Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 13, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. four weeks after the grenfell fire, the search teams still working theresa may tells the bbc she was devastated after hearing the exit poll results on general election night, and so is the result was a com plete night, and so is the result was a complete shock. devastated enough to shed a tear? yes, a little tear, yes. at that moment? at that moment, yes. ministers prepared to publish their long—awaited repeal bill to convert eu legislation into uk law. in the face of stinging criticism, ambulance response times in england are being completely overhauled. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard resumed their high court challenge for their son to receive experimental treatment. £114 million fine for southern rail‘s owners after a year of delays
11:01 am
and cancellations for passengers. donald trump arrives the macron with trade and joint action against so—called islamic state in syria and iraq top of their agenda. also this hour, a new era for london's natural history museum. a 4.500 tonne blue whale has been suspended over the entrance hall, replacing the iconic dippy the diplodocus. and close encounter with the red giant — the most detailed images yet onjupiter‘s giant — the most detailed images yet on jupiter's great red giant — the most detailed images yet onjupiter‘s great red spot captured by the juno spacecraft. good morning. it's thursdayjuly 11 welcome to bbc newsroom live. in an exclusive bbc interview,
11:02 am
theresa may has said her initial reaction to learning she was likely to lose her majority last month was to lose her majority last month was to shed a tear. she said the predictions in the exit poll, which proved accurate, came as a complete shock. in april she had started the election campaign with a lead of more than 20 points in the opinion polls. the most of that was wiped out on election day, along with a 17 seat majority that she inherited from david cameron. in her interview with emma barnett, she avoided answering questions about how much longer she will remain in power in downing street, after losing a majority. she said she wanted to get on with thejob majority. she said she wanted to get on with the job despite her political setbacks. i think if the campaign was going on, i realise that everything wasn't going perfectly. but throughout the whole campaign, the expectation still was that the result would be a different one, a better one for us,
11:03 am
thanit different one, a better one for us, than it was. we didn't see the result that came. if i'm honest, i've heard stories about quite a few labour mps who didn't think they we re labour mps who didn't think they were going to keep their seats, and ended up keeping them. when the result came through, it was a com plete result came through, it was a complete shock. a complete shock? when was that moment for you of realisation? it was when i heard the exit poll. to be honest with you, i didn't actually watch the exit poll myself. i have superstition about things like that. my husband watched it for me and came and told me. i was shocked at the result that came through in the exit poll. it took a few minutes for it to sink in, what that was telling me. my husband gave mea hug, that was telling me. my husband gave me a hug, and then i got on the phone to cchq, to the conservative party, to find out what had happened. that must've been a moment for philip to tell you that. it must have been quite hard for him? yes, was. but he's been a huge support
11:04 am
for me over the years. there are times when i perhaps get in to read a newspaper article —— i perhaps get him to read a newspaper article for me. when you have that hug, did you have a cry? how did you feel?|j suppose have a cry? how did you feel?” suppose i thought devastated really. asi suppose i thought devastated really. as i say, i knew the campaign wasn't going perfectly. but still, the m essa 9 es going perfectly. but still, the messages i was getting from people i was speaking to, but also the comments we were getting back from a lots of people that were being passed on to me, whether we would get a better result than we did. devastated enough to shed a tear? yes, a little tear. at that moment? yes. then you obviously have to brush yourself down. you have a responsibility. your resume and being, you've been through that experience. but i was there as leader of the party and prime
11:05 am
minister. i had a responsibility then as we went through the night to determine what we were going to do the next morning. did you feel in any way an extra pressure not to step down, because you are only the second woman to hold this office of prime minister? did that play a role? no, i can honestly say it didn't. what i looked at was what i believed was important. important for the country, getting a government. we were the largest party. i think i had a responsibility as leader of the party. in a sense, it can be easy sometimes if something like this happens, just to walk away. and to leave somebody else to deal with it. just like david cameron. what i said to my colleagues is that i think i got us injuries, and i would work to get us out. the prime minister speaking to radio five live. the government is publishing its repeal bill today,
11:06 am
a key plank of its brexit strategy. formally known as the european union withdrawal bill, it will repeal the european communities act 1972, which took britain into the eu and remove the supremacy of eu law. it will give parliaments and assemblies in westminster, edinburgh, belfast and cardiff the power them in the future. t is not expected to be debated until the autumn, but will need to have been passed by the time the uk leaves the eu — due to be in march 2019. the brexit secretary, david davis, has called it "one of the most significant pieces of legislation that has ever passed through pa rliament". he's called on all parties to work together but labour has already said it will vote against it, unless major changes are made. 0ur assistant political rditor, norman smith, is in westminster. getting it through the commons will
11:07 am
be something rather different? what we have learned is by getting it through, and it is the legislative linchpin of brexit which underpins the whole brexit process, getting it through is going to be a titanic battle. because already the liberal democrat leader, tim farron, says he is going to make life hell for the government over this. and significantly labour have now signalled they will vote against the whole bill unless there are significant concessions. that means that labour plus tory rebels could be enough to defeat the bill. which is why this morning, the brexit minister steve baker, was appealing for all parties to cooperate over the passage of this legislation. we will consider what they bring forward. after we published the bill and everyone has had a chance to look at that, we look forward to seeing what they bring forward. this isa seeing what they bring forward. this is a bill in the national interest and is an essential next step. the
11:08 am
labour party manifesto accepted the result of the referendum. i'm hoping people will come together in the national interest, support this bill and ensure we are able to leave the european union in a way which is smooth and orderly, and which gives individuals and businesses that certainty that the law will have some continuity as we leave. so, why is labour threatening to vote down this brexit bill? i'm joined by the shadow brexit minister, jenny chapman. i thought you supported the idea of leaving the eu? we support that we support the eu? we support that we support the idea of taking the eu rules and putting them into uk law. but what we re putting them into uk law. but what were not going to do is sell the british public down the river by backing a bill that hasn't been properly thought through. and the reason that we have a process of passing a bill in this country is so we can improve it through that process. so rather than staging some 11th hour ambush on the government, we want to let them know today, on
11:09 am
day one, what it is that we want them to improve about this bill so that we don't end up in some impact at the end. that we end up being able to support the bill. why don't you simply seek to amend the bill as it goes through parliament, rather than using the nuclear option and voting against it in what is called the second reading when in effect you can blow it out of the water? we do want you supported and be constructive. —— we do want to support it. but when theresa may's ministers go on the airwaves and say they want us to work with them, what they want us to work with them, what they mean is they want us to do what they mean is they want us to do what they want us to do without challenging. that isn't going to happen. we've set out today some very clear thoughts on this bill with told the government what we wa nt with told the government what we want see. they now need to respond ina want see. they now need to respond in a constructive and responsible manner to that. and i believe we're not going to get a second reading until september. if they give us the assurances that we want to see, will be ina assurances that we want to see, will be in a place that we can support
11:10 am
it. as it stands, we just can't do that. let's be clear. if you vote down this bill, it is a not a moment for brexit. it blocks brexit, in effect. a dozen, and that's not our intention. but neither do we just go along with what theresa may once. —— it doesn't, and not our intention. we want to bring it eu law into british law and we want to do it properly. this bill at the moment doesn't do it properly. we find that the government intends to make changes behind closed doors. they make sunset clauses or deadlines. they're not being reasonable with the devolved administrations. we don't know how they intend to deal with disputes through this bill. so it's do it our way, or it's not going to happen? due it in a way that's fair to the british people, and transparent and open. the government has said in the last few days that they want to work with us.
11:11 am
that is being straightforward. i think we are being fed to the british people. were doing ourjob as the opposition. if they don't wa nt as the opposition. if they don't want to do these negotiations, we are happy to take over if that's what want. i should to you, then, that we have seven other brexit bills queued up behind this one. so once this battle is completed, if it's completed, there are still seven other bills which have to be got through parliament in little over a year. there are going to be also the parliamentary battles and tussles in the year ahead. norman, many thanks. the publication of the repeal bill comes asjeremy corbyn is due to meet the european commission's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. mr barnier has already held private talks with the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon this morning and will also meet the welsh first minister carwyn jones ahead of the second round of formal negotiations in brussels next week. we can speak now to our brussels reporter, adam fleming.
11:12 am
a busy round of talks. what we expect out of them. michel barnier has moderately red carpet for a whole host of visitors in the uk today. he just had the meeting with nicola sturgeon, first minister of scotland. it was very, very short. she flew in and spoke to michel barnierfor she flew in and spoke to michel barnier for less she flew in and spoke to michel barnierfor less than she flew in and spoke to michel barnier for less than an hour. then flew out, not speaking to us media at all. although we are expecting her to make a statement about her attitude to the great repeal bill when she landed back in glasgow shortly. the next visit michel barnier received from the uk, labour leaderjeremy corbyn who has just arrived in the building behind me, home to the european commission. first when meeting a man good friends timmons, the first vice president of the commission, deputy tojean—claude president of the commission, deputy to jean—claude juncker. then the labour leader will have his big
11:13 am
meeting at a lunch with michel barnier. i understand jeremy corbyn has just arrived and had a few words to say to reports on his way in. we are going into —— we are going into dame representing 13 million people who voted labour in the general election. these are crucial negotiations for our country, and we're here to ensure that they ensure jobs and living standards. to try and discover exactly what the views of the european union are today on the whole process. it's our first meeting with them. jeremy corbyn, the labour leader, feeling that he wants to get into outer michel barnier about the real detail of the eu side's position in these negotiations. but also making these negotiations. but also making the point when he wants to pitch to him that labour would have a different kind of brexit that would
11:14 am
focus onjobs more different kind of brexit that would focus on jobs more than different kind of brexit that would focus onjobs more than becoming government would. and also the fact that label want to make a unilateral offer to eu citizens living in the uk to protect all their rights from day one of brexit. which i imagine would be music to the ears of the eu, because that's the sort of thing that they want to achieve out of the brexit negotiations on that particular issue. however, in the labour press release issued ahead of this visit, they talk aboutjeremy corbyn being here as the leader of the government in waiting. that gives you a clue that is notjust about the substance of the brexit talks. there were also using this as an opportunity to makejeremy corbyn isa an opportunity to makejeremy corbyn is a prime ministerial. adam, thank you. the system for deciding how quickly ambulancesin england should reach all patients is being completely overhauled. nhs leaders say the previous targets have become "blu nt and dysfunctional". under the new rules, 90% of the most serious calls, when people aren't breathing for example, will now need to be reached within 15 minutes. previously it was 75% to be reached in 8 minutes. our health editor, hugh pym,
11:15 am
is outside london ambulance service's headquarters in waterloo. this is quite a dramatic change. yes. it's being billed as the biggest shake—up in ambulance response standards in england in about four decades. what's ambulance service leaders are saying is that the current system doesn't deliver the current system doesn't deliver the best outcome for patients. you have targets for the most serious calls. three quarters of ambulances arriving within eight minutes. but because there is a focus on hitting the targets, often the wrong type of vehicle is sent, like a paramedic on a motorbike. they say far too many blue lights are being sent out, when actually they are not needed. a
11:16 am
quarter of blue lights stood down. this is all because of the target system and the fact that the call handler only have 60 seconds to make a decision about the best deployment of the vehicles. and often defaults to just of the vehicles. and often defaults tojust sending of the vehicles. and often defaults to just sending out a blue light, when actually it's not necessary. call handlers are going to be given a bit longerfor all but call handlers are going to be given a bit longer for all but the call handlers are going to be given a bit longerfor all but the most life—threatening calls. four minutes, rather than one, to make that crucial decision. so it might mean slightly longer waits, but the argument is the right decision will be made for the patient, and the right deployment. critics might say that this is changing the goalposts is completely, because you've got a target system where targets are being missed in england for the last couple of years. you're changing the goalpostss. but the argument here, said to be backed by the medical profession, this will deliver better outcomes at a time when demand is rising rapidly across the nhs. link
11:17 am
you very much indeed. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. theresa may tells the bbc she was devastated after hearing the exit poll result on general election night and says the result was a complete shock. the government is publishing the repeal bill — which will convert existing eu legislation into british law. 0pposition parties are warning that they'll fight its passage through parliament. hearings on the case of the terminally ill baby, charlie gard, are continuing for a second day at the high court. the us doctor offering charlie experimental treatment will give evidence this afternoon. and in sport, johanna konta is one win away from becoming the first british woman to reach a wimbledon final for 40 years. she plays five—time champ venus williams in the second semi—final of the day. jo says she's helped along from the support of the home crowd. former fifa official chuck blazer, seen on the left, has died of cancer aged 72. the american was banned from all football activities
11:18 am
for life two years ago before turning whistle blower to help uncover corruption in the game. chris froome takes an 18 second lead into stage 12 of the tour de france with the battle for the yellow jersey. i'll be back with more on those stories after half past. lawyers representing the parents of the terminally—ill baby, charlie gard, are at the high court in london, to present what they claim is new evidence showing an experimental treatment could help him. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital, where he's in intensive care, say the therapy won't work, and his life support systems should be turned off. chris gard and connie yates didn't speak to reporters, but the family's solicitor gave this statement outside. thejudge, mrjustice
11:19 am
the judge, mrjustice francis, thejudge, mrjustice francis, has said he wants charlie's parents to know that a large number of people have been working in their baby's best interest, that his welfare is of paramount concern. counsel for the parents said they were wanting to reopen the case on the basis that charlie is likely to have muscular improvement, and that the proposed treatment could cross the blood brain barrier. the treatment is likely to have an effect on the ba by‘s likely to have an effect on the baby's brain likely to have an effect on the ba by‘s brain cells. likely to have an effect on the baby's brain cells. also we are hearing that the american doctor offering charlie gard that experimental treatment will be giving evidence this afternoon. that's at two o'clock this afternoon. mrjustice francis said it was very unlikely that a final determination would be made on the case today. the parents didn't speak to reporters, but the family's solicitor did give us the statement outside. we are continuing to spend every moment working around the clock to save our dear baby charlie. we've
11:20 am
been requesting this specialised treatment since november. we've never asked the hospital, the courts 01’ never asked the hospital, the courts or anyone for anything — except for the permission to go. we've raised over £1.3 million and have had invitations from specialised doctors in the us and italy. they've offered their ground—breaking treatment to us, and confident that they can help charlie. we will continue to make the case for us to seek treatment for charlie with doctors that are actually specialised in mitochondrial dna depletion syndrome. and we hope that the judge and the courts will finally wall in favour of us seeking treatment elsewhere. we love him more than
11:21 am
life itself. —— will finally rule in favour. if he still fighting, then we are fighting. that was good solicitor of charlie gard's parents beating court a short time ago. donald trump is in paris where he'll hold talks with president macron and attend bastille day celebrations. high on the agenda will be us—french actions in syria and iraq against so—called islamic state. despite differences between the two leaders, mr macron has indicated he will work to reaffirm historic ties between the two allies and prevent the us from being isolated. 0ur correspondent has been telling us 0ur correspondent has been telling us that the two men have plenty to discuss. this relationship is between trump and macron. 0n the face of it, it's hard to think of anything that unites them. the age
11:22 am
gap is huge. their personal interests have nothing at all in common. their political views are wide apart. and yet there does seem to be some kind of relationship building up between them. maybe it's macron's ineffable charm. they say that he could charm pluto out of hades, such as his gift of the gab. if you remember, there was a famous handshake a month ago when macron wouldn't let go of trump's hand as a way of affirming from the start friends and macron's determination to show its strength. navy that created in trump a glimmer of admiration for this new boy on the block. however, there does seem to be some kind of relationship building up, which is also based on interests. both countries would like and need to keep the relationship going. the french view is very much, we may not like the fact that donald trump is president, but we are going to deal with it. that is definitely
11:23 am
macron's view. for him, it's not macron's view. for him, it's not macron and trump, aegis france and america, as represented by these two men. “— america, as represented by these two men. —— it is france and america. there is a relationship. there is even a chemistry building up, we are told. which means although there will be issues are great though versions under discussion, trade, climate, they will focus and emphasised the things that bring them together. and above all, and thatis them together. and above all, and that is the issue of security and the help and cooperation which the two companies have in the fight against islamic state, for example. and what the french hope will turn into corporation in the fight against terrorism in north africa. the natural history museum in london has unveiled the skeleton of a blue whale in its entrance hall. weighing four—and—a—half tonnes, it's been suspended from the ceiling with wires, so that it appears
11:24 am
to dive down onto visitors as they enter the building. the whale replaces dippy the diplodocus which will soon head out on a tour of the uk. 0ur correspondent rebecca morelle joins us now from the natural history museum in kensington. quite a sight, rebecca. it's absolutely amazing to see. you really get a sense of the size of this thing. it's the biggest animal on the planet, 25 metres long, 4.5 tonnes. the blue whale has been called hope, and it is the new star of the natural history museum. in hasn't been without controversy. the whale has replaced the much loved, the dinosaur, the dip and ogres. the natural history museum said it was time for a change. the rain is head of conservation in. you looked after
11:25 am
dippy four years. i still do. i took him down in january. why the change. i only we wanted to transform not only the hall but this -- we wanted a real specimen, something we could tell a story about. we wanted something large and rather special. i think you'll agree that hope fills that for us. we want to talk about out that for us. we want to talk about our role in the natural world. hope, along with 600 other new specimens, are here for the public to see. and to really get all inspired and engaged with natural history. we just really wanted to show more of out just really wanted to show more of our science. and she's a great starting point for us. the logistics of dismantling a dinosaur and then bringing something else into he has been really challenging, hasn't it? hugely challenging. this whale is extremely heavy. 221 bones. the
11:26 am
skull alone is six metres long. she was on display in another gallery and we had to get her down. that took three months. then we've had a year of conservation, which we did ina pot year of conservation, which we did in a pot of love. then the nerve—racking time of actually raising hera nerve—racking time of actually raising her a pinch nerve—racking time of actually raising hera pinch this nerve—racking time of actually raising her a pinch this amazing dive feeding poems, a hugely interactive pose. hanging from these ancient girders as well. this is kind of a cathedral science. making sure it doesn't fall on someone's headis sure it doesn't fall on someone's head is important. tell me about the history of the wales. it's beached in 1890 history of the wales. it's beached in1890 in history of the wales. it's beached in 1890 in march in wexford, ireland. the museum at the time were looking to collect things. they paid £250 for her, which i think is a bargain. they brought her back to the museum, but they didn't have a gallery for her. here she is today.
11:27 am
thank you very much. the proof is in the pudding, when this whale opened to visitors tomorrow they will be coming in and they will have seen the replacement of one join of nature for an even bigger giant of nature, because the blue whale is the biggest animal on the planet. possibly the biggest ever to have lived on the planet. it will be up to be public to decide whether it has been a worthwhile exchange, replacing dippy with hope the blue whale. we will see what people think when they come in. many thanks for that, rebecca, at the natural history museum. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc 2. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. thank you, ben. a lovely day so far for many of us and we will continue to see lovely spot of sunshine as we head through the day. we've had lovely pictures sent in from our weather watchers, too. this scene
11:28 am
from guernsey with some fairweather cloud. lovely stars of sunshine for the rest of the afternoon, but also the rest of the afternoon, but also the risk of scattered showers. you can see this weather front out in the atlantic, that will bring some further persistent showers as we had through later in the day across the. any showers elsewhere will be well scattered. largely drive. and for wimbledon, too, very unlucky to be well scattered. largely drive. and for wimbledon, too, very unlucky to reach a shower here. or the northwest we will see showers for a time across parts of northern ireland and scotland, too. along the east coast, largely drive. 0ne ireland and scotland, too. along the east coast, largely drive. one or two showers on the fargo is a bit fresher. towards the south, plenty in the way of sunshine with temperatures reaching around 20 celsius. in south—eastern parts, it will be dry with temperatures reaching around 20 celsius. for wales, one or two showers here. showers for a time in the south—east, but more in the way of ensuring. wimbledon will be largely dry with good spot of sunshine.
11:29 am
that's your forecast for now. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines now: theresa may has admitted she shed a little tear when she realised the result of the general election. she said she had been devastated to hear the exit poll. the government is preparing to publish a key part of its brexit strategy, the bill which will convert existing eu legislation into british law. the system for deciding how quickly ambulances in england should reach all patients is being completely overhauled. nhs england says the new rules will lead to a quicker response for all patients across the board. the high court is beginning a second day of hearings on the case of the terminally ill baby charlie gard, as his parents say there is new evidence showing an experimental treatment could help him. those are our latest news headlines
11:30 am
so we those are our latest news headlines so we will now check out the world of sport. those are our latest news headlines so we will now check out the world of sport. thank you very much. thank you very much. britain's on the verge of having its first woman reach a singles final at wimbledon in 40 years, later. johanna konta takes on five—time champion venus williams on centre court. jo says she knows she's got her work cut out but appreciates the support from the home crowds. it makes it more special because it is home and i do get that home support which i don't get anywhere else, so in that sense it makes it, i guess it makes it that much sweeter. well, jo has a lot of support not only from the fans watching but players and coaches too. one of her former coaches believe she has what it take to go all the way. the character traits, the dedication, the grounded nurse that
11:31 am
she brings in those competitive situations is something that her competitors are going to have to find a way or find competitors are going to have to find a way orfind a competitors are going to have to find a way or find a way over because she has learnt how to bring that tenacity and create that competitive spirit and she is not going to give that away easily. if not, she is going tojust get going to give that away easily. if not, she is going to just get better and better. that konta and williams match is second on centre court today after the first semifinal between the 2015 women's finalist garbine muguruza and the unseeded magdlena rybarikova. the 14th seed mugururuza has dropped only one set on her way to the semifinals. andy murray says it's possible he'll take several weeks off to recover fully from his hip injury, after he was beaten in five sets by american sam querrey. murray looked to be strugglingk, in pain throughout limping between points. the american came from two sets to one down, and is through to his first ever grand slam semifinal,
11:32 am
where he'll face marin cilic next. cilic beat novak djokovic who retired with injury. roger federer is the favourite to take the men's title now that three of the top four men's seeds are out. federer looked impressive in beating last year's finallist milos raonic in straight sets. he's bidding to win a record eighth wimbledon title and will face tomas berdych in the semifinals. well, the action on some of the outside courts is already underway at wimbledon, including in the wheelchair event, which starts today. let us take you to court 17. these are live pictures of the first of a four british players who is in action. gordon reid is the defending champion and he also won the men's doubles last year. he is one down and he is alongside england ‘s alfie hewett. away from wimbledon,
11:33 am
the former fifa official chuck blazer has died, aged 72. the american, seen here on the left, had been banned from all football activities for life, two years ago, after admitting charges of tax evasion. he'd been suffering from cancer, but did turn whistleblower to help investigators uncover corruption in football. it's a day for the climbers today at the tour de france, with stage 12 taking the race into the pyrenees. yesterday germany's marcel kittel won his fifth stage on this year's tour de france with victory in stage 11. chris froome retained the leader's yellowjersey and will be looking to defend his 18 second overall lead today. rory mcilroy says he needs to find form at the scottish open this week to give himself a chance at the open at birkdale next week. the world number four has yet to win a tournament in a year that's been hit by injury, erratic form, and new clubs. and he hasn't started well this morning.
11:34 am
he's currently four over par, seven shots off the leaders. his round so far has included three bogeys and a double bogey. england's andy sullivan is faring better in the early stages. he holds a share of the lead on three—under. the leader is andrew dodt from australia and they are one behind them. that is all the sport for now. i will be back in the next hour. thank you very much. as we've been hearing, the government is publishing its repeal bill today, a key pillar of its brexit strategy. the legislation will ensure the same rules apply in the uk after brexit, while giving uk parliaments the power to change them. brexit secretary david davis said he will work with anyone to make it a success, but he faces opposition. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster for us this morning. we are still waiting actually for
11:35 am
this bill to be published, although maybe it has already been buried, given the scale of opposition it seems to be facing, with labour saying they will vote against it u nless saying they will vote against it unless the government gives in for some of their demands. the liberal democrats say they are prepared to create hell for the government over this legislation. joining me is their brexit spokesman, tom brake. how can you say you will create hell when you haven't seen the bill yet? the government will see it has us creating hell but what we are going to do is we are going to want to scrutinise this bill effectively, andi scrutinise this bill effectively, and i think that is something the government are unlikely to be prepared to let parliament do because, for instance, there is an estimate there might be 800 to 1000 pieces of secondary legislation that might fall off the back of this and for parliament to scrutinise those effectively will take a very effectively will take a very effectively —— a very considerable period of time. so you want mps to
11:36 am
scrutinise all the endless thousands of bits and pieces of eu registration —— legislation, isn't that unrealistic? dart i thought that unrealistic? dart i thought that was the purpose of parliament. i thought the purpose of parliament for all parties was to scrutinise what the government of the day are intending doing, and what the government seems to be intending to do is to give henry viii power to give government, not the parliament, the power to legislate in ways that could affect quite dramatically workers' rights or environmental laws and we are not prepared to see that happen. the reality of that is surely that brexit will be delayed for many years while you go through the minutiae of those little bits and pieces of eu legislation. the minutiae of those little bits and pieces of eu legislationm the minutiae of those little bits and pieces of eu legislation. if we don't go through the minutiae of that legislation then potentially what could happen is gaps and loopholes appear in our legislation where we might have transposed over into uk law part of the eu
11:37 am
legislation and we might have transposed it over in its entirety, but with references to agencies that no longer exist so the risk of not scrutinising it is that we create a lawyer ‘s bonanza in terms of the gaps that could appear in our legislation. what about those who say that the liberal democrats have a lwa ys say that the liberal democrats have always been opposed to brexit and this is just another way to scupper and overturn the results of the referendum? a key message that came out of the referendum campaign is that the uk wanted the parliament to regain control of our own laws and thatis regain control of our own laws and that is exactly what we are doing, regaining controls of our own laws means that members of parliament of all parties are able to scrutinise them and that is what we are going to be doing. thank you very much for your time. there is trouble ahead, be sure of that. it will probably last for some time as the government tries to get its bits and pieces brexit legislation through parliament. all right. thank you very much indeed, norman. as we've been hearing, lawyers representing the parents of the terminally—ill baby,
11:38 am
charlie gard are at the high court in london this morning, to present what they claim is new evidence showing an experimental treatment could help him. our correspondent sarah campbell is at the high court for us this morning. what has been going on so far in court? behind me be supporters of the parents of charlie gard, and theirfight to the parents of charlie gard, and their fight to keep the parents of charlie gard, and theirfight to keep him alive, is going on very much in evidence behind me. the court case itself, the hearing is happening in court number 50 inside the high court. it started at 10:45am in front of mr justice francis, who is the original judge who heard the original high court ruling on charlie gard and he said there are a lot of people who have been working very hard in the best interest of this baby and he stated that his welfare is a paramount concern to all of us. we
11:39 am
leave this hearing, as you mentioned, is about this experimental treatment that has been the thread running through this whole long—running court case. the experimental treatment is offered by a doctor in the united states which so far great 0rmond street hospital have argued will not have any significant improvement on the condition of charlie, and the argument which has been supported by the courts all the way to this so far is that the kindest thing to do is to have his life—support systems are withdrawn, and that is a decision that the parents have never been able to accept. it is being argued in court that there is new evidence that actually this therapy will go some way to help his condition and will do some way to help his brain damage which they dispute with the hospital is irreparable, and their lawyer is at the moment standing up and giving reasons to the court as to why this evidence that they are bringing forward is new. they are saying that the american doctor is a scientist who is at the forefront of his
11:40 am
profession and he is not a low voice. they say there is a perfectly rational basis for applying this therapy to charlie. they also say that this doctor says there is a 10% chance that there might be a meaningful improvement for charlie if you were allowed to undergo this experimental treatment. 0ne if you were allowed to undergo this experimental treatment. one thing, ona experimental treatment. one thing, on a timetable, mrjustice francis said that it is extremely unlikely that a final determination will be made today, in effect that a final decision will be made today, and i guess that is not least because that american doctor is expected to give video conferencing, take part in a video conferencing, take part in a video conference at 2pm this afternoon so he will have to be cross—examined and there is still a lot of evidence yet to be heard. thank you very much. in 2015, nearly a million migrants made the dangerous journey by sea from turkey to greece. more than 10,000 are still in refugee camps, denied entry into western europe. but the island of tilos believes it has the answer, offering accommodation to migrants who work and integrate, in a trial that could be rolled out across the rest of greece.
11:41 am
0ur europe reporter gavin lee reports. gavin, explain how this might work? it is quite extraordinary and it is the first time that this has been tried on any greek island. there are 800 people here and it is very small and quite close to rhodes. the mayor here first saw what was going on with all the boats coming into the other islands, more than 10,000 of those migrants and refugees are still on those islands are waiting for a decision as to whether they can return to turkey to seek asylum there as part of the eu migration plan. the idea was that a small number were selected to come here if they would work and integrate and i
11:42 am
have been talking to a number of refugees a few months on to see how the project is going. tilos island, ten miles from the turkish coast, population 800. a place where there are more goats than people. a year ago, the local mayor announced the islanders wanted to help and receive refugees looking for a new life, bucking the trend of the other islands keener to see migrants leave. it's a small but significant show of faith for this tiny island. 50 refugees selected from around greece who are prepared to work, who are prepared to integrate, and it's mainly families, and in exchange they'll get somewhere to stay and residency here. meet kousay, the new baker of tilos. he escaped from the war in syria and originally aimed for germany with his family. when i arrived to tilos all my life changed. my life and my wife is now relaxed and my children go to school and the people here i think are very nice, very beautiful.
11:43 am
excuse me, in room? 0ne hotel has taken on three refugees, two as housekeepers, including mahar baraka from damascus, who talks of one day buying a house here. in the tilos refugee centre, the children have been learning greek songs. they're singing, "blow, wind, blow, take us to distant places." the key to the tilos plan being a success is how the younger generation of refugees settle here and whether they continue to feel welcome and part of the community over the years to come. something that strikes me that i
11:44 am
have been on the other islands but a lot of the refugees here speak about staying here and making a life here. i will speak to a woman who featured in the film we just saw and a woman from solidarity now. tell me the reaction you get from locals here. are they nice to you and welcoming to you? i am here now on tilos and before i come here i come, i start on another island. after i come here i see grease differently because after i stay in tilos i see here are people who are nice and do not have a problem with the refugees from syria and now i have a shop after help from solidarity now, i have a job andi
11:45 am
help from solidarity now, i have a job and i am now happy and i think now i start life anew and the future of news. i know that your husband is a chef and you are both talking about setting up the first syrian and greek restaurant serving falafel here. yes, this is my dream. i want to sunday by a restaurant here for syrian food. this is the first restau ra nt syrian food. this is the first restaurant here, maybe in tilos, i hope this. and maybe it would have the name mrand hope this. and maybe it would have the name mr and mrs falafel. thank you. this is fantastic in terms of integration but how do you make it work elsewhere? there are 50,000 refugees and migrants on the mainland, how does it spread as a project? actually tilos has showed us project? actually tilos has showed us the example of how the express
11:46 am
solidarity of people in the local community and the municipality will all get together with organisations such as ngos and locals come together and they can make it happen. this can work as paradigms shift for other local societies as well. thank you both for talking to me andi well. thank you both for talking to me and i really appreciate it. this is something new and something that people here say is a success so far and people like sophia are working where else in greece might be open to trying something like this. thank you very much indeed. now some news here. we arejust you very much indeed. now some news here. we are just hearing you very much indeed. now some news here. we arejust hearing in you very much indeed. now some news here. we are just hearing in the wa ke here. we are just hearing in the wake of the grenfell tower fire that there have been some tests on school buildings and two have failed their fire tests. a secondary academy in london and the primary secondary —— primary special school in london as well. we get from the department education that they're cladding was not limited combustibility and the effective schools have been
11:47 am
informed. more on that as it comes into us. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may tells the bbc she shed a little tear when she realised the result of the general election. she says she does not regret calling it. as ministers prepared to publish their long—awaited repeal bill a top civil servant says the government is so badly split over brexit it risks falling apart like a chocolate 0range. hearings on the case of the terminally ill baby, charlie gard, are continuing for a second day at the high court. the american doctor offering experimental treatment will give evidence this afternoon. i'm alice baxter. in the business news: the uk housing market is in a state of lethargy, with estate agents
11:48 am
reporting the lowest aqua properties bought more than 40 years. new instructions fell for the 16th month ina row instructions fell for the 16th month in a row tojune and members of the royal institution of chartered surveyors said the market might continue flat—lining for a while. irish business leaders have called for a the european union to provide a state aid programme worth more than £890 million to protect their companies from a hard brexit. the irish business and employers confederation said that if britain left the customs union, it would massively disrupt trade, leaving irish firms exposed. britain is ireland's largest trading partner, supporting 400,000 jobs. southern rail has been fined over £13 million over train delays. the department for transport said the fine would have been higher, but most of the delays had not been southern's fault, saying strikes and unprecedented levels of sick leave were also to blame. the rmt said the government had let southern and its parent company off the hook. but first, let's kick off with a but of fashion news with a bit
11:49 am
of fashion news because another pay row is brewing at luxury retailer burberry. this come off the back of better than expected first quarter sales, released yesterday, with retail revenue up 3% to £478 million on the back of a rebound in china. but instead of basking in reflected check glory, new chief executive marco gobbetti is instead bracing himself for today's agm, where a shareholder backlash is expected, and it's all to do with the thorny issue of executive pay. particularly the awards for to chief creative director and former ceo christopher bailey, and new finance directorjulie brown. the former having been offered a cool £10.5 million, purportedly to stop him moving to another fashion house. let's speak to ashley hamilton claxton, corporate governance manager at royal london asset management, a shareholder in burberry many thanks for joining
11:50 am
many thanks forjoining me on the programme. that agm has kicked off and it is under way. talk me through how your organisation will be voting. this year we have decided to vote against the annual pay report and also against the chairman of the pay committee, that is the committee that determines pay for burberry. we have voted against the german as well because we have significant concerns about corporate governance in general. there is a lot of chaotic messaging coming out of the company and mixed messages are being sent to investors this year and it is very confusing. on the issue of executive pay, do you feel burberry are out of step with a lot of other uk companies and what they are doing at the moment. they are out of fashion with the current trend because we are seeing a lot of boards out there drawing down on the amount of executive pay they are offering. there is a lot of history with the executive pay controversy
11:51 am
at burberry. there were an eye watering number of shares offered to the chief executive with com paik —— opaque conditions and many people voted against that package. this is less to do with his pay package or the new ceo but the issue of the appointment of the finance director who was recruited in and has had to voluntarily hand back the award that burberry gave her because they ended up burberry gave her because they ended up being more than what her former employer would have given her. this has all been done after the annual result —— the report had been published and had to issue press state m e nts published and had to issue press statements and so on to clarify for investors what was going on so it is a confusing message and shareholders just do not have clarity about who is in control of the board or in control of the company. geordie brown gave back up to £2.4 million worth of shares after that award and christopher bailey has waived his bonus for the last two years but you
11:52 am
still think more needs to be done, including the way that burberry is run as a company. exactly. we voted against the chairman this year primarily because of the reason around who is leading the company. we have to remember that mr bailey was a chief creative company —— officer and then appointed chief creative officer and ceo in that strategy did not work so the company is now dialling back strategy and he has been placed in as president and there is this new ceo and there have been a lot of changes with both of these men who will be reporting to these men who will be reporting to the chairman and when you have two people leading the head of the company it gets confusing as to who does whatjob said the message from us as shareholders is that we need a lot more clarity from the board and a little bit less chaotic communication from them as to what their strategy is. good to talk to you. thank you. a fiery agm currently underway at burberry.
11:53 am
letters have a quick look at shares. burberry shares are up but rather flat. that is all the business for this hour. thank you. see you later on. nasa has released new images of a raging storm onjupiter, which were taken earlier this week by the unmanned juno spacecraft. the pictures are the most detailed insight scientists have ever had to the phenomenon known as the great red spot, revealing its size and extraordinary colour. with me is our science correspondent, jonathan amos. first of all, what is the great red spot, and why are we fascinated by it? this is an enormous storm, kind of like a hurricane and it is 16 kilometres across, imagine a hurricane that is even bigger than earth. it has been raising —— it has been raging for centuries. even since we had telescopes, galileo looked up at the sky and we get
11:54 am
better and better telescopes and ever since we have looked atjupiter this thing has been there, which is extraordinary. a hurricane sweeps across the atlantic and it lasts a few days or whatever and then it dissipates but this has been going for all of that time, which is just amazing. what does this new research tell us about it will that we did not know before? we will see. notjust the pictures, but also juno before? we will see. notjust the pictures, but alsojuno and all of its other instruments on as it went over the top of the spot. the pictures show us the chaos of the region, they show us all of those swirls and those waves and vortices ina kind swirls and those waves and vortices in a kind of detail we have not seen before. they are seeing, the scientists are seeing features as small as a few tens of kilometres across, let's say, so that gives them the 3—d structure of the cloud tops. the other instruments that they had on at the time will be able to sense the below those top of those clouds, right down into the spot, and tell us about the engine
11:55 am
that drives it. how deep do all of those gases go that former part of this whirling vortices that we see and that will tell a sub bit about howjupiter works and that will tell a sub bit about how jupiter works because we and that will tell a sub bit about howjupiter works because we don't really know how this world works. why is it so important to study jupiter into much detail? jupiter into much detail? jupiter is key in the solar system. if you think about performing some, 4.5 billion years ago, it forms at the centre of this big cloud of gas and dust and jupiter was almost certainly the next thing to form and grabbed a lot of the available material that was around at that time. if you take all of the other planets, comets, asteroids, and all the rest of it, everything else except the sun, all of that material will go inside jupiter, that except the sun, all of that material will go insidejupiter, that is how big it is. unless you understand jupiter and how it works you do not really understand the rest of the solar system. idyllic i understand it anyway but
11:56 am
thank you very much, as ever! time for a look at the weather now. no great red spot storms here, i hope. no, it is lovely and dry and there are no storms thankfully and the rest of the afternoon will continue to cds and spells of sunshine. sunshine mainly across more central eastern areas and a few showers developing in more central areas as we had through the afternoon. the northwest will see showers developing later in the day and spreading into northern ireland and western scotland but for most of us it is dry and for wimbledon it does stay largely dry this afternoon with temperatures climbing up to 23. during the evening those showers across the north—west will spread further south—east and in the south of the country it looks as though it will stay dry with clear spells and temperatures in towns and cities similarto temperatures in towns and cities similar to last night. in rural areas it is a few degrees lower than that and quite cool. tomorrow there isafair that and quite cool. tomorrow there is a fair bit of cloud around and scattered showers but for most of us it is dry with sunny spells and rain
11:57 am
arriving across the north—west later in the day and temperatures similar to today at 17 or 22. it remains humid as we head to the weekend. that is your forecast for now. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. theresa may tells the bbc she was devastated after hearing the exit poll result on general election night, and says the result was a complete shock. devastated enough to shed a tear? yes, a little tear. at that moment, that private moment? yes, at that moment. ministers have just published their long—awaited repeal bill to convert eu legislation into uk law. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, meets the first ministers of scotla nd barnier, meets the first ministers of scotland and wales. later he will hold talks withjeremy corbyn. the parents of terminally—ill baby charlie gard resume their high court challenge for their son
11:58 am
to receive experimental treatment. they say if he is still fighting, they are still fighting. in the face of stinging criticism, ambulance response times in england are being completely overhauled. donald trump arrives for talks with president macron, with trade and joint action against so—called islamic state in syria and iraq top of their agenda. also this hour, a new era for london's natural history museum. the iconic dippy the dinosaur has been replaced as the museum's centrepiece by a 4.5 tonne skeleton of a blue whale. and close encounter with the red giant — the most detailed images yet ofjupiter‘s great red spot captured by the juno spacecraft. good afternoon. it's thursdayjuly 13. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
11:59 am
in an exclusive bbc interview, theresa may has said her initial reaction to learning she was likely to lose her majority last month was to shed a tear. she said the predictions in the exit poll, which proved accurate, came as a compete shock. in april she had started the election campaign with a lead of more than 20 points. but most of that was wiped out on election day, along with the 17—seat majority she inherited from david cameron. in the interview with 5 live's emma barnet, she avoided answering questions about how much longer she will remain in power after losing the majority. she said she she wanted to "get on with the job", despite her political setbacks. as the campaign was going on, i realised that everything wasn't going perfectly. but throughout the whole campaign the expectation still was that the result would be a different one, a better one for us than it was. we didn't see the result that came coming, and if i'm honest, i've heard stories about quite a few labour mps who actually didn't think
12:00 pm
they were going to keep their seats, and ended up keeping those seats. so when the result came through, it was a complete shock. a complete shock? when was that moment for you, though, of realisation? well, it was when i heard the exit poll. to be honest with you, i didn't actually watch the exit poll myself, i have a little bit of superstition about things like that. my husband watched it for me and came and told me, and i was shocked at the result that had come through in the exit poll. it took a few minutes for it to sort of sink in, what that was telling me. my husband gave me a hug, and then i got on to the phone to cchq, to the conservative party, to find out what had happened. that must have been a moment for philip to tell you that. it must have been quite hard for him? yes, it was, but, as you know, he's been a huge support for me over the years, and there are times when i perhaps get him to read a newspaper article for me and tell me what it says,
12:01 pm
rather than reading it directly. when you had that hug, did you have a cry, how did you feel? well i felt, i suppose, devastated really because as i say, i knew the campaign wasn't going perfectly, but still the messages i was getting from people i was speaking to, but also the comments we were getting back from a lot of people that were being passed on to me, were that we were going to get a better result than we did. devastated enough to shed a tear? yes, a little tear. yes, at that moment, that private moment? at that moment, yes. and then you obviously have to just have to brush yourself down. you have a responsibility. you're a human being, you've been through that experience, but i was there as leader of the party and prime minister, and i had a responsibility then to, as we went through the night, to determine what we were going to do the next morning. i must ask, did you feel, in any way, an extra pressure not to step down,
12:02 pm
because you're only the second woman to hold this office of prime minister, did that play a role? no, i can honestly say it didn't. what i looked at was what i believed was important... important for the country was getting a government. we were the largest party, i think we had a responsibility, and i think i had a responsibility as leader of the party and as prime minister. you know, in a sense, it can be easy sometimes if something like this happens just to walk away, and to leave somebody else to deal with it. just like david cameron? well, what i've said to my colleagues, is that i thought it was important, i got us into this and i'm going to work to get us out. theresa may speaking to bbc radio five live. the government has just published a key part of its brexit strategy. the repeal bill will convert existing eu legislation
12:03 pm
into british law. 0pposition parties have said they have concerns about several issues and are warning they'll fight its passage through parliament. formally known as the european union withdrawal bill, it will repeal the european communities act 1972, which took britain into the eu and remove the supremacy of eu law. it will transpose eu law into british law so the same rules apply on the day of brexit as the day. but it will give parliaments and assemblies in westminster, edinburgh, belfast and cardiff the power change them in the future. it is not expected to be debated until the autumn, but will need to have been passed by the time the uk leaves the eu — due to be in march 2019. the brexit secretary david davis has called it "one of the most significant pieces of legislation that has ever passed through pa rliament". he's called on all parties to work together but labour has already said it will vote against it, unless major changes are made. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster. it is now published, but can they
12:04 pm
get it through the commons? good question. in an interview we saw, theresa may was asked pretty much the same question. she appealed to mps of all parties to back this legislation to deliver on the will of british people. all of which said, begin no doubt, there is trouble ahead. the liberal democrats have said they are going to cause "hell". labour have signalled they will vote against it at second reading. what will the snp do? what will those tories do who were not enthusiastic about brexit? i'm joined by donna greaves and stephen deference. stephen, what does your party do with this bill? the bill is not good enough. an amended, we are not good enough. an amended, we are not going to vote for it. it doesn't provide provision for the devolution of powers, or a raft of importance
12:05 pm
for the compromise set out in the scottish government. this government has had a year to get this right. more than a year since we had the referendum. i still don't think we are that much further forward. dominick, you've been looking at the bill. are you happy with it, or do you have concerns which might mean you have concerns which might mean you vote against it? it tries to do an awful lot in 19 clauses. i think it will require very careful scrutiny, both in terms of the powers which it gives government, and how they are to be exercised. also the other area of particular interest to me is how it dovetails with the eventual outcome of the negotiations. it seems to me, from what i can see, that parliament will have to have a further role because some aspects of this bill may not be required depending on what form brexit ultimately takes. where i think i disagree, certainly with the labour party's position, is that it's incoherent to say on the one hand we will vote to trigger article
12:06 pm
50, which is what they did. but on the other hand to turn around and say they won't, at second reading, support the necessary legislation to implement that decision. labour need to explain themselves on that because i don't understand it. i'm certainly willing to help the government along the way. but i also will be, i hope, a critical friend as to the way this legislation is put together. much of the concern centres on the issue of parliamentary scrutiny and fears that the government can change the legislation without parliamentary scrutiny. is that a big enough issue for you to vote against the government? i certainly don't see myself voting against this bill at second reading, because this legislation is needed if we are leaving the eu. without that, we can't leave the eu. as i say, having accepted the decision of the electorate, unless the electric change their mind during the course of these negotiations, we will be leaving. —— unless the electorate
12:07 pm
change their mind. i will apply the mind ofan change their mind. i will apply the mind of an independent and also that ofa mind of an independent and also that of a loyal critic, because we have got to get this right. in certain circumstances if we don't, i might review my position about the legislation altogether. stephen, some people might say this is all gameplaying. some people who have never accented brexit are just finding a reason to derail its. we have to remember, and let's not forget this, leaving the european union will have an impact on the environment, our rights, almost every aspect of our life. as dominick points out, scrutiny becomes very important. i think the labour party got it wrong when they gave a blank cheque to the tory party over the triggering of article 50. now, people of different political parties need to try to work together to get the best possible deal. that is why the scottish government has been willing to compromise. but this bill doesn't get it right. they've had a year, and the clock is ticking. let's talk
12:08 pm
about that. is there any prospect of this bill, and the seven other brexit bills, getting through parliament by the autumn of next year when mr barnier says it has to be done? we have a duty of parliamentarians to try to facilitate the process. but the silicate is in the process is not the same as rubber—stamping it. it's an ambitious project, that's always been my concern that brexit is a hugely ambitious project fraught with risk for this country. i've been playing it for a long time, and i believe it is still to be the case. i think the outcomes we will get from it are very uncertain. but lam willing, get from it are very uncertain. but i am willing, as a democrat, observing the decision of the uk electorate, to do my best to facilitate this process. but without sanctioning parliamentary scrutiny. stephen, are we going to have to start talking about transition very quickly? it's going to be very impossible to get this legislation through in the remaining time. the
12:09 pm
first thing we need to see as a coherent plan. the scottish government has one. as we've seen today yet again, there is no coherent plan. the plans the tories have fought hard brexit could cost up have fought hard brexit could cost up to 18,000 jobs have fought hard brexit could cost up to 18,000jobs in have fought hard brexit could cost up to 18,000 jobs in brexit alone. -- 80,000 up to 18,000 jobs in brexit alone. —— 80,000 jobs. up to 18,000 jobs in brexit alone. —— 80,000jobs. | up to 18,000 jobs in brexit alone. —— 80,000jobs. i have up to 18,000 jobs in brexit alone. —— 80,000 jobs. i have to do all that i possibly can do to get the best possible deal for my constituents. voting for this bill as it is is not the right thing to do for me. thank you, boat, very much for your time. there is an awfully long way to go with this and i think there will be many late nights in the commons over the months and maybe even years ahead. i'm sure there will be, and you'll be there reporting on all of it for us! the publication of the repeal bill comes asjeremy corbyn is due to meet the european commission's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels. mr barnier has already held private talks with the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon this morning, and will also meet the welsh first minister carwyn jones ahead of the second round of formal negotiations
12:10 pm
in brussels next week. mr barnier said the british politicians had requested the meetings and that he will only negotiate with the uk government. we can speak now to our brussels reporter, adam fleming. a very busy day with meetings of various british politicians for mr barnier. a crowd of british politicians in town today in brussels. nicola sturgeon was the first visit this morning, arriving quite early. not staying for particularly wrong, jetting back out of brussels after less than an hour. she was making the case for a scottish flavoured version of brexit where scotland still has excellent access to the single market, the sort of message c ‘s been saying all throughout the process. then he got aim visit from the first minister of gibraltar. then the next person was the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, here is what he had to say a short while ago as he arrived. we are going in today to meet the vice president of the commission, and we're
12:11 pm
meeting michele barnier later on this afternoon. we're representing 13 million people that voted labour in the general election. and these are crucial negotiations for our country, and we're here to ensure that we defend jobs and living standards. and try and discover exactly what the views of the european union are today on the whole process. it's our first meeting with them. jeremy corbyn's first meeting was actually with the bright wood vice president of the european commission, —— was actually with the vice president. jeremy corbyn will talk about how the labour version of brexit will be different from the uk government version. he says it would focus onjobs government version. he says it would focus on jobs and the economy, and that he wants to make unilateral decisions on the rights of the designs living. just guaranteed their rights from day one. which i
12:12 pm
imagine would be music to the ears of the eu side, because that is the sort of deal they're looking for. however, mr barnier is saying again that he's taking this meeting because jeremy corbyn asked that he's taking this meeting becausejeremy corbyn asked for it. the only person that mr corbyn will be asking for is david davis, the representative of the uk government. we'll be waiting to save mr barnier said anything about these meetings. he's not got any interviews and press co nfe re nces he's not got any interviews and press conferences schedules. what i will be keeping an eye on is his twitter feed to see if he had anything to say about the great repeal bill published in london, or the repeal papers, the technical government published today on issues like membership of euratom and court cases pending in the european court ofjustice. mr barnier has a habit ofjustice. mr barnier has a habit of sending out a little tweet whenever he gets one of those documents, giving his verdict on what he thinks about them. you keep an eye on his twitter feed. yankee
12:13 pm
very much, adam. —— thank you very much, adam. lawyers representing the parents of the terminally—ill baby, charlie gard, are at the high court in london, to present what they claim is new evidence showing an experimental treatment could help him. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital, where he's in intensive care, say the therapy won't work, and his life support systems should be turned off. 0ur correspondent sarah campbell is at the high court for us. what's expected to happen today? what has been said in court so far today? as you say, this hearing probably is the last chance for charlie's parents to argue that this experimental treatment in the us will make a difference to his condition. they have to put forward new and compelling evidence to affect what is currently available. for around affect what is currently available. foraround an affect what is currently available. for around an hour, their counsel have been putting forward the case. the doctor in the us proposing to carry out the treatment will appear from america by video link this
12:14 pm
afternoon. he has been quoted as saying that he believes there is a 10% chance of significantly improving charlie's condition. as well as arguing over the treatment, another issue raised again is the difference of opinion between charlie's doctors and great 0rmond street hospital, and charlie's pa rents over street hospital, and charlie's parents over the severity of his brain damage. charlie's parents dispute that the brain damage is irreversible. in the last few moments come and this is from journalists tweeting from the court, one representing the parents says there is a report from doctors saying there is no irreversible brain damage, and the lawyer representing charlie, she says that is inaccurate and says those comments are being made for the benefit of the press. another issue that we heard about in the hearing on monday — the judge that we heard about in the hearing on monday — thejudge had that we heard about in the hearing on monday — the judge had asked for charlie's ‘s goal to be measured as the hospital says it hasn't grown in three months and that is evidence of
12:15 pm
a lack of brain function. charlie's pa rents say a lack of brain function. charlie's parents say it has grown, and there isa parents say it has grown, and there is a dispute over the measurement. connie yates says she measured at this morning and it is two centimetres bigger. thejudge says he wants proper evidence by tomorrow and he says, and i quote, but it is absurd that the science of this is being measured by the inability to measure a child's skull. the issue needs to be resolved quickly for charlie's say, but not at the expense of fairness. we are not expecting a decision today, there is plenty more evidence to be heard. thank you, sarah. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. theresa may tells the bbc she was devastated after hearing the exit poll on general election night and the result was a complete shock. the government publishes its repeal bill — which will convert existing eu legislation into british law. 0pposition parties are warning that they'll fight its passage through parliament. as you've just been hearing, the
12:16 pm
pa rents of as you've just been hearing, the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard resume their high court challenge for their son to receive experimental treatment. time now for all of the latest sports news. following andy murray's exit yesterday from wimbledon, all eyes now onjohanna konta. she's hoping to become the first british woman to play in a singles final at the all england club for 40 years. but she'll have to do it the hard way, she'll have to beat 5—time champion venus williams in the semi—final later today. the pair have met five times before, with konta winning three out of the five matches. let's join hugh, who's at wimbledon for us. johanna's been in fine form so far during the tournament, hasn't she? yes, it has. epitomised by her quarterfinal win over the number two
12:17 pm
seed, simona halep. coming from a set down to win that match. konta will go into today's final feeling that she has nothing to lose. but there is a daunting prospect on the horizon. venus williams is a five—time champion. at a time she has reached the final in the women's single. should konta win and become the first champion for 40 years, it will cap a meteoric rise for her over the past two seasons. the character traits, the dedication, the ground admits that she brings in those competitive situations is something that her competitors are going to have to find a way around, or find going to have to find a way around, orfind a going to have to find a way around, or find a way over. because joanna 's learned how to bring that tenacity and competitive spirit. and she's not going to give that away easy. she's going to get better and
12:18 pm
better. away from konta, there is plenty of other british action, is in the? yes, there is. gordon reid, the defending champion in the men's wheelchair singles has started his defence today. things haven't been going his way on court 17. he trails by one set. you lost the first 16—2. easily broken twice in the second, but he is staging a fightback. —— he's been broken twice. later on centre court you will see jamie murray and martina hingis in the mixed doubles, taking on british pairjocelyn ryan kent scott ski. at least one british name will be going through in the mixed doubles. 0f course, johanna konta, is the main draw here at wimbledon. we will have more throughout the day. but for now, back to the studio. the system for deciding how quickly ambulances in england should reach patients is being overhauled.
12:19 pm
nhs leaders say the previous targets have become "blu nt and dysfunctional". under the new rules, 90% of the most serious calls will now need to be reached within 15 minutes. previously it was 75% to be reached in eight minutes. our health editor hugh pym, who's outside the london ambulance service's headquarters in waterloo, explained what this meant for patients. it's being billed as the biggest shake—up in ambulance response standards in england in about four decades. what ambulance service leaders are saying is that the current system doesn't deliver the best outcome for patients. you have targets for the most serious calls, three quarters of ambulances arriving within eight minutes, but there is a focus on hitting the targets, often the wrong type of vehicle is sent, like a paramedic on a motorbike. when an ambulance would have been more appropriate.
12:20 pm
they say far too many blue lights are being sent out, when actually they are not needed. a quarter of blue lights are stood down. this is all because of the target system and the fact that the call handler only has 60 seconds to make a decision about the best deployment of the vehicles. and often defaults to just sending out a blue light, when actually it's not necessary. call handlers are going to be given a bit longerfor all but the most life—threatening calls. four minutes, rather than one, to make that crucial decision. so it might mean slightly longer waits, but the argument is the right decision will be made for the patient, and the right deployment. critics might say that this is changing the goalposts is completely, because you've got a target system where targets are being missed in england for the last couple of years. you're changing the goalpostss. but the argument here, said to be backed by the medical profession, this will deliver better outcomes
12:21 pm
at a time when demand is rising rapidly across the nhs. president donald trump is in paris where he'll hold talks with president macron and attend bastille day celebrations. high on the agenda will be us—french actions in syria and iraq against so—called islamic state. despite differences between the two leaders, mr macron has indicated he will work to reaffirm historic ties between the two allies and prevent the us from being isolated. 0ur correspondent, david eades, is in paris and joins us now. david, what sort of reaction and response is he going to get from the french people, but also, in particular, from president macron? it's interesting, this, especially
12:22 pm
after last weekend where right thing, politically, the president will have felt rather bruised by being in europe. he comes back this time knowing that public opinion looks around 60% in favour of this visit, so he'll get a relatively warm welcome. they're intrigued rather than captivated by the idea of mrtrump coming rather than captivated by the idea of mr trump coming here. president macron is absolutely extending a very warm hand of friendship towards both the president and the first lady. that's reflected in part on what you've said they're going to be talking about — issues of syria, anti—terrorist moves, security. rather than focusing on issues of free trade versus protectionism, or the climate change agreement. it was the climate change agreement. it was the paris treaty but donald trump has pulled out of. the whole notion of this is that they can work together. and to top it, the symbolism is there. it is an historic symbolism because it's 100 historic symbolism because it's100 yea rs historic symbolism because it's100 years since american troops first
12:23 pm
set foot on french soil in the latter stages of the first world war. the message here is this is a very long—standing and very warm relationship over a very long time. it's not a here today gone tomorrow sort of arrangement. the idea is that they can build two strong new leaders on world stage, building a proper rapport together. some a nalysts proper rapport together. some analysts have been suggesting that because they have a reasonable amount of respect for each other and get on quite well that perhaps president macron could be a kind of bridge for donald trump into europe, where other leaders in europe may be more hostile towards him.“ where other leaders in europe may be more hostile towards him. if you consider this, that in the last few hours, angela merkel has been in paris as well having franco german discussions with munster macron, there is no way that she would be involved in this particular meeting with mrtrump, involved in this particular meeting with mr trump, because it wouldn't work. you are absolutely right, the macron camp see him as the best persuader, if you like. the one who
12:24 pm
might be able to work most closely with president trump. whether he can bring him round on issues of climate change, let's be realistic, would be the message here. but the fact that you cannot have an america alone on the world stage is seen across the piece is critically important. and maybe the new french president is the best person to do that. certainly the message we get is that their telephone conversations initially have been very warm. mr macron speaks very good english as well. they have interesting business as well, common ground there. oh, and the olympics — both the us and france have good news about hosting the games. so they have a few things to get the talks underway. good to talk to you, david. many thanks indeed. the natural history museum has unveiled the skeleton of a blue whale in its entrance hall. it
12:25 pm
weighs 4.5 times and is suspended from the ceiling with wires so it appears to die down from the building onto visitors. —— dive down. quite a dramatic site, rebecca? i have to say, standing here in front of it, you really get a sense of the size of this aim. it's absolutely huge. a 25.2 metre long 4.5 tonne blue whale called hope. the name has been unveiled today, along with the skeleton. putting a wail in here hasn't been entirely without controversy. the blue whale replaces the much loved dippy the dinosaur, the diplodocus. to find out why the natural history museum decided to make this change, i'm joined by sir michael dixon, director of the museum here. so, why ditch dippy? we haven't ditched
12:26 pm
dippy. ditch dippy? we haven't ditched dippy, not at all. but you reimagine a fantastic space like this was a real opportunity for us. we also thought dippy was a gift to the people of the uk from the great industrialist andrew card needy. so we thought, why not take him back to the people of the uk? he's going on and eight venue tour of the uk starting early next year in the dorset county museum in dorchester, and will be re—engaging people with nature for the next few years. having decided to move him, we thought, what will fill the space and make the same kind of impact that dippy has done? i think your viewers will agree that something the size and scale of hope, our blue whale, certainly does that. it really does fill up this almost cathedral here. the logistics have been challenging, to say the least. the whale was on display in another pa rt the whale was on display in another part of the museum. how tough has it
12:27 pm
been too shifted from one part of the museum into here? it's been a 3.5 year project, 18 months in the planning and two years in the execution. hope was in a different gallery, just laid in a traditional way, but very close to the ceiling we re way, but very close to the ceiling were people didn't appreciate her and hersize. were people didn't appreciate her and her size. —— displayed in a very traditional way. we thought we'd do something challenging, put her in a diving pose to bring movement to the skeleton. so she's in this lunged live pose with herjaws open. as you come in the front door, you are effectively baked waiting to be eaten. the challenge was immense, as you said she weighs 4.5 tonnes with the armature. suspending that from the armature. suspending that from the ceiling of a grade one listed building is no small feat, but we had a fantastic team. 130 people involved in this project, and tremendous support from contractors and suppliers. we think the result
12:28 pm
is spectacular. thank you very much for that. the real proof in the pudding will be tomorrow when the museum opens to the public will stop visitors will be coming in here to see one giant of nature, dippy the dinosaur, replaced with an even biggerjointed nature because the blue whale is the biggest animal on the planet and possibly the biggest you have ever existed on the planet. it's going to be up to them to decide whether swapping dippy for hope was a worthwhile decision. i have to say, it does look fantastic and it is absolutely huge. it fills up and it is absolutely huge. it fills up this whole beautifully. now let us check out the latest weather prospects with nick miller. we have sunshine out there and most of us have seen that at some stage of us have seen that at some stage of the morning and there is cloud building of the threat of the shower in england and where. it isjust a threat, not a guarantee. the vast
12:29 pm
majority will avoid them and stay dry. we are going to see heavier downpours developing in the afternoon and later this afternoon and the evening and into western scotland. temperatures close to average. this evening some of the heavier downpours push further east across scotland and in the north of england there are showers overnight in the woodlands, east anglia, south of that it will be dry as the night goes on. variable cloud and clear spells. the temperature difference between town and rural areas so it will be cooler in rural areas. showers dotted around tomorrow but by the afternoon most places are dry. a lot of cloud around tomorrow but some sunny spells and it will feel very pleasant. if if this is your kind of temperature, there is not too much of wind but the breeze will pick up over the weekend and it turns warmerfor will pick up over the weekend and it turns warmer for some and cloudier for others. more details about the weekend in our next bulletin.
12:30 pm
this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines now: theresa may has admitted she shed a tear when she realised the result of the general election. she said she had been devastated to hear the exit poll. the government has published the repeal bill to sever ties with the eu. it says the government has two years after brexit to correct any deficiencies arising from converting eu law into british law. the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has held talks with the first ministers of scotland and wales ahead of the second round of formal brexit negotiations next week. later he'll meet labour leaderjeremy corbyn. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard say they hope the courts will finally rule in their favour, as a judge hears new evidence about whether an experimental treatment could help.
12:31 pm
the system for deciding how quickly ambulances in england should reach patients is being overhauled. nhs england says the new rules will lead to a quicker response for patients. let's get more now on the repeal bill which hasjust been published. as we've been hearing, the case of baby charlie gard returns to the high court today, with his parents hoping evidence that an experimental american treatment could improve their son's condition. our correspondent aleem maqbool has been to baltimore to visit a child receiving a similar treatment to that being offered to charlie gard. this young boy is now six years old. he has a similar syndrome to charlie grant, that effectively shuts down his muscles and organs. when he was 1.5 his parents were taken —— told
12:32 pm
to ta ke 1.5 his parents were taken —— told to take their child had to die with dignity. they fought to get approval to get experimental treatment for their son. i did not care if he was their son. i did not care if he was the first human to try these medications because they only told us he was going to die. we had already called a priest to give him the last rites because he hadn't opened his eyes in a few days. luckily we were able to get the approval pretty fast and then we we re approval pretty fast and then we were able to get him the medication so little by little he started to get stronger. doctors and the courts in the uk say that baby charlie gard has suffered too much irreversible brain damage to survive and any further treatment could cause him significant harm. this child is extraordinary for so many reasons. at the forefront of the campaign to keep charlie on life support is an anti—abortion pastor from
12:33 pm
washington, dc, the group that gathered hundreds of thousands of signatures to save him is also american and two us congressmen are trying to pass legislation to give charlie american citizenship so he could get treatment in the us that could get treatment in the us that could help improve his condition.” realise that these are hard issues but we have to stick to these bright lines and make sure that parents are the default decision makers because if we don't then all the little charlie gards in the world or in trouble. of course president trump weighed in as well. the charlie gard story has become political here with some on the right saying that it shows that having a national health system is bad. those on the other side of the debates over donald trump is being hypocritical, on one hand showing compassion to a british family, while his party tries to pass health legislation that could seriously endanger american children. he is deciding over the biggest medicaid cuts that we have
12:34 pm
ever seen as biggest medicaid cuts that we have ever seen as well as fundamental and restructuring of the programme that kids rely on. this will shred the safety net that children have been relying on for many now. this is probably the most important issue for children in decades. this american father ‘s only concern was fighting to keep his son alive. he understands better than anyone what charlie gards parents are going through, being told he should let his child die when there was a promise, however implausible, that he could be saved. the parent company of southern rail has been fined £114 million following widespread delays and cancellations to services. the department of transport says the amount would have been much higher but most of the problems were down to strike action and high staff sickness levels rather than anything the operator had done. joining me now via webcam is sim harris, the editor of rail news.
12:35 pm
thank you for being with us. we know it has been a pretty miserable time for the passengers, what do you think of this fine? less than we might have expected, although to be fair, go—ahead who own 65% of go via had predicted about 15 million earlier this year so maybe this is in line with expectations, they say it is. to what extent do you think management is to blame and to what extent a re management is to blame and to what extent are the unions to blame for all these problems? i think the primary causes that part of the franchise contract, which wasn't given much publicity, in fact no publicity at first, that said that pa rt publicity at first, that said that part of the go via thames link railway franchise would include this changeover from a conductor and the driver to a driver with a second person on board known as an on—board
12:36 pm
supervisor. that proved to be the match that set off the explosion. where are we now with that dispute? we are not sure because there is an aslef ballot depending and the rmt are still on strike but southern are using a get out clause that allows them to run trains without on—board supervisors which tend to be rmt members and they are running them true driver only. whether that is sustainable and whether the unions will eventually give way on this is absolutely unknown but what i can say to anybody who uses southern is that this story is not over yet and it is an interesting development but we have to keep waiting. a finite this is a smack on the wrist but it does not really help the passengers and the commuters particularly. well, it should do a little bit, because it is going to be reinvested, we a re because it is going to be reinvested, we are told. it is not entirely clear how it will be
12:37 pm
reinvested in detail but intriguingly some of it, a couple of million of it could pay for some more on board supervisors. in fact, it is4 more on board supervisors. in fact, it is 4 million when i look at my notes. 15 more on—board supervisors in the next few years to improve travel for staff and customers. does that mean there will be more on southern railway will baby on other services that go via thames link railway run, which includes thames link itself and great northern will stop i have asked the question but i don't know the answer. more staff is seen don't know the answer. more staff is seen to be one way forward. thank you for talking to us. more now on the news that the system for deciding how quickly ambulances in england should reach patients is being overhauled. nhs leaders say the previous targets have become blunt and dysfunctional. under the new rules, 90% of the most serious calls will now need to be reached within 15 minutes. previously it was 75% to be reached in eight minutes. with me isjuliet bouverie, chief executive of the
12:38 pm
stroke association. thank you for being with us. what do you think of these changes? we welcome these changes. we know that stroke is a medical emergency. every second counts so the great thing that we welcome about these changes is that previously some stroke patients, who needed to get to an acute stroke unit quickly, were being dispatched a motorbike or a car which was unsuitable to their needs. now what we know is that all stroke patients will get access to an ambulance with a 2—person crew that will take them quickly to an acute stroke unit where they will get a ccess acute stroke unit where they will get access to the life—saving drugs and treatments that they need so all we see it as good news. just generally, do you think it was time
12:39 pm
foran generally, do you think it was time for an overhaul? that the system was, as we have heard, dysfunctional? the system hasn't reviewed for many years and what we like about this proposed changes that it has been properly piloted and evaluated. the pilot that has happened in the last 18 months in england has demonstrated that lives have been saved and there have been no adverse patient safety risks and it isa no adverse patient safety risks and it is a more efficient use of resources . it is a more efficient use of resources. what used to happen before is a motorbike might be dispatched and it would be the wrong vehicle and then an ambulance needed to come out, or sometimes multiple ambulances would come out to the same patients and then needed to be returned. it just was same patients and then needed to be returned. itjust was not a efficient use of scarce resources within the nhs. with stroke patients, when someone has a stroke, obviously time is absolutely critical, every second. yes, we talk about time is brain. for every second blast there are hundreds of thousands of brain cells being damaged and therefore that patient ‘s life is at risk and the extent of their disability could be significantly increased. the most important thing with a stroke is that it important thing with a stroke is thatitis important thing with a stroke is that it is treated as an emergency and we want the ambulance call
12:40 pm
operators to do the fast test properly and recognise that someone is showing the signs and symptoms of a stroke and we want stroke patients to get quickly to an acute stroke unit. we want access to brain scans within an hourand unit. we want access to brain scans within an hour and clotbusting drugs if that is appropriate within four hours because all the evidence shows us that it saves lives and it morley importantly reduces disability and enables people to have a better outcome. can be ambulance paramedics do much within the vehicle, during the journey were at the scene, or does it all have to be done back in the hospital? is itjust a question of getting the patient quickly to hospital? the trick is getting the patient as quickly as possible. what the ambulance crew will do is they will repeat the fast test to see the face and arms are affected and then they will dispatch as quickly as possible to a acute stroke unit. as the patient is transported they will liaise with accident and emergency and the stroke unit so that all the people are on hand to deliver the
12:41 pm
essential scans and get the patient ready, if they are eligible, for clotbusting treatment called from the lysis, or even this new really game saving treatment for trope where the stroke is physically removed from the brain, the clot is physically removed. thank you very much for coming in. that is the chief executive of the stroke association, thank you. theresa may said she stroked a little tear when she realised the result of the general election but says she does not regret calling. ministers have published their long—awaited repeal bill and a top civil servants as the government is so badly split over brexit that it risks falling apart like a chocolate 0range. hearings on the case of the terminally ill baby charlie gard are continuing for a second day at the high court. the american doctor offering charlie experimental treatment will give evidence this afternoon. in 2015, nearly a million migrants
12:42 pm
made the dangerous journey by sea from turkey to greece. more than 10,000 are still in refugee camps, denied entry into western europe. but the island of tilos believes it has the answer, offering accommodation to migrants who work and integrate, in a trial that could be rolled out across the rest of greece. a short time ago our europe reporter gavin lee joined a short time ago our europe reporter gavin leejoined me from the island of tilos. it is quite extraordinary and it is the first time that this has been tried on any greek island. there are 800 people here and it is very small and quite close to rhodes. the mayor here first saw what was going on back in 2015 with all the boats coming into the other islands, more than 10,000 of those migrants and refugees are still on those islands and waiting for a decision as to whether they can return
12:43 pm
to turkey to seek asylum there as part of the eu migration plan. the idea was that a small number were selected to come here if they would work and integrate and i have been talking to a number of refugees a few months on to see how the project is going. tilos island, ten miles from the turkish coast, population 800. a place where there are more goats than people. a year ago, the local mayor announced the islanders wanted to help and receive refugees looking for a new life, bucking the trend of the other islands, keener to see migrants leave. it's a small but significant show of faith for this tiny island. 50 refugees selected from around greece who are prepared to work, who are prepared to integrate, and it's mainly families, and in exchange they'll get somewhere to stay and residency here. meet kousay, the new baker of tilos. he escaped from the war in syria and originally aimed for germany with his family. when i arrived to tilos all my life changed. my life and my wife is now relaxed
12:44 pm
and my children go to school and the people here i think are very nice, very beautiful. excuse me, in room? 0ne hotel has taken on three refugees, two as housekeepers, including mahar baraka from damascus, who talks of one day buying a house here. in the tilos refugee centre, the children have been learning greek songs. they're singing, "blow, wind, blow, take us to distant places." the key to the tilos plan being a success is how the younger generation of refugees settle here and whether they continue to feel welcome and part of the community over the years to come. something that strikes me that i have been on the other islands
12:45 pm
but a lot of the refugees here speak about staying here and making a life here. i can speak to two people who have been involved in this. firstly mahar baraka who featured in the film we just saw and sophia ioannou from solidarity now. mahar, tell me the reaction you get from locals here. are they nice to you and welcoming to you? i am here now on tilos and before i come here i come, i start on another island. after i come here i see greece differently because after i stay in tilos i see here are people who are nice and do not have a problem with the refugees from syria and now i have a job after help from solidarity now, i have a job and i am now happy
12:46 pm
and i think now i start life anew and the future of anew. i know that your husband is a chef and you are both talking about setting up the first syrian and greek restaurant and calling it mr & mrs falafel. yes, this is my dream. i want to set up a restaurant here for syrian food. this is the first restaurant here, maybe in tilos, i hope this. and maybe it would have the name mr & mrs falafel. thank you. sophia, this is fantastic in terms of integration but how do you make it work elsewhere? there are 50,000 refugees and migrants on the mainland, how does it spread as a project? actually tilos has showed us the example of how the express
12:47 pm
solidarity of people and of the local community and the municipality when all get together with organisations such as ngos and locals come together and they can make it happen. this can work as paradigms shift for other local societies as well. thank you both for talking to me and i really appreciate it. this is something new and something that people here say is a success so far and people like sophia are working elsewhere in greece are working out where else in greece might be open to trying something like this. we have an update on the news of charlie gard. his parents are at the high court saying that american experimental treatment might improve their son ‘s condition and we were hearing earlier on that the judge had said it was absurd that the science of the case was being
12:48 pm
undermined because of a dispute over the measurement of charlie ‘s skull. we arejust the measurement of charlie ‘s skull. we are just hearing that the parents have walked out of the high court hearing on the treatment of their son. let us go to our correspondent who is at the high court. do we know anymore about why they have walked out of the court? well, it was basically a dispute over what had been said at a previous hearing. because of the way this has been working because this hearing was quite a last—minute call it was only on monday that it started, and then this is only two days later, said transcripts have not necessarily been available from previous hearings, bearing in mind there have been so many court levels, so there is a dispute and thejudge was trying levels, so there is a dispute and the judge was trying to remember what chris gard, charlie ‘s father, had said at a previous hearing about ‘s condition and he quoted from it
12:49 pm
but then charlie ‘s parents disputed what he had said about the issue of whether charlie was suffering or in pain at the moment and at that point they stormed out of court, or they walked out of court. you could hear the doors banging as they left. really what it highlights is the level of intensity. this is obviously a very difficult hearing for his parents. they have been sat in there for two hours and listening to their son being talked about in the third person and not able to interjecting clearly they have done a lot of research themselves and they have a lot of opinions about what should happen and this was after two hours of having to listen to other people talking, this was sort of a chance and frustration built up and they left the court room. afterwards mrjustice francis tried to find the original quote and he did find it and he said that he thought what he quoted was almost exactly what they said, if not exactly what they said, if not exactly what they said, if not exactly what they said, and he asked their council whether they want to adjourn because of this year that point chris gard and connie yates we re
12:50 pm
point chris gard and connie yates were not in the courtroom, but they did carry on with some evidence that their council said that the parents we re their council said that the parents were actually aware of so more evidence being heard in court but evidence being heard in court but evidence really of just evidence being heard in court but evidence really ofjust how sensitive this cases. of course, most of all, for charlie ‘s parents. indeed. thank you for coming out of court and giving us that update. nasa has released new images of a raging storm onjupiter, which were taken earlier this week by the unmanned juno spacecraft. the pictures are the most detailed insight scientists have ever had to the phenomenon known as the great red spot. a little earlier i spoke to our science correspondent, jonathan amos, who told us more aboutjupiter‘s great red spot. first of all, what is the great red spot, and why are we fascinated by it? this is an enormous storm, kind of like a hurricane and it is 60 kilometres across, imagine a hurricane that is even bigger than earth. it has been raging for centuries.
12:51 pm
ever since we had telescopes, galileo looked up at the sky and we get better and better telescopes and ever since we have looked atjupiter this thing has been there, which is extraordinary. a hurricane sweeps across the atlantic and it lasts a few days or whatever and then it dissipates but this has been going for all of that time, which is just amazing. what does this new research tell us about it will that we did not know before? we will see. notjust the pictures, but alsojuno and all of its other but alsojuno had all of its other instruments on as it went over the top of the spot. the pictures show us the chaos of the region, they show us all of those swirls and those waves and vortices in a kind of detail we have not seen before. they are seeing, the scientists are seeing features as small as a few tens of kilometres across, let's say, so that gives them the 3d structure of the cloud tops. the other instruments that they had on at the time will be able to sense below the top of those clouds,
12:52 pm
right down into the spot, and tell us about the engine that drives it. how deep do all of those gases go that form a part of this whirling vortices that we see and that will tell us something about how jupiter works because we don't really know how this world works. why is it so important to study jupiter into much detail? jupiter is key in the solar system. if you think about the forming sun, 4.5 billion years ago, it forms at the centre of this big cloud of gas and dust and jupiter was almost certainly the next thing to form and grabbed a lot of the available material that was around at that time. if you take all of the other planets, comets, asteroids, and all the rest of it, everything else except the sun, all of that material will go inside jupiter, that is how big it is. unless you understand jupiter and how it works you do not really understand the rest of the solar system. dashcam footage has captured
12:53 pm
the moment a mudslide suddenly struck a busy road in southern china. it's thought to have been triggered by continuous rainfall in the region. eight vehicles were left buried in mud and three eight vehicles were left people were injured. time for a look at the weather now. the chance for catching a shower this afternoon, but most of us won't. these are some weather watcher pictures from today. is fair amount of sunshine coming through in the shetland islands. hazier and sunny spells in sussex. most of us will see sunshine at some stage in the day and some of those quite frequently. in england and wales the showers are few and far between. not heavy and eastern scotland but in the afternoon and evening there is a greater chance of getting heavy showers in northern ireland and running into western scotland as well. a chance for getting wet as we go through the evening rush—hour
12:54 pm
here. the breeze picks up a bit as well. for most parts of the wind is light and the temperatures are in the high teens or low 20s and very close to average for the time of year. for england and wales the showers are very year. for england and wales the showers are very hit and miss in the vast majority are going to miss rather they catch. through thursday evening and night we have a weather system taking rain further east across scotland and the heavier downpours in northern england for a time with showers in wales. the temperatures are quite a range between the town and city centres and what goes on a more rural spots and what goes on a more rural spots and in the suburbs so the more rural you are the lower the temperature and a fresh feeling stuck to friday. a chance for catching showers in the morning of friday. later on there are not many left behind and it is mainly dry afternoon. there will be afairamount of mainly dry afternoon. there will be a fair amount of cloud around but there will be some sunny breaks at times. again temperatures are close to average for the time of year and
12:55 pm
it makes for a place on friday. the weather system is approaching northern ireland and scotland and it will bring outbreaks of rain on friday evening so it you could see that developing here and be aware you may get wet out and about on friday evening here. the big picture for the weekend, a flow of quite moist and humid air coming in from the atlantic which means quite a lot of cloud and in northern and western coasts and hills there will be some outbreaks of rain and drizzle around and some more substantial rain heading through northern ireland and scotla nd heading through northern ireland and scotland on saturday evening. much on the south and east will stay dry and get warmer and more humid. there isa and get warmer and more humid. there is a breeze in the northern part of the uk by sunday and there is the return of sunny spells here. the prime minister tells the bbc she became tearful when she learned on election night that she'd lost her majority. in a frank and personal interview, theresa may described her shock
12:56 pm
as she learned of the result. enough to shed a tear? um, to... yes, a little tear. yes, at that moment? at that moment, yes. but mrs may said she didn't regret calling the election, as it was "the right thing to do at the time". also this lunchtime: the government publishes the repeal bill, a key part of its brexit strategy. the parents of terminally—ill baby charlie gard walk out of a high court hearing that's been asked to review his treatment. donald trump arrives in france for talks with president macron, and to attend bastille day celebrations. and konta's big test — she faces venus williams this afternoon in her attempt to be the first british woman
12:57 pm
12:58 pm
12:59 pm
1:00 pm

155 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on