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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 17, 2017 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a very good morning. details of 16,000 jobs are announced as the first major contracts to build the h52 rail line are revealed. the high—speed line between birmingham and london will cost around £7 billion. leeds and manchester will also be unveiled. good morning. it's monday the 17th ofjuly. also this morning: in sport, the "king of centre court" does it again. a record eighth wimbledon title for roger federer, as he beats marin cilic in straight sets. the first man ever to achieve that.
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1,000 years after the lynx became extinct in the uk, the authorities consider a plan to reintroduce them in northern england. more than two—thirds of people who enter competitions on—line are putting themselves at risk of fraud by entering their personal details without checking whether the offer is legitimate. i'll have more on that later. the doctor is a girl! there's been plenty of reaction like that to the revelation that jodie whittaker will take the title role in the next series of doctor who. we'll be hearing from fans and critics. the humber bridge becomes a listed building. this is the scene there this morning. we have replaced carol with a man!” hope the reaction is not as strong this morning! welcome to the banks of the humber, the bridge opened in
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1981. it has finally received a listed status. storms by mid—week. see you soon. what a beautiful view. good morning. first, our main story. details of 16,000 jobs are being revealed this morning as the first major contracts to build the hs2 rail line are announced. the high—speed line between birmingham and london will cost around £7 billion. later this afternoon, the routes for extensions to leeds and manchester will also be announced. our business correspondent, joe lynam, has more. it's britain's biggest investment ever in public transport. highspeed2 is designed to cut journey times and increase the number of passenger seats between london and the northwest via birmingham. it's been six years in the planning but now the first construction contracts have been signed, and they're worth £6.6 billion, which the government says will support 16,000 jobs during the construction phase. the first trains aren't expected to run, though,
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until 2026, by which time they hope to carry 300,000 passengers per day. £50 billion on a track of this nature... but hs2 has faced stiff opposition. the stop hs2 campaign in the chiltern says it will only benefit the richest in society and the corporations who build it. and reports on the weekend said hs2 could end up as the most expensive rail line per mile in the world. even so, the muddy work of spades in the ground begins next year for what the government calls "the backbone of britain's rail network." joe lynam, bbc news. so many questions. is it significant? it shows that it is on the way to happening despite all the protesting. it is the first time some contractors will be giving the
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job a go. they have had some problems. thousands of people work in these companies and rely on these contracts. £7 billion worth of contracts. £7 billion worth of contracts is being given today. they will work on it for the next ten yea rs. will work on it for the next ten years. and for the people living there, they will get more details this morning of the routes from birmingham to manchester. also from birmingham to manchester. also from birmingham to manchester. also from birmingham to show —— sheffield. big decisions this morning. that is why it is important. so many people want to know the answers. the case of a terminally ill man who wants to change the law in england and wales so a doctor is allowed to help him die returns to the high court today. noel conway, who has motor neurone disease, is beginning a legal challenge to the ban on assisted dying, saying he wants the right
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to choose how he dies. 0ur medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. noel conway increasingly relies on a ventilator to help him breathe. his chest muscles are gradually getting weaker. 0nce fit and active, motor neuron disease has already robbed him of the ability to walk. as the condition progresses, he fears becoming entombed in his body. i will be quadriplegic. in fact, i could be virtually catatonic. i'll be conceivably in a locked—in syndrome. that to me would be a living hell. that prospect is just not one i can accept. mr conway came to a preliminary high court hearing in march, but now feels too weak to make thejourney from shropshire. his lawyers will say he wants
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the right to a peaceful and dignified death while he still has the capacity to make the decision. it's three years since the supreme court dismissed the last major challenge to the suicide act, which involved tony nicklison, who also wanted the right to die. since then, mps overwhelmingly rejected proposals to allow assisted dying. supporters of the current law say it protects the weak and vulnerable but mr conway says the law is broken, and condemns him to unimaginable suffering. fergus walsh, bbc news. and we will talk about that more in—depth later. the brexit secretary, david davis, has called for both sides to "get down to business" this morning, as the next round of negotiating takes place in brussels. mr davis is meeting the european commission's chief negotiator, michel barnier. key issues will include the future rights of eu citizens in the uk
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and british citizens living in other member states along with the irish border and a financial settlement from the uk. a memorialforest is being dedicated to the victims of the malaysia airlines flight mh17 today, near amsterdam's schipol airport. 298 people died when the plane was shot down over eastern ukraine three years ago. international prosecutors say a russian missile was fired from rebel held territory, which moscow disputes. the duke and duchess of cambridge will travel to poland later today. it's part of a trip that the foreign office hopes will remind eu countries about the strength of their ties to the uk. william and kate will take their children prince george and princess charlotte to warsaw before going on to germany later in the week. here's our royal correspondent, peter hunt. wimbledon wind day, walsall the
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next. —— one day. for a duke and duchess, the pleasure of a wimbledon final will be replaced by flying the flag in poland. it is a visit which has already attracted attention here. this is a country which recently embraced the eu, welcoming the royal representatives of one on the royal representatives of one on the way out of a royal in the tution. the monarchy will experience poland's turbulent past, and a visit toa poland's turbulent past, and a visit to a museum representing an u nsuccessful to a museum representing an unsuccessful uprising. this visit to poland and then germany will inevitably be seen in the context of brexit. it will not impact the negotiations, but the government hopes their presence will show the strength of the ties once britain has left the eu. they brought that
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presence to france in march and other cities in their roles as royal ambassadors for the uk. they are coming en masse. fort george and charlotte, such trips are a novelty. —— for. inevitably, they will be a way of life. peter hunt, bbc news. it was the moment whovians had been waiting for since peter capaldi announced he was relinquishing the key to the tardis. jodie whittaker has been announced as the 13th doctor. the identity of the latest incarnation of the doctor who time lord was revealed in a trailer at the end of the wimbledon men's single final. jodie is the first woman to play the character and, as you can see from this video, her announcement generated a lot of excitement. the new doctor is a girl!
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i think she is happy! the casting has made nearly every newspaper front page this morning and has certainly divided opinion. we will have a look at them in a minute. i will get them out. thank you. john tweeted to say that as a father and grandfather to girls he was pleased they would have great heroes to aspire to, not just companions. quite a few people are complaining about it as well. michael tweeted to say he thought the show had been ruined "for the sake of political correctness." colin baker, the sixth doctor, tweeted: "change, my dears, and not a moment too soon. she is the doctor whether you like it or not!" i wish i could have done that in a dr who voice. maybe i have one now, thatis dr who voice. maybe i have one now, that is the key. i am a woman. sorry, i was not listening. that is the key. i am a woman. sorry, iwas not listening. i that is the key. i am a woman. sorry, i was not listening. i was listening to the creator of doctor who, who said at a later stage, she should be metamorphosed into a woman, and she said that in 1986. we
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will speak later on about dr who and who dr who is. it is a lovely start to the day. it was a bit dark when we got here. yet. glorious. i think it is going to stay like that. is it? who knows? it was so dark when we got here, do you want to reveal... yeah, my dress is on back to front. i said that with ten seconds to go. you could totally have gotte n seconds to go. you could totally have gotten away with it. it gave me a fright. ijust hope i am wearing trousers. everyone knows now. what about wimbledon? it is over. but
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what a fortnight! it is lovely to be back. who would have known we would be talking about that man? i remember saying at the start look at how he is moving. it made the hairs on the back of your head stand up. we have the theory of people playing in the first round injured. then people expecting novak djokovic, sta n people expecting novak djokovic, stan wawrinka. and then with the finals with the ladies on saturday and then the men yesterday, it gave ita and then the men yesterday, it gave it a lift it needed. and marin cilic yesterday, he was struggling with injury. everyone had an injury. roger federer had knee surgery and two months off. he got better, certainly more fit. and look what happened. he made history. the most successful male player in the
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history of the sport! this man, roger federer, the history—maker at wimbledon yesterday. his eighth singles title, the most successful male player in the history of the tournament. and a 19th grand slam title. but it wasn't all about him on the last day at wimbledon. there was some british success too! jamie murray and his doubles partner, the former singles champion, martina hingis, beat the defending champions, britain's heather watson and finland's henri kontinen in straight sets. jordanne whiley and her partner yui kamiji won theirfourth successive wheelchair doubles title too! england's cricketers have an almost impossible job ahead of them, after they were set a74 to win the second test against south africa. no team has ever scored that many to win a test match in the sport's history. they'll resume this morning on one without loss. my my goodness, it was a busy weekend.
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it was! plenty to watch!” my goodness, it was a busy weekend. it was! plenty to watch! i love wimbledon fortnight, i will really miss it. i think you should come next year. i would love to. we have a big mug. are you allowed to mention that? it is not one of us, it is an actual big mug for wimbledon. we should have left a camera running inside for the whole fortnight to see where it has really been. if only it could talk. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather, he's just outside of hull for us today. you hull for us today. are there for a special reason? good you are there for a special reason? good morning. i certainly am, a stunning morning here but what you can see is the humber bridge. it
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took 100 years of campaigning, but on this very day in 1981, the queen officially opened this stunning structure, 11110 metres long, the world's longest suspension bridge at the time, still in the top ten to this very day and more importantly today, as part of hull's city of culture year it has received grade one listed status and that puts it one listed status and that puts it on par with the likes of buckingham palace and also the house of commons and even today it is an amazing feat of engineering. more on that through the morning. a beautiful start as you can see on the banks of the humber but if we look at the forecast for today across the uk, it's a day in which it's notjust dry, sunny, but it's also very warm as well. pretty good start to the week for many if you're heading out this morning but one word of caution, a bit on the cool side if you're
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heading out in the short—term. temperatures have dropped markedly overnight from the humid day some saw yesterday. a bit of patchy cloud in the english channel and there's some cloud in western scotland and the north of scotland producing some showers and that will linger into parts 0rkney and shetland into the afternoon but the afternoon in the southis afternoon but the afternoon in the south is a hazy and sunny affair, strong sunshine overhead for many and temperatures will soar under a gentle breeze for the majority. temperatures in the south could hit 27 or 28. temperatures in the south could hit 27 or28. in temperatures in the south could hit 27 or 28. in the north we could hit 25 or 26. 25 possible to the east of northern ireland and in eastern parts of scotland, always cooler in all 0rkney and shetland with more cloud and some rain and drizzle. the cloud and some rain and drizzle. the cloud will come and go in north—eastern scotland. more cloud drifting to the south—west every now and again, including wales, but for most it's a clear night and after
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that one day temperatures will drop a bit so another fresh tartu tomorrow morning with patchy mist and fog. for many, like today, tuesday will be another stunning david ash fresh to. more cloud at times to the west of england and across wales —— fresh start. eastern england will be dry, sunny and warm. the same in scotland and northern ireland and tomorrow it will be warmer than today, temperatures could get to the high 20s in some parts of southern england and to the bar north of scotland we could get to 26 or 27. the moray firth and the north—west highlands in particular. like in the day big flashes of lightning in the south—west could drift towards wales, not a huge amount of rain to begin with but into wednesday more widespread storms into northern england and northern ireland and scotland —— late in the day. torrential downpours in places, the risk of minor flooding. downpours in places, the risk of minorflooding. england downpours in places, the risk of minor flooding. england and downpours in places, the risk of minorflooding. england and wales will start with more sunshine around ona will start with more sunshine around
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on a very humid start but that could get together and we could see big storms developing. they will be hit and miss, difficult to say where they will be at the moment, but we could have torrential downpours as temperatures are peaking around the mid twenties. heat and humidity swept away into thursday. back to fresher conditions. still sunshine around in eastern parts but late in the day we will see rain arriving in the day we will see rain arriving in the west. that's the weather it's a big humber bridge behind me. one of a number of historical buildings that get listed status today in hull. as well as the bridge we have some really quirky edwardian toilets in the city. also the home of the famous poet philip larkin, he is one ofa number of famous poet philip larkin, he is one of a number of famous people from hull who have had their homes listed, including a few architects and a person who died in a serious rail crash back in the day, which
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led to some increased safety features on the rails. also the tidal storm surge barriers in hull, which keeps this low—lying city safe from the ravages of the sea and the humber. more on all of that through the morning on a stunning start to the morning on a stunning start to the day. back to you both in sa lfo rd. the day. back to you both in salford. thanks very much, matt, see you later. we will be there through the morning. let's have a look at the papers, we tried to frighten the front pages earlier. —— to find. there she is, about time, lord. that's the headline. always over 50s life cover! drops on my lap as well! this is the main story. nurses and cops overpaid while raking in £10,000 a month renting property, as he lives in luxury for free, about the philip
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hammond. the doctor there with the headline. front page of the times, roger federer makes so many of the front and back pages. they are talking about fighter jets, front and back pages. they are talking about fighterjets, so much money being spent on f—35 stealth aircraft but they say they might not be able to be used because things like software upgrades, spare parts and cost reduction images use have been buried in us defence contracts and they are not included in the published figures according to investigation by the times. the daily mail. doctor who changes sex, while male tv heroes beings at? and federer and cilic on the front cover, cilic in tears and federer crying —— being zapped. completely different on the front page of the guardian, they are talking about brexit being a threat to safe and sta ble
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brexit being a threat to safe and stable food supplies. an interesting story about grenfell saying stripping grenfell style cladding could put more blocks at risk. they have talked to experts and they say the installation is more dangerous than the cladding that covers it. what have we got? it isn't often that winnie the pooh gets on the front of the financial times.” wonder if that has ever happened before. i would say not but beijing has blocked winnie the pooh images china has taken them down from social media. no official reason has been given. not wearing any pants? that seems all right, but observers have suggested it was related to previous comparisons of president gee pin the portly teddy bear. there's images we can see of president xijingping there's images we can see of president xi jingping with president 0bama —— comparisons of president xi jingping. it goes to show, we have
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talked before about twitter and google trying to break china, that's why it's a bit harder because you can't put anything you want up. what an interesting story! you surely couldn't find anything wrong with winnie the pooh! there is a page six article on it in the ft as well, so they have gone big on winnie the poohin they have gone big on winnie the pooh in the ft. i didn't know that winnie the pooh doesn't wear pants, i've never noticed! you're really observant! i have never really noticed! shall we move on? the back page of the times, this is roger federer, you can't argue, this morning it's all about that man. to put it into context, in his career there is a 11.5 year gap where he didn't wina there is a 11.5 year gap where he didn't win a grand slam title at all. backpages all saying the same thing. roger federer with the trophy yesterday. back page of the racing post, roger federer 11 to four favourite to make it nine next year. i know we will talk about this later
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but a blister is what happens to marin cilic, a very serious problem caused by something quite innocuous. 0n the sole of his foot under his left foot. it had been drained quite a few times. the day before they try to scrape it off. did he wear the wrong socks? who knows! it's because he had a five set semi—final and he was turning direction too much and you need to wear two pairs of socks but it gives you extra rubbing. amazing, cost him the final! probably not very nice images for brea kfast, probably not very nice images for breakfast, apologies. it sounds weak, doesn't it, it can be like a cold! i'm not kidding, he had a cold, federer, for the two weeks. are you one of those people were federer can do no wrong?” are you one of those people were federer can do no wrong? i wasn't, but i have become one of those people. it's more than 1,000 years since the lynx became extinct in the uk but campaigners hope
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a decision later today could change that. an application being considered by natural england could see them released into kielder forest in northumberland, but the return of a major predator is worrying farmers. brea kfast‘s graham satchell reports. the last lynx in britain was killed for its further 1500 years ago. the application going into natural england today would see them return. between six and ten wild lynx released into kielder forest in northumberland. this is a huge conservation milestone. this is the first licence ever submitted to reintroduce lynx on a trial basis into the uk. this is a life—sized cutout of a lynx, so that's how big a real lynx is, so they aren't that big... paul donahue from the lynx trust has been doing a consultation, talking, listening and explaining and the children at kielder school have big questions. are lynx
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dangerous to people? lynx live all over the world and in human history a healthy wild lynx has never attacked a human anywhere in the world. there's a genuine excitement here and enthusiasm for the return ofa here and enthusiasm for the return of a wildcat. they do look really nice and it's good that they don't hurt any people or anything. they might not hurt people but lynx are expert hunters. their main prey, dear. deer eat out the understory, they overgrazed and if you see now there's very little under story around so there's not really many places for small mammals and birds to nest and lynx are needed to balance the ecosystem. not according to sheep farmers, who said deer are not a problem and lynx would be a threat. i think it's absolutely a stupid idea for a predator that's
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not been in this country for 1000 yea rs not been in this country for 1000 years to be released where it's going to cause damage to viable business. as far as i'm concerned, the links will go for the easy target, which is going to be sheep and lamb —— lynx. farmers would be compensated for any livestock lost, but they are strongly against the issuing of a licence. there's got to be a legal case taken against them because to release a dangerous animal onto private land, that can't possibly be right. annual fight them? yes, definitely. -- and you'll. opinion here is divided. in the local pub, mike brown is thinking about his business. 0ne estimate suggests the lynx could bring around £30 million a year in extra tourist revenue. we need as many tourists as we can get, it's the most remote forest immigrant, we rely on tourist trade, that's 99% of the trade we take ——
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in england. will kielder forest become the land of the lynx? the decision is now in the hands of natural england but if they say yes, experts predict there could eventually be as many as 400 lynx in forests around the uk. graham satchell, bbc news, kielder forest. whatever you think, they are beautiful animals. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. tougher sentences for people responsible for acid attacks will be debated by mps later following a rise in the number of assaults in the capital. last week there was five acid attacks injust one night in islington, stoke newington and hackney. mps will consider restricting the sales of corrosive acids and whether a licence should be required to buy them. a 16—year—old boy's in a critical condition after a crash between a police car and a moped in wimbledon.
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three teenagers were riding the bike which was also being tracked by a police helicopter. 0fficers believe it had been used in an attempted robbery. a new report's found high levels of stress and fatigue among london's bus drivers have contributed to a rise in the number of crashes on the capital's roads. 25 people were killed on or by buses between 2015 and 16. the report by the london assembly transport committee, recommends giving staff extra training and setting safety targets. today sees the beginning if the annual count of swans living on the river thames. the ancient tradition, known as swan upping, sta rts at sunbury lock cut and will take a number of days to complete. it's carried out by the thames watermen and is a chance to not only count the swans and signet, but also to check their health and remove any fishing tackle that may become caught around their feet or wings. let's have a look at the travel situation now. we're off to a good start
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on the tube—no reported problems as as you can see there so far. all those lines appear to be running well. this is how it looks at the blackwall tunnel (cam) this is how it looks at the blackwall tunnel, the usual delays really, building up northbound. in hammersmith, king street is closed for repairs to a burst water main. in kidbrooke, kidbrooke park road is closed from the a2 past kidbrooke station for roadworks. and in islington, more works taking place, essex road is closed northbound from islington green. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. if you weren't a fan of the weekend's humidity, high pressure in control for a couple of days so feeling fresher, lots of sunshine around today, a mainly dry day as well, barely any clouds in the sky in fact so very high uv levels and very high temperatures as well, getting up to about 27 and just a whisper of the wind. as we head through the night, we're seeing fairly clear skies overnight but pretty warm still. temperatures only dropping down to about 15 or 16 celsius. and as we head into
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tomorrow, well, it's looking a very similar day, probably a tomorrow, well, it's looking a very similar day, probablya bit tomorrow, well, it's looking a very similar day, probably a bit more cloud around but still very bright, lots of sunshine and pretty warm with highs of 26 celsius with an easterly wind starting to kick in. now, overnight we start to see a bit of activity, though. some thundery showers, most of them should have cleared by the morning but there may bea cleared by the morning but there may be a few home—grown showers around on wednesday. probably the peak of the week where temperatures and humidity are concerned on wednesday, but we're back to a fresh appeal on thursday. temperatures coming down somewhat as well and that breeze continuing. by friday, though, looks like we could have some more wet weather setting in. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment,
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but also on breakfast this morning: it's three years today since mh17 was shot down over ukraine. we'll be joined by a close relative of one of those who died, who says more needs to be done to bring those responsible to justice. our love of certain dog breeds has led to more "puppy farms" operating than ever before. we'll be asking how to make sure you're buying a happy, healthy pet in about an hour's time. she's one of the stars of one of the biggest shows in the world. yes, game of thrones burst back onto screens in america just hours ago. if you're a fan, stay with us. gemma whelan will be here before the end of the programme. if you're watching, let us know what you think. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today, after years of disagreements. there's also more detail on who has been awarded contracts worth nearly
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£7 billion to work on the first stretch of the line, and information on around 16,000 jobs. the scheme has drawn controversy from campaigners who say it will only benefit the richest of society, though the transport secretary says it will drive productivity in both the north and the midlands. a terminally ill man will today begin a legal challenge to overturn the ban on so—called assisted dying. noel conway, who has motor neurone disease, wants to change the law in england and wales so a doctor is allowed to help him die when his health deteriorates. under the current law, any doctor who helped him would face up to 14 years in prison. 0pponents say the change would put vulnerable people at risk. the brexit secretary, david davis, has called for both sides to "get down to business" this morning as the next round of negotiating takes place in brussels. mr davis is meeting the european commission's chief negotiator, michel barnier.
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key issues will include the future rights of eu citizens in the uk and british citizens living in other member states. the after affects of the heatwave in europe last week continue to be felt. fires have broken out in different corners of the continent. firefighters tackled blazes on the croatian coast, which were driven by strong winds. scrubland in the mountains of genoa, italy, also set alight with ten metre flames in some areas. and a fire in the north of portugal, which had been declared as contained, spread once more, sending residents running. incredible pictures. the duchess of cornwall turns 70 today, and clarence house have marked the occasion by releasing a new official portrait. here it is for you. the picture shows camilla with the prince of wales in the morning room
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of their london home. it was taken by mario testino, who first photographed the couple on theirfirst wedding anniversary in 2006. are we are having problems with italian names? i think! changed their sex. very dr whovian. we will talk about dr who soon. we will talk about it with an actor who plays a companion in the radio version. about it with an actor who plays a companion in the radio versionm has caused a lot of discussion. some people are upset. some have said they will not watch it again. people are upset. some have said they will not watch it againm people are upset. some have said they will not watch it again. it is a fictional character. and then they say they don't even watch it anyway. it makes no sense! are going to... can we talk about tennis? will the talk about the mug in the room? can i get talk about the mug in the room? can igeta talk about the mug in the room? can i get a shot of it? will let ruin
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everything for everybody? it is so obvious... there his. look at the size of it! it is normal size, it is just perspective. everyone just had a heart attack. first we will speak about roger... rogerina? i'm trying to think of the female version. rog. i know you were laughing about me thinking he can do no wrong. basically, he can't! he had a few setbacks. yes. he did not even need to break a sweat! yes, roger federer is the wimbledon champion for a record eighth time and he did it without really needing to break sweat against maric cilic. federer won in straight sets injust one hour 41 minutes against croatian, maric cilic.
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the swiss is the first man since bjorn borg to win the title without dropping a set throughout the tournament. i was not sure if i was ever going to be here again in anotherfinals after last year. i had some tough ones, losing to novak djokovic in 2014 and 2015. but i always thought i could maybe do it again. if you really believe you can go far enough in your life, you can. i kept dreaming and believing, and here i am. it is fantastic. it was emotional, wasn't it? marin cilic was crying. he had a good reason. he had developed a blister on the sole of his left foot which was so on the sole of his left foot which was so grim that they had spent friday, his team spent friday, working on it. he had a doctor with him for six hours. it sounded horrible. draining it. packing it. trying to work out whether any painkiller could help it. but if you have something wrong with your foot, you go on a big walk and have a
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blister, you cannot go on. he had tears and sadness and frustration. to get to that point and sit there with everyone watching at that moment in your career. you cannot play your best tennis. and blister sounds weak and feeble. but if you speak to someone who has been through it, they say once it gets deep”. through it, they say once it gets deep... stop! yes, it is agony. you have to feel for him. but, you know, he will be back. he got all the way there. but that needs to steal. as you said, he was crying, roger federer was crying for a different reason. his twins were misbehaving. that was glorious. more on that later. and now for other news. and the last day of wimbledon wasn't without some british success. jamie murray and former singles champion martina hingis beat the defending champions, britain's heather watson and finland's henri kontinen in straight sets. really happy that i contacted jamie
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for playing together. pretty much my dream came true to give ourselves a good chance to win the title, and we did the blue it was a great two weeks for us, we played great tennis. excited to win. it was a huge achievement for us. and jamie murray wasn't the only british winner. jordanne whiley and herjapanese partner yui kamiji have won their fourth successive women's wheelchairs doubles title. it is great jamie it is greatjamie murray and her we re it is greatjamie murray and her were playing only at the start. see texted him and said do you fancy a game? he did not check his phone and she started to panic. it worked out in the end. great britain'sjonnie peacock has won gold in the men's 100m t44 to become the eighth british gold—medallist of the 2017 world pa ra—athletics championships. peacock‘s winning time was 10.75 seconds inside the london stadium, it was actually slower than his heat—winning time earlier today. britain also picked up a bronze through maria lyle in the women's
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200m t35 final. i knew i was in good form, but at the end of the day, when it comes to the end of the day, when it comes to the final, i don't care about times. it isa the final, i don't care about times. it is a great cherry on top of the icing, but metals are what i can keep forever and what i can look back on. —— medals. and there's been more british success this weekend. lewis hamilton won the british grand prix for a record—equalling fifth time. the historic victory moves him to within a point of sebastien vettel at the half way stage of the formula one season. that, after the championship leader suffered a dramatic late puncture. crowd—surfing. i love it. crowd-surfing. i love it. it feels amazing to be out here. i am so proud to see all of these flags. the support has been immense. i am proud i could do this for you. thank you for the support and pushing us. the team was faultless. it was an exceptionaljob. the team was faultless. it was an exceptional job. the perfect team was faultless. it was an exceptionaljob. the perfect weekend for us. they always get the best people to do those interviews. that
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was 0wen people to do those interviews. that was owen wilson, hollywood filmstar. england's cricketers need to produce an heroic effort if they're to avoid defeat, when the second test against south africa resumes this morning. the tourists are firmly in control after setting england a target of 474 for victory at trent bridge. englands reply got off to a nervous start when alastair cook was given out first ball. that decision was eventually overturned but england face an uphull task to stop south africa levelling the series. we did not play very well at all, but we have the opportunity to bat well for the next two days and see what we can do. you cannot rule it out as well, with the players we have. and the wickets are still pretty good. we have played spin pretty good. we have played spin pretty well in the past. britain's defending champion chris froome overcame mechanical issues to retain his 18—second lead after stage 15 of the tour de france. he had to change a wheel, and deal with the hostile, booing, home fans, but he recovered brilliantly, holding onto the yellow jersey.
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and he'll get to put his feet up today as it's a rest day. 30 seconds between the top four. terrifying. there was a moment yesterday when we thought he would lose the lead. i don't know how he hung on to it. we will have to wait a couple of days to start talking about it. you need to explain what this is. the big moment. my favourite prop for summer. you have seen everyone have a go at favourite prop for summer. you have seen everyone have a go at this. will you have a go as blue a little one. would you like a ball? thank you. woah, woah, woah. who is going to go first? overarm. over. come on,
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sal. come on, sal. lethal leftie. youraim sal. come on, sal. lethal leftie. your aim wasn't much better. awful! seriously. i am going to have to practise. another go at that later. maybe we need a slightly bigger... maybe we need a slightly bigger... maybe a football or something. and now we are at humber bridge, which has been given listed status. where are you? good morning. i am on the banks at the moment. a stunning shot of the humber bridge. the first plans for crossing it were back in 1870. they wanted a tunnel, but after 100 years of campaigning and
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eight years of construction as well, the humber bridge now takes over 8 million journeys the humber bridge now takes over 8 millionjourneys each the humber bridge now takes over 8 million journeys each year. and, the humber bridge now takes over 8 millionjourneys each year. and, of course, as you have mentioned, today isa course, as you have mentioned, today is a special day. it is not only the 36th anniversary of its opening, but it has received listed status. blue skies. notjust on the banks of the humber, but also for the uk. a sunny day in store. a warm one as well. especially after a cool start. blue skies for many first thing this morning. patchy cloud in the english channel, mainly to the south—west of england. and also in the north and north—west of scotland. the cloud in the north—west may threaten show us this morning. shetland, 0rkney, showers continuing. a dry day. quickly warming up as well under strong sunshine. temperatures quite widely could be seen hitting the low 20s. more cloud towards the south—west of the country compared to much of england, wales, scotland,
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northern ireland to the temperatures today will be likely in the east of england, 27 degrees is possible. including near hull. and in eastern ireland and scotland, 35 degrees is possible. always more cool for the far north and west of scotland. getting cloudy in 0rkney and shetland. mid—afternoon, the showers should clear. the cloud will be here in the finals of scotland. also, some in the far south and west of the country. clear skies. patchy mist and fog. again, a the country. clear skies. patchy mistand fog. again, a clearand fresh night coming after a warm day. temperatures dropping after the sun sets. a fresh start tomorrow morning. a warm day. still some good sunny spells. most of us will the sunshine. a bit of a breeze to the south and east. that means some of
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the warmest weather in the north and west tomorrow. south—east wales, south—east parts of the midlands, temperatures getting to 29 degrees. even in the north and north—west of scotland, we could get to 27 degrees. storms pushing into the south—west by the end of the day. lightning storms initially into wednesday that the torrential downpours. northern england and ireland. wales sees some sunshine. through the day, heat and humidity reaching 31 degrees across eastern england, which could be enough to that of some localised severe storms. a bit difficult to see where the weather will be. kit tuned to the weather will be. kit tuned to the forecast. all of it will be swept out on thursday. a bright day for many on thursday by feeling more fresh before rain arrives in northern ireland later. that is how the weather is looking. as you can see, the humber is looking stunning, along with the bridge. it is not
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just the bridge, but eight other localities have listed status in the city, including some pretty edwardian toilets. and the storm surge barrier as well in hull which protects this low—lying area from severe surges and the humber and the north sea as well. that is how it is looking here on the banks of the humber. good to see an edwardian toddler awarded as well, about time! people who enter competitions online could be putting themselves at risk of fraud. sean's here to tell us more. good morning. you see lots of them, on the back of things in supermarkets or online or on newspapers, some people make a living out of them if you're really good but we aren't all that wise! the prizes offered by the some online competitions can be extremely tempting.
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that's backed—up by a survey from the nationwide building society, which says that around two thirds of people who enter them are putting themselves at risk of fraud. that's because people are sending off things like their name, address and date of birth without checking first if the deal on offer is for real. how big a risk is all this? let's talk to emily 0rton, who's the director of cyber security firm darktrace. the research says we are aware of these risks but when it comes to these risks but when it comes to these competitions we are giving away our details, why are we more casual? we are used to giving out personal data in this day and age, especially young people, so lots of the time it is social media things like date of birth, where we live, where we studied, so it's not a big lea p to where we studied, so it's not a big leap to enter a competition where we
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think the upside could be something like a holiday or vouchers. 18 to 24 —year—olds are more likely to dish out this information, is it because there's rarely big consequences for giving out your details?” there's rarely big consequences for giving out your details? i would say that consumers or individuals are less of a target and a large organisation, we've seen many big cyber attacks against large organisations who have huge datasets and much more to lose in many ways. i think the injury to all doesn't he'll the immediacy of that risk. —— individual. ultimately there's a trade—off, there's an awareness that cyber security a problem, but especially young people are taking that decision to run the risk for the upside. when it comes to checking, nationwide advises if it looks too good to be true then it might be but it's a competition and the point is it's meant to be too good to be true —— nationwide. is there anything you can do to be sure
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that the company you're dealing with is verified? there are basics that goa is verified? there are basics that go a long way, the first thing is this a reputable organisation? check the website, is there a padlock, can you see... just next to the website in the browser? yes, that will help because it says we have certified the organisation is who they say they are. things like questioning whether they really need your date of birth, what was the purpose of them collecting it. sometimes there's an asterix that you need the info and sometimes you don't need to put it all in? that's right, often you would expect that, there's a big drive to collect marketing data and you don't need to put it in. if there's a website that requires you to enter a lot of data, you need think twice. emily, thanks very much. there we go. a bit of advice to keep on top of this. if you want to keep on top of this. if you want to get into this, holidays of a
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lifetime, check the padlock at the top and don't have to fill in all the boxes, that's about it! it is not often a television show casting announcement holds the front pages, generates thousands of column inches and inspires such strong opinions on both sides. jodie whittaker on the front page of the telegraph and the mirror and most of the papers this morning and a question on the daily telegraph, nice to meet who. she is the new doctor! however, the revelation the 13th time lord is to be played by a woman has done just that. we will be getting the thoughts of a doctor who actress in a moment, but first a reminder of how jodie whittaker was unveiled and the reaction of some breakfast viewers. that looks like a woman's feet,
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small feet. i wouldn't be surprised if it was a woman. it is a woman! 0h oh my god, they've got a girl! it's a woman! 0h a woman! oh my god! it's a woman! the doctor... i might cry. it's a woman, i cannot believe it, they did it. i'm shocked still! what a good choice. for me as a girl, this is something i never thought possible ever. there are always doubts when there's a new doctor and if it's a brilliant actor, because it's a brilliant actor, because it's a brilliant part, if it's a brilliant actor and jodie whittaker is a brilliant actor then it's all going to be fine but what's interesting is it's going to be very different. jodie whittaker, wow!
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let's speak now to the actor lisa bowerman, who plays professor bernice summerfield in the doctor who audio plays. good morning, good morning! i'm guessing your reaction by the smile on yourface is guessing your reaction by the smile on your face is your pretty happy about this? it's an extremely good decision. it's been so fascinating this morning, the papers are covered with it. i was in the car on the way this morning and it was all over the radio, the reaction has been extraordinary and it's an extremely good thing. the bottom line is, i heard a bit in the clips you just played, it's a brilliant piece of casting, jodie whittaker is a fantastic actress and i think that can only bode well. on having a problem with my microphone, sorry, i hope you can still hear me. it's my problem, not yours! she said
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herself," i problem, not yours! she said herself, " i want problem, not yours! she said herself," i want to tell fans not to be scared by my agenda", but there's been a big reaction to this, hasn't their? it's interesting, because of all the roles that have been played by women recently, i saw glenda jackson playing king lear last year, maxine peak played hamlet recently, of all the parts the doctor is one that can easily be played by a woman. after all it is a fantasy show, an alien with two hearts who floats around space in a 1960s telephone box. to actually think that somebody... actually, let's face it, the doctor is an alien who met or is every few years, there's no reason why the doctor, which is a generic title, let's be honest, it could be a woman or a man, couldn't transport themselves, couldn't
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transpose themselves into a woman. i think when it comes to doctor who, it's always reflected these are guys, it's always reflected these are guys, the age that it's been produced in and i think it was right for this particular change —— zeitgeist. i've been a fan for many yea rs zeitgeist. i've been a fan for many years and each of the actors who plays the doctor, they make it their own, which seems like such an extraordinarily brilliant thing to do in some ways. i know. you talk about all the different interpretations, we've had everything from old men, jon pertwee with a bouffant hairstyle and a frilly shirt, they very much reflect the age in which they were produced. interestingly i think i've heard a lot of responses from fans who are extremely worried, i'm never going to watch it again, but we should trust the producer, chris jade north, not to putjodie whittaker in
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a pairof north, not to putjodie whittaker in a pair of stilettos running in a field handing the sonic screwdriver toa field handing the sonic screwdriver to a companion and saying you deal with it. i think the doctor will a lwa ys with it. i think the doctor will always have that character. i think the character of the doctor won't disappear. the doctor has always had the moral high ground. i say he, the doctor, is not an action hero. he isn't someone who throws people around with the strength of his muscles, it actually doesn't matter whether the doctor is a man or a woman because that essential goodness, that essential fighting for the outsider i think we'll probably still be there. let's leave it with that thought, that essential goodness. thanks for your time on brea kfast goodness. thanks for your time on breakfast this morning. get in touch with us to let us know what you think about the appointment ofjodie whittaker as the next doctor who, she coats over at christmas. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. tougher sentences for people responsible for acid attacks will be debated by mps later following a rise in the number of assaults in the capital. last week there was five acid attacks injust one night in islington, stoke newington and hackney. mps will consider restricting the sales of corrosive acids and whether a licence should be required to buy them. an american neurosurgeon who's offered to carry out a new therapy on the terminally ill baby charlie gard is due to meet the child's medical team in london today. doctor michio hirano believes that there's a 10% chance his treatment could help the 11—month—old boy. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital, where charlie is being treated, say his condition is irreversible. a new report's found high levels of stress and fatigue among london's bus drivers have contributed to a rise in the number of crashes on the capital's roads.
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25 people were killed on or by buses between 2015 and 16. the report by the london assembly transport committee recommends giving staff extra training and setting safety targets. the annual count of swans on the river thames begins today. the ancient tradition, known as swan upping, will get under way at sunbury lock, near walton on thames in surrey. as well as checking on their numbers, thames watermen will also be making sure they're in good health. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's no 0verg round between gospel 0ak to upper holloway due to a track fault with severe delays from upper holloway to barking. this is how it looks at the blackwall tunnel. the usual delays really, building up northbound. in hammersmith, king street is closed for repairs to a burst water main. and in kidbrooke, kidbrooke park road is closed from the a2 past kidbrooke station for roadworks. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. well, if you weren't a fan of the weekend's humidity, high pressure in control for a couple of days so it's
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going to be feeling a bit fresher, lots of sunshine around today, a mainly dry day as well, barely any clouds in the sky in fact so very high uv levels and very high temperatures as well, getting up to about 27 and just a whisper of the wind. as we head through the night, we're seeing fairly clear skies overnight but pretty warm still. temperatures only dropping down to about 15 or 16 celsius. and as we head into tomorrow, well, it's looking a very similar day, probably a bit more cloud around but still very bright, lots of sunshine and pretty warm with highs of 26 celsius with an easterly wind starting to kick in. now, overnight we start to see a bit of activity, though. some thundery showers, most of them should have cleared by the morning but there may be a few home—grown showers around on wednesday. probably the peak of the week where temperatures and humidity are concerned on wednesday, but we're back to a fresh appeal on thursday. temperatures coming down somewhat
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as well and that breeze continuing. by friday, though, looks like we could have some more wet weather setting in. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. details of 16,000 jobs are announced as the first major contracts to build the hs2 rail line are revealed. the high—speed line between birmingham and london will cost around £7 billion. the final routes for extensions to leeds and manchester will also be unveiled. good morning. we havejust got the names of the companies that will build this project. i will have more on that shortly. good morning.
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it's monday the 17th ofjuly. also this morning: in sport, the "king of centre court" does it again. a record eighth wimbledon title for roger federer, as he beats marin cilic in straight sets. the first man ever to achieve that. and he is already favourite for next year. 1,000 years after the lynx became extinct in the uk, the authorities consider a plan to reintroduce them in northern england. the new doctor is a girl! there's been plenty of reaction like that to the revelation that jodie whittaker will take the title role in the next series of doctor who. we'll be hearing from fans and critics. the humber bridge becomes a listed building. the banks of the humber. the
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weather. thank you. good morning. it was 36 years ago today the bridge was 36 years ago today the bridge was officially opened. today it joins the likes of buckingham palace and the house of commons in receiving grade 0ne listed status. plenty of sunshine in the weather. will it last? more on that in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. details of 16,000 jobs are being revealed this morning as the first major contracts to build the hs2 rail line are announced. the high—speed line between birmingham and london will cost around £7 billion. later this afternoon, the routes for extensions to leeds and manchester will also be announced. our business correspondent, joe lynam, has more. it's britain's biggest investment ever in public transport. highspeed2 is designed to cut journey times and increase the number of passenger seats between london
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and the northwest via birmingham. it's been six years in the planning but now the first construction contracts have been signed, and they're worth £6.6 billion, which the government says will support 16,000 jobs during the construction phase. the first trains aren't expected to run, though, until 2026, by which time they hope to carry 300,000 passengers per day. £50 billion on a track of this nature... but hs2 has faced stiff opposition. the stop hs2 campaign in the chiltern says it will only benefit the richest in society and the corporations who build it. and reports on the weekend said hs2 could end up as the most expensive rail line per mile in the world. even so, the muddy work of spades in the ground begins next year for what the government calls "the backbone of britain's rail network." joe lynam, bbc news. let's get more on this
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story with sean. many of those 16,000 jobs will be working for a lot of british companies, though some foreign ones. people don't know the breakdown of how much muggy is going to how many areas just yet. last week, this business has had their shares fall by 16%. they have given money to others to look after this project. this could be seen as a lifeline for them. a contract they needed to win. there are many question marks after last week. what is important is that it is under way, it seems. some of our preliminary work will begin next
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year. manyjobs. our preliminary work will begin next year. many jobs. but our preliminary work will begin next year. manyjobs. but those residents will be wondering about those route changes. it could affect many people in their homes. we will find out more about that this morning. thank you so much. we will talk to you more about that. the case of a terminally ill man who wants to change the law in england and wales so a doctor is allowed to help him die returns to the high court today. noel conway, who has motor neurone disease, is beginning a legal challenge to the ban on assisted dying, saying he wants the right to choose how he dies. the government is looking to
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increase the punishment for acid attacks. amber rudd said she wanted perpetrators to feel the full force of the law. a memorialforest is being dedicated to the victims of the malaysia airlines flight mh17 today, near amsterdam's schipol airport. 298 people died when the plane was shot down over eastern ukraine three years ago. international prosecutors say a russian missile was fired from rebel held territory, which moscow disputes. we will talk to people about that soon. george a romero, the horrorfilm director known as the zombie master, has died at the age of 77. romero co—wrote
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and directed night of the living dead in 1968 which became a cult classic, spawned a successful franchise and shaped horror movies for decades. according to his manager, the director died in his sleep while listening to the soundtrack to the film the quiet man after a brief battle with lung cancer. the brexit secretary, david davis, has called for both sides to "get down to business" this morning, as the next round of negotiating takes place in brussels. mr davis is meeting the european commission's chief negotiator, michel barnier. key issues will include the future rights of eu citizens in the uk and british citizens living in other member states along with the irish border and a financial settlement from the uk. adam fleming is outside the commission. what will be on the agenda? anything different? last time these two men met it was the talk about acting all things, like the timetable of things going forward. this is theirfirst the timetable of things going forward. this is their first chance to talk about clarifying each side's position. both sides have released a flurry of papers. they will be asking questions about what they actually mean to be the big issues on the table at the moment, david davis says his priority is the
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rights of citizens. what will happen to eu citizens living in the uk after brexit and what guarantees will people living in the eu have after brexit? michel barnier, from the eu side, he is talking about the financial settlement, wanting be uk to agree to the principle to pay money to the eu to leave. —— the. that will not be due until the future. a thorny issue. everyone here is obsessed about what is happening back home. how long we'll theresa may remain prime minister? —— will. and are ministers disagreeing about how long and whether there should be a transition period? thank you for that. the duke and duchess of cambridge will travel to poland later today.
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it's part of a trip that the foreign office hopes will remind eu countries about the strength of their ties to the uk. william and kate will take their children prince george and princess charlotte to warsaw before going on to germany later in the week. here's our royal correspondent, peter hunt. wimbledon one day, warsaw the next. for a duke and duchess, the pleasure of a wimbledon final will be replaced by flying the flag in poland. it's a visit that's already attracted attention here. this is a country that relatively recently embraced the eu, welcoming the royal representatives of one on the way out of a royal of the institution. the monarchy will experience poland's turbulent past, and a visit to a museum representing an unsuccessful uprising against nazi rule. this visit to poland and then germany will inevitably be seen in the context of brexit. it won't obviously have any impact on the negotiations, but the government hopes their presence will show the strength of the ties once britain has left the eu. they brought that presence to france
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in march and other cities in their roles as royal ambassadors for the uk. as in canada last year, the cambridges are coming en masse. for george and charlotte, such trips are a novelty. eventually, they will be a way of life. peter hunt, bbc news. we are going back to a main story. 0ne we are going back to a main story. one of the most controversial debates about time. —— of ourtime. should we be able to choose when and where we die if we are suffering from a terminal and debilitating illness? noel conway has motor neurone disease and wants to change the law in england and wales so anyone who helps him end his life won't face prosecution. his case returns to court today and we will debate it in a moment. first, here is noel‘s story in his own words.
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ido i do not want to die very slowly of suffocation and being semiconscious until i am in a condition where i don't even know what is going on. that is called... for some people, they say that is good palliative care. but i am sorry, that is not an a cce pta ble care. but i am sorry, that is not an acceptable option for me. they cannot tell me how long it will take. none of them can. it could be days, it could be weeks, it could be even longer. i... i... iam going days, it could be weeks, it could be even longer. i... i... i am going to be left in a situation at some stage when i can face that amount of suffering, actually being locked in my own body, or are facing a slow, suffocating death, drifting off slowly into unconsciousness. why should i have to do that? i know i
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am going to die. telling us his story. tony bonser volunteers at a hospice, is a former trustee for the national council for palliative care and opposes any change to the law. mick murray on the other hand is a campaigner for dignity in dying. they both join us on the sofa now. iam sure i am sure this is a conversation many people having listened to you this morning will be having themselves. we will start with you. why are you opposed to changes in the law? first of all, i am immensely moved by that story and that extract we have seen. it is not the first such example. i don't know how people cope in that situation, andi how people cope in that situation, and i don't know how his wife, his partner, manages in that situation either. i would, partner, manages in that situation either. iwould, as partner, manages in that situation either. i would, as you know, partner, manages in that situation either. iwould, as you know, i partner, manages in that situation either. i would, as you know, i work for a local hospice, ideal with a lot of people near the end of their lives. i find that people tend to be vulnerable, able to be persuade. when i was with the national council
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for palliative care, we did research showing how people are concerned about not being of use, a bother, being a burden to their families. about not being of use, a bother, being a burden to theirfamilies. i am concerned at a time when they are vulnerable, although they have mental capacity, they are able to be persuaded. i think the problem is creating a law allowing people like noel to have his wish, to end his life with dignity, safeguarding the rights of people vulnerable. let us put that to you. you are on the other side of the fence. and that point about vulnerable people being brought in difficult positions. what is your response to that? the campaign is arguing that for a numberof campaign is arguing that for a number of checks and balances to be put in place to stop that happening, primarily, two doctors should determine mental capacity, they should also determine it is a
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terminal illness. and finally, a high courtjudge, terminal illness. and finally, a high court judge, a judge terminal illness. and finally, a high courtjudge, ajudge in terminal illness. and finally, a high courtjudge, a judge in a family court, they should determine there is no pressure, it is a freely made decision. you have both got personal experience again from different points of view.” personal experience again from different points of view. i have been to dignitas twice, a husband and his wife, within two years of each other. she died of palsy, and there is no palliative care for that. she could no longer use her tongue and could not speak. in the end, she decided to end her life. she could not do it here. one year and a half later, my best friend, bob, who was a very active mountain near, campaign, what have you, contracted asbestosis, ravaging him
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to the point where he had 22 boxes of pills beside his bed. —— mountaineer. he was still like this, clutching his chest, rocking backwards and forwards, saying i feel as though my chest is on fire. so the argument is not that people should not have palliative care, of course they should, but sometimes it does not work. bob was especially lucid, along with his wife before him. and you lost your son? yes. he died in 2009 after five years of having soft tissue sarcoma. he had a different outlook on things. although towards the end he was increasingly disabled, found it difficult to walk found it difficult to eat. and his pain levels grew increasingly high until he really needed very high levels of morphine
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just to control the pain. but he always wanted to live and get the full amount out of life. the morning of the day he died, he said to me, dad, i of the day he died, he said to me, dad, lam of the day he died, he said to me, dad, i am going to beat cancer. that is what made it work. some people say you should not fight it. that is what kept him alive. different people have different attitudes. there is the key problem, that's why the law is very keen on this. it comes down to individuals but you we re comes down to individuals but you were talking about people who perhaps need to be protected, do you see that point? as i said earlier, i com pletely see that point? as i said earlier, i completely agree that there need to be checks and balances that at the moment there is no legal control, lots of people are taking their own lives in private, assisted by friends, which is potentially illegal. the campaign i think is for... iadmire illegal. the campaign i think is for... i admire noel‘s being able to campaign ata
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for... i admire noel‘s being able to campaign at a time when he is dying, which is remarkable. is notjust campaigning for himself, he's campaigning for himself, he's campaigning for himself, he's campaigning for others so they can have the freedom to die with dignity. that's a pretty basic human rights. tony, as we've been explaining through nick, that right to control how your life comes to an end? i totally understand that and i have enormous admiration for noel and his bike. i looked at the proposed changes to the law and i acce pt proposed changes to the law and i accept all the checks and balances but it doesn't stop people being influenced at a time when they are very susceptible —— fight. that's my concern. very susceptible —— fight. that's my concern. say i believe personal experience isn't a good guide to good, sound law. we need to find a form of law that meets all the requirements and it doesn't at the moment. thanks very much to you both. that goes to the high court today and nole conway is too ill to go to court but thank you very much
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indeed —— noel conway. go to court but thank you very much indeed -- noel conway. thanks very much. i'm sure you will be involved at home as well. let us know what you think. we will try to read out your comments later on. it's going to be lovely, it is already if you are by the humber bridge, like matt this morning. good morning again! good morning and good morning again! good morning and good morning to you. i am by the humber bridge, it took 100 years of campaigning, eight years of construction, tens of thousands of tons of steel and concrete and at peak construction it was using 1000 members of staff. today, exactly 36 yea rs members of staff. today, exactly 36 years after it was officially opened by the queen, it has received grade one listed status putting it on a par with the likes of buckingham palace and the houses of commons. it's not the only place to receive listed status today, eight other parts of britain's england's i should say have received listed
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status. it is linked to hull's city of culture status —— england's i should say have received listed status. 0ut should say have received listed status. out of them all it has to be said my favourite is the bridge behind me. a beautiful sight. 8 million journeys behind me. a beautiful sight. 8 millionjourneys are behind me. a beautiful sight. 8 million journeys are taken over that bridge every year and traffic is building now. blue skies overhead at the moment. if we look at the forecast today, not just blue if we look at the forecast today, notjust blue skies here but blue skies for many, shaping up to be a stunning summer's date for the vast majority. we've started on a fresh note, a bit coolerfor one or two, but warming up in the sunshine —— summer's day. patchy cloud in the english channel towards the south—west and the west of wales,
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high cloud elsewhere turning sunshine hazy but for most blue skies overhead. north and west scotla nd skies overhead. north and west scotland more cloud with a few showers, mainly like. they will continue to affect 0rkney and shetland into the afternoon but elsewhere the cloud will break up and the sunshine will come through —— mainly light. temperature is widely into the 20s and very strong sunshine overhead, even if it doesn't feel as hot and humid for some in the south as yesterday but temperatures in the south—east could peak at around 25 or 27. 25 or 26 in some parts of north—east england, including here by the humber in hull, 25 not out the question in eastern northern ireland and eastern scotla nd eastern northern ireland and eastern scotland but always cooler in 0rkney and shetland where we continue with the cloud. tonight the cloud will come and go in 0rkney and shetland, more cloud to the west of england and wales but most will have clearer skies, light winds and patchy mist and fog and fresh to start. temperatures changing from day to
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night to start the week. but tomorrow could be a hot day. a bit more cloud in western england and wales but still with good sunny spells to be found. temperatures will shoot up markedly but with more ofa will shoot up markedly but with more of a breeze to the south and east of england, warmest weather will be found in parts of the south—west midlands and south east wales, where we could get 28 or 29 and to the north of scotland, 27 or 28 around the moray firth and north—west highlands. late on you will notice those clusters of shower clouds pushing up from south—west england to wales, they could produce nasty thunderstorms. initially they will just be lightning but then in northern ireland and scotland they will turn into torrential rain storms that could produce minor flooding and that will affect the far north—west on wednesday. hot and humid on wednesday, especially to eastern england, 30 or 31 possible and we could see in temperatures thunderstorms brewing in england and wales for a time. we will keep you
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updated tomorrow. those storms out of the way by thursday and it will feel fresher and it should be sunny for most on thursday but in parts of northern ireland and western scotland, more cloud and rain pushing in later. a cracking start to the week, stormy midweek and fresher to end. that's your weather ina fresher to end. that's your weather in a nutshell. back to you both. thanks very much, see you in half an hour. i have a fact about the humber bridge, it is so good i am going to save it! it's more than 1,000 years since the lynx became extinct in the uk but campaigners hope a decision later today could change that. an application being considered by natural england could see them released into kielder forest in northumberland, but the return of a major predator is worrying farmers. breakfast‘s graham satchell has got all the details. the last lynx in britain was killed for its fur 1,300 years ago. the application going in to natural england today would see them return. between six and ten wild lynx released into kielder forest in northumberland. this is a huge
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conservation milestone. this is the first licence ever submitted to reintroduce lynx on a trial basis to the uk. this is a life—sized cutout of a lynx, so that's actually how big a real lynx is, so they aren't that big, that's actually about the size of... paul 0'donoghue from the lynx trust has been doing a consultation, talking, listening and explaining and the children at kielder first school have big questions. are lynx dangerous to people? lynx live all over the world and in human history a healthy wild lynx has never, ever, ever attacked a human anywhere in the world. there's a genuine excitement here and enthusiasm for the return of a wildcat. they do look really nice and it's good that they don't hurt any people or anything. they might not hurt people but lynx are expert hunters. their main prey, deer. deer eat out the understory, they overgrazed and if you see now there's very little under story
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around so there's not really many places for small mammals and birds to nest and lynx are needed to control that balance, to balance the ecosystem. not according to sheep farmers, who say deer are not a problem and lynx would be a threat. i think it's absolutely a stupid idea for a predator that's not been in this country for 1,000 years to be released where it's going to cause damage to viable business. as far as i'm concerned, the lynx will go for the easy target, which is going to be sheep and lamb. farmers would be compensated for any livestock lost, but they are strongly against the issuing of a licence. there's got to be a legal case taken against them because to release a dangerous animal onto private land, that can't possibly be right. and you'll fight them? yes, definitely. i can understand the farmers being nervous...
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0pinion here is divided. in the local pub, mike brown is thinking about his business. 0ne estimate suggests the lynx could bring around £30 million a year in extra tourist revenue. it is the most remote village in england, so we need as many tourists as we can get. we rely on tourist trade, that's 99% of the trade we take is tourists. will kielder forest become the land of the lynx? the decision is now in the hands of natural england but if they say yes, experts predict there could eventually be as many as 400 lynx in forests around the uk. graham satchell, bbc news, kielder forest. very beautiful. would you like me to give you the fact about the humber bridge? i can't wait. this has been sentin bridge? i can't wait. this has been sent in by tim. and actual fact? bridge? i can't wait. this has been sent in by tim. and actualfact? i
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think it is right, both the towers are vertical but they are not parallel. that is because of the curvature of the earth, they are so farapart, as curvature of the earth, they are so far apart, as you can see, there's a few inches‘ difference far apart, as you can see, there‘s a few inches‘ difference between the top and the bottom because it is so big. i'm not sure that's my favourite of your facts. ok, i have stolen it from tim hill but thanks for those, keep sending them in. that‘s the scene in hull this morning but now let‘s find out what‘s happening where you are, national headlines in a moment. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sonja jessup. a new report‘s found high levels of stress and fatigue among london‘s bus drivers have contributed to a rise in the number of crashes on the capital‘s roads. 25 people were killed on or by buses between 2015 and 16. the report by the london assembly transport committee recommends giving staff extra training and setting safety targets. an american neurosurgeon who‘s
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offered to carry out a new therapy on the terminally ill baby charlie gard is due to meet the child‘s medical team in london today. doctor michio hirano believes that there‘s a 10% chance his treatment could help the 11—month—old boy. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital, where charlie is being treated, say his condition is irreversible. a 16—year—old boy‘s in a critical condition after a crash between a police car and a moped in wimbledon. three teenagers were riding the bike which was also being tracked by a police helicopter. 0fficers believe it had been used in an attempted robbery. the annual count of swans on the river thames begins today. the ancient tradition, known as swan upping, will get under way at sunbury lock, near walton on thames in surrey. as well as checking on their numbers, thames watermen will also be making sure they‘re in good health. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. the 0verground now has severe delays between gospel 0ak to barking because of a track fault.
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other lines appear to be running normally. we have delays on the m25. this is how it looks, it‘s slow anti—clockwise approaching junction 16 for the m40. in hammersmith, king street is closed for repairs to a burst water main. and in kidbrooke, kidbrooke park road is closed from the a2 past kidbrooke station for roadworks. and in islington, more works taking place. essex road is closed northbound from islington green. let‘s have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. well, if you weren‘t a fan of the weekend‘s humidity, the good news is we have high pressure in control for a couple of days so it‘s going to be feeling a bit fresher, lots of sunshine around today, a mainly dry day as well, barely any clouds in the sky in fact so very high uv levels and very high temperatures as well, getting up to about 27 degrees celsius and just a whisper of the wind. as we head through the night, we‘re seeing fairly clear skies overnight but pretty warm still. temperatures only dropping down to about 15 or 16 celsius. and as we head into tomorrow, well,
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it‘s looking a very similar day, probably a bit more cloud around but still very bright, lots of sunshine and pretty warm with highs of 26 celsius with an easterly wind starting to kick in. now, overnight we start to see a bit of activity, though. some thundery showers, most of them should have cleared by the morning but there may be a few home—grown showers around on wednesday. probably the peak of the week where temperatures and humidity are concerned on wednesday, but we‘re back to a fresher feel on thursday. temperatures coming down somewhat as well and that breeze continuing. by friday, though, looks like we could have some more wet weather setting in. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello.
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this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. first our main story. the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today after years of disagreements. there‘s also more detail on who has been awarded contracts worth nearly seven billion pounds to work on the first stretch of the line and information on around 16,000 jobs. the scheme has drawn controversy from campaigners who claim it will only benefit the richest in society but the transport secretary said it would "drive economic growth and productivity in the north and midlands." a terminally ill man will today begin a legal challenge to overturn the ban on so—called assisted dying. noel conway, who has motor neurone disease, wants to change the law in england and wales so a doctor is allowed to help him die when his health deteriorates.
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under the current law, any doctor who helped him would face up to 14 years in prison. 0pponents say the change would put vulnerable people at risk. we were talking to two guests about that earlier. the brexit secretary, david davis, has called for both sides to "get down to business" this morning as the next round of negotiating takes place in brussels. mr davis is meeting the european commission‘s chief negotiator, michel barnier. key issues will include the future rights of eu citizens in the uk and british citizens living in other member states. the rise in acid attacks will be discussed in parliament today. the latest official figures suggest there were more than 400 assaults involving corrosive substances in england and wales in the six months to april. the debate comes as the government begins a review into the issue which could see sentences for the offence increased. yesterday, the home secretary amber rudd said she wanted perpetrators to "feel the full force of the law." george a romero, the horror film director known as "the zombie master," has died at the age of 77. romero co—wrote and directed night of the living dead in 1968
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which became a cult classic, spawned a successful franchise and shaped horror movies for decades. according to his manager, the director died in his sleep while listening to the soundtrack to the film the quiet man after a brief battle with lung cancer. the after affects of the heatwave in europe last week continue to be felt. fires have broken out in different corners of the continent. firefighters tackled blazes on the croatian coast, which were driven by strong winds. scrubland in the mountains of genoa, italy, also set alight with ten metre flames in some areas. and a fire in the north of portugal, which had been declared as contained, spread once more, sending residents running. the duchess of cornwall turns 70 today, and clarence house have marked the occasion by releasing a new official portrait. the picture shows camilla with the prince of wales
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in the morning room of their london home. it was taken by mario testino, who first photographed the couple on theirfirst wedding anniversary in 2006. to the next news now. we will be talking about the macro weight, i will get this ready while we talk about the sport. we have some bridge
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fa cts about the sport. we have some bridge facts coming on. look at this golden picture of roger federer in a golden frame. he managed this without dropping a frame. wasn't he a bit presumptuous with that t—shirt that had his name and the number eight?” will give you that one, i did not love that. but anyway. yes, roger federer is the wimbledon champion for a record eighth time and he did it without really needing to break sweat against maric cilic. federer won in straight sets injust one hour 41 minutes against croatian, maric cilic. the swiss is the first man since bjorn borg to win the title without dropping a set throughout the tournament.
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i was not sure if i was ever going to be here again in anotherfinal after last year. i had some tough ones, losing to novak djokovic in 2014 and 2015. but i always thought i could maybe do it again. if you really believe you can go far enough in your life, you can. i kept dreaming and believing, and here i am. it is fantastic. and the last day of wimbledon wasn‘t without some british success. jamie murray and former singles champion martina hingis beat the defending champions, britain‘s heather watson and finland‘s henri kontinen in straight sets. really happy that i contacted jamie for playing together. pretty much my dream came true to give ourselves a good chance to win the title, and we did the blue it was a great two weeks for us, we played great tennis. excited to win. it was a huge achievement for us. and jamie murray wasn‘t the only british winner. jordanne whiley and herjapanese
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partner yui kamiji have won their fourth successive women‘s wheelchairs doubles title. amazing achievements. you have to feel sorry for marin cilic with that horrible blister on the sole of his ford which had to be attended to. look at this! —— foot. both he and the blister were weeping. that is when you realise you are on your own. you cannot turn to a tee. he was waiting his whole career for this. the only thing you can say in consolation is you would hope he
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would be there again. talking about that, roger has said he hasn‘t thought about next year, but wouldn‘t it be wonderful. do you think he will be going for ten? maybe he could be cryogenically frozen and brought out every year for wimbledon. they are at the top of the game now and are doing things like only playing important matches, play less, play better. maybe we should all do that and only come into work every once in a while. great britain‘sjonnie peacock has won gold in the men‘s 100m t44 to become the eighth british gold—medallist of the 2017 world pa ra—athletics championships. peacock‘s winning time was 10.75 seconds inside the london stadium, it was actually slower than his heat—winning time earlier today. britain also picked up a bronze through maria lyle in the women‘s 200m t35 final.
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i knew i was in good form, but at the end of the day, when it comes to the final, i don‘t care about times. it is a great cherry on top of the icing, but medals are what i can keep forever and what i can look back on. and there‘s been more british success this weekend. lewis hamilton won the british grand prix for a record—equalling fifth time. the historic victory moves him to within a point of sebastien vettel at the half way stage of the formula one season. that, after the championship leader suffered a dramatic late puncture. it feels amazing to be out here. i am so proud to see all of these flags. the support has been immense. i am proud i could do this for you. thank you for the support and pushing us. the team was faultless. it was an exceptionaljob. the perfect weekend for us. great crowd—surfing skills there. england‘s cricketers need to produce an heroic effort if they‘re to avoid defeat, when the second test against south africa resumes this morning.
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the tourists are firmly in control after setting england a target of 474 for victory at trent bridge. englands reply got off to a nervous start when alastair cook was given out first ball. that decision was eventually overturned but england face an uphull task to stop south africa levelling the series. we did not play very well at all, but we have the opportunity to bat well for the next two days and see what we can do. you cannot rule it out as well, with the players we have. and the wickets are still pretty good. we have played spin pretty well in the past. the open starts next week. record crowds expected at royal birkdale. and one man who wasn‘t expecting to be there is callum shinkwin. the world number 405 earned his place, finishing second at the scottish 0pen. but it could have been oh so much sweeter.
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the 24—year—old missed a putt to win the tournament outright, had to play—off against rafa cabera bello, and missed again, handing the spaniard victory at dundonald. 0pen soon. and the incredible game, set, mug. before that, can i use these to assist your understanding of the humber bridge. the towers are vertical, but not parallel, because of the curvature of the earth. a vertical tower. they are vertical. but because they are so far apart, there it is,... when they come back, they are not parallel, because they are like this. or are they like that? no... oh, i never did
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geography. it is like that, isn‘t it? different at the bottom.” geography. it is like that, isn‘t it? different at the bottom. i am glad you used tennis racquets or i would never get it. we are only allowed one go each at this. in! nearly! for the team!” allowed one go each at this. in! nearly! for the team! i need allowed one go each at this. in! nearly! for tt§§§§ neec i go. you are a great teacher. i nearly went into it but was told i was too mature. good morning. getting a dog can be one of the most important and rewarding decisions a family can make but an increasing
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number of people are being caught out by unscrupulous puppy dealers. the rspca says 2016 saw the largest number of calls by the public reporting problems with breeders and dealers and the charity is warning buyers against people in the trade who put profit over welfare. we spoke to some dog lovers about what precautions you should take before buying a puppy. hi, this is our dog. a lot of problems nowadays with puppy farms. we wa nted problems nowadays with puppy farms. we wanted to look at where he was. we wanted to look at where he was. we were lucky. i am from manchester and these are my three dogs. 0ur first pup was two years old when he died of pda, meningitis. it meant he
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was ill. we found out later from the puppy was ill. we found out later from the puppy farm. unfortunately, we got the wrong choice at that time. hi, i‘mjen. this the wrong choice at that time. hi, i‘m jen. this is a four—year—old puppy- we i‘m jen. this is a four—year—old puppy. we did not think about the whole process and breed at the time. i‘m nick. and this is vanessa. and this is our boy albert. and this is our little girl victoria. recommended breeders locally were good for us. we went down to see albert and meet him for the first time. they also check us out to make sure we were good dog owners. some people just say that is great and go home with a puppy. some people go
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home with a puppy. some people go home without thinking about it first. look at the research first. personally, he is like a grandchild to me and has made our family. they were amazing scenes. honestly, there were 2000 pugs outside. it was pugfest. joining us now to discuss this further is the rspca‘s chief inspector, ian briggs. good morning. good morning. people might think that a puppy is a puppy, but you are concerned about where they are coming from. yes. what we have seen in the last 5— the years isa have seen in the last 5— the years is a huge increase in puppies being sold directly over the internet. —— 5-6. sold directly over the internet. —— 5—6. they are coming from puppy farms in eastern europe. they are
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trucked in by the hundreds through the ports and sold on through free internet sites in days. the problem is the welfare standards were the dogs are bred are considerably less than what is expected. the dogs are removed from their mothers too early and they don‘t get the right immunisation levels they should. they have no vaccinations. there is cross contamination between dogs and their source. they come in to the country carrying life—threatening diseases that don‘t really manifest themselves until a couple of days after the buyer gets them home. themselves until a couple of days after the buyer gets them homem is not just about after the buyer gets them homem is notjust about pugs, but all puppies. when we got our dog, we got the advice to make sure you can see the advice to make sure you can see the mother and check them out. what
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other advice can we give them?m the mother and check them out. what other advice can we give them? it is all about research. you have to do as much research as possible. don‘t give in to the temptation of insta ntly give in to the temptation of instantly buying. if you do your research on the internet, look at local breeders, go onto the rspca website where they have the puppy contract, a guidebook on how to buy a dog. it tells you what you should be doing. the problem is a lot of these dealers are criminal by nature. and what they set out to do is to dupe that buyer into believing they have a homebred puppy. so if they have a homebred puppy. so if they are floundering, that is a red flag. they will have an adult dog present at the place of sale and try to pass
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that off as the mother of the puppies. if when you turn up that dog is showing no interest in the puppies or it has been produced from another room or they will come up with a story about the mother is out at the vet all gone for a walk, these should be raising red flags not to purchase from those sellers. 0bviously not to purchase from those sellers. obviously as well when you get a puppy, obviously as well when you get a punpy. and obviously as well when you get a puppy, and you take it to obviously as well when you get a puppy, and you take it to your obviously as well when you get a puppy, and you take it to your vet, make sure it has the right vaccinations. the first place you should go to is your local vet, any documentation given with these dogs, ta ke documentation given with these dogs, take that to the vet and get them to have a look at it. they will produce fa ke have a look at it. they will produce fake vaccination cards and it‘s the key time when you get the puppy home where it could fall ill. those key questions, on the rspca website? yes, the puppy contract, you can download it and it will give you the advice you need. the dog should know its name as well if there is the
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mother there. all these things are put in place to defraud the buyer. thanks so much! we are out and about this morning by the side of the humber bridge and we have been learning about the curvature of the earth and we can learn about the weather with matt, who has a gorgeous view. good morning. anotherfact, did you know the first plans and proposals for a crossing across the humber at this point were in 1872. it was meant to bea point were in 1872. it was meant to be a tunnel. several proposals have been since and in 1959, the humber bridge, in all its splendour, got its construction approval but it wasn‘t until this day in 1981 that the queen officially opened it. it isa the queen officially opened it. it is a stunning example of architecture and engineering and todayit architecture and engineering and today it has received grade one listed status, which puts it in line with the likes of buckingham palace
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and the house of commons. it‘s not the only place to receive listed status today, all other aid arguing to be in the city of falsity, part of the city of culture, including some gorgeous edwardian toilets in the city —— eight all in the city of hull. this structure behind me, 410 metres in length, the most well—known of all. under blue skies at the moment. it will be under blue skies all day long, as will much of the uk. not just skies all day long, as will much of the uk. notjust a sunny day but after a fresh start it will be an increasingly warm one. a bit of cloud at the moment in western and northern scotland producing some light showers, they will continue in 0rkney and shetland into the afternoon and patchy cloud into parts of being this channel, south—west england and for some in
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wales. most of that will be well broken with sunshine coming through, a lwa ys broken with sunshine coming through, always more cloud to the south—west —— of the english channel. strong sunshine throughout. temperatures in the low to mid 20s for many. could hit 25 or 27 in some parts of eastern england, including in the north—east of england. eastern parts of northern ireland could hit 25, as could eastern parts of scotland. always a bit cooler to the far north of scotland, especially 0rkney and shetland, but you should finish the day dry with a few breaks in the cloud as well. tonight, we start dry, a dry night forjust about eve ryo ne dry, a dry night forjust about everyone again. a bit more cloud to the south—west of the country at times but with clear spies elsewhere, some mist and fog patches forming and a bit on the chillis side to start tuesday —— clear skies. a bit of variation from morning and afternoon. —— chilly
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side. the breeze will be a bit stronger in southern and eastern england. you have to head west for the highest temperatures. parts of the highest temperatures. parts of the midlands, south east in wales, could get to 28 or 29 and could hit 27 in the far north of scotland. late in the day, some storms pushing into the south—west, lightning mainly to begin with but as they drift north overnight into parts of northern england and into northern ireland and western scotland, some torrential rain storms are possible as well and rain on and off on wednesday through the north—west of the uk. sunshine for a time in england and wales, very humid on wednesday and we could see temperatures get very close to if not just above 30 temperatures get very close to if notjust above 30 celsius in eastern parts of england but that in itself good set of one or two isolated but pretty severe storms. details on where they will be, uncertain at the moment, we will keep you updated. fresher air clears them out of the way on thursday, rain to the north
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and west on thursday later on but most will have a dry day and after a sticky wednesday, feeling more co mforta ble sticky wednesday, feeling more comfortable as well. that‘s how your weather is looking from the glorious sight of the humber bridge here. back to you both. spectacular this morning. thanks very much indeed!‘ swa n morning. thanks very much indeed!‘ swan in the background!” morning. thanks very much indeed!‘ swan in the background! i was fascinated by that‘s one! palma airport in majorca is one of europe‘s busiest airports for holidaymakers and lots of brits on holiday there have been caught up in huge queues. sean‘s has more on this, there‘s been a few problems this summer, what‘s going on? heathrow, manchester, edinburgh have all seen long queues for a variety of reasons, from technical glitches to power delays over recent weeks. palma airport in majorca was the latest to affect those on their holidays, with some queuing for more than two hours at passport
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control. my my girlfriend and i flew into palma airport on wednesday evening. we we re airport on wednesday evening. we were greeted with scenes of chaos. at passport control there was a queue of about 2000 people. it was hot, no air conditioning, no instructions being given by any of the officials, no water handed out, children crying. that you took about two hours to get through and when we finally got to passport control, there were only three passport control officers checking passports so control officers checking passports so all in all it was a terrible experience. tony mann is director of idle travel near bradford. that sounded horrendous, that experience. more than 5 million people are going through the airport last year from the uk, what is going wrong? it seems since earlier on in the year, palma was hit quite bad,
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these new passport security checks in place have meant it takes longer and at peak times they seem to have had a strain where people can be there up to two hours before so people need to take into account if you‘re an independent traveller to get there earlier. if you‘re on a package deal, they will be monitoring the situation and they will get you there in good time. you say get there in good time but if you get their two hours before your flight you get their two hours before your flight but you are met with a huge queue, and actually uq for that length of time and you don‘t make it, what rights do you have to get your money back? your rights aren't great because in the end it‘s not down to the airline, they say to get there in good time so it isn‘t their fault, you could be stuck and it could cost you more money to rebook u nless could cost you more money to rebook unless you get a gesture of goodwill from the airline to read book your flights. we are coming up to peak time and a busy time so that will be difficult to do. do you feel like
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airports are ready and prepared and have everything in place with these new regulations? sometimes resources at certain airports are stretched at times. when peak times, long, whichever airport it is, we always advise customers to go at least two hours before. even in the uk, could be be worse than previous summers? we are lucky in the travel industry at the moment, things have been going the way we are concerned. flights... this is peak school holidays, these airports will be really busy. at times, whether it is abroad or in the uk, give yourself plenty of time. in terms of the resources british airports have got, do they have enough? it's not too bad at the british airports. 0n couple from quite a few different ones and at times certainly don‘t go for your ones and at times certainly don‘t go foryour minimum ones and at times certainly don‘t go for your minimum check—in time, that‘s not the thing to do because you would struggle so definitely go early. it strains a bit at peak
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times, like everything does, so my advice would be to go early and get advice would be to go early and get a good travel experience. go early, good advice! if you‘ve had any experiences like this this summer then let us know. rubbish if you go through that. let us know on twitter, facebook and we will come back to you. i turn iturn up i turn up very early at airports so thank you very much! i will go even earlier! earlier we were talking about the right to die and so many people have got in contact, let me read a few. the right to die and manage one‘s own death is a basic human rights, right now people suffer with no option and our pets have much better end to life options. and as lee said it is humane and right people have control when they die. —— leslie says. mike said it is a basic human necessity. thanks for getting in touch. you can
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e—mail us or talk to us on twitter as well. keep watching because in the course of the next hour you may be one of those people, bleary eyed this morning, you may have watched season seven of game of thrones at 2am. we will bejoined by seven of game of thrones at 2am. we will be joined by one of the stars, she plays one of the characters in game of thrones. gemma weir and will be with us in the next hour. now, let‘s join the breakfast teams in our bbc newsrooms across the uk this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sonja jessup. a new report‘s found high levels of stress and fatigue among london‘s bus drivers have contributed to a rise in the number of crashes on the capital‘s roads. 25 people were killed on or by buses between 2015 and 16. the report by the london assembly transport committee recommends giving staff extra training and setting safety targets. an american neurosurgeon who‘s
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offered to carry out a new therapy on the terminally ill baby charlie gard is due to meet the child‘s medical team in london today. doctor michio hirano believes that there‘s a 10% chance his treatment could help the 11—month—old boy. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital, where charlie is being treated, say his condition is irreversible. a 16—year—old boy‘s in a critical condition after a crash between a police car and a moped in wimbledon. three teenagers were riding the bike which was also being tracked by a police helicopter. 0fficers believe it had been used in an attempted robbery. the annual count of swans on the river thames begins today. the ancient tradition, known as swan upping, will get under way at sunbury lock, near walton on thames in surrey. as well as checking on their numbers, thames watermen will also be making sure they‘re in good health. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. the 0verground has minor delays between gospel 0ak to barking because of a track fault.
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0n the tube because of staff shortages, holland park station is currently closed. this is how the a13 looks. it‘s very slow heading into town through dagenham, the usual delays not helped by a broken down car earlier. in hammersmith, king street is closed for repairs to a burst water main. and in kidbrooke, kidbrooke park road is closed from the a2 past kidbrooke station for roadworks. let‘s have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. well, if you weren‘t a fan of the weekend‘s humidity, the good news is we have high pressure in control for a couple of days so it‘s going to be feeling a bit fresher, lots of sunshine around today, a mainly dry day as well, barely any clouds in the sky in fact so very high uv levels and very high temperatures as well, getting up to about 27 degrees celsius and just a whisper of the wind. as we head through the night, we‘re seeing fairly clear skies overnight but pretty warm still.
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temperatures only dropping down to about 15 or 16 celsius. and as we head into tomorrow, well, it‘s looking a very similar day, probably a bit more cloud around but still very bright, lots of sunshine and pretty warm with highs of 26 celsius with an easterly wind starting to kick in. now, overnight we start to see a bit of activity, though. some thundery showers, most of them should have cleared by the morning but there may be a few home—grown showers around on wednesday. probably the peak of the week where temperatures and humidity are concerned on wednesday, but we‘re back to a fresher feel on thursday. temperatures coming down somewhat as well and that breeze continuing. by friday, though, looks like we could have some more wet weather setting in. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is sam. details of 16,000 jobs are announced as the first major contracts to build the hs2 rail
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line are revealed. the high speed line between birmingham and london will cost around 7 billion pounds — the final routes for extensions to leeds and manchester will also be unveiled. good morning — we‘vejust got the names of the companies who‘ll be building the first phase of the huge project. the likes of carillion and alfred beatty or two of the firms that are rumoured to be involved. i‘ll have more on that shortly. good morning, it‘s monday 17thjuly. also this morning: a record is broken at wimbledon... the king of centre court does it again. a record eighth wimbledon title for roger federer, as he beats marin cilic in straight sets to become the first man to achieve the feat. 1000 years after the lynx became extinct in the uk — a plan is considered to reintroduce them in northern england. the next doctor who is a girl!
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plenty of reaction like that as jodie whittaker is revealed as the next doctor. we have more reaction. game of thrones is back — we‘ll be discussing series seven with gemma whelan who plays yara g reyjoy. it doesn‘t look like winter is coming in hull today. matt is with us coming in hull today. matt is with us for the weather. sunny skies overhead. it took 100 years of campaigning, eight years of construction, the humber bridge, this bridge has received grade one listed status, we will be talking about the bridge and the forecast which contains lots of sunshine but
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will it last? good morning. first our main story. the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today — after years of disagreements. there‘s also more detail on who has been awarded contracts worth nearly seven billion pounds to work on the first stretch of the line — including troubled construction giant carillion — and information on around 16,000 jobs. sean is here. what do you have us? this is just the first phase, £7 billion in total, when they have finally old at all, if that ever happens, we will get there in decades, £57 billion, current costs. there have been questions over that figure, questions over the weekend, some researchers putting together figures saying it will be double that, but the government says it‘s not true, everything is on—time and on budget. that little bit of money
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this morning, little bit, £7 billion, will go to companies including balfour beatty, the one thatjohn died as carillion, brilliant making headlines last week, the share price fall in by 7%, financial problems, debt issues, interestingly along side the announcement, carillion has said they are appointing a new strategic advisor to try and sort out the company, albert the cost reductions. that is the one that mightjump out but many workers who have worked on railway upgrades and other schemes, several companies listed. we will know about the route a little bit later because lots of people want to know where it is going. yes, particularly the detail around sheffield, we will get that later, whether it goes from birmingham to leeds, they have made a final decision but they should do today, also we might hear something about
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the line to crew and manchester, could lead that could be implemented earlier than previously thought, 2026 phase one, 2027 for the next bit to crew is what we could hear later but residents and environmentalists will be keen to watch that stop carillion have got to build a tunnel through the children‘s, that has been particularly controversial. sheffield is interesting, it was going to go to meadowhall, the shopping centre, now told that it will go to an existing station, talk that it will go through homes, people moved into a new estate and just a couple of weeks later found out about the rail line. it‘s not the last time we will speak about this. no, iguarantee the last time we will speak about this. no, i guarantee you. thank you. the brexit secretary david davis has called for both sides to "get down to business" this morning as the next round of negotiating takes place in brussels.
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he‘s meeting the european commission‘s chief negotiator michel barnier in about an hour. 0ur brussels reporter adam fleming is outside the commission. adam, are they likely to make any progress this time? it's it‘s been pretty slow going, as we expected it would be?” it‘s been pretty slow going, as we expected it would be? i think we will get a press conference at the end of the week on thursday at the end of the week on thursday at the end of the first round of substantive talks between david davis and michel barnier. in terms of whether there will be progress, that‘s a good question, eu officials have told me this will be about clarification. both sides exchanging papers on a range of issues, it will be about getting round a table and each other asking questions about what they really mean, getting details about the other‘s positions rather than making great leaves forward up this point. david davis says his personal priority is the issue of citizens rights, what rights were eu citizens living in the uk after brexit have and what
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about brits living in the rest of the continent? 0r michel barnier it‘s about getting the uk to agree a dose money to the eu as the result of leaving. adam, thank you. a press conference expected later, that will bea conference expected later, that will be a big topic of escutcheon, and bbc news channel will be covering that. also in the news today, a terminally ill man will begin a high court challenge to the ban on assisted dying. noel conway has motor neurone disease and once a doctor to be allowed to prescribe a lethal dose when his health deteriorates further. under the current law and england and wales any doctored who helped him would face up to 14 years in prison but opponents say a change in the law would put vulnerable people at risk. fergus walsh has more. noel conway increasingly relies on a ventilator to help him breathe.
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his chest muscles are gradually getting weaker. 0nce fit and active, motor neuron disease has already robbed him of the ability to walk. as the condition progresses, he fears becoming entombed in his body. i will be quadriplegic. in fact, i could be virtually catatonic. i‘ll be conceivably in a locked—in syndrome. that to me would be a living hell. that prospect is just not one i can accept. mr conway came to a preliminary high court hearing in march, but now feels too weak to make thejourney from shropshire. his lawyers will say he wants the right to a peaceful and dignified death while he still has the capacity to make the decision. it‘s three years since the supreme court dismissed the last major challenge to the suicide act, which involved tony nicklison, who also wanted the right to die. since then, mps overwhelmingly rejected proposals to allow assisted dying.
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supporters of the current law say it protects the weak and vulnerable, but mr conway says the law is broken, and condemns him to unimaginable suffering. fergus walsh, bbc news. thank you for your comments on all offer this morning. a rise in acid attacks suggests or 400 attacks involving corrosive substances and england and wales in the six months to april, the debate comes as the government begins a review into the issue which could see sentences for the offence increased. yesterday the home secretary amber rudd said she wa nted home secretary amber rudd said she wanted perpetrators to feel the full force of the law. prince george and princess charlotte will travel with their parents to later at the start ofa their parents to later at the start of a four—day tour of eastern europe. the duke and it is of cambridge will start the trip in warsaw before to berlin later. foreign office hopes the tour will
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remind eu countries about the strength of their ties to the uk. it was the moment that doctor who fans have been waiting for since peter capaldi have been waiting for since peter ca paldi announced he have been waiting for since peter capaldi announced he would relinquish the key to the tardis. is there a key to the tardis? there is now. she has it. jodie whittaker has been announced as the 13th doctor, the identity of the latest incarnation of the doctor who time lord was revealed in a trailer at the end of the wimbledon men‘s‘s singles final. jodie whittaker is the first woman to play the character and the announcement created quite a lot of excitement. the next doctor is a girl! that is the daughter of american author jenny trout and that has been re—tweeted and sherrod. pure excitement. i have a paper... she is on the front page of a lot of papers. you going to break
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something? there she is, clearly delighted. lots of people getting in touch, thank you. john tweeted to say, as a father and grandfather to girls, he was pleased. thank you, my assistant, my companion. great heroes to aspire to, notjust companions. michael said he thought the show had been ruined for the sake of political correct this. 0uch. in the interest of balance there was quite a bit of that reaction. colin baxter, the sixth doctor, tweeted. .. not reaction. colin baxter, the sixth doctor, tweeted... not bad for an assistant? colin baker, the sixth doctor, remember him? change, my dears. not a doctor, remember him? change, my dears. nota moment doctor, remember him? change, my dears. not a moment too soon. she is the doctor whether you like it or not. we will discuss that later on. they write for the daily mirror and they are a self—confessed doctor who fan. it‘s 11 minutes past eight. let‘s return to one of the main stories. three years after flight mh17
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was shot down by a missile over ukraine, relatives are preparing to unveil a "living memorial" to their loved ones. a total of 298 trees have been planted to represent each of the people who died on the malaysia airline jet. 0ur europe correspondent, anna holligan, is in the hague for us this morning. anna, it‘s going to be an emotional day, isn‘t it? it sounds like such a beautiful memorial. tell us more about that. hugely emotional day for the relatives. i was speaking to one of the mothers who lost her son on board flight image 17 and she said it‘s important to remember remembering brings all the memories flooding back so today this memorial forest which was chosen by the relatives will be unveiled about 15 minutes drive away from schiphol airport were so many of them saw their loved ones for the last time. each tree bears the name of one of the victims, one of the 298 people
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on board. it‘s designed to represent three things, growth, life and hope which is what so many of the families were still holding onto. and of course today is the third anniversary but it‘s also serving another purpose they say, to keep what happened in the public consciousness as they are terrified people will forget and the pressure will be off the authorities to bring those responsible to justice. will be off the authorities to bring those responsible tojustice. as will be off the authorities to bring those responsible to justice. as far as the investigation is concerned they identified a long list of persons of interest that they still haven‘t named any suspects. the victims relatives are still waiting and today remembering. anne, thank you. a rather beautiful scene today. joining us now isjordan withers, whose uncle glenn thomas died on flight mh17. i worked with glenn, such a wonderful man. jordan, you have talked to us very honestly about what is going on, as it is special day today? massively special. my
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pa rents a re day today? massively special. my parents are in the netherlands today, marking the downing of flight image 17, the trees are being planted, the ribbon that we were in memory of mh17. but i don‘t want to focus on the barbaric acts too much. it's focus on the barbaric acts too much. it‘s so cleverly done, there are is an eye that looks up to the sky as pa rt an eye that looks up to the sky as part of those trees planted and i know you say you don‘t want to concentrate on those things but as well as celebrating the lives of the loved ones lost there is an investigation which continues and huge resources being poured into it by the dutch investigators. still so many questions unanswered ? by the dutch investigators. still so many questions unanswered? you know, there should be a lot of money poured into it, it has affected people across five continents and it seems that every turn there is someone seems that every turn there is someone trying to stop it from happening but we might be getting
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somewhere. unfortunately i think it will take a lot of time but it‘s nice we are finally getting somewhere and hopefully the perpetrators will be brought to justice, we wantjustice, it‘s as simple as that and we won‘t give up until we get it. simple as that and we won‘t give up untilwe get it. so many simple as that and we won‘t give up until we get it. so many questions unanswered, which for you is the most important? for me, iwant unanswered, which for you is the most important? for me, i want to know who pressed the button essentially and for that chain of command leads up to. i don‘t know for that leads to, but i doubt it was the person who pressed the button who may or may not have known what they were doing, i think the chain of command is the most important thing but we are not going to stop, we are going to make sure we get the justice that i think all of the victims deserve. members of yourfamily will of the victims deserve. members of your family will be of the victims deserve. members of yourfamily will be in of the victims deserve. members of your family will be in the netherlands today, will that be come isadore day they happen looking forward to the fact that they still don‘t know, as that made it more difficult in some respects? they wa nt to difficult in some respects? they want to do that to be there, but i imagine it doesn‘t feel complete. want to do that to be there, but i
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imagine it doesn't feel complete. my mum is being supported by my dad, she be so upset, plus her twin brother, these days don‘t get easier, these anniversaries. every christmas, every birthday, every anniversary, so difficult each year and they say time heals but the longer it goes on, you live in this and some people forget three years on we have nothing whatsoever.m looks like a beautiful tribute and armorial, will it be software you will visit as a family, do you think? definitely, not far away from us think? definitely, not far away from us in the uk but i think the best thing for us, the forest is a growing memorial, it will get more beautiful as time goes on. hopefully it will be there for years to come so it will be there for years to come soi it will be there for years to come so i can show my children for uncle glenn is. you said it was something people affect it on five continents, do those families together feel more
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should be done or is it a case of following this investigation and hoping as you say it finds those people responsible for making that efficient to shoot down? i think more should always be done. it's i think more should always be done. it‘s many the interests of the national community that things should be done. you know, we are a big family of mh 17, the families of victims and we always stay in touch and days like these are perfect to remember them and we get together on these days. so it‘s a tough day. brought together under such extraordinary and horrific circumstances as well. i remember working with him when i first started here at the bbc. how do you remember him best? oh, god, he was just too lively to put into words. he was a brilliant person. like you said, you‘ve worked with him so you will know he was a great person and he‘ll be sorely missed by everyone today. i know a lot of people are having a quiet moment or a drink in
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his memory. absolutely. thank you for sharing those memories today and coming in. it seems stupid to say it but i hope your parents have a day they can remember for the but i hope your parents have a day they can rememberfor the right reasons today over in the netherlands. thank you very much, nice to see you again, thanks jordan. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... it‘s full steam ahead for hs2 as details of 16,000 jobs connected with the project are announced. a terminally—ill man challenges the ban on assisted dying at the high court, but could a change in the law leave vulnerable people at risk? we are going to go back to the humber bridge which looks glorious this morning. 0n the banks of the river, not only
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can you find the lovely view but matt is there. the humber bridge. it took 100 years of come paining to get it built, eight years of construction and on this very day in 1981, the bridge was officially opened by the queen. even pore special today, it receives grade i listed advice from historic england. f bins me now. grade ' 77w ' ”www" bins me now. grade | 77'” ' ”www" bins me now. grade | listed ”""""’”' england joins me now. grade i listed status — what does that mean and why is it so special? it's many the top 2.596 is it so special? it's many the top 2.5% of all listed buildings in the country so it‘s about standing interests so any changes must respect what makes it so brilliant. putting it on a par with the likes of buckingham palace and the house of buckingham palace and the house of commons? it's an extremely
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admired thing and is in great company. all of the nine properties that were listed all in the area linked to hull city of culture, tell us linked to hull city of culture, tell us about those? we've liked working with hull on this, it‘s a great city with hull on this, it‘s a great city with a whole range of things from a 19205 with a whole range of things from a 1920s public lavatory to the flat where phillip larkin used to live. it's where phillip larkin used to live. it‘s that range and diversity that makes hull so interesting. fantastic. the old town has heritage status as well. what does that mean? that is us working with the city to maximise the apeople of the place, celebrate its history and bring in investment and prove lives for everyone. a brilliant day for hull and the surrounding area? terrific, great to be a part of it. a lovely morning as well for such an historic occasion for it. blue skies overhead and for many others today. we have sunshine almost across—the—board but we have sunshine almost across—the—boa rd but not we have sunshine almost across—the—board but not quite everywhere. it‘s a very warm day
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ahead. we started on a cool note. some rain around the english channel. across the far north and west of scotland too, you could see a shower there. sunshine will develop through the day in the hebrides. we‘ll continue the cloud in 0rkney and shetland, bringing one or two spots of rain into the afternoon. for the majority, or two spots of rain into the afternoon. forthe majority, it‘s dry with strong sunshine overhead. temperatures by this afternoon could reach around 25 to 27 in parts of eastern england. eastern parts of northern ireland and into the east of scotland, we could also hit 25. quite widely into the 20s as far as temperatures are concerned. it‘s a pleasa nt temperatures are concerned. it‘s a pleasant heat today rather than the humidity of yesterday. in 0rkney and shetland, the cloud remains throughout. tonight is dry
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with largely clear skies for many. a bit more cloud across the far south—west. temperatures will drop away quickly. big variation between day and night at the moment. that will change as we go through tuesday night, as i‘ll show you. for tuesday itself, another dry day for most. lots of sunshine around. more cloud in western england and wales and more breeze to south and east england. temperatures down a little bit for you tomorrow. warmest conditions, south—west midlands, south—eastern parts of wales could get close to around 28 or 29. around the moray firth and highlands of scotland, 27 is not out of the question. we could see some lightning in the far south—west to finish the day, mainly lightning storms to begin with. as they move north, scotland and northern ireland for wednesday morning, some torrential rain storms to go with it. the north—west on wednesday will see the most rain. sunshine develops elsewhere. very humid. could get close to 30 if not above in the
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east. that could set off some isolated, severe storms through wednesday afternoon. swept out of the way into thursday, thursday will bea the way into thursday, thursday will be a day of sunshine and a bit of rain into western scotland and northern ireland and it will certainly feel fresher. a different story, top and tail of the week, warming up to start with, storms midweek and fresher to end. that is how it‘s looking. back to you both. really impressed that your companion, the swan, has stayed with you throughout the programme this morning? he certainly has. they are doing the swan count on the thames today. mine doesn‘t take me too long. thank you very much. a survey from building society nationwide has found that more than two thirds of people don‘t check whether an online competition is genuine before sharing
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things like their name, address and date of birth. people are doing that a bit too easy. nationwide says they are at risk of fraud even if they are aware of it in the first place. there is a new boss in town at itv. they‘ve appointed the easyjet boss as its chief executive, there she is, she‘s been there for seven year bus got another big business on her cv now. and there are reports today some references references to winnie the pooh have been removed from china. some observers are saying the chubby bear has been banned
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because of comparisons made with the chinese president, xijinping. we were talking earlier about queues at palma airport. mrs donovan‘s got in touch saying we have just returned from palma, passport control area dreadful, hundreds queueing, took two hours, very hot, no air conditioning, babies crying in the heat. she said we suggested get there early to avoid missing the flight get there early to avoid missing the flight and a few people have got in touch making this point, saying the problem is, there are only three passport booths open for the thousands going through, it‘s as if they are on strike. keep those e—mails coming in. it seems like there is an issue at some airports across europe. caroline and john said faro airport in portugal through june, on the said faro airport in portugal throuthune, on the way out, no problem, but the queues in passport
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control going back were horrendous, officials made sure we stayed in the hot and uncomfortable queues. two hours to get through. keep getting in touch with us. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. we are going to be talking dr who. jodie whittaker, there she is on the front—page of the telegraph. jodie first woman doctor kept the secret for months. mike says everyone i know male and female said before the announcement, if the new doctor is a woman they‘ll not watch the show. so watch out for falling viewing
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figures. david says a brave refreshing change, just hope she carries on the character of the doctor. i would hate to make her stop the confrontations with the dale ks stop the confrontations with the daleks just with her make—up. stop the confrontations with the daleksjust with her make—up. dr who character could be any person of any gender or whatever. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are now. some very bored and hot temperatures
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mean we will start off the week in fine there. clouds are sinning and breaking across scotland this morning, cloud and rain becoming confined to the far north of scotland, fine and bright weather across england and wales, a bit of high—level cloud turning the sunshine hazy. temperatures at a maximum of 25—26d in london, plenty of fine and bright weather across wales and northern ireland, temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees. light winds and a similar story for scotland, the temperatures responding into the early 20s. cooler for we hold onto cloud responding into the early 20s. coolerfor we hold onto cloud in responding into the early 20s. cooler for we hold onto cloud in the far north. this evening and overnight, holding onto cloud for the far north of scotland, clear spells throughout northern ireland and scotland, more cloud pushing into the south—west, staying dry and muqqy into the south—west, staying dry and muggy in the south, overnight lows
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of between 14 and 18. on tuesday, high pressure in charge, edging slightly to the east, dragging in some mild airfrom the south, becoming increasingly warm with the risk of thundery showers. a bright start to the day, a touch more in the way of cloud across wales and the way of cloud across wales and the southwest, and in and breaking to allow sunshine, late afternoon thundery showers creeping in, the odd rumble of thunder and lightning, is of around 29 degrees, feeling very is of around 29 degrees, feeling very warm. is of around 29 degrees, feeling very warm. as we is of around 29 degrees, feeling very warm. as we move is of around 29 degrees, feeling very warm. as we move into wednesday, the risk of an isolated, heavy thundery shower, or news if you don‘t like it quite so hot, becoming fresher and changeable later in the week. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and alice baxter. china‘s factories keep on churning. latest growth figures from the world‘s second biggest economy prove it‘s resilience. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday the 17th ofjuly.
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china grows faster than expected — but will measures to rein in debt put the brakes on the world‘s second biggest economy. also in the programme.... the uk‘s brexit secretary urges for both sides to get down to business — as the second round of formal talks with the eu begins in brussels. this
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