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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 13, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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luck with not a fair question. good luck with your exams, i suspect we will talk your exams, i suspect we will talk you again about who knows what, but best of luck. thank you very much. this is bbc news. the headlines at three: the government publishes the repeal bill, a key part of its brexit strategy, to sever ties with the eu. in a frank and personal interview, the prime minister tells the bbc she became tearful when she learned the election result. devastated enough to shed a tear? in that moment, yes. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard walk out of a high court hearing that's been asked to review his treatment. also this hour: president trump touches down in paris as part of a two—day visit. while there he'll hold talks with president macron and attend bastille day celebrations. the chinese dissident liu xiaobo who
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took part in the academy square protests a nd took part in the academy square protests and won the nobel peace prize has died at age 60 one. konta's big test — she's playing five—time champion venus williams in her attempt to be the first british woman in a wimbledon final in a0 years. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the government has published a key part of its brexit strategy. the repeal bill will convert eu legislation into british law after brexit, giving uk parliament the power to change them. the brexit secretary david davis says the legislation will ensure we have a "fully functioning legal system" on leaving the eu. but opposition parties are warning they will vote against it, unless major changes are made.
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0ur political correspondent ben wright reports from westminster. power is shifting. brexit will end the supremacy of eu law in the uk. but untangling a0 years of rules and regulations will be complex and contentious. the bill published today will eventually repeal this — the 1972 european communities act. it will also copy and paste existing eu law into uk legislation. we believe that to deliver a smooth and orderly exit from the eu, we need to ensure people know they face the same laws and rules and regulations on the day after we leave as they did the day before. so there's no step change. people can be confident the law will continue to operate, but parliament, crucially, will have control. so this new bill is crucial and without it there would be legal chaos on the day that britain left the eu. but the task is huge. thousands of existing eu rules and regulations will be copied across into domestic uk law.
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parliament needs to pass this bill by the time the uk leaves the eu in march 2019. and because time is short, ministers plan to change some laws without a vote by mps — and that is controversial. is the government reallyjust sticking to what it said it would do, using the powers to make technical changes, or is it changing the law importantly by using these powers? that will be one flash point in this bill. presentation of bill, mr secretary davis... but the government's job will be made harder because it doesn't have a majority in the house of commons, and opposition parties are clear they plan to battle the government over this bill. we want to bring eu law into british law and we would do it properly. this bill, at the moment, doesn't do it properly. so we find that the government intends to make changes behind closed doors. they may put sunset clauses or deadlines in, they are not being reasonable with the devolved administrations. we don't know how they intend to deal with disputes
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through this bill. they need to answer those questions. this morning, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn and his team headed for brussels for talks with the eu's negotiators, clear the party would derail the government's new bill unless changes are made. the liberal democrats, too, have warned ministers the government faces hell trying to get the repeal bill through. in the months to come, some tory mps may be tempted to vote with opposition parties to significantly shape the way brexit happens — through this bill and others. it's parliament where theresa may's weakened position will be tested. let's speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young. it's going to be difficult, protracted, tough work. yeah, and i think the sheer complexity of disentangling the united kingdom
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from more than a0 years of a close relationship from the united kingdom —— european union is very apparent today. you have negotiations going on in brussels about how we get out of the eu and then what future relationship is going to be and then heard in parliament over the next two years, you're going to have this repeal bill going through with a government that doesn't have a clear majority on any of this. that is going to be troublesome. then you're going to be troublesome. then you're going to be troublesome. then you're going to have also the new bills, if you're taking away some of these things, freedom of movement for example, have all immigration system will have to change, we will need a new system put in change which will require legislation. all of these things going on at the same time and you really do see how much the government has on its plate. even before the general election, much closer it is predicted, there are conservatives who were saying that this repeal bill will be the moment they can exert quite a lot of
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influence. now they feel even more confident about that. i was speaking to the former cabinet minister nicky morgan who is the chairwoman of the treasury select committee and i asked her what her priorities would be in the coming months and years. clearly the option of it transitional phase so getting everything done in 20 months, having potential cliff edge which we need to avoid so that everything doesn't change from one day to the next so whether that is in the bill or something that is going to be agreed as part of the negotiations. i think alsojust looking at as part of the negotiations. i think also just looking at things like single market access, access to the customs union, the whole issue of how we're going to keep our economy strong whilst we are undergoing brexit and once we are leaving the european union so there might not be issues with the bill mrs sally but i think ministers will need to talk about them as they are taking the bill through parliament. there are other conservatives on the remain side of the argument in the eu referendum. they say they are not intending to block brexit but they
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do say they will be loyal critics of the government in the coming months andi the government in the coming months and i think the big question isjust how far they are prepared to go in that. with me is journalist matthew holehouse who writes for the global newswire mlex and was in a briefing on the bill earlier on. what was the mood amongst colleagues at the end of this? is fantastically complicated exercise, trying to move the body of eu law into domestic law but without changes. it's fa ntastically but without changes. it's fantastically fiddly. but it sounded so fantastically fiddly. but it sounded so simple. there's just bring european law into british parliament, they take it over and can fiddle with it at will later on. it's not as simple as that? some laws, for example which chemicals you can use, decently transpose it which is what they plan to do. the really complicated bit is how that law is enforced. who decides the
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chemicals? where does the decision come from? the uk has to create a whole separate body of regulators or pass new powers to existing regulators which is what this bill allows them to do and that is something that is really contentious because they're creating at great speed without the normal levels of scrutiny a whole new range of powers for the british state and that is what is making quite a lot of lawyers and campaigners quite jumpy about the powers created by this bill. you mention it to state and we have heard from the first ministers of scholars and wales saying this is a land grab. exactly, in scotland and wales, as far as the jurisdictions interact with the eu, what scotland and wales have said todayit what scotland and wales have said today it is they're not happy with these changes and the first minister of wales and the first minister of scotla nd of wales and the first minister of scotland have said they will not recommend their parliaments give consent to the changes and if the scottish and welsh parliaments don't
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consent to these changes you will see a constitutional flash point that will put the entire course of the brexit process in question. the devil is always in the detail. you know about the detail. then early couple of sentences, paragraphs, that would appear to give ministers incredible powers. that's what people are concerned about. to give an example, the eu canada trade agreement contains provisions which have got to pass through the uk parliament as regular, primary legislation. what this is saying is there will be a clause that says the entire withdrawal bill and any changes needed to uk legislation to deliver the eu exit deal can be done by ministers the executive action. parliament will have to pass this through, approve it without knowing what is in the content of that final brexit steel saw lots of critics will say that ministers are really asking parliament to ask them a blank cheque to deliver brexit with the ticking clock against them. says
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impossible to me. we will see some interesting parliamentary battles and the interesting thing is, what happens if this legislation doesn't get past? will brexit not happen because they have took hold the entire article 50 process? what is the uk still aches the eu but with its statute book in disarray and is none of the changes that they need to make delivered? —— does the uk still exit? the parents of the terminally ill baby charlie gard are this afternoon back in court, after they walked out of the high court on the second day of a hearing focussing on their son's treatment. their lawyers have been presenting what they claim is new evidence showing that an experimental treatment could help him. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital, where the little boy is in intensive care, say the therapy won't work. 0ur correspondent sarah campbell is at the high court for us. what's expected to happen today? this hearing is a speaking for
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charlie god. the traffic behind me is beeping in support for him —— charlie gard. the parents are desperate for this new treatment. they say it'll make a difference to his condition and it has been undoubtedly difficult for them today. they walked out of court before lunch after a disagreement with thejudge. they before lunch after a disagreement with the judge. they are now back in and had been listening to evidence this afternoon. the judge said they we re this afternoon. the judge said they were free to leave whenever they had to. this afternoon's evidence on video links on the united states now was the american doctor who has been proposing to treat charlie gard. we cannot name him to do reporting restrictions and we cannot name the institution he works for but he is giving evidence at the moment and he
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has been asked because this is crucial to the ceiling, what is it thatis crucial to the ceiling, what is it that is new that, that has come forward since the originaljudgment in april? he has said that there has been information since april that this nucleoside therapy, this experimental treatment, is able to reach the brain when tested on mice and also that there is new evidence that it helps with muscle weakness. just in the last few minutes, he has been asked, what about the prospect of success on charlie gard. he said since april we have had the chance to analyse more data and he estimates the chance of success to be around 10% and that is based on the fact that they have looked at nine similar patients not with exactly the same condition as charlie but nine similar patients full—time on ventilators and one of them is now able to be off the ventilator and he says that is clinically meaningful. interesting
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on another point which has been an issue of debate between charlie's pa rents issue of debate between charlie's parents and great 0rmond street is theissue parents and great 0rmond street is the issue of brain damage, how severely brain—damaged is charlie? when the stock was asked about that, he said the eeg that he has seen a charlie's brain suggest disorganisation of brain activity but not structural brain damage and charlie's parents gave a thumbs up at that point. at the moment, we had only hearing his perspective, he hasn't been cross—examined so he has been asked by charlie's parents‘ council but that's what's going on at the moment and that video link is continuing. sarah campbell outside a very noisy high court, we are grateful. the headlines on bbc news: the government publishes the repeal bill, a key part of its brexit strategy, to sever ties with the eu. 0pposition parties want able fight its passage through parliament. the parents of terminally ill baby charlie gard walk out
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of a high court hearing that's been asked to review his treatment. in a frank and personal interview, the prime minister tells the bbc she became tearful when she learned the election result. she lost her majority but says she does not regret calling the election. the giant skeleton of a blue whale takes centre stage at the natural history museum. johanna konta is currently playing venus williams. can she took place in the at wimbledon? 0ne venus williams. can she took place in the at wimbledon? one of them will play the spanish player in the final. mo farah says his final race on the track in the uk will be at the birmingham grand prix in august. i'll be back with more than those stories just after 2:30pm. modern the interview with theresa
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may in which she said she shed a tear upon hearing the exit poll saying she would lose her majority. she had lent the campaign had not been going, in her words, " perfectly". been going, in her words, "perfectly". she declined to say how long she would stay in power and reissued her call to work with opposition parties to deliver brexit. it started so well. all of that talk was about how much you are going to win by, how big the extra majority would be. when did you first have an inkling it might not be going according to plan? i think as the campaign was going on, i realised everything wasn't going perfectly. but throughout the campaign the expectation still was that the result would be a different one, a better one for us than it was. we didn't see the results that came coming. when was the moment of realisation? it was when i heard the exit poll.
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to be honest, i didn't watch the exit poll myself. i'm superstitious about things like that. my husband watched it and came and told me. and i was shocked at the result in the exit poll. it took a few minutes for it to sink in, what that was telling me. my husband gave me a hug. and then i got on the phone to gchq, to the conservative party. when you had a hug, did you have a cry? how did you feel? i suppose i felt devastated. enough to shed a tear? yes, a little tear at that moment. you had no idea this was going to go like this. you've explained how the campaign worked. why should people feel confident you are any good at reading the mood music of a room,
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especially when you go to brussels on the deal on the basis that you have an idea that your campaign wasn't going well? i've said that i knew the campaign wasn't going perfectly, so i'm not sitting here... it's rather more dramatic than that. i'm not sitting here saying it was going swimmingly. i knew it wasn't a perfect campaign. but what i also knew was that i was doing the job that i thought was important at the time. that was talking to people about the challenges the country faces. you have to get brexit through the commons. can you guarantee you'll get the numbers that you personally are able, to do the necessary deals to get brexit through the commons? the first thing is to get a good dealfrom the european union. but you can't do it without the commons, so can you guarantee you'll get it through? i want to get a good deal from the european union, and i'd hope that people from across the house of commons,
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regardless of party, will see the importance of that deal for the future of britain. i have said before that i'm a feminist. and i believe it's important that women genuinely have equal opportunities. 73% of women aged i6—2a voted forjeremy corbyn. one thing that i have been involved in my career is trying to get more women into parliament, but on the basis that i don't want people to think, i'm going to vote for a woman or a man. if you don't see somebody doing the role, you don't believe it's possible. it can be inspirational. it can be. when i became prime minister, i heard a lovely story of a friend whose six—year—old daughter said,
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"mummy, i didn't realise a girl could do thatjob." if she'd been 18, the stats show she would have voted forjeremy corbyn. for some young people, there were issues. there were issues the students around their fees and university education. just say to me now, sitting in this office, you have been on a long journey to get to this point. what would you say to your younger self? oh, gosh, this is one of those, "what would i write to a 16—year—old theresa may?" i think what i would write to my younger self is, believe in yourself. always do the right thing. and, you know, work hard to tackle injustice when you see it. the chinese nobel peace laureate
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liu xiaobo has died, days after he was moved from prison to hospital for cancer treatment. mr liu, who was 61, was serving an eleven year prison sentence — punishment for his role in writing and circulating an online petition calling for an end to china's one—party state. the legal bureau in the northeastern city of shenyang, where he had been hospitalised, confirmed his death in a statement. donald trump is on a two—day trip to paris, where he'll hold talks with president macron and attend bastille day celebrations. they're expected to discuss joint action in syria and iraq against the so—called islamic state group. a short time ago he was welcomed to the city by the french president at a ceremony. the area houses the tomb
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of napoleon. they are now heading to the palace for talks. we go now like to paris to our correspondent. what's on the agenda? the agenda todayis what's on the agenda? the agenda today is the military complex today where donald trump and melania trump have been shown around personally by emmanuel macron who has taken personal control of this part of the ceremony and has been showing them around the tomb of napoleon a man who ensure donald trump feels a certain fascination and they are due at palace any minute. the guards are lining the steps up to the front door of the elysee. they will arrive here, they will be talks then a short press conference, then after that they will be whipped off to the
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eiffel tower for a slap up that they will be whipped off to the eiffel towerfor a slap up meal in the restaurant halfway up. tomorrow, there's the march past the champs—elysees. the invitation is linked to the 100 years since american troopsjoined linked to the 100 years since american troops joined in world war i. it is not personal, it is to the president because of the important anniversary taking place tomorrow. the presence of the two first ladies adds a sense of glamour to this. yes, absolutely. we saw melania trump this morning at france's reading hospitalfor trump this morning at france's reading hospital for children, trump this morning at france's reading hospitalfor children, where she was shown around and met children —— leading hospital. there are other trips planned including a
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trip down the river and dinner tonight. there is a glamour people side to this but it doesn't detract from the fact they will be a serious content from the fact they will be a serious co nte nt to from the fact they will be a serious content to these talks today. there are content to these talks today. there a re clearly content to these talks today. there are clearly disagreements, particularly over climate and we remember emanuel macon's pointed video when he says to donald trump after he had left the paris accord, let's make the planet great again, mrtrump. let's make the planet great again, mr trump. that notwithstanding, there is a clear sense of the french side that although the idea of agencies —— there are divergences on the french side, the historical importance of the relationship goes beyond personalities and it is the duty of every french president to greet every american president and do them june on —— due honour.m greet every american president and do them june on -- due honour. it is a chance for them to get to know
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each other because they are relatively new leaders. they have met of course, they have met three times in the last two weeks, so the newness of the relationship is gone. i'm not sure how much personal chemistry they really have because in the face of it they are miles apart on personality, on age, and interests, but you must never underestimate the power or charm of emmanuel macron, he is a man who could charge you of hades —— pluto out of hades, and a special gift, this relationship he's got with america which could have been problematic as being resuscitated. emmanuel macron always has his — the leadership of europe and the return of france to the world stage. is this helping to extend this honeymoon period that emmanuel
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macron seem to be enjoying? yeah, i would say to a point. all of this is relative and beginning to lose its shine, the honeymoon period was very obvious when the first encounters between emmanuel macron and other world leaders to place and in the run—up to the legislative elections here a couple of weeks ago. that phase in which we all basked in the newness of this man, his youth and his energy and his considerable charm, that is slightly beginning to wear off as people look to seeing actions and reforms and change. that said, his performance on the world stage has been given 100% thumbs up more 01’ stage has been given 100% thumbs up more or less by the french press. he is regarded as having played an absolute blinder in the last couple of months. a visit that could have been so criticised in france, when you think about how they could have
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been mass demonstrations, there has been mass demonstrations, there has been nothing here goes he has won the argument with the french. when he says whatever be think about this man, he represents one of our oldest allies will stop we cannot but receive them —— him and give him due honour. johanna konta is on court facing venus williams. these are live pictures from wimbledon. as you can see, for dash to be suggesting that games have been going with comtesse irving now with 30 all —— with johanna konta serving now with 30 all. williams is the tenth seed and game point. perhaps we can stay with
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the tennisjust to game point. perhaps we can stay with the tennis just to see whether she can make it for all —— four all. a driving forehand from johanna konta to level the scores and we will keep you in touch with the scorers. now, if you've taken a trip to the natural history museum recently, you'll have been greeted by dippy the diplodocus, standing proud in the entrance hall. now, another creature is taking the central display — the skeleton of a giant blue whale, suspended from the ceiling. but fans of dippy need not fear —
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the dinosaur will soon be heading on a tour of the uk, as our science correspondent pallab ghosh reports. it's the biggest creature that's known to have existed. 0nce driven to the point of extinction, but now saved by human collaboration. the blue whale is the natural history museum's new iconic display. and it's been named hope. hope represents the ability of man to use rational evidence and good science in making decisions that will affect the future of our planet. we think that's a message that's really important at this time. hence the reason to call her hope — hope for the future, hope we'll make the right decisions based on good science, rational debate and clear evidence. the whale was beached off the coast of wexford in south—east ireland in 1891. it's been on display in one
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of the museum's galleries for more than 100 years and it's been a huge engineering challenge to move it. the 25 metre skeleton of this young female fills the entire length of the entrance hall of the museum. its skull alone weighs more than a tonne and its lowerjawbone is the single longest bone of any animal on the planet. as visitors arrive they're greeted by it swooping down towards them, as if they're the tiny krill that whales feed upon. the whale replaces the much loved dippy the dinosaur, which has thrilled visitors for decades. let's see if we can find out how long it is. i think it's great that we're going to take dippy round on tour. we want to engage people all around the uk. we're hoping for at least 5 million new people to become engaged when they see dippy and they learn more about the history of that specimen.
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the museum staff believe that hope the whale takes the same place in our hearts that dippy once did. pallab ghosh, bbc news, at the natural history museum in london. and you can see more on the new exhibit at the natural history museum on horizon tonight on bbc two at nine o'clock. some sunny spells, but a weather system of award and battling northern ireland, pushing east toward scotland in this evening, and northern england overnight, if you follow wales and the midlands, 12 showers for east anglia. southwark england remains fairly dry. temperatures down to single figures
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for towns and city centres. friday, to start the day they will break if you showers around, despite a fair amount of cloud it is looking guy, just occasional sunny spells coming through, we will see this weather system bringing some rain across scotla nd system bringing some rain across scotland and northern ireland on friday evening. cabbages coaster damage by time of year, low 20s, south—east england will get warmer over the weekend, the weekend starts with a lot of cloud, some outbreaks of rain, gradually pushing east on saturday. breezy picture. i will tell you more about part to the weekend and have an hour. this is bbc news. the headlines: the repeal bill, one of the most crucial pieces of brexit legislation has been published by the government. the opposition has called for changes to the bill, which will convert eu law into british law. the parents of terminally ill baby
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charlie gard say they hope the courts will finally rule in theirfavour — as a judge hears new evidence about whether an experimental treatment could help. in a candid interview, theresa may has told the bbc she shed a tear when the exit poll correctly predicted she would lose her majority. the french president, emmanuel macron, has welcomed donald trump to paris with an official ceremony at les invalides. talks between the two leaders are expected to focus on joint efforts to combat the so—called islamic state group in syria and iraq. china's best known political dissident liu xiaobo has died at the age of 61 —— shortly after he was moved from prison to hospital to be treated for liver cancer. he won the the nobel peace prize in 2010. time for the sport. there is early one game in town right now. johanna konta is on centre court right now facing venus williams. she'll be trying to become the first
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british woman to reach a wimbledon finalfor the first time in a0 years. hugh is at wimbledon for us. how are things looking? of the british fans out on the hill at the moment, gasping for every shot between johanna at the moment, gasping for every shot betweenjohanna konta and venus williams and what has been the biggest match of konta's career so far, the first set is very tight. it has gone with serve, 5—a to venus williams, playing very well any tenth game at 30—30, really to stay ina set tenth game at 30—30, really to stay in a set of konta. a good start so far, she's not out of it. venus williams has all the experience here, eight times a finalist, a very big match forjohanna konta. after that win over simona halep, she will be very confident, as it is he the light picks here, 30—0 here, johanna
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konta was here she can stay in the match... as you can see, still playing quite well against venus williams. a difficult match for her, but she well, if she can come through, move on to face dabbing but she well, if she can come thi’l group, ove on to face dabbing but she well, if she can come thi’l group, a /e on to face dabbing but she well, if she can come thi’l group, a set n to face dabbing but she well, if she can come thi’l group, a set pointace dabbing but she well, if she can come thi’l group, a set point for dabbing but she well, if she can come thi’l group, a set point for venus g the group, a set point for venus williams there, so a difficult moment the match, could be a very big moment forjohanna konta. as you said, hugh, whoever wins this match, konta williams will face the spanish opponent. yes, she is already through to the final and they give very light work against the number 87 in the world, magdalena rivera cover, 6—1, 6—1, finished 87 in the world, magdalena rivera cover, 6—1, 6—1,finishedjust 87 in the world, magdalena rivera cover, 6—1, 6—1, finished just over an hour, bean as williams now on set point... three set points decision
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ta ke point... three set points decision take the opening set, johanna konta under real pressure indeed on her own serve. she has served very well so own serve. she has served very well so far in this tournament, she has hit more 80s than any other player to this point. but we can see she's going to stay in a match, one point back. deal that iraq still to set points, let's drop into the commentary team. commentator: second serve their from johanna. just back on the line. that is long, and it is the first blow to venus williams in the semifinal. there was a pause as the crowd to get end. —— the crowd to it in. she has lost the first set there, hasn't she? yes, a very
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different moment, her serve has been so different moment, her serve has been so impressive so far thatjust different moment, her serve has been so impressive so far that just a single break there any final match of the first set means that it goes to venus williams, and now a mountain to climb forjohanna konta. we'll see as you can turn things around and become the first bit is when to reach a final in women boult singles since indie seven. haas so tense, the remedy. manchester city are close to a deal to spend up to £50 million on tottenham and england right—back kyle walker. the 27—year—old is expected to have a medical and complete the transfer tomorrow. walker, who joined tottenham from sheffield united in 2009, will notjoin up with spurs for the start of their pre—season training on friday. instead, he will travel with city on monday to start their tour of the usa. that's all sport for now. more from us in the next hour. the government has today published a key part of its brexit strategy. the repeal bill will
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convert existing eu legislation into british law. 0pposition parties have said they have concerns about several issues and are warning they'll fight its passage through parliament. formally known as the european union (withdrawal) bill, it will repeal the european communities act 1972, which took britain into the eu and remove the supremacy of eu law. it will transpose eu law into british law so the same rules apply on the day of brexit as the day before. but it will give parliaments and assemblies in westminster, edinburgh, belfast and cardiff the power to change them in the future. it is not expected to be debated until the autumn, but will need to have been passed by the time the uk leaves the eu — due to be in march 2019. the brexit secretary david davis has called it "one of the most significant pieces of legislation that has ever passed through pa rliament". he's called on all parties to work together but labour has already said it will vote against it, unless major changes are made.
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a short while ago our assistant political editor norman smith joined me from westminster and said the big question is can the prime minister get this bill through parliament? theresa may in that interview was art the same question, and appealed to the mps in all parties to back this legislation, to deliver on it will be british people, which would mean there is trouble ahead. the liberal democrats have said they're going to cause health, labour have signalled they will vote against it at second reading, which is the main moment of the bill is approved, what we re moment of the bill is approved, what were the snp do? what were the tories do who are not enthusiastic about brexit? i am joined by the snp's brexit andy, tawny general. what does your party do with his bail? on the bill is not good enough, so an amended we're not going to vote for this
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bill, we will be amending it, it does not provide provision for devilish additional powers. it doesn't provide a whole raft of eid areas that were set out in the scottish government. discovered has had a year to get this right and more than a year since we had the referendum. i still don't think we're much for the forward. you have just been looking at the bill, are you happy with it or do you have concerns which might mean you vote against the? it tries to do a lot in 19 clauses. i think it but requires careful scrutiny in terms of the powers it gives government and how they are to be executed, and also they are to be executed, and also the other area of particular interest to me, how it actually dovetails with the eventual outcome of the negotiations. it seems to me from what i can see that parliament will have to have a further role, because some aspects of this bail may not actually be required depending on what form the exit
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ultimately takes. where i disagree with the labour party's position is that it with the labour party's position is thatitis with the labour party's position is that it is incoherent to say on the one hand we are going to vote to trigger article 50, as they did, but on the other hand to say, we will not at second reading support the necessary legislation to implement the decision. i think we need to explain themselves because i do not understand it. i explain themselves because i do not understand it. lam explain themselves because i do not understand it. i am willing to help the government along the way but i am also be a critical friend at the way this legislation is put together. loss of sound much of the concern centres on the issue of parliamentary scrutiny. the government can change the legislation without parliamentary scrutiny, is that a big enough issue for you to vote against the government? i don't see myself voting against this bill at second reading because this legislation is needed if we are leaving the eu. without it, we cannot leave the eu. asi without it, we cannot leave the eu. as i said, having accepted the decision of the electorate, i left
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the electric change their minds during the course of these bidders jesu, we will be leaving. the detail of it is certainly something which i intend to apply an independent and also that of a loyal critic, because we have got to get this right, and in certain circumstances if we do not get it right, i might have to review my position about the legislation. there will be people who say this is alljust gameplay, what is going on? people who have never accepted brexit and is finding a processing reason to derail it. we have to remember, let's not forget this, leaving the eu will have an impact on the environment, our rights, almost every aspect of our life, and as dominik points out, scrutiny becomes very important. i think the labour party got it wrong when they get a blank cheque to the tory party of the triggering of article 50, but we are now in a place where people in different parties need to work together to get the best possible deal, that is why the best possible deal, that is why the scottish government has been
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willing to compromise, but this bill does not get it right. they have had a yearand does not get it right. they have had a year and now the clock is ticking. is there any prospect of this bail and the seven other brexit bills and getting through parliament by the autumn of next year, when it has to be done? we have had a duty as parliamentarians to facilitate that process, but facilitating it is not the same as rubber—stamping it. it is an ambitious project, it has always been my concern that brexit isa always been my concern that brexit is a hugely ambitious project, which is a hugely ambitious project, which is fraught with risk but for this country. i have been saying that for a long time and the midst of the case. i think the outcome is that we will get our very uncertain about i am willing as a democrat, observing the decision of the uk electorate, to do my best to facilitate this process, but without sacrificing parliamentary scrutiny. are they going to have to start talking about
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transition very quickly, because it is going to be almost impossible to get all of this legislation through in the remaining time? we have to see a coherent plan. the scottish government has set one out, but we have seen today that there is no coherent plan. these plans the tories have for a hard brexit could cost u p tories have for a hard brexit could cost up to 80,000 jobs in scotland alone. as a constituency mp i have a responsibility to do i possibly can to get the best possible deal and do what is right for my constituents. voting for this bail is not the right thing to do for me. —— this bill. there is an awfully long time -- way to go, i think there will be late nights in the commons in coming months and years ahead. the king of spain has arrived at downing street on the second day of his state visit. king felipe vi was welcomed to number ten by the prime minister. the trip is the first state visit by a spanish king to the uk since his father, juan carlos, came 31 years ago. the government publishes the repeal
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bill which will convert eu law into uk law. the high court hears further evidence on possible experimental treatment from a doctor in the united states any case of a terminally ill baby, charlie gard. the prime minister tells the bbc she became tearful when she learned she had lost the majority but says she does not regret calling the election. business news. the uk housing market is in a state of lethargy, according to property surveyors, with estate agents reporting the lowest stock of properties for nearly a0 years. new instructions fell for the 16th month in a row injune and members
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of the royal institution of chartered surveyors said the market might continue "flat—lining" for a while. irish business leaders have called for a the european union to provide a state aid programme worth more than £890 million to protect their companies from a hard brexit. the irish business and employers confederation said that if britain left the customs union, it would massively disrupt trade, leaving irish firms exposed. britain is ireland's largest trading partner, supporting a00,000 jobs. formula 1 motor racing has signed a global deal with mobile app snapchat to create exclusive content from its upcoming grand prix races.the deal marks f1's first commercial tie—up with a major digital service that appears on mobile devices first.the partnership will kick—off this weekend, with coverage of the british grand prix on sunday via snapchat‘s 0ur stories format. southern rail‘s parent company has been fined over £13 million for poor performance following months of disruption. the department for transport said the amount imposed
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on govia thameslink would have been higher, but most of the delays had not been rail company's fault saying strikes and unprecedented levels of sick leave were also to blame.the rmt said the government had let the company off the hook. for more of this — lets talk to the bbc‘s transport correspondent richard westcott. £13 million sounds pretty significant — but it could have been a lot higher — how much criticism from the dept of transport was there of how unions have acted. as ever, the government has been very scathing about the unions and the way they have acted throughout the way they have acted throughout the past year or so. to units are involved, the rmt he and has left, who have always said this is basically political motivation, so they know that the unions want to nationalise the railway and want to see private companies fail, the government has accused them of doing anything possible, making customers
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suffer, passengers suffer, just for their own political ends. that is denied by the unions. they assessed this is about safety and having a guaranteed second person on board, sub is that they are guaranteeing that. but the unions say long—term, they fear that this is about getting rid of a second person on board, and they hired its happy going on for a year and neither have come anywhere near resolving it. in terms of the fine, £30 million doesn't leave a very big bad in southern rail‘s funds. you can see it is not the norm is. the reason for that, the government are saying, they don't think the delays are down to the company, a lot of people would dispute that, but they are saying most of this is bound to strike days and alsojust most of this is bound to strike days and also just a most of this is bound to strike days and alsojust a union members taking sick days when they are not meant to, so an unofficial strike action. the rmt union said the fine was pathetic, while the company called it a fair outcome — what are passenger groups saying? it depends which ones you ask. there
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area it depends which ones you ask. there are a variety who want different things, passenger groups who want sub and stripped of the franchise, that frankly was never going to happen. the government is not going to wa nt happen. the government is not going to want to take over this line, and thatis to want to take over this line, and that is what would have happened, it is conflict and difficult, industrial relations problems, people want nationalised railway, in the labour party, the unions, some commuters, which have a field day, the commuter groups are really had to heather severs about this on the left of the little spectrum are not getting their way. southern stays in. ordinary people going up and down the line want to go to work on time, theyjust down the line want to go to work on time, they just what the craze down the line want to go to work on time, theyjust what the craze to work, they don't will care who is responsible. they just wanted work, they don't will care who is responsible. theyjust wanted to work. a few other stories we've been following today: the maker of havaianas — perhaps the world's most famous brand of flip—flops — has been sold for £850 million. the company which owned is looking to raise cash after being caught up in brazil's corruption scandal.
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havaianas are one of brazil's best—known international brands with over 200 million pairs of flip—flops sold per year. sports direct has bought a 26% stake in struggling computer games retailer game digital. game said sports direct had bought aa million shares and that it looked forward to "working collaboratively" with the company. last month, game issued a profit warning, blaming poor supplies of the nintendo switch console. and wills could be texts or emails in future. the law commission for england and wales has said that wills should be updated and brought into the "modern world" and that the current rules were "unclear" and could be putting people off from making one. the commission has launched a consultation on the proposals. bit of a choppy day today for london's blue chip share index — the ftse has been dipping in and out of negative territory— astrazeneca has been weighing on the health care sector and bp and royal dutch shell tracking crude prices lower.
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burberry has continued to do well, despite what looks to be an explosive agm taking place today — with concerns over the level of executive pay at the company. some better than expected sales numbers boosted by strong growth in china, thanks to a social media drive has lifted the share price. news just newsjust in, rhodri phillips who is the fourth viscount saint david's has been sentenced to 12 weeks in prison. that was after offering money on facebook for someone to kill the brexit campaignerjean miller. rhodri phillips, the fourth viscount and davids, has been sentenced to 12 weeks in prison. that was at westminster magistrates‘ court after offering money for someone to kill the brexit
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campaignerjean miller. we are waiting —— gena miller. what he did, he wrote an online post which was offering £5,000 for the businesswoman and campaigner liu xiaobo to be run over. if you remember, she won a brexit legal challenge against the government, but we now hear that he has been —— gina miller. here he is emerging from the earlier court hearing. 12 weeks in prison, and we will have a word from our correspondence later on. dashcam footage has captured the heart—stopping moment a mudslide suddenly struck a busy road in southern china. this dramatic footage shows the moment the mudslide hit yesterday. it shows several vehicles, including a truck, being violently swept away by the force. it‘s thought to have been
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triggered by continuous rainfall in the region. eight vehicles were left buried in muf. no one died but three people were injured. —— might. a 15—year—old work experience student has found unexpected fame after taking over southern rail‘s twitter account. complaints about cancellations and late trains seemed to be forgotten, and followers even used the hashtag ‘ask eddie‘ to quiz him about what they should have for dinner and how to make tea. eddie was such a hit, that southern rail invited him back for another day. a short time ago eddie joined us from the gtr offices in crawley in sussex where we asked him why he‘d signed up for work experience at southern railways. i chose to go to sub because one of my friends kept telling me all of these interesting and amazing stories about his time there. i thought i would give it a go because idid not thought i would give it a go because i did not know to what i wanted to
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do. i give it a go, i did not know to what i wanted to do. i give ita go, like i said, advertisers been an amazing journey andi advertisers been an amazing journey and i have enjoyed every moment of it. so people where tweeting, they we re it. so people where tweeting, they were not asking you about the trains strikes, they come up with random questions. yeah, i quite liked the questions. yeah, i quite liked the questions. they were very out there. i have just seen one. what is the worst monger? im, fish war? how did you answer that? i had to say that fishmonger whether best, because at my local asda, the fishmonger there is absolutely amazing. always thought i was out well. not warmonger? no, they would have to be the worst. laughter you would take over this twitter account, someone must be looking
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over your shoulder. did they realise, he has got some fans out there? i got experienced last week because i was working with the twitter team then, and that is where i got my gardens and i learned how to a nswer i got my gardens and i learned how to answer all of the questions. —— guidance. it was a collective decision to let me go out there, and say hello to the world. that is where i managed to get all these questions. what might have found another one, would you ratherfight one horse sized duck or 100 buck sized horses? 100 buck sized horses. a horse sized duck would terrify me. laughter it would terrify me, too. you are sitting in an office, ostensibly handling one of the toughest briefs in the world, because southern has not had an easy time recently. what
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did the bosses say about how to handle this account?|j did the bosses say about how to handle this account? i got to be guidance last week, and was mainly how to talk to the public on how to be formal. and talk in a manner where you would not disrespect anyone and you would be helpful, which is what you need to be. that is where i learned how to talk to the public in that sense. what sort of feedback have you had from the bosses? i got a lot of great feedback, not just from bosses? i got a lot of great feedback, notjust from the bosses but from everyone at the office. i really appreciate all of that and it has all been going great and the past couple of days. you are going to get such stick when you get back to get such stick when you get back to school. of course. laughter have you enjoyed it? what has been a highlight, and what has been the worst bit? you must have had some difficult questions. i have had a
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view. there were a view questions that where a bit too far out there will stop i don‘t know if i‘m allowed to share them because they area bit allowed to share them because they are a bit too extreme. there are a view of those that i just had are a bit too extreme. there are a view of those that ijust had to pass on to some of my older team members. time for a look at the weather. a dry afternoon for much of the uk, one or two showers around, not any isle of wight though, this gorgeous picture from edward and lending, our weather watchers. some showers moving to northern ireland, are they going to spread to scotland as a go through this evening? northern england overnight, if you brushing into wales, east anglia, south of that it will be mainly dry overnight. variable cloud and clear spells. temperatures not going as
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far as they did last night, but still some into single figures, especially rural spots in scotland. friday morning, one or two showers dotted about, scotland and northern ireland, that is it, most will be dry. sunny spells, a view showers feeding through north wales and north—west england and in the midlands. a little bit breezy out thanit midlands. a little bit breezy out than it has been. first thing, you may encounter one of the showers, not so many through eastern parts of england and temperatures into the high and mid—teens at this stage. though showers first thing i going to fade away and by the afternoon, although there is a lot of cloud, the vast majority are going to be dry. a pleasant friday. mele dry. some cloud, some sunny spells coming through, and temperatures close to average for the time of year, as high teens at a fuse box into the low 20s. more action tomorrow at
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wimbledon. more cloud, perhaps compare with the day, but starting temperatures creeping up to the low 20s. temperatures creeping up to the low 205. a temperatures creeping up to the low 20s. a little breezy. friday evening, weather system coming to northern ireland and scotland, encounters of rain, the start of the weekend, frontal system coast to the far north—west. plenty of cloud and are bits of rain, across western areas, but during the days some of this will migrate further east. we are expected a good deal of cloud on saturday, sunshine hard to come by, a breezy day as well, we will keep some of that breed across northern areas on sunday, but a brighter day for scotland and northern ireland, a weakening band of cloud, spots of rain sinking southwards, head of that becoming very warm in south—east england but temperatures in the warm spot is heading into the upper 20s. that is how the weekend is shaping up. the forecast where you are of where you are going is
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available on our website you can check out the cap. this is bbc news. the headlines at apm. the government publishes its repeal bill, a key part of its brexit strategy, to sever ties with the eu. theresa may tells the bbc she was shocked and became tearful when she learned the election result. devastated enough to shed a tear? well... yes, a little tear. at that moment? at that moment. an american doctor, offering to treat terminally ill charlie gard, tells the high court that experimental treatment "would be worth trying." i‘m simon mccoy, also this hour, president trump and the first lady arrives in paris for a two—day visit. following a ceremonial welcome, he‘ll hold talks with president macron and attend bastille day celebrations. chinese dissident liu xiaobo,
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