Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 15, 2017 6:00pm-6:36pm BST

6:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 6pm: tony blair says some eu leaders are ready to compromise on freedom of movement to help britain stay in the single market. laws on buying acid are to be reviewed by the government following a spate of attacks in london. a 15—year—old girl has died after taking a drug — formerly known as a "legal high" — in newton abbot in devon. two other girls were taken to hospital. time and time we hear about people paying the ultimate price for this. it's not worth experimenting with your life. also in the next hour: events are held to celebrate the anniversary of the failed coup in turkey. since the attempt to topple president erdogan, more than 150,000 state employees have been dismissed, while some journalists have been jailed.
6:01 pm
spain's garbeenya muguruza beats venus williams to win the women's singles at wimbledon. we'll have more of that match plus all the rest of today's action at the all england club in sportsday, here on the news channel in just over half an hour. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the former prime minister tony blair has suggested some eu leaders might be prepared to change the rules of the single market — to keep britain inside the european union. he says the views of voters could have shifted, and the british might be willing to stay inside the eu if changes were made — such as stricter controls on migration. 0ur political correspondent, emma vardy, has this report. tony blair once argued
6:02 pm
passionately that britain should remain in the eu and lost. now in his latest intervention, he has said that britain could get a better deal on immigration while remaining part of the single market. something many thought impossible. so is he an incurable optimist? 0r delusional, blair was asked. i think what is important is to understand that there is already a lot that we know now that we did not know a year ago when we took the decision. we know, for example, that our currency is down significantly, that's a prediction by the international markets as to our future prosperity. we know that businesses are already moving jobs out of the country and we know this time last year we were at the fastest—growing economy in the g—7 and we are now the slowest. i think we now know there is not £350 million a week extra for the national health service. in the short and medium—term there is less money. tony blair has set out his case in an article for his
6:03 pm
institute for global change. saying: but there is scepticism over whether there is really the political will in europe to allow britain to change the rules. just last week, the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier said that the principles of freedom of movement, of people on the goods and services are indivisible. the eu itself has made it absolutely clear that the four freedoms including freedom of movement are indivisible, as they are called it. the chief negotiator barnier said that. they took four minutes to agree these guidelines. there is no debate in the eu. and it is complete nonsense. it is just another attempt to undermine brexit. tony blair has criticised the labour party for not championing a position on europe that is not different from the tories.
6:04 pm
jeremy corbyn says he has set out a path that is distinct from theresa may's. the issue is clear, i wanted to make it clear to michelle barnier, that we would not be doing what theresa may is proposing to do. we would have an investment—led economy, and that we were wanting a tariff free trade access to the european market. there is a huge integrating and manufacturing industry on both sides of the channel. but tony blair says that what he hears behind—the—scenes is that there is the possibility of a new compromise on the table. and that this should not be discounted. laws on buying and carrying acid are to be reviewed by the government following a spate of attacks which took place in london on thursday night. five people had corrosive liquid thrown at them, including one man who is said to have suffered life—changing injuries.
6:05 pm
two teenage boys, aged 15 and 16, remain in custody on suspicion of robbery and grievous bodily harm with intent. andy moore's report contains flashing images and some scenes you may find distressing. where's it hurt, mate — your eyes? we need to try and get water in your eyes... in the aftermath of the first attack, police doused the victim with water. he was protected by his helmet, and lucky to escape with only minor injuries. but even so, it was a terrifying experience. i took off my helmet, and i wasjust screaming for help, because it was getting dry, and as much as it was getting dry, it was burning. so i was just screaming for water, screaming for help, knocking on all the doors and car windows. another moped rider attacked at this location was not so lucky. he has life—changing injuries to his face. the shadow home secretary called the attacks horrific and barbaric. she is calling for tighter controls.
6:06 pm
nobody in their own home needs pure sulphuric acid. there are different alternatives forjust cleaning your drains. no—one should be able to buy sulphuric acid unless they're a builder or a workman who needs it in the course of their profession, and they should have to have a licence. the government says it's working with the police to see what more can be done to combat the growing menace of acid attacks. andy moore, bbc news. stephen timms, the labour mp for east ham who has campaigned on this issue, joins us now from east london thank you very much forjoining us. the topline unders seems to be guidelines on buying and carrying acid. surely it is more a corrosive substance? many does you can find in
6:07 pm
the bottom of your kitchen drawer.|j welcome the announcement of a review. i hope it will be to action. this is a first step. i think carrying our featured in this is a first step. i think carrying ourfeatured in itself be this is a first step. i think carrying our featured in itself be a criminal offence, in the same way that carrying a knife around the streets is today a criminal offence. i also very much agree with what diane abbott was saying in your earlier clip, but nobody should be permitted to buy sulphuric acid u nless permitted to buy sulphuric acid unless they have a licence. i also welcome what i think has been announced, which is a review of the sentencing guidelines to look at the likelihoods, the need for tougher sentences for acid attacks, and also more consistent. to look at the
6:08 pm
likelihoods, the need for tougher sentences for acid attacks. u nfortu nately we a re sentences for acid attacks. unfortunately we are having trouble with our connection here. we will try one more time. why only now? these attacks have been taking place for a very long time. most of those have been gangland related, either domestic file of men against women. why now? it's fascinating that a lot of attacks go unreported and are surprisingly —— a surprisingly worrying number are against the elderly. there has been a very dramatic rise in the number of incidentsjust over dramatic rise in the number of incidents just over the last two or three years. my concern was raised bya three years. my concern was raised by a very nasty attack in my constituency, when a couple of cousins sitting in a car had somebody leaned in the car window
6:09 pm
and threw acid is overdone. that has given rise to a lot of concern in my constituency, hence my concern about this. there has been this very large rise in the last three years, and i think it is clear that we need some changes in the law along the lines that i have been calling for. this crime also appears now, this modern—day crime, to be linked with mopeds. there is this rise in the use of mopeds. it has been described asa use of mopeds. it has been described as a crime epidemic, and many police officers, including the ipcc, so that she cannot attack, you cannot challenge might deal with the problem of acid attacks without also looking at the use of mopeds. they are restricted by pursuits guidelines. these two things, the police are saying, go hand—in—hand. their hands are tied a lot of the time. is very important that we do
6:10 pm
listen to the concerns that the police are raising in this discussion. i hope the home office will take notes on those. my particular concern is about the use of acid, the attack in bacton in my constituency did not involve a mopeds, it was somebody on foot. i think we need changes to address that very specifically. 0k, stephen timms, labourmp. thank that very specifically. 0k, stephen timms, labour mp. thank you very much. thank you very much. the authorities in turkey have sacked a further 7,000 members of the security forces and civil service — as mass rallies are held in the country to mark the first anniversary of a failed coup to overthrow president erdogan. around 200,000 people have now been punished for allegedly supporting the plot. 0ur correspondent mark lowen reports and a warning you might find some of the images in this report distressing. turkey's nightmare was unleashed as the plotters seized the bosphorus bridge. sabri unal tried to reach it to resist the coup attempt. a tank approached. he lay in its path,
6:11 pm
between its tracks. miraculously, he got up unhurt. then a second... he tried to stop it again, but it ran over his arm. today, he bears the scars of the coup. translation: i came here for the sake of god, to gain his blessing. i was not afraid and i am nota hero. to be a hero, i would have had to stop the tanks. i wish the coup had never happened. 0n the 15th july, rogue soldiers bombed government buildings and seized roads. more than 260 people were killed. the coup attempt failed. the coup soon became the purge, with over 50,000 arrested, accused of ties to the alleged plotter, the cleric fethullah gulen. president erdogan called it a gift from god to cleanse the virus of gulen followers. critics say all dissent
6:12 pm
has been crushed. the government hits back that the real crime was the coup itself, not what came afterwards. we are actually saving turkish democracy, turkish rule of law, turkish future from a power— hungry criminal network. 140,000 people have been dismissed or suspended. there is now a commission to look at all those cases. you will see, when this episode is over, that turkish democracy is functioning, the turkishjudiciary has been functioning. gulen followers were in every corner of society. the purge went wide, far too wide, many believe. protests in support of two academics on hunger strikes for four months, calling for theirjobs back. alongside, a human rights monument is now sealed off. a bleak metaphor for turkey's plight. the wife of one is herself on hunger strike in solidarity.
6:13 pm
this in a country hoping tojoin the eu. translation: one day your name is on a list and you are struck off. your life is turned upside down. you're killed off by the system. they are in a critical state. they want to live but for their demands to be met. i cannot think of the alternative. immortalised for generations to come as turkey's rebirth, it is being celebrated here as the legend of the 15th ofjuly, but for others, it is a painful chapter that is still being written. mark lowen, bbc news, istanbul. bbc producer seref isler was in turkey twelve months ago. he's been telling me about his experience. i remember everything. ithink there's a bbc producer, of course we have our days off like any other human being. i have taken some reason to attend a friend's wedding in the south of turkey. it was
6:14 pm
halfway through the wedding when i saw two f—16 jets fly over me, and my dad called and said, do you know what's going on? it's a question i'm pretty familiar with, pretty used to asa pretty familiar with, pretty used to as a turkish journalist. i said i don't know what's happening. i turned on the tv and the bridge had been shot, one lane had been shut. under state tv, a declaration from the military was being read. that's a military had taken over control. we drove us fast as we could to reach our hotels. along the way, i saw people queueing at atms, trying to get all the cash out and buying lots of bread, lots of cheese, anything they can get their hands on. filling up their cars with petrol. it was very clear that people were source of getting prepared for a worst—case scenario, and then of course after the evening prayers, the imams at mosques called
6:15 pm
people to take to the street and defend democracy. at that moment, although underwater when out the window. did you get the sense it was a momentous moments, a turning point in history? we have some scenes here on the screens of some of the celebrations that are taking place across turkey. did you get the sense that it was a turning point in history, because this is how it has been celebrated? it is a turning point in turkish history, a different segments of society view it as different segments of society view itasa different segments of society view it as a different turning point. the supporters of mr —— the supporters believe, rightly so, they don't stop a coup from taking place and defended democracy. the opposition also argues that in the aftermath no one is doubting that democracy was saved by day, but in the aftermath, the powers that were given to
6:16 pm
president erdogan under the state of emergency legislation, he was able to fire people from theirjobs, a lot of laws were passed at cabinet meetings as opposed to parliamentary meetings. the opposition believes that democracy in the long run has been eroded in the aftermath of the two. many people watching these scenes, mr erdogan is going to be at many events. it looks like some incredible pr events, personal pr events, by the stern again. people will be asking if that to really warranted this? it is a moment, in a way, the governing party has been in power for way, the governing party has been in powerfor a long time way, the governing party has been in power for a long time and way, the governing party has been in powerfor a long time and mr burden has been the leader of turkey for a very long time. arguably one of the most popular leaders since the founder of the republic, ataturk. 0r
6:17 pm
the other holidays and special days have to do with the setting up of the republic, but this was the first time that this party was able to defence chris lee in action. is the sense that mr are again likens himself to ataturk? indefinitely sees himself as one of the greatest leaders. his supporters would definitely argue that he is the modern—day ataturk. if after has incredible significance for the secular segment of society, current supporters of the governments would think that he is their ataturk. the headlines on bbc news: tony blair says some eu leaders are ready to compromise on freedom of movement to help britain stay in the single market laws on buying acid are to be reviewed by the government following a spate of attacks in london. a 15—year—old girl has died after taking a drug — formerly known as a "legal high" — in newton abbot in devon.
6:18 pm
more now on the afternoon's tennis action — and spain's garbine muguruza has won herfirst wimbledon title. the 23 year old beat venus williams in straight sets, overwhelming her american opponent in 77 minutes. our sports correspondent hugh woozencroft gave us this update a little earlier from wimbledon. tap—in winning a challenge to seal victory here today, but a stunning performance. early deserved. she is a newly crowned winner of wimbledon, the ladies singles. she beat five times champion venus williams in straight sets. there were two very contrasting sets, the first one to garbeenya muguruza. venus had two
6:19 pm
chances to win that sad. ruthless from that point on, the second is that completely different. 6— love in favour of the spanish player. she becomes the first woman from spain to win the championship here since herstand—in to win the championship here since her stand—in coach, martinez, to win the championship here since herstand—in coach, martinez, back in 1994. a very worthy winner indeed. she only dropped one sat in her seven matches of the two weeks. she was only broken four times. a stunning performance from her on the day and across the two weeks. venus williams, the fairy tale story was not to be. she was aiming for a sixth championship here. she would have been the oldest grand slam winner in the open era, but she didn't put in the performance today that would have been worthy of winning. instead the enduring images of the day will be garbeenya muguruza who has won herfirst wimbledon title here. a beaten finalist in 2015 when venus's younger sister, serena, beat finalist in 2015 when venus's youngersister, serena, beat her. she was in tears out on centre court but today the exact opposite. she
6:20 pm
was greeted by king carlos of spain who gave her a big hug, said congratulations. a fantastic win and a fantastic day for garbeenya muguruza, who is the ladies ingalls champion here are wobbled on. many people were left in shock at the speed that this match took place. and also comments made at how weary perhaps venus was looking. at the age of 37, it was a fantastic performance is to reach the final here. after the match, garbeenya muguruza spoke about how she used to watch venus williams as she was a young girl, that's brought some laughterfrom the young girl, that's brought some laughter from the centre court fans. the reality is that it was still a fantastic performance from her to reach this stage. the last time she w011 reach this stage. the last time she won the title here was in 2000. she had a realdip won the title here was in 2000. she had a real dip in the middle of her career, struggled with fatigue and joint eight problems. she has bounced back, showing some fantastic tennis to reach the final. but tuohy performance which really did deserve
6:21 pm
championship title. a teenager in devon has died after having an adverse reaction to drugs. the girl, who was 15, was found unconscious at nearly 5am in a park in newton abbot this morning. two other girls were also taken to hospital as a precaution. the substance has not yet been identified, according to devon and cornwall police. detective superintendent ken lamont gave this update. the working hypothesis is the moment is that we believe she has taken some new psychoactive substances. it is important for me to make sure that people don't misuse of the term legal highs. it has often been talked about. it tends to give it some sort of legitimacy. these are all illegal drugs and very dangerous because we don't know what goes into making them. there is a real community message pretty things from me, we are confident the community know who supplied these drugs to this young girl. she has made an
6:22 pm
u nfortu nate this young girl. she has made an unfortunate choice which is ultimately lead in the most serious consequences, we would appeal for the public to come forward. either youngsters or parents. it may be that they want to use crimestoppers. how do you think the children... you say there were a number in the park, how did they get hold of the drugs? we don't know. we believe they were supplied either before or at that scene. within the recent history. we are confidence that a number of people will know where those drugs have come from, and i appeal to them to come forward. had he been able to identify other children were there last night? you said you took two other goals into hospital. had he been able to speak to other members of the group? we have spoken to nearly all of the members of that group. for their welfare and to give
6:23 pm
them safeguard in advice, as well as witnesses. what would you say too many teenagers for anyone thinking of trying new psychoactive substances, especially now it is summer? if anyone asks you to take a quantity of a substance you didn't know within it, why would you do that? time and again we hear people paying the ultimate price for this. it's not worth experimenting with your life. time for the weather. the lucky few have been seeing some warm sunny spells today, weather most of has—been cloudy. it has often been wet as well. into this evening, scotla nd wet as well. into this evening, scotland and northern ireland is seeing further outbreaks of rain. edging into northern england's and wales. low cloud and health care. turning clearer behind our weather system. scotland made it down into single figures. a warm night further south. a sunnier picture for scotland's, northern ireland,
6:24 pm
eventually northern england. a fresher feel the mobility of showers. this strip of thicker cloud continues to edge south towards england and wales. light rain or drizzle may threaten the british grand prix, and later on wimbledon with a shower. quite warm and humid. with some sunny spells ahead of the bands, and high pressure gives plenty of fine weather monday. and much of tuesday. that's it for now. 0n. on. the former minister tony blair has suggested the eu leaders might be prepared to change the rules of the single market to keep britain inside the european union. he said the british might be willing to stay inside the eu if changes were made, such as stricter controls on migration. these comments have been dismissed by both senior conservative and labour figures. balancing the needs of the uk economy at the same time as getting
6:25 pm
greater control of britain's borders isa greater control of britain's borders is a key issue in the brexit debates. former labour prime minister has suggested political change in france has opened the path to compromise. tony blair claims the eu could be willing to make concessions on the free movement of people to allow the uk to stay in a reformed eu. britain benefits enormously from that freedom of movement. however the question is, where there are changes to it, not alteration in the visibility of the printable but qualifications to it, around the things that concern people. but those claims directly contradict what those in brussels are saying, that the uk must accept free movement without exception or new ones. i'm not going to disclose conversations i had within europe, but am not saying this on the basis ofa whim. but am not saying this on the basis of a whim. some of those who campaigned to leave the eu says there is no evidence to back up his
6:26 pm
claim. the eu has made it absolutely clear that the four freedoms including freedom of movement are not divisible. the chief negotiator said that. they took four minutes to read his guidelines, there is no debate in the eu. it's complete nonsense , debate in the eu. it's complete nonsense, another attempt to undermine brexit. campaigning in southampton the current labour leader rejected the position of his predecessor and says his party respects the result of the referendum. anyone is entitled to give their views and i listen to all of them. the views we have is that we wa nt of them. the views we have is that we want to see tariff free access to the european market, protection of eu national and of the rights and consumer rights we achieved through european union membership. this latest intervention from tony blair will not change the government ‘s approach to negotiations. ministers say the former labour prime ministers demonstrating again that he is out of touch with voters yet
6:27 pm
mr blair has reopened the debate on the central issue of brexit, a decision he says is the biggest country has faced since the second world war. 0nce country has faced since the second world war. once he helped determine britain's place in the world. now this former prime minister must settle with commenting from the sidelines. eleanor garnier, bbc news. military coup there. president erdogan's government has in the past twelve months dismissed or arrested 200,000 people accusing them of having backed the plot. people accusing them let's hear from our correspondent mark lowen who's in istanbul. mark. mark lowen who's in istanbul. many people arrested mark but people there are celebrating. yes, there are celebrating. people here, a pretty noisy crowd, yes, people here, a pretty noisy crowd, they see it as dickie's second independence, the might last year when the people stood up the and thwarted a fifth successive coup in the history of the country,
6:28 pm
tonight president erdogan will come here to address the crowd and will speak to parliament one year from when the rubble jets speak to parliament one year from when the rubblejets bombed speak to parliament one year from when the rubble jets bombed the building. yet the opposition have not come here, they are deeply critical of the mass arrests that followed, 50,000 arrested, 150,000 sacked or suspended, 7000 more last might. the government insists it is rooting out the virus of the supporters of the coup and that the supporters of the coup and that the supporters run far and wide in this society. yet critics believe that in the last year the president has used a state of emergency to crush dissent. when year ago there was unity against the coup. it has faded and this country believesjuly 15 marks the rebirth of modern turkey. the other side believes the aftermath is killing off what was left of turkish democracy. mark, thank you very much. police in devon say a 15—year—old girl has died after suffering an adverse reaction to a psychoactive substance, sometimes referred to as a legal high.
6:29 pm
the teenager was found unconscious in the early hours of this morning at a park in newton abbot and died later at torbay hospital. in newton abbot and died let's speak to chloe axford who's in newton abbot for us now. what in newton abbot for us now. can you tell us? i am the what can you tell us? i am here in the park, it is a peaceful evening, it was a different scene in the early hours of this morning when paramedics were called out. they took the girl, who was unconscious, took the girl, who was unconscious, to hospital with two other girls. sadly she later died. police believe she took a new psychoactive substance known as a legal high. she was not from this area. she had been visiting family and had been in the park last night with 12 other young people. police say they are almost certain that someone in the community knows who might have supplied the drug and they are keen to find that supplier. they believe people might be too scared to come forward but they have said to me that if anyone has information and if there are any witnesses they really wa nt if there are any witnesses they really want to hear from them. thank you, chloe. it is a very busy
6:30 pm
weekend of sport, we will start with a tennis. with all the details, here'sjohn watson at wimbledon. yes, there was to be no fairytale 6th title for venus williams in the women's final at wimbledon today. she was beaten in straight sets by garbine muguruza of spain. joe wilson watched the match. by garbine muguruza of spain. 14 by garbine muguruza of spain. years between the j you 14 years between the players, would you have experience be decisive, the pieces gave nothing away. it's a wimbledon final, is it ever final four venus williams? routine just goes on. she arrived at wimbledon like a revolution, seemed completely new in 1997. ask your parents! 23—year—old garbine muguruza at the top of the screen, over 20 years every opponent has learned that venus williams can reach most things. we have seen that before. uniquely for a women's final, the roof was closed so everything was
6:31 pm
amplified. the rallies were getting longer, they were getting louder. both women were playing well but one was better. garbine, shouldn't the first set 7—5. second said started with a double fault, venus suddenly fragile, how quickly she unravelled, even when williams threw everything into her shots and connected there was garbine muguruza. strong and certain she would not be beaten. a new champion, a new era, the match was settled by a computer, the final williams error but there had been many. the second set, 6—0. garbine muguruza had beaten the player and. i thought, the hardest match today against venus, she is such an incredible player. i grew up watching her play so it's incredible to play the final! well, what venus experienced today was what the
6:32 pm
williams sisters inflicted on so many opponents here but are they done? venus had this message for serena. i miss you. itried my done? venus had this message for serena. i miss you. i tried my best to do the same things you do but i think there will be other opportunities! i do. there is the new champion, changed out of her tennis gear and surrounded by old friends and plenty of new ones as well. this occasion always stays the same but wimbledon always need someonejust to same but wimbledon always need someone just to handle same but wimbledon always need someonejust to handle it same but wimbledon always need someone just to handle it a same but wimbledon always need someonejust to handle it a bit differently. it is a new take on tradition, which keeps us enthralled. joe wilson, bbc news, wimbledon. britain won their first title of the tournament today and it came in the wheelchair men's doubles. of the tournament today and it came gordon reid and alfie hewett retained their title, beating the french pair stephane houdet and nicolas peifer in three sets. stephane houdet and nicolas lewis hamilton will start tomorrow's british grand prix in pole position, equalling jim clark's record of five poles at the silverstone circuit. jim clark's record of five the mercedes driver was more
6:33 pm
than half a second faster than ferrari's kimi raikkonen. than half a second faster championship leader sebastien vettel, who leads hamilton by 20 points, was third fastest. south africa are on top against england in the second test at trent bridge. against england in the second captain joe root was the only player to pass 50 for england as they were bowled out for 205. in their second innings, south africa closed on 75—1 a lead of 2015. south africa closed on 75—1 england's women have fared better, completing a sixth successive win at the women's world cup. completing a sixth successive win captain heather knight made 67 before the west indies fell well short made 67 before the west of their target to lose by 92 runs. made 67 before the west england will now face south africa in the semi—finals. stef reid has won great britain's second gold medal at the world pa ra—athletics championships in london in the t44 long jump. the double paralympic silver medallist won her first major global championship title with a jump of 5 metres 40.
6:34 pm
and chris froome has regained the yellowjersey in the tour de france. regained the yellowjersey and that, kate is all from wimbledon. back to you. all from wimbledon. john, all from wimbledon. thank you. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel, we are back with the late news at ten to ten — now on bbc1 it's
6:35 pm

48 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on