jumped 27% healthy sales over three months to june. premier oiljumped 27% this morning after announcing a significant oil discovery off the coast of mexico and after starting slightly higher this morning shows injd slightly higher this morning shows in jd wetherspoon ‘s slightly higher this morning shows injd wetherspoon '5 cell. the company said that recent good weather boosted sales with brits having more of a good excuse to drink in the summer. that is it for me. i will have more in the next hour. face—to—face bullying is considerably more common than cyber—bullying among english teenagers, according to a new academic study of more than 110,000 15—year—olds. researchers from the university of oxford say nearly a third of those surveyed were being bullied regularly. jon ironmonger reports.
1:46 pm
this study, the largest of its kind ever conducted in england, suggests bullying is rife as ever. of the 110,000 15—year—olds who were asked privately about their experiences, nearly a third said they were the victims of some sort of regular bullying. 12% of teenagers said they were frequently called cruel names or teased, while around one in 50 suffered physical abuse, such as being kicked, shoved or locked indoors. this research echoes a feeling among many parents that bullying is worse now than when they were children. i knew people who were bullied, but mostly it was more overweight or looked a little bit different. we think now, with all of the social media, it's different. there is also a lot of, "it'sjust banter," but people don't really perceive how it might come across to others. i know it's around. you hope it isn't your child and that they don't bully either. despite a recent focus on so—called cyber bullying, it was found to be far less common than face—to—face abuse.
1:47 pm
the study‘s authors said it was best understood as another avenue for bullies to target victims, and they called for an urgent drive to help teenagers become more resilient. in the penultimate pmq's of the parliamentary session the conservatives and labour clashed over the position of the uk in the result of the a no deal in the brexit talks. the secretary of state damian green, standing in for the prime minister, was asked by labour's emily thornberry, were the governmentjust making it up as they go along? damian green said that the government were being practical and pragmatic. we can cross to our assistant political editor norman smith. he is also practical and pragmatic! if you hear helicopters buzzing overhead at any time it is because they are preparing for the arrival of the king or queen of spain said thatis of the king or queen of spain said that is what that noises and it is also white mrs may and jeremy corbyn we re also white mrs may and jeremy corbyn were not facing up to each other at pmq ‘s and we had emily thornbury
1:48 pm
and damian green. main clashes were over what happens if there is no deal and emily thornbury questioned whether there was any planning and preparation of what was the plan? have a lesson. is there a contingency plan for no deal, or isn't there? if there is will he undertake to publish it? the honourable lady is happy to talk about unemployment but she cannot bring herself to talk about falling unemployment. we will clearly have to try harder to establish a consensus on what would hope would be something that were genuinely unite all sides of this house. 0n theissue unite all sides of this house. 0n the issue of the report the 0br is publishing its fiscal risks report tomorrow so if she will be patient she can see the report she wants. rather awkwardly for the 0br report will not issue the —— address the issue of no deal so do not expect
1:49 pm
any big revelation about what that package will be in that the sport tomorrow. we will monitor all over. iamjoined by tomorrow. we will monitor all over. i am joined by vince cable, who will be the leader of the lib dem is because no one has put up against him. plusa because no one has put up against him. plus a labour mp. it is all very well saying what is the plan, but if you rule out the option of walking away from the table, you undermine your negotiating strategy because the eu will simply know that if we play tough they will accept what we give them. emily was absolutely superb at highlighting the fact that the government has got to get a grip because it is all very well to say no deal and we will walk away but that means there is no transition so what is the plan for that? you can have a plan for not having a deal, we need to have the people in place and the policies in place and the resources in place. we don't have a plan to not have a deal orfor don't have a plan to not have a deal or for getting don't have a plan to not have a deal orfor getting a deal don't have a plan to not have a deal or for getting a deal and don't have a plan to not have a deal orfor getting a deal and there is a terrible negotiating stance which is, take it or leave it, and we have
1:50 pm
absolute redlines. 0f is, take it or leave it, and we have absolute redlines. of course, ideological things that the prime minister is convinced will be sacrificed, she is prepared to sacrificed, she is prepared to sacrifice our economy and the health of many people in this country. chris, perhaps the biggest handicap to our negotiating is borisjohnson who keeps making remarks about the eu can go whistle and who cares if we don't have a deal, that doesn't help our negotiating strategy. we don't have a deal, that doesn't help our negotiating strategylj must help our negotiating strategy.” must correct on the health point, our radioactive health materials are not included in the deal that we are talking about is a cancer patients can be reassured there is no implication at all. the royal couege implication at all. the royal college of radiologists say the opposite. damian green said in the house of commons very clearly that those lowly radioactive isotopes are not subject to these regulations, in terms of their export from the
1:51 pm
european union into the uk so patients can be reassured. boris johnson is a charismatic and dynamic foreign secretary and everyone agrees. david davis has said that we are planning for all contingencies but the most important thing is that we try to get a deal in our interests on security cooperation residency rights for uk and eu citizens and of course a free—trade deal. i was with the finance minister of bavaria last week who was here seeing parliamentarian listens and and he is very keen for a free—trade deal because we are the biggest export market for german cars. i biggest export market for german cars. lam biggest export market for german cars. i am confident we can do a free trade deal in our interests but also the interests of the europeans. vince cable, you were the first senior politician to float the idea
1:52 pm
that brexit actually might not happen and prove too difficult. won't that be a green light for the european commission to say they will play really tough because these guys, play really tough because these guys, in the end, they will populate. they will play tough anyway, they have made their position very clear and it is a united position and it is very difficult to move it because you are talking about 27 governments. i thought the exchange today was very good and actually damian green and emily thornbury were both very sharp and very wet and better than their principles, i have to say, but it did expose the fundamental issue of what happens if we get a bad deal or no deal and the british public should be given the choice to go back to where we were, for membership, through another referendum, but keeping the option open. the government, i think, referendum, but keeping the option open. the government, ithink, is referendum, but keeping the option open. the government, i think, is in some difficulty over the issue but i would go back to emily thornbury, who was very sharp today with very good questioning, what would you do if there was no deal? jeremy corbyn is very committed to taking us out of the european union. is the lead changing at westminster? now the old remainers are on the art and it is now the brexiteers who seem to be on the defensive. certainly on the
1:53 pm
conservative side there is unanimity that we need to negotiating britain's best interest and get that free trade deal and the best we can do is going to europe and make sure our opposite numbers, like the bavarian finance minister, getting their electorates and a national governments to make sure they make the case for free trade which helps that more than it helps us because we have a trade deficit with europe and we must make sure they put pressure on the european commission not to do anything foolish. 0n the referendum point, ithink not to do anything foolish. 0n the referendum point, i think if anyone we re referendum point, i think if anyone were to say we would have a second referendum at the end, it does fatally undermine our negotiating position because it rather incentivises the european union to give usa incentivises the european union to give us a bad deal in the hope it frightens us into staying so it is dangerous. reena jeremy corbyn is going to see mr barnier tomorrow, what is his message? the messages a labour government would negotiate a brexit deal that is the interest of
1:54 pm
both the european union and the uk because it is aboutjobs first. we do not have ideological redlines. you are leaving the customs union and the single market so how is it aboutjobs? and the single market so how is it about jobs? it is really not the same as the government position. being out of the single market is a technical thing. 0ur being out of the single market is a technical thing. our membership is pa rt technical thing. our membership is part of the european union membership. the cbi view more of that. the question of whether we are in or out of it technically, it is pa rt in or out of it technically, it is part of the european union membership so leaving the european union means week leave it but we can re—negotiate terms with the european union which are the same as being in the single market and that is a really important point. vince cable, do we really have to be part of the single market? we could make some sort of agreement that is just as good. no, absolutely not. we all believe in free trade with europe what is important about the single market? it is 30 years of accumulated agreements on regulation. unless you have common
1:55 pm
regulation. unless you have common regulation or mutually acceptable regulation, you don't have the kind of level of integration through trade we have, so simply saying free trade we have, so simply saying free trade and no tariffs doesn't actually deal with the issue, it is about a common approach to regulation and that is the fundamentals of the single market. very briefly, do you think we will actually leave on march 2019 or will we be into transition time?” actually leave on march 2019 or will we be into transition time? i think it is 50/50 now and if you had asked the week ago i would've said it is likely to leave but the problems are mounting up and it is increasingly clear that we might not. the public are clear that we might not. the public a re clear clear that we might not. the public are clear it is a democracy but they wa nt are clear it is a democracy but they want the decision followed through. we will be leaving but it will be on very bad terms. i can absolutely say with certainty that we will be talking that brexit for weeks and months and years. norman, as ever, strong and stable! a quick line of breaking news. the
1:56 pm
royal bank of scotland has agreed to pay £3.65 billion to american authorities for its role in selling risky mortgages that were at the centre of the global financial crisis 2008. rbs has already set aside funds to cover the settlement and it has another case outstanding which it is expected to raise a symbol —— a similar level of fines. the government still owns 72% of rbs, so it belongs to us at the moment. now for a weather update. the camera is working! look at that! smooth. we have had a change around whether white in the last 2a hours. we had some very heavy rain across england and wales over the last 2a hours, in fact, well over half a month worth of rain fell fairly widely across the southern counties of england and thatis southern counties of england and that is where the wettest weather has been. that caused big problems this morning around the capital. click on in london had standing
1:57 pm
water and dangerous driving conditions. it was an area of low pressure that brought that soggy weather as it drove its weight to the east across england and ways and brought heavy rain. it has cleared away pressure is built from the north and it is increasingly melting thataway. this was the scene earlier today in the highlands of scotland, looking absolutely splendid. in the southern counties of england we have a few patches of rain but the sunshine is melting through the cloud and temperature wise we are looking at highs getting to about 23 in london. in wales and the midlands and the northern counties barely clad in the sky, it is glorious day. it was dry yesterday and will be dry to day and we will have long spells of sunshine and a few patches of cloud. that means as we go through this afternoon there will be no interruptions weather—wise to the play at the wimbledon tennis courts. sunny spells all the way and temperatures staying up into the 205 as well now. 0vernight tonight we
1:58 pm
have clear skies in place and high pressure and light winds. it is a recipe for temperatures to take a tumble. it will be cold enough to get some pockets of ground frost developing in the countryside so it will turn quite chilly there and in towns and cities temperatures stay up towns and cities temperatures stay up in double figures. high pressure with us for tomorrow and a weather front try to sneak in later in the day. for most of us it is a dry morning with some sunshine but cloud will bubble up as the afternoon progresses across england and where from an eastern scotland and some of those shadows could be sharp. in the south—east of england and east anglia ‘s stays dry with sunshine that in the afternoon we see another change coming into west of scotland and northern ireland and that band of rain should not last too long but it will bring wet weather to end the day here. we have another weather front approaching the north—west and through the night it will bring another spell of rain into the north—west and it will leave a
1:59 pm
legacy of rather cloudy skies as we start off the weekend. there will be a few showers and most of them to the north—west but in the sunshine comes out in the south it could become warm and pretty humid as well. that is your latest weather. this is bbc news. the headlines. four weeks after the fire at grenfell tower, the new council leader promises to build homes for those who no longer have one — saying it will take a generation to rebuild trust. the community is strong, the cousin is between the community, whether rich or poor, it is between then and the state. whether they have lost trust in local government or central government. that is what we have to restore. donald trump defences son
2:00 pm
who was under pressure after discussions with russian lawyer. he said his son was being subjected to a witchhunt. a gay man wins a landmark ruling at the supreme court about equal pensions. thousands of married gay couples will now have the same pension entitlements as heterosexual couples. the eu's chief negotiator warns the uk must recognise its financial

60 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on