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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 17, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. in brussels, the brexit secretary, david davis, has called for both sides to "get down to business" this morning as the next round of negotiating begins. a terminally ill man will today begin a legal challenge to overturn the ban on so—called assisted dying. ido i do not want to die very slowly of suffocation, and being semiconscious until i am in a position where i do not even know what is going on. the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today, after years of disagreements. also, the father of the zombie film genre, george a romero, has died at the age of 77. the american—born director's 1968 cult classic night of the living dead spawned an entire genre of zombie movies. and the cyclist who stole her bike
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back from a man selling it on a street corner, the day after it was stolen from her. good morning. it's monday the 17th ofjuly, i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the brexit secretary, david davis, and the chief negotiator for the eu, michel barnier, have begun a second round of talks in the brexit negotiations in brussels this morning. the talks are expected to last until thursday, as the two sets of negotiators look to reach agreements on some key issues over the week. mr davis says a priority for the talks is to lift the uncertainty for eu citizens living in the uk and britons living in the eu.
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the brexit "divorce bill" is also thought to be high on the agenda. the uk's financial settlement with the eu is a key point for mr barnier. and the future of the irish border is also a key topic up for discussion. the two men met and spoke briefly to journalists just a short time ago — this is what they had to say. we need to examine and compare our respective positions in order to make good progress. as you know, our negotiating groups will work on citizens‘ rights, on the financial settlement and other separation issues. our coordinators will engage in a political dialogue on ireland. and they will work on the enforcement of the article 50 agreement. we are now getting to the substance of the matter, and as you heard, it is four categories, really. the issue of citizens' rights, the issue of finance,
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the issue of separation issues, and of course, separately, northern ireland. for us, it is incredibly important we now make good progress, that we negotiate through this and identify the differences so that we can deal with them, and identify the similarities so we can reinforce them. and now, it's time to get down to work and make this a successful negotiation. joining us from brussels to tell us more about what we can expect from today's talks is our correspondent kevin connolly. kevin, shell barnier has been saying the clock is ticking, david davis says let's get down to business. how productive will the next few days be likely to be? it is certainly important has to be progress on those big issues, the irish border, the site of the —— size of the so—called divorce bill and the issue of citizens' rights, otherwise but
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not get onto the subject of a future trade relationship, which is the really important thing which determines britain's economic relationship with the eu. so lots of m essa 9 es relationship with the eu. so lots of messages about delving into the heart of the matter, getting on with business. not long after those pictures were taken, david davis personally left the meeting, left brussels, we understand, is heading back to london, has political business there this week. such business there this week. such business as will be got down to, we think, by officials, then david davis and michel barnier will come together on thursday to discuss any matters which have been thrown up by those official talks and give us another press conference. from now until then, we think there will be a kind of radio silence on the —— on the negotiations as the officials deal with these immensely difficult and promulgated issues, against a clock which has already started ticking, as mr barnier likes to
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remind us. apologies if you were struggling with the sound is that, asi struggling with the sound is that, as i was a little bit. let's go now to our assistant political editor, norman smith. well, the meeting takes place against a backdrop of discord amongst ministers here. clear signs of tension within the cabinet over brexit, between what might be termed the brexit ideologues and the brexit pragmatists around the chancellor, would philip hammond leading the demand for some sort of transitional period to be built into our departure from the eu. the thinking, to try and ensure business does not face some sort of cliff edge when we leave the eu in march 2019, to give business a breathing space, to adapt to whatever new trade arrangements we put in place. why that has caused concern amongst the so—called brexit ideologues is that they feared that is basically a ruse to delay leaving the eu. maybe forever. in other
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words, it is a device, a tactic, to scupper brexit. that is why, over the weekend, we saw this briefing against philip hammond from within the cabinet, over and his reported criticism of the public sector workers, suggesting they were overpaid. but the real thrust of it was that damage the chancellor, because he is seen as the main proponent of a transitional deal, and a softer form of brexit. in the end, because of the parliamentary arithmetic, is it not inevitable that it will have to be a softer form of brexit? that depends if the labour party stay committed, as jeremy corbyn has said they are, to leaving the eu and the single market, and depending free movement. if they do, the government, of course, has a comfortable majority to pursue its agenda. however, that
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is not necessarily a given, because there is a view in labour circles that these brexit bills which the government has to get through parliament, if the government was to be defeated in on any of those, it would be seen potentially as a vote of no—confidence in the government, and that may well tempt of no—confidence in the government, and that may well temtheremy corbyn to vote against theresa may, even though he has previously said he supports her in leaving the eu. so it is by no means a given that theresa may will be able to get these brexit bills through parliament and if you cannot, who knows where that may lead? it could even potentially lead to another general election. norman, thank you very much. we will keep you updated on the talks in brussels today. a terminally ill man has begun a high court challenge to the ban on assisted dying. noel conway has motor neurone disease and wants a doctor to be allowed to prescribe a lethal dose when his health deteriorates further. under the current law in england and wales, any doctor who helped him to die would face up to 1a years in prison but opponents say a change in the law would put vulnerable
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people at risk, as our medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. noel conway increasingly relies on a ventilator to help him breathe. his chest muscles are gradually getting weaker. 0nce fit and active, motor neurone disease has already robbed him of the ability to walk. as the condition progresses, he fears becoming entombed in his body. i will be quadriplegic. in fact, i could be virtually catatonic. i'll be conceivably in a locked—in syndrome. that to me would be a living hell. that prospect is just not one i can accept. mr conway came to a preliminary high court hearing in march, but now feels too weak to make thejourney from shropshire. his lawyers will say he wants the right to a peaceful and dignified death while he still has the capacity to make the decision. it's three years since
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the supreme court dismissed the last major challenge to the suicide act, which involved tony nicklinson, who also wanted the right to die. since then, mps overwhelmingly rejected proposals to allow assisted dying. supporters of the current law say it protects the weak and vulnerable, but mr conway says the law is broken, and condemns him to unimaginable suffering. fergus walsh, bbc news. christie arnsten is a campaigner in favour of assisted dying and she's at the high court today. thank you very much forjoining us. i know also you gave written evidence to support noel conway's case. tell us more about the evidence you put forward. the evidence you put forward. the evidence i have given isjust an honest recount of how it feels to
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have incurable cancer, and the pressure of knowing that you are going to die, how you live with it every single day, and how having a concept of an assisted death would actually make life so much easier to live now, if i knew the end was sorted out and that i could actually died still being me. so, tell us more about why it is... obviously, you have said it would help that the concept of assisted death, why would it help? at the moment, i have obviously considered my options, i have researched suicide and found it to be so unreliable that i could not put my family through that. i have also looked at going to dignitas, and again, i'm afraid that would be too traumatic for my family. so u nfortu nately, too traumatic for my family. so unfortunately, i am left with the situation for i will end my life
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suffering, and that will have an impact on not only me, but how i wa nt impact on not only me, but how i want my family to see me and to remember me. how do your family feel when you have these conversations with them? they have been amazing. the first time i spoke to my children, who are 20 and 23, about assisted dying, they were absolutely bemused but it was not already a law and could not understand why people could not choose how their life ended. we have choices or throughout oui’ ended. we have choices or throughout our lives, and yet we have no choice at the end. the legal team for noel conway say that the difference in this case with previous ones that have been heard, there is the famous case of tony nicklinson, who had paralysis after a stroke, the difference with this case and that one is the fact that noel conway has
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a terminal illness and that there would be strict criteria and safeguards in order to protect the vulnerable for any abuse of the system. do you think that is an important distinction?” system. do you think that is an important distinction? i think there isa important distinction? i think there is a huge issue with understanding what terminal means. i have incurable cancer. terminal means that you're likely, expected to die within a six—month period. i am not there yet, i could be at any point but i am not there yet. this law only applies to people who are in that terminal state of life, and no other people, no other vulnerable parts of society would be included in that option. what do you say to people who are worried about the potential for any change in the law in this regard being open to exploitation of the vulnerable people potentially suffering? of course people worry and they are right to worry. but as the law stands at the moment, it is really quite stringent. you have to get two
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gps proving a mental state and prove that you are in that state of light. it goes before a judge before it is agreed you can proceed. it goes before a judge before it is agreed you can proceedm it goes before a judge before it is agreed you can proceed. if this case goes against noel conway and therefore, it would dash your hopes for a change in the law, how would you feel? to be honest, devastated. after it was howard in parliament, i thought i would be ok and actually, i was really, really low for a long time afterwards and took a long time to pick myself up and realise you have to carry on even if that assisted dying was not going to be for me, maybe it could be for my children and other people i love. thank you so much for talking to us, christie arntsen. the department for transport has announced the winners of more than £6 billion worth of contracts to build the first phase of hs2 between london and birmingham.
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uk companies carillion, costain and balfour beatty are among the firms which will build tunnels, bridges and embankments on the first stretch of the new high speed rail line. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. it's britain's biggest investment ever in public transport. highspeed2 is designed to cut journey times and increase the number of passenger seats between london and the north west via birmingham. it's been six years in the planning, but now the first construction contracts have been signed, and they're worth £6.6 billion, which the government says will support 16,000 jobs during the construction phase. the first trains aren't expected to run, though, until 2026, by which time they hope to carry 300,000 passengers per day. £50 billion on a track of this nature... but hs2 has faced stiff opposition. the stop hs2 campaign in the chilterns says it will only benefit the richest in society and the corporations who build it. and reports at the weekend said hs2 could end up as the most expensive
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rail line per mile in the world. even so, the muddy work of spades in the ground begins next year for what the government calls "the backbone of britain's rail network." joe lynam, bbc news. following the announcement of the first contracts, the transport secretary has said he has no reason to have any doubts about the project. speaking to the bbc, chris grayling said hs2 will be delivered on time and on budget. the project is essential for the future of our transport system. we have a situation today where the railways around our big cities are congested, where there is not enough space for all the freight services that would like to use our railways. if we are going to have the capacity we need for the future, we've got to get the express trains off those existing mainlines, create more space in london, birmingham, manchester, leeds for commuter trains and more space to get freight off the roads and onto rail. is it right to be spending all of this money on a train line like this when public sector workers haven't had a pay rise? shouldn't you be spending
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it on that instead? there is a big difference between the short—term money we spend on day—to—day services, on day—to—day pay for the public sector and long—term capital investment. if we don't have the capital investment we need for the future, to increase the capacity of our transport system, to support economic development, we will not carry on with the progress we've made that has brought unemployment down to the lowest level since the 1970s. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. talks on the substance of eu withdrawal are now under way in brussels as the brexit secretary david davis called on both sides to get down to business. a terminally ill man with motor neurone disease begins his high court challenge to the ban on assisted dying. the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today after yea rs of birmingham will be announced today after years of disagreements. roger federer has told the bbc he
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has his sights set on becoming world number one again after winning his record eighth wimbledon title, beating marin cilic in straight sets. he also says he will carry on playing for as long as he can. the new world rankings arrived this morning and one konta has risen to a great height of fourth after becoming the first british woman to reach the semifinals. andy murray remains the men's world number one. and england's cricketers have resumed play on the fourth day of the second test of —— against south africa. they have got off to a terrible start. i will have more on those stories and the rest of the day's sports just after half past. it's been one month since a fire in the 2a—storey grenfell tower block of flats happened in west london. 80 people are believed to have died in the blaze, which took a0 fire engines and more than 200 firefighters to tackle. an investigation into the fire is still under way, with teams working to gather belongings and remains from homes in the block.
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questions are still being asked about how the fire spread — but also about what the future may hold for the tower block and the wider area. joining us from our central london studio is michael lockwood, chief executive for harrow council and member of the grenfell task force. thank you very much forjoining us. what is the state of that block? 0ur priority has been, a big issue with the community, the safety and stability of the building. so what we have been doing in recent weeks is trying to ensure that building is both safe and secure. as you will appreciate, it suffered a horrendous fire, something of the order of 1000 degrees and parts of the building, so we degrees and parts of the building, so we have managed to secure and make so we have managed to secure and ma ke safe so we have managed to secure and make safe the exterior of the building, and that has been confirmed by the health and safety executive, are structural engineers. so we will be writing to tenants today to confirm to them that the building is safe and there is little risk to the public. when should the
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whole process recovering of what can be recovered from inside the complete? having made the building safe, the next steps are the recovery operation and the criminal investigation. the recovery operation is taking place, so we are trying to recover the remains and possessions of people within the building, and the criminal investigation is designed to collect evidence. in the case of the former, we believe the recovery operation should finish by early or mid november, and the criminal investigation by just november, and the criminal investigation byjust after christmas. that is depending on a number of factors, indicative lee, we should be finished the criminal investigation by just we should be finished the criminal investigation byjust after christmas. when you say, our investigation should be finished by then, are you saying that potentially charges could be brought as early as then? the evidence that
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the police need to put the case for will have been gathered. it will then be for the investigation to decide the results of the evidence thatis decide the results of the evidence that is provided. in terms of what happens with the building then, if everything that can be recovered is recovered by early to mid november, what happens with the block?|j recovered by early to mid november, what happens with the block? i think you can probably already see, the community, it is a very important issue for them, there have been a number of petitions that have been built around which basically are saying they would like to have the building replaced by a memorial park for memorial gardens. i think we should be led by what the community wa nts should be led by what the community wants and listen to what they want asa wants and listen to what they want as a replacement for the building. so, that is a decision that will ta ke so, that is a decision that will take place just after christmas time. obviously, the thoughts and feelings of the residents are absolutely paramount here. it is a building that stands there, a
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burned—out, i suppose, building that stands there, a burned—out, isuppose, memorialto what happened, but in terms of how residents feel about having to see that every day, do you get any sense whether there is a desire to pull it down sooner rather than later, or to perhaps cover it with a tarpaulin? in terms of the operation, it is highly likely that scaffolding will need to go up around the building, that will help with the criminal investigation and the recovery operation. and that scaffolding may include some netting and we need to make sure we discussed that with the community before we do it. i have been into the building and it is a very traumatic, difficult and challenging experience. as a chief executive, you face allsorts of things and that has been the most difficult thing i have faced. i have seen some of the devastation, particularly on the top floors, nearly 15 tons of material has to be
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removed from those upper floors. 0n the bottom floors, there is in some fa cts the bottom floors, there is in some facts very little damage. so, quite a contrast within the building. but for me, it has been very physically and emotionally draining to see that. and all we're trying to do is make sure, working with the police and other services, we can get the most information out of that to enable the enquiries to ensure that justice is achieved. after everything that has happened and that the authorities have been criticised for the handling of the situation, is the situation, is that effectively now a pledge in place that no decisions will be taken on anything like the issues we have been talking about, without consulting those who have survived and the relatives and making sure that everybody is comfortable with things as they go for?|j that everybody is comfortable with things as they go for? i think that is absolutely vital, yes. we need to listen, that is an important word, to what the community and the relatives want, what the families and friends want and make sure we try and help them deliver what is important to them, not what we think
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is important. the whole issue of communication and of listening but that public meetings, it is kind to bea that public meetings, it is kind to be a critical one, so they understand and know what will happen to that building in the weeks and months ahead. michael lockwood, thank you very much. let's look at some of today's other developing stories. an american neurologist who's offered to carry out a new therapy on the terminally ill baby, charlie gard, is due to meet the child's doctors in london today. he is also expected to examine charlie over the next two days and meet other medical experts. doctors at great 0rmond street hospital believe his condition is irreversible. the high court is considering his case. a memorialforest is being dedicated to the victims of the malaysia airlines flight mh17 today, near amsterdam's schipol airport. 298 people died when the plane was shot down over eastern ukraine three years ago. international prosecutors say a russian missile was fired from rebel—held territory, which moscow disputes. george a romero, the horrorfilm director known as the zombie master,
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has died at the age of 77. romero co—wrote and directed night of the living dead in 1968, which became a cult classic, spawned a successful franchise and shaped horror movies for decades. according to his manager, the director died in his sleep while listening to the soundtrack to the film the quiet man after a brief battle with lung cancer. the author stephen king has paid tribute to the director on twitter. for a full summary of the news, you can go to our website. you can get more details on all the stories we are covering, the latest on brexit, of course, the negotiations under way today in brussels. the rise in acid attacks will be discussed in parliament today. the latest figures suggest there were more than 400 assaults involving corrosive substances in england and wales in the six months to april. the debate comes as the government begins a review into the issue which could see sentences
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for the offence increased. prince george and princess charlotte will travel with their parents to poland today, at the start of a four—day tour of eastern europe. the duke and duchess of cambridge will begin their trip in warsaw, before moving to berlin later this week. the foreign office hope the tour will remind eu countries about the strength of their ties to the uk. here's our royal correspondent, peter hunt. wimbledon one day, warsaw the next. for a duke and duchess, the pleasure of a wimbledon final will be replaced by flying the flag in poland. it's a visit that's already attracted attention here. this is a country that relatively recently embraced the eu, welcoming the royal representatives of one on the way out of the institution. the monarchy will experience poland's turbulent past, and a visit to a museum representing an unsuccessful uprising against nazi rule.
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this visit to poland and then germany will inevitably be seen in the context of brexit. it won't obviously have any impact on the negotiations, but the government hopes their presence will show the strength of the ties that will endure once britain has left the eu. they brought that presence to france in march and other european cities in their roles as royal ambassadors for the uk. as in canada last year, the cambridges are coming en masse. for george and charlotte, such trips are a novelty. eventually, they will be a way of life. peter hunt, bbc news, warsaw. 0ur royal correspondent, peter hunt, is in poland for us now. so, you are at the airport, awaiting the arrival? very much so. if i was
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a plane spotter, this would be geek i°y a plane spotter, this would be geek joy for me, and said i am competing with the noise of the engines! —— deepjoy. and this is one of with the noise of the engines! —— deep joy. and this is one of life with the noise of the engines! —— deepjoy. and this is one of life —— this one arrives many hours before they do. so there is no red carpet, just the planes. but very soon they will arrive in those first shots that we have keenly awaited by those fascinated by the young children, when we see prince george and princess charlotte climbed on the steps, as we did in my early report in canada a year on, they are coming again. as! in canada a year on, they are coming again. as i was saying in that report, this is still a novelty for the children, given they represent the children, given they represent the future of the house of windsor, will become a way of life as they get older. they will be here with their parents, and crucially during their parents, and crucially during the week that william, kate and theirjob and are here in first poland and germany, they will not be getting into the nitty—gritty of brexit, for example the polish i'm sure will be keen to talk about the keyissue sure will be keen to talk about the key issue for them, the rights of polish citizens of more than 800,000 living in the uk. but that will not
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be the talk, it will really be about focusing on the past, the shared past of the two countries of the uk and poland, and the potentialfor the future relationships between the two countries. thank you very much. i'm sorry two countries. thank you very much. i'm sorry you're not a plane spotter so you're not enjoying being at the airport, especially as you have so long before they come but we will talk to you later. let's catch up with the weather now. some very warm and at times hot weather as we move through the next few days. plenty of brightness and good spells of sunshine. it will feel very warm in the sunshine today. we do have a little bit more in the way of cloud across western scotland. that will thin handbrake. cloud becoming confined to the far north of scotland with some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle for shetland and 0rkney. plenty of brightness in northern ireland. for england and wales, a sunny day. that's a little hazy at times. temperatures maximum 27. as we go
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through this evening and overnight, the cloud becomes confined to the north. it will be largely dried with clear spells through much of the country. a little more in the way of cloud pushing him from the south west. 0vernight lows of between 11 and 17. it will feel fairly muggy in the south. for the next few days, we will start to see temperatures increasing, becoming increasingly muqqy increasing, becoming increasingly muggy with the risk of seeing a thunderstorm midweek. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: brexit secretary david davis has called on both sides in the negotiations on the uk's departure from the european union to "get down to business". mr davis said his priority was to "lift the uncertainty" for eu citizens living in the uk and britons living in the eu. the high court is to begin hearing the legal challenge of a terminally ill man who wants the right to die. noel conway has motor neurone disease and wants doctors to be given permission to prescribe him a lethal dose when his health deteriorates further. the final route of the manchester and leeds branches of hs2 is due
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to be announced later. transport secretary chris grayling says the scheme will help rebalance the economy. but critics say the £56 billion project is too expensive. film—maker george a romero, who created the genre—defining living dead movie franchise, has died at the age of 77. romero co—wrote and directed the film that started the zombie series night of the living dead in 1968. let's catch up with the sport now. roger federer has spoken to the bbc this morning, the morning after winning his eighth wimbledon title. the dad of four, who turns 36 in a few weeks, says he has his sights set on becoming world one at least once more during his career and a warning to his rivals, telling russell fuller he is keen on playing
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well into his 40s. it is very special but it is borderline strange for me, because he will always be my hero and because i have surpassed his feed here at wimbledon, it doesn't change anything for me, he is still my guide, p. after my match in 2001, that one day i would surpassing, i never thought that would be possible in my wildest dreams, so i take it as it is and i really run with it, i enjoy it. i'm happy, the people and fa ns were enjoy it. i'm happy, the people and fans were happy for me again yesterday, so it wasjust fans were happy for me again yesterday, so it was just another incredible day here at wimbledon. wimbledon has been too kind, too nice to me after all these years and to be the record—holderfor the first time for a male to win eight wimbledons, i will always be that quy: wimbledons, i will always be that guy, it is very, very special and pete remains my hero for life, of course. how tempted you by the prospect of being world number one? it looks almost certain that you or
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rafael nadal will take over from andy murray at some point in the near future. it is a fantastic storyline to the next few months. absolutely, it'll be three, four way race and maybe a two—way race between me and rafa when andy dropped his world number—1 ranking but if all of a sudden, and they start winning again, we all have to start winning again, we all have to start winning again but at some stage, if he starts dropping points, we will get there. i hope it is me, and not rafa, because it would mean and not rafa, because it would mean a lot to me to get back to world number one. i was just trying to explain to the press that i haven't thought about it a whole lot yet. i have to speak to the team and decide how much i'm going to chase it for the near future, so how much i'm going to chase it for the nearfuture, so if i may be get to world, onejust the nearfuture, so if i may be get to world, one just one more time in my career, 01’ to world, one just one more time in my career, or maybe finish the year as world number one, which is an even bigger deal, but for me, it makes the difference being world number—1 for a week or year end number—1 for a week or year end number one at this stage of my career. so is to have a meeting and
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discussion with my team over the next couple of weeks. britain's johanna konta has moved up to number fourin johanna konta has moved up to number four in the rankings out today. she reached the semifinals of the ladies singles at wimbledon before losing in straight sets. she was ranked seventh before the tournament started. andy murray remains world number one despite going out in the men's semifinals. england are trying but failing to salvage something from their second test against south africa. the fourth day is under way at trent bridge. england are currently 23—1. their target is 474. the england goalkeeperjoe hart is set for a medical with west ham today, ahead of a season long loan move. he has been told he can find another club by his manager pep guardiola. it is expected the deal will include an option for west ham to buy the 30—year—old, with city
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pa rt to buy the 30—year—old, with city part funding his wages while on loan. the bbc has announced the venue loan. the bbc has announced the venue for the sheer‘s sports personality of the year awards. last yea r‘s personality of the year awards. last year's show was held in birmingham and this year, it moves to the echo arena in liverpool. it will take place on sunday december the 17th, in front of an audience of some 11,000 people and will be broadcast live on bbc one. and before i go, 0livia breen has won great britain's ninth gold medal of the world para athletics world championships. she set a new personal best of 4.81 metres in the fourth round to take the women's t38 long jump title. thank you very much, see you later. more now on the news that the department of transport has announced the winners of more than £6 billion worth of contracts to build the first phase of hs2 between london and birmingham. uk companies carillion, costain and balfour beatty are among the firms which will build tunnels, bridges and embankments on the first stretch of the new high speed rail line between london and birmingham. a decision on the final routes for the manchester and leeds
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branches is expected later. joining us from our central london studio is mark littlewood, director general of the institute for economic affairs. thank you forjoining us. well, it is british companies, is that a good thing? well, i suppose that is a good thing but this is a wrong—headed project all in all. i mean, this is a matter of really extreme financial folly for the government. we think that the project will cost upwards of £80 billion to complete, possibly as much as 100 billion. you can assume that all of these big government projects that they overrun. it won't come fully on stream until 2033 and even then, it depends whether you are willing to trust the government's projections of when it will be fully operational, probably later, by which time it is unlikely, i think, to be a piece of
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cutting—edge technology, it is likely to be something of an anachronism. so at a time when the government is running a budget deficit of tens of billions of pounds, this is money very badly spent. what about the argument that investing in infrastructure, it is obviously a long—term project, but in the long term, it is good for the country and in the short term, it will be supporting 16,000 jobs in britain. there is no doubt that investing in infrastructure is a good idea, it's a question of which infrastructure. the department for transport have on their books at the moment a whole range of projects that, even on their own estimates, would be much betterfor the economy, it would get a much better rate of return over a shorter period of time than this colossal rail project. so specifically, what would you think would be a better use of the money than this? lots of much smaller enterprises. they are not as grand, they don't grab the headlines, they don't leave a legacy
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for the politicians who designed them, but they're all all sorts of typically road projects that would be much more valuable for the economy than the colossal multi—billion pound new trainline which won't be fully operational for 15 years. so infrastructure is a useful thing but my test would be is the private sector willing to invest in it? the private sector is very keen to invest in airport expansion but doesn't seem to have much appetite for hs2. but if you are going to spend public money, spend it on the projects that have the best rate of return and they tend to best rate of return and they tend to be lots of small, fiddly projects, rather than one colossal grand one. in the end, can you put a price on the long—term impact on cutting journey times vary significantly in some cases, between different cities? i mean, the biggest margin, i think, is with leeds, where the journey time to london would go from 130 minutes to 80. for people who need to make thatjourney, that
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makes a big difference. i'm sure does make a big difference and, of course, being able to get from a to b faster than we can at the moment isa b faster than we can at the moment is a benefit, but you have to try and put a price on thatjourney times because there is a price associated with the project. actually, saving journey times from london to birmingham, which will be the first saving we will make, and thatis the first saving we will make, and that is only 12 saving, yes, that has some value but i don't think it has some value but i don't think it has tens of billions of pounds worth of value and when you are looking at journey times, particularly by rail, it is worth building in that increasingly now, people can work on a train almost as efficiently as in an office. you see people with la pto ps an office. you see people with laptops out, reading papers, taking notes, so we shouldn't consider that a slightly shorter journey time means we should automatically throw tens of billions of pounds of public money at the project. they need to be properly costed and my fear at the moment is they are seen as a dead weight loss. sometimes, ifind it easier to work on a train then in
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my own office, so those benefits need to be calculated, calibrated but not assumed to justify any amount of money the government wishes to spend. thank you very much. the title role in doctor who is to be played by a woman for the first time in the 54 year history of the series. jodie whitaker, who starred in the itv drama broad church, will take over from starred in the itv drama broad church, will take overfrom peter capaldi, making her first church, will take overfrom peter capaldi, making herfirst appearance as the 13th doctor in the christmas special. however, the decision to give the role of the 13th doctor to a woman has split some fans. we can speak to sophie aldridge, who played the doctor's companion in the 1980s, the doctor's companion in the 1980s, the sidekick two sylvester mccoy. what do you think? well, i think it is an amazing move. i know that i have been watching my twitter feeds on my facebook feeds, and opinion is divided, but mainly i have to say in
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favour and also, let's not forget that doctor who is an alien, so he is kind of gender neutral anyway. i also think that this whole thing about whether he is a man or a woman, a hee rishi, young people nowadays who, let's face it, —— a he or ritchie, young people nowadays, for whom the programme is principally made, they are a lot more fluid on gender than us old folks and for them, it may be doesn't matter as much whether it is a man ora doesn't matter as much whether it is a man or a woman. so are we doesn't matter as much whether it is a man or a woman. so are we making too big a deal of it? i think we are, ina too big a deal of it? i think we are, in a sense, although i think the main thing is how isjodie whittaker going to play the part? how has it been written for her? she isa how has it been written for her? she is a fantastic actress, she is obviously incredibly versatile. it is all in the writing, really. what will the writers and producers have decided that the character of the
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doctor is? and that is going to be, actually, for me, very interesting thing to find out, quite apart from the fact that she is a woman. 0bviously, the fact that she is a woman. obviously, in an ideal world, nothing comes into a decision—making process other than who is best for a particular job process other than who is best for a particularjob or part. how, ideally, do you think it normally works in terms of casting? well, she is the 13th person to have played this fantastic role in over 50 years and having been lucky enough to know most of those 13 people, men so far, ican most of those 13 people, men so far, i can say without doubt that each one of those people is fascinating, interesting, amazing in their own right and interesting, amazing in their own rightandi interesting, amazing in their own right and i don't knowjodie whittaker, but i'm sure that she is the same. she will be a fascinating person, a lot of the doctors have
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had a sort of eccentric nature. it will be fascinating to see. and also who she is paired with. will she be paired with a male companion? is she going to have a companion? that is going to have a companion? that is going to have a companion? that is going to be another really interesting thing. as you say, it'll be interesting to see how it all unfolds. sophie, thank you very much for us. it's more than 1,000 years since the lynx became extinct in the uk but campaigners hope a decision later today could change that. an application being considered by natural england could see them released into kielder forest in northumberland, but the return of a major predator is worrying farmers. graham satchell has got all the details. the last lynx in britain was killed for its fur 1,300 years ago. the application going in to natural england today would see them return. between six and ten wild lynx released into kielder forest in northumberland. this is a huge conservation milestone. this is the first licence ever submitted to reintroduce lynx on a trial basis to the uk.
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this is a life—sized cutout of a lynx, so that's actually how big a real lynx is, so they aren't that big, that's actually about the size of... paul 0'donoghue from the lynx trust has been doing a consultation, talking, listening and explaining and the children at kielder first school have big questions. are lynx dangerous to people? lynx live all over the world and in human history a healthy wild lynx has never, ever, ever attacked a human anywhere in the world. there's a genuine excitement here and enthusiasm for the return of a wildcat. they do look really nice and it's good that they don't hurt any people or anything. they might not hurt people but lynx are expert hunters. their main prey, deer. deer eat out the understory, they overgraze and if you see now there's very little understory around so there's not really many
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places for small mammals and birds to nest and lynx are needed to control that balance, to balance the ecosystem. not according to sheep farmers, who say deer are not a problem and lynx would be a threat. i think it's absolutely a stupid idea for a predator that's not been in this country for 1,000 years to be released where it's as far as i'm concerned, the lynx will go for the easy target, which is going to be sheep and lamb. farmers would be compensated for any livestock lost, but they are strongly against the issuing of a licence. there's got to be a legal case taken against them because to release a dangerous animal onto private land, that can't possibly be right. and you'll fight them? yes, definitely. i can understand the farmers being nervous... 0pinion here is divided. in the local pub, mike brown is thinking about his business. 0ne estimate suggests the lynx
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could bring around £30 million a year in extra tourist revenue. it is the most remote village in england, so we need as many tourists as we can get. we rely on tourist trade, that's 99% of the trade we take is tourists. will kielder forest become the land of the lynx? the decision is now in the hands of natural england but if they say yes, experts predict there could eventually be as many as 400 lynx in forests around the uk. ina in a moment, a summary of the business news. first, the headlines. talks on the substance of eu withdrawal are now under way in brussels as the brexit secretary david davis calls on both sides to get down to business. a terminally ill man with motor neurone disease
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begins his high court challenge to the ban on assisted dying. and the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today after years of disagreements. iam i am alice baxter, let's get an update on the business news. the government has announced the first major contracts for the high speed railway between london and birmingham. balfour beatty, the swedish—based skanska, and carillion — which is facing financial difficulties — are among the companies chosen to build tunnels, bridges and embankments at a cost of nearly £7 billion. itv has appointed the head of easyjet, carolyn mccall, as its new chief executive. ms mccall, who will begin the newjob nextjanuary, succeeds adam crozier, who stepped down at the end of last month. paramedics, teachers, prison guards and firefighters are thousands of pounds worse off since 2010 after public—sector pay caps and freezes, according to the tuc. the head of
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the trade union body, frances 0'grady, is calling for public—sector pay review bodies to be "genuinely independent". consumer confidence has recorded the biggest decline in more than two years as households' concerns about disposable incomes and debt levels grow. according to the consumer tracker report by deloitte, across the uk, consumer confidence fell by three percentage points in the second quarter of 2017 — that's the biggest quarterly decline in more than two years. let's get more now and talk to ben perkins, who is head of consumer research at deloitte. many thanks for joining research at deloitte. many thanks forjoining me. talk us through this decline in consumer confidence. ok,
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so what our research has shown is really driving this decline in confidence is that consumers are feeling a squeeze on incomes and they are feeling that pain in their pockets. so during the first half of 2016, we've seen inflation rise and inflation has risen at a faster rate than wages are growing, which means that consumers have less money to spend. and rising inflation also feeds into this. absolutely. so i think that most retailers have done what they can to manage the impact on consumers, they have worked on their supply chains, they have worked with their suppliers to drive their costs down but the prices are rising in shops and this is impacting consumers. so are there any positive nodes on the horizon for consumers? there are, and there are two very big positives for consumers. the first is that unemployment remains at an historically low level, which means that consumers are still, in the
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main part, secure in theirjobs and the other part that is really positive for consumers is that borrowing remains at a very low rate as well, so they are relatively secure in theirjobs and still have access to credit. and yet this is the biggest quarterly decline in consumer confidence in more than two yea rs. consumer confidence in more than two years. how worried should we be as a country? i think it is a very good question, because since the financial crisis at the end of 2007, the consumer economy has really been the consumer economy has really been the engine room behind the uk economy as a whole. so at a time when big business has slowed down its spending, when the government has slowed down spending, it is consumers that have driven it forwards, so any slowdown in the consumer market should be of concern to the broader economy as well. we are going to have to leave it there but many thanks, ben perkins, head of consumer research at deloitte. some other business stories we are
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keeping an eye on today. the proportion of overseas—based landlords across britain has fallen to the lowest levels seen by a lettings network in at least seven years. countrywide, the country's largest letting agent — which lets 90,000 properties — said just 5% of british homes now have overseas owners, compared with 12% in 2010. foreign investors have previously been blamed for pushing up house prices. tax changes appear to have discouraged some of them, while others have bought property in cheaper areas instead. a major cyber attack could cost the global economy around £40 billion — that's according to research by lloyd's of london. that's roughly the same cost as superstorm sandy, the hurricane that hit the east cost of the united states in 2012. the hurricane that hit the east coast of the united states in 2012. french car—maker renault has reported record sales for the first six months of the year. the company sold 1.9 million vehicles, a 10% rise on the same period a year earlier. sales in europe, which remains
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renault‘s most important market, rose 5.6% to above one million, helped by a strong performance from the company's dacia brand. a quick look to see what the markets are up to today. the ftse100 starting with solid gains, driven mostly by some basic resources, that government contract hit by struggling construction firm carillion, that has given it some respite from the troubles last week. carillion — which is involved in the redevelopment of battersea power station, the extension of anfield and, as of this morning, part of the hs2 rail network — has seen its shares by 69 points. but shares are down by 75 points this year. that is all the business,
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more in the next hour. a cyclist has managed to recover her stolen bike through a clever sting. 30—year—old jenny morton humphrey ignored police advice and turn the ta bles ignored police advice and turn the tables on the thief. earlier, jenny spoke to my colleague victoria derbyshire and explain what happened. i was very unhappy, as you might imagine, and someone had seen ita might imagine, and someone had seen it a picture of it, for sale, i had asked that if anyone saw it, please tell me and i got a response from a total stranger who was amazing, helped me out messaging the guy and i posed as a buyer, didn't go to work the next day and just went and took it, pretty much. well, it was a bit more than that. you met him, you chatted, you did the pleasantries and then what did you do? well, i had seen him across the street, i saw him with my bike and i thought i
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will just be saw him with my bike and i thought i willjust be friendly, be nice, ask a couple of stupid questions about the bike, is it even a girl's buy? is it even the right size? can i write it? i was nervous but i think he believed everything i was saying andi he believed everything i was saying and i said, ok, i'm going to take it for a test ride and i had thought about this the night before. i had a bunch of old keys which were, strangely enough, the keys for the locks that they had cut off my bike the night before, so i thrust goes into his hand and said, can you hold these, i'm going to ride it and he said ok and i walked down the pavement a little bit, kind of fell offa pavement a little bit, kind of fell off a couple of times to make it more realistic and off i went. and you pedalled like the wind, did you? i really did, faster than i ever have before for quite a long time. i didn't look back, i did know where i was, ijust kept going. eventually, i found my way back to a meeting spot that i had arranged with my friend who was watching the whole
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thing from the corner and, yeah, a lot of adrenaline going on. let's talk about the safe side of his career did inform the police and say this is what i'm going to do and they did advise against it. why did you decide to do it because it could have been dangerous? it could have been but i think anyone who owns a bicycle knows how i felt. i was so angry, someone else had my bike, which i love. i did phone the belize, i did give them evidence because we had a number of screenshots —— phone the police. we had the conversation between the guy online and the guy who had presumably stolen it. i did consider that it might be dangerous but i was quite confident that i could pull it off. angie did and there is your splendid bike behind you. —— and you did. right here, very happy. we asked avon and somerset police for a comment and they gave us this statement. we would advise against people taking matters into their own
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hands... the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with a look at the weather. thank you, good morning. some very warm and hot temperatures on the way as we move through the next few days. plenty of brightness around as well, some blue skies across north yorkshire and as you can see in this photo sent in by our weather as we move through the rest of the day, plenty of sunny spells around and it will feel very warm in that sunshine. moynagh way applied across parts of scotland today, western parts of scotland today, western parts of scotland today, western parts of scotland. —— moynagh way of
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life. the far north of holding more cloud with a few outbreaks of drizzle. we are looking at a lovely day with fine and dry and bright weather. the sunshine could be hazy at times thanks to some high—level cloud, highs of perhaps 25 or 26 celsius in london. for wales, plenty of brightness and sunshine and the northern ireland, highs of 23 celsius with light winds, feeling warm and a similar story in scotland. where we have the sunshine, temperatures responding nicely but a little bit cooler where we have more in a way of cloud. as we have more in a way of cloud. as we go through this evening and overnight, that cloud holding on in the far north of scotland. it will be largely dry, and the northern ireland and scotland, plenty of clear spells and a little bit more ina way clear spells and a little bit more in a way of cloud pushing in from the south—west. it will be a fairly muqqy the south—west. it will be a fairly muggy evening in the south. 0vernight lows of 18 celsius. tuesday, high pressure remains in charge and that means we will start to see some warmer weather coming in
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from the south, but becoming increasingly hot over the next few days. it will be a dry, bright start of the day. the best of the sunshine across northern ireland and scotland first thing. a bit more in the way applied across wales and england, thinning and breaking with temperatures reaching 29 celsius. later in the day, the chance of some heavy and thundery showers and those showers will slowly creep their way north as we move through tuesday night, becoming increasingly heavy with some rumbles of thunder and lightning. they will be strong across northern ireland and scotland as we get to the first part of wednesday morning but with increasingly warm temperatures, there is the chance of thunderstorms across england and wales. it could be quite heavy, containing the odd rumble of thunder, some surface water and localised flooding is that feeling really warm on thursday with highs of 30 celsius. if you don't like it so hard, in the latter part of the week, temperatures cooling
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off in becoming increasingly changeable and we do have some outbreaks of rain towards the end of the week but a warm start of the week, plenty of sunny spells as we move through the day butjust the risk of seeing a heavy and thundery shower by the time we get to midweek. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. the brexit secretary, david davis, calls on both sides to get down to business as talks on eu withdrawal begin in earnest. a terminally ill man with motor neurone disease begins a legal challenge to overturn the ban on assisted dying. i do not want to die very slowly of suffocation, and being semiconscious until i'm in a position where i don't even know what is going on. the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today, after years of disagreements. also — the most successful man in wimbledon singles history. after a five—year wait, roger federer tells the bbc how special it is to win his eighth title at his favourite tournament. wimbledon has been too kind, too
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nice to me for all these years, and notably the record—holder for the first time, a mailfor the eight wimbledon, it is very, very special. and we'll hear from the cyclist who turned the tables on a bike thief, the day after it was stolen from her. good afternoon. it's monday the 17th ofjuly, i'm joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the brexit secretary, david davis, and the chief negotiator for the eu, michel barnier, have begun a second round of talks in the brexit negotiations in brussels this morning. the talks are expected to last until thursday, as the two sets of negotiators look to reach agreements on some key issues over the week. mr davis says a priority for the talks is to lift
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the uncertainty for eu citizens living in the uk and britons living in the eu. the brexit "divorce bill" is also thought to be high on the agenda. the uk's financial settlement with the eu is a key point for mr barnier. and the future of the irish border is also a key topic up for discussion. the two men met and spoke briefly to journalists before they went in — this is what they had to say. we need to examine and compare our respective positions in order to make good progress. as you know, our negotiating groups will work on citizens' rights, on the financial settlement and other separation issues. 0ur coordinators will engage in a political dialogue on ireland. and they will work on the enforcement of the article 50 agreement. we are now getting to the substance of the matter, and as you heard, it is four categories, really.
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the issue of citizens' rights, the issue of finance, the issue of separation issues, and of course, separately, northern ireland. for us, it is incredibly important we now make good progress, that we negotiate through this and identify the differences so that we can deal with them, and identify the similarities so we can reinforce them. and now, it's time to get down to work and make this a successful negotiation. joining us from brussels to tell us more about what we can expect from today's talks is our correspondent kevin connolly. how much progress are they expected to make over the next few days?m isa to make over the next few days?m is a very good question. so far at least, this has been a surprisingly un—leaky least, this has been a surprisingly un—lea ky process. we least, this has been a surprisingly un—leaky process. we will hear from these two at the start of talks now, we will hear from them... excuse me.
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0n we will hear from them... excuse me. on thursday, and the talks in between, there is a tremendous adopt detailed work, which is going to be done by senior officials on both sides and david davis having delivered that exhortation to get into business, talked about getting to the substance of the matter, he left the talks and we think he has already gone back to london. so in that context, probably michel barnier will be there either. so you will have senior officials on both sides who will have been involved in preparing position papers on all of those very important issues mother brexit divorce bill, the future of citizens' rights on both sides, the future of the irish border. how much they will say about what has happened, i think, they will say about what has happened, ithink, will they will say about what has happened, i think, will be interesting on thursday but my sense is, and! interesting on thursday but my sense is, and i think this will be a general characteristics of these talks going forward, my sense is that we will not hear from very much in the next couple of hours or the next couple of days about what goes on from minute to minute at that
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level of detail we have been talking about. it is interesting that the two men we are seeing now shaking hands and not involved over the next few days. so at the justice hands and not involved over the next few days. so at thejustice —— a sort of symbolic thing for them to come out and kick of the process in that visual way? i suppose they would feel that a photo opportunity involving them conveys a sense of positive, warm, mutual determination to get things done at the start, thatis to get things done at the start, that is the job of politicians, i suppose, to set a tone top, to give a character, a favourite of the talks, then the heavy lifting is done by senior officials. that is probably the case with most political process. on the british side there has been talk about eyeballing european leaders across the table, sitting down face—to—face with the leaders of the other 27 european member states. i do not think these talks were ever going to work in that way and i think it is
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now clear how they will work. david davis and michel barnier have set the tone, there will be involved with the more delicate moments where people are meeting political redlines and in the meantime officials will talk and it will be up officials will talk and it will be up to david davis and michel barnier on thursday to decide what sort of tone to set in public about how the talks are going, if they are problematic it will be interesting, for example, to see how they deal with that. so they are about tone, i suppose the granular, the nitty—gritty, the heavy lifting is being done at the lower level but we are assured that work is well under way. thank you very much, kevin. let's speak to our thank you very much, kevin. assistant political editor, norman smith. all sorts of lobbying and jockeying and whatever else you like to call it going on here against the backdrop of these talks. and an indication of the very real divisions within cabinet over the
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approach to brexit between those who you might term the brexit ideologues, who want to get on with it, and the pragmatists around philip hammond, who want to build in some sort of transitional period before britain leaves. so that business can adapt but of the problem with that is, the ideologues fear that is basically a ruse to delay brexit, maybe even to permanently put it on hold. so it has become a real clash, which is why we saw that briefing at the weekend against philip hammond. interesting, number ten saying that tomorrow's cabinet meeting, theresa may will begin by stressing the need for such meetings to be private, thatis, for such meetings to be private, that is, foreign end to the leaks. how is accessible that will be is probably quite debatable, because the divisions over this issue are so profound, i do not get the sense that either side is willing to back off over this. more than that, you
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only have to go back a few months, when misses may was at the prime of her powers, and she ordered the cabinet secretary to issue a note to ministers and senior civil servants to tell them then to stop leaking, threatening for example that their e—mail records would be seized, mobile phone records would be seized, they would be disciplined, and lo and behold, the leading has still continued and now theresa may is in an even worse position. -- the leaking. and what is the thinking about how this comes across in brussels, when the negotiations are underway? this division here. i think that has to surely damage britain's approach to the negotiations, the lack of clarity, the uncertainty, the division and to some extent, once we get down to the really ha rd some extent, once we get down to the really hard bargaining, i would imagine it gives mr barnier and his collea g u es imagine it gives mr barnier and his colleagues a significant advantage,
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in that they can play on those divisions, and certainly in terms of perception here at home, never mind in brussels, it just perception here at home, never mind in brussels, itjust feels a sense ofa in brussels, itjust feels a sense of a government addressed, there is a lack of control and a lack of direction, and ministers seemingly publicly squabbling with each other. thank luel! ~ thank é very much, a terminally ill man has begun a high court challenge to the ban on assisted dying. noel conway has motor neurone disease and wants a doctor to be allowed to prescribe a lethal dose when his health deteriorates further. under the current law in england and wales, any doctor who helped him to die would face up to 14 years in prison but opponents say a change in the law would put vulnerable people at risk, as our medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. noel conway increasingly relies on a ventilator to help him breathe. his chest muscles are gradually getting weaker. 0nce fit and active, motor neurone disease has already robbed him of the ability to walk. as the condition progresses, he fears becoming entombed in his body. i will be quadriplegic.
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in fact, i could be virtually catatonic. i'll be conceivably in a locked—in syndrome. that to me would be a living hell. that prospect is just not one i can accept. mr conway came to a preliminary high court hearing in march, but now feels too weak to make thejourney from shropshire. his lawyers will say he wants the right to a peaceful and dignified death while he still has the capacity to make the decision. it's three years since the supreme court dismissed the last major challenge to the suicide act, which involved tony nicklinson, who also wanted the right to die. since then, mps overwhelmingly rejected proposals to allow assisted dying. supporters of the current law say it protects the weak and vulnerable, but mr conway says the law is broken, and condemns him
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to unimaginable suffering. fergus walsh, bbc news. nikki kenward from distant voices is at the high court now. she campaigns against assisted dying. thank you very much for joining us. i know that the reason you feel so strongly about this is your own personal situation. you had locked—in syndrome and wanted to die at one point, and now you have totally changed your perspective. talk us through what your experience has been. well, i had a neurological disease, i was locked in completely i could not speak, move, feel or hearfor i could not speak, move, feel or hear for about five and a half months. then for the next two and a
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half years, i could not feed myself or do anything was done and now, i have some movement, but not a great deal. but i am still here. and when you're at your worst, going through that, and obviously when you are in that, and obviously when you are in that situation, he did not know if you would ever get any better. did you would ever get any better. did you want to end your life? well, but it this way, if i signed an advanced directive, which is becoming massively popular all over the world, then my family, from the goodness of their hearts, they would be thinking, would have said, because i was an actor, i was a very active person, i think, because i was an actor, i was a very active person, ithink, i'm because i was an actor, i was a very active person, i think, i'm sure they would have said she would rather die. and i would not have been able to say, it's not like that when it happens is that they don't wa nt to when it happens is that they don't want to die, i have got to live. your spirit is something that cannot
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be overestimated. and it is that spirit that takes a lot of people with disabilities to a good, fulfilling life. not an easy life, but that is life, that is how things are. obviously, you say that if you're in that situation, you did not want to die, but there are people who do want to die. why should they not have that right? because in every country that this has become law, the list of people who are eligible has always extended. at the moment, on the list, dementia, but will be a big thing about this, we can utilise now, just having what you have as they completed life, you can be euthanised were being mentally ill you can be euthanised for feeling
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old and losing your looks. recently, alcoholism was added to it. there doesn't seem to be any end to this. and i think that cases like noel co nway‘s and i think that cases like noel conway's make very bad law. but i am here today with other disabled people who belong to our organisation, and i'm afraid for them because mencap, who i think we can rely on information they have given us, they found in a report in england, 1200 disabled people in europe who died unnecessarily, and i can do this through the death of a nine—year—old child who had an infection and the staff in the hospital decided that her life was not worth saving, and she was allowed to die over a period of three weeks and she could have been few words. -- she could have been
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cured. 0bviously few words. -- she could have been cured. obviously you are very worried about a law potentially being the thin end of the wedge. if there could be complete safeguards around it, and the lawyers for noel conway say that this case sets out strict criteria, and would be clear potential safeguards to protect vulnerable people, if that was the case, would you be open to something in very specific cases? no, because you would have to show me an instance, look at rotherham, look at telford, look at all those places where those kids were taken into sexual slavery, they all had safeguards. the lcp, which was instrumental, through which thousands of people died, but was a logarithm that was jam—packed with safeguards, and the bottom line is,
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the end of the slippery slope is that we cannot be trusted with power like this. i have spoken to a lady earlier who is living with incurable cancer, and she said for her, the issue is, and she has been given written evidence in this case, she said for her the issue is, every day living with the fact she knows she is going to die of this cancer, and the thought of the sort of death she would go through is always hanging over her and if she had the comfort of knowing she could have an assisted death one day, it would make a great difference to the life that she has left. what would you say to somebody like her? well, first of all, i would say that it is not that we do not care about you, but i would say to her that only 26%
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of nurses are trained to manage that. let's get the sort of palliative care, you must learn to live by. people need to be taken ca re of live by. people need to be taken care of properly. you will net —— never get rid of full death, it is pa rt never get rid of full death, it is part ofan never get rid of full death, it is part of an existential existence. it is too dangerous to say, i mean, in other countries, medicating other people, —— medicaid are people saying they were not paid to have standard jobs and lives but they will be euthanised. the authorities are not backing euthanasia. the sad thing is that people are still dying and they are not being given the
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fa cts . and they are not being given the facts. they're not been given enough information. before we make decisions, can we just stop and say, what happens in other places? why do these people die? thank you very much forjoining us, nikki kenward. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. talks on the substance of eu withdrawal are now under way in brussels as the brexit secretary, david davis, called on both sides to "get down to business". a terminally ill man with motor neurone disease begins his high court challenge to the ban on assisted dying. the final route for the controversial hs2 rail line north of birmingham will be announced today after years of disagreements. let's get a sports update now. good afternoon. roger federer‘s spoken to the bbc the morning after winning his record eighth wimbledon title. the dad of four, who turns 36
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in a few weeks, says his sights are set on becoming world number one at least one more time in his career. but he told the bbc‘s russell fuller it was a special moment for him to pass pete sampras‘ seven titles at the all england club. i had to speak to the team and decide how much i want to chase it for the near future. decide how much i want to chase it for the nearfuture. 0r decide how much i want to chase it for the nearfuture. or maybe decide how much i want to chase it for the near future. or maybe finish the year as world number one, which would be a bigger deal. but maybe that mix a difference, being world number one for a week or the year—end. so, i have to have a bit ofa year—end. so, i have to have a bit of a meeting and a discussion with my team about that in the coming weeks. britain'sjoanna konta has moved up to number four in the world in the new rankings out today. konta reached the semi—finals of the ladies singles at wimbledon before losing to venus willams. she was ranked seventh before the tournament started. andy murray remains world number one despite going out in the men's semi—finals. england are trying their best to salvage something from the second test against south africa.
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the fourth day is underway at trent bridge right now. england are currently 55—3. cook has 23 but captainjoe root is finally off the mark on six. they've got a target of 474 and if they do manage that, it would be a world record for a test match. 0livia breen has won britain's ninth gold medal of the world para athletics championships. breen set a new personal best of 4.81m in the fourth round at the london stadium to take the women's t38 long jump title. the bbc has announced the venue for this year's sports personality of the year awards. last year's show was held in birmingham and, this year, it moves to the echo arena in liverpool. sports personality of the year will take place on sunday december the 17th in front of an audience of some 11,000 people, and be broadcast live on bbc one. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour.
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i get very much, see you later. —— thank you very much. the department for transport has announced the winners of more than £6 billion worth of contracts to build the first phase of hs2 between london and birmingham. uk companies carillion, costain and balfour beatty are among the firms which will build tunnels, bridges and embankments on the first stretch of the new high speed rail line. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. it's britain's biggest investment ever in public transport. highspeed2 is designed to cut journey times and increase the number of passenger seats between london and the north west via birmingham. it's been six years in the planning, but now the first construction contracts have been signed, and they're worth £6.6 billion, which the government says will support 16,000 jobs during the construction phase. the first trains aren't expected to run, though, until 2026, by which time they hope to carry 300,000 passengers per day. £50 billion on a track of this nature... but hs2 has faced stiff opposition.
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the stop hs2 campaign in the chilterns says it will only benefit the richest in society and the corporations who build it. and reports at the weekend said hs2 could end up as the most expensive rail line per mile in the world. even so, the muddy work of spades in the ground begins next year for what the government calls "the backbone of britain's rail network." joe lynam, bbc news. following the announcement of the first contracts, the transport secretary has said he has no reason to have any doubts about the project. speaking to the bbc, chris grayling said hs2 will be delivered on time and on budget. this project is essential for the future of our transport system. we have a situation today where the railways around our big cities are congested, where there is not enough space for all the freight services that would like to use our railways. if we are going to have the capacity we need for the future, we've got to get the express trains off those existing mainlines, create more space in london, birmingham, manchester, leeds for commuter trains and more
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space to get freight off the roads and onto rail. is it right to be spending all of this money on a train line like this when public sector workers haven't had a pay rise? shouldn't you be spending on that instead? there is a big difference between the short—term money we spend on day—to—day services, on day—to—day pay for the public sector and long—term capital investment. if we don't have the capital investment we need for the future, to increase the capacity of our transport system, to support economic development, we will not carry on with the progress we've made that has brought unemployment down to the lowest level since the 1970s. our business correspondent alice baxter has been following the story. so, tell us more about who has got the contract is because we mention some british firms, but it is not all british firms? so this morning, we heard the names of the companies that won the contracts. very lucrative, worth about £6.6 billion to build and design this first phase of ages to commerce between and
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birmingham was done as you mentioned, notjust birmingham was done as you mentioned, not just uk birmingham was done as you mentioned, notjust uk firms involved, indeed —— in the three stages as they have been carved up of this first tranche of hs2. in areas “— of this first tranche of hs2. in areas —— in area south, we have a uk company, costain, buta areas —— in area south, we have a uk company, costain, but a swedish company, costain, but a swedish company and an austrian company as well. in the central area, we have some uk companies involved, sir robert mcalpine for instance, but also a french company, carillion, more of them in a moment, and in the northern tranche of the line, we have the uk company balfour beatty but also a french company. 0n carillion, this major uk construction company, they had a torrid time of it last week, issuing a profit warning, firing their ceo over the past four months we have seen the share prices falling by some 75%. but after this morning's announcement, we saw it was given a boost by over 7%. but that has not
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stopped the government seeking reassu ra nces stopped the government seeking reassurances from carillion and also its partners involved in hs2 that it can actually deliver on the job. certainly a nalysts can actually deliver on the job. certainly analysts i have been speaking to this morning and said thatis speaking to this morning and said that is still a major challenge for carillion, can they deliver after having won the contract? but they are in thisjoint having won the contract? but they are in this joint venture with these other constructions —— construction companies, and both of them have said that each company's boards give assurance they confirmed they underwrite the problems of each other in delivering the contract and thatis other in delivering the contract and that is the key point, hs2 will continue to monitor the situation. and the cost. the government says £56 billion, others say they reckon up £56 billion, others say they reckon up to £100 billion. how does it break down? this project has been beset by controversy for the moment it began. both environmental and when it comes to the price tag. 0ver the weekend a report came out from a quantity surveyor saying that the price will balloon to over £100
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billion, which would make it the most expensive railway ever built. we have heard from the transport secretary, describing the figure is nonsense. he is still saying that it will cost £56 billion, that the government will deliver the high speed 2 on—time and on budget. government will deliver the high speed 2 on-time and on budget. thank you very alice. a 20—year—old man has been charged with drug offences by police investigating the death of a teenage girl in newton abbot over the weekend. the 15—year—old was found unconscious at a park in newton abbot over the weekend. devon and cornwall police have charged jacob khanlarian from newton abbot with possession with intent to supply a class a drug. he is due to appear before magistrates in plymouth later. a gentleman on the iaaf has been provisionally suspended pending an investigation. the former new mood being spent to release to a potential ethics violation. he is being investigated by the athletics integrity unit over payments he received from the son of the former
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iaaf president. the title role in doctor who is to be played by a woman for the first time in the 54—year history of the series. jodie whittaker, who starred in the itv drama broadchurch, will take over from peter capaldi, making her first appearance as the 13th doctor in this year's christmas special. however, the decision to give the role of the 13th doctor who to a woman has split some fans. earlier, i spoke to sophie aldred, who played the doctor's companion ace during the late 1980s. a sidekick to the seventh 0ptima, played by sylvester mccoy. i asked her what she thought of the news. -- the seventh doctor. i think it is an amazing move. i have been watching my twitter feed and facebook, and opinion is divided, but mainly i have to say, in favour. also, let's not forget that doctor who is an alien, similarly he is kind of gender neutral anyway. i also think that this thing about whether he is
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a man ora that this thing about whether he is a man or a woman or he or she, young people nowadays who, let's face it, they are, that is both in the programme is principally made, they area programme is principally made, they are a lot more fluid on gender than us are a lot more fluid on gender than us old folks, and i think to them, it perhaps doesn't matter as much whether it is a man or a woman. are we making too big a deal of it?|j think we are, in a sense, although i think we are, in a sense, although i think the main thing is, how is jodie whittaker going to play the part? how has it been written for her? because she is a fantastic actress, she is incredibly versatile. it is all in the writing, really. what will the writers and producers have decided that the character of the doctor is? and that is going to be actually, for me, a very interesting thing to find out, quite apart from the fact she is a woman. obviously in an ideal world,
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nothing comes into a decision making process , nothing comes into a decision making process, other than who is best for a particularjob or part. how ideally do you think it normally works in terms of casting? well, she is the 13th person to have played this fantastic role in over 50 yea rs, this fantastic role in over 50 years, and having been enough to know most of those 13 people, men so far, ican know most of those 13 people, men so far, i can say without doubt that each one of those people is fascinating, interesting, amazing in their own right, and i don't know jodie whittaker, but i'm sure that she is the same. she will be a fascinating person will stop a lot of the doctors have had a sort of eccentric nature. it will be just fascinating to see. and also who she is paired with, will she be paired with a male companion, is she going to have a companion? that is going
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to have a companion? that is going to be another interesting thing. let's wait and see! let's catch up with the weather now. temperatures peaking about 30 by wednesday. so we have some sunshine on the way for most of us. but there will be some midweek storms as well. before we get the mcgrath, this is what the truck looks like, plenty of sunshine. the only exception is across the far north—west of scotland. just 14 celsius. but 27, 28 on the cars this afternoon, it will feel warm, the winds light. tonight, we will keep the dry weather, mostly clear skies as well. reasonable conditions for slipping, the exception perhaps across parts of southern england and southern wales, with a temperjust stay up somewhat. tomorrow, more of the same, some high cloud making the sunshine hazy but there will be lots more of that sunshine. thunderstorms will start to arrive across the channel islands, as tim ridgers push
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on up into the mid to high 20s and the warmest spots. —— temperatures. then we will see storms driving north overnight. some of those could turn out to be torrential across parts of southern england, wales and the south midlands. that's the weather. you are watching bbc newsroom live. the headlines: rhetoric secretary david davis has said brexit negotiations need to get down to business. —— brexit secretary. he said his priority was to live the uncertainty for eu citizens living in the eu and —— uk and britons in the eu. a terminally ill man with motor neurone disease has begun a legal challenge to 0verturn the ban 0n assisted dying. the final route of the manchester and leeds branches
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of the manchester and leeds branches of hst of the manchester and leeds branches 0f hst is to be announced later. chris grayling says the scheme will help rebalance the economy. film—maker george romero, who created the genre—defining living dead movie franchise, has died at the age of 77. romero co—wrote and directed the film that started the zombie series night of the living dead in 1968. it's been one month since the fire in the 24—storey grenfell tower block in west london, in which 80 people are believed to have died. an investigation is underway, with teams working to gather belongings and remains from homes in the block. questions are still being asked about how the fire spread — but also about what the future may hold for the tower block and the wider area. a short time ago, i spoke to michael lockwood, chief executive for harrow council and a member of the grenfell task force. so having made the building safe, the next steps are the recovery operation and the criminal investigation. the recovery operation is taking place, so we are
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trying to recover the remains and possessions of people within the building and the investigation is designed to collect the evidence. in the case of the former, we believe the case of the former, we believe the recovery operation should finish by early or mid november and the criminal investigation byjust after christmas. that is dependent on a number of factors but critically, we should have finished the investigation just after christmas. so when you save the criminal investigation should be finished by then, are you saying potentially charges could be brought as early as them? so the evidence that the police need to put the case forward will have been gathered. it will then be for the criminal investigation to decide the results of the evidence that is provided. and in terms of what happens with the building, if everything that can be recovered is recovered by early— mid—november, what then happens with the block? i think you probably
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already can see that the community, it isa already can see that the community, it is a very important issue for them. there have been a number of petitions that have been put around which basically say they would like to have the building replaced by a memorial park or memorial gardens. i think we should be led by what the community once and listen to what they want as a replacement for the building. so that is a decision that will take place just after christmas. obviously the thoughts and the feelings of the residents are absolutely paramount here. it is are absolutely paramount here. it is a building that stands there, a burned—out sort of, i suppose, memorial to what happened, but in terms of how residents feel about having to see that every day, do you get any sense whether there is a desire to pull it down sooner rather than later or two perhaps cover it with tarpaulin, which has been mentioned. it is highly likely that
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scaffolding will need to go up around the building. that will help both the criminal investigation and a recovery operation and that scaffolding may include some netting and we need to make sure we discussed that with the community before we do it. i have been into the building, it is a very traumatic, difficult and challenging experience, and as a chief executive, you face all sorts of things and that has been one of the most difficult i have faced. i have seen the devastation on the top floor, nearly 1,500 tonnes of material has to be moved from those flaws and in the bottom floors, there are in some plot very little damage, so quite a contrast within the building but for me, it has been physically and emotionally draining to see that and all we are trying to do is make sure, working with the police and other services, that we can get the most information out to enable the enquiries to make sure
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justice is achieved. and after everything, the way the authorities have been criticised of their handling of the situation, is there effectively now a pledge implies that no decisions will be taken on anything like the issues we have talked about without consulting those who have survived, and the relatives, just making sure that everybody is comfortable with things as they go forward? i think that is absolutely vital, we need to listen, thatis absolutely vital, we need to listen, that is an important word, listen to what the community one, the relatives want, what the family and friends want and make sure we try and help them deliver what is important to them, not what we think is important and i think the importance of communications and listening at public meetings is critical, so they understand and know what is going to happen to that building in the weeks and months ahead. michael lockwood talking to mea ahead. michael lockwood talking to me a little earlier. the second round of talks of the brexit negotiations have begun in brussels, with the rights of eu citizens in the uk top of the agenda. david
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davis said his priority was to lift the uncertainty for the three million eu citizens living in the uk and the1 million eu citizens living in the uk and the 1 million million eu citizens living in the uk and the1 million britons living in the eu. the government wants to offer settle status to the eu citizens who have lived in britain for five years, meaning citizens who have lived in britain forfive years, meaning eu nationals have the same rights to education benefits, health care and pensions as british citizens. we can speak to the campaign group fighting for the rights of eu citizens post brexit. thank you forjoining us. what reassu ra nces thank you forjoining us. what reassurances do you want? well, we have had a very comprehensive and detailed offer from the have had a very comprehensive and detailed offerfrom the eu which guarantees virtually all the rights that we have at the moment and their principle is that we should be able to continue to live our lives as we a lwa ys to continue to live our lives as we always have and all we are asking the uk government is is to match that offer. what they have on the table is a lesser offer and all we
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are saying is be fair, we would like common sense to prevail and we wouldn't want either side to play politics with our rights and our lives and family's lives. so what is the difference between what you say the difference between what you say the eu is offering and what britain is offering? well, the uk is offering something which is based in uk law, so it's a different status, which hasn't been created yet, so we are talking about something that we haven't even seen yet. there isn't that much detail, and we have had legal people both from our side of the eu nationals living in the uk and also we stand shoulder to shoulder with the british people living in europe, and they have looked at it as well and there is a whole host of rights which are either not included or it is just not clear whether they will be covered or not. we are talking about
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recognition of qualifications, voting rights, family reunion, which is absolutely crucial to who we are. by is absolutely crucial to who we are. by our very definition, we are people that have crossed national boundaries to make our lives in a different country to the one we were born in, and so we have family on either side of the channel. so just to give you an example, family reunion is absolutely indispensable for us. living with the uncertainty, what is it like? well, it has been demeaning, to say the least, to be used as bargaining chips, which we have, very clearly, and you shouldn't forget that we all came to this country, i'm talking about eu nationals living in the uk, because we love this country, and so the brits that live in europe, they are fully settled in their countries, they have lived, loved and worked in
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our countries and living with this uncertainty and anxiety, and in some cases it has been an acceptable for most of the vulnerable population, so we are talking about stay at home pa rents, so we are talking about stay at home parents, we are talking about disabled people that for instance just have no way of proving they have been in this country for long enough or have earned enough to make the threshold to qualify for settle status. thank you very much for joining us. we are going to go live to warsaw, you can see the aeroplane which has carried the duke and duchess of cambridge and their children to warsaw for the start of their visit to poland and germany, the five—day tour of poland and germany at the request of the foreign & commonwealth office. so with the duke and duchess of cambridge, as i mentioned, prince george, who is three, and princess charlotte, who is two, and we are told they will be seen on at least a couple of occasions over the course of the
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week. let's bring in peter hunt, who is at the airport waiting for them to get off the plane. yes and earlier when i was talking to you, i developed a keen interest in looking at planes and we know looking at this one, the privatejet at planes and we know looking at this one, the private jet that was hired by the royals for the family to arrive here and you can see the dignitaries and as i speak, hopefully you are seeing george in the doorway with his dad, prince william. george, from my distance, doesn't look overly keen to actually get off this plane. he is being persuaded by his dad that it probably is a wise idea. there you see now the first sight of the family arriving here in poland with george walking down the steps with his dad holding his hand and princess charlotte being helped down the steps in the arms of her mum kate, the duchess of cambridge and notably on such trips, they are now meeting with dignitaries. it has been raining here and so the weather will be familiar to them. it seems
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to be brightening upjust as they talked of those dignitaries on the red carpet here at warsaw airport and they will go from here to a meeting and this will go on for several days in poland and germany, where you will inevitably see it in the context of brexit but i hope the british government will hopefully think people will see this as regarding the future opportunities that lie ahead after brexit. as i mentioned, the torah of these two countries is at the request of the foreign & commonwealth office office —— vautour. as you say, the brexit backdrop is absolutely part of what this is about but in terms of this being anything political, it can't being anything political, it can't be that, can it, because of the fact that they are members of the royal family? yes, the nitty-gritty of brexit will not come up. when william and kate meet the president
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of this country, he might be very keen to talk about the burning issue of brexit which is the rights of polish citizens, some 800,000, resident, but that will not be discussed by these two, it will be ata discussed by these two, it will be at a prime ministerial level. you will be seeing shops of rather relaxed prince george with one hand in his pocket, the other holding onto his dad as his dad talks to dignitaries. so, yes, the nitty—gritty will not be gone into at all. i think it is more that they hope that this couple will remind people about the nature of the relationship between poland and the uk and germany and the uk. and looking at these pictures, it is probably fair to say that george and charlotte are going to be the scene stealers of this visit. well, inevitably, because they are seen so rarely and on occasions where they
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are, like now, it is when people focus on them, it is an inevitable human reaction, commenting on how they have grown, how different they are, what they do, and i think this is what we will see over the coming days, literally getting on and off planes. there don't seem to be any plans planes. there don't seem to be any pla ns yet planes. there don't seem to be any plans yet for them to go to a public engagement, so it is all a novelty for them and it must be... i can't imagine asa for them and it must be... i can't imagine as a child having this much intense focus unusual walk along the red carpet into a building but the future of the british monarchy, which is what george and charlotte are, this will be their way of life in the years ahead. thank you very much, peter. let's bring the right up—to—date with the headlines. talks on the substance of eu withdrawal are now under way in brussels as the brexit secretary david davis calls on both sides to get down to business. a terminally ill man with motor neurone disease has begun his high court challenge to the ban on assisted dying. and the first contracts have been awarded for the high—speed to rail
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line between birmingham and london. details of the final route will be announced later —— hs2 rail line. a cyclist has managed to recover her stolen bike through a clever sting. 30—year—old jenni morton—humphrey ignored police advice and turned the tables on the thief. earlier, jenni spoke to my colleague victoria derbyshire and explained what happened. i was very angry, as you might imagine, and i happened to see it on the internet, someone messaged me, and someone had seen it a picture of it, for sale, i had asked that if anyone saw it, please tell me and i got a response from a total stranger who was amazing, helped me out messaging the guy and i posed as a buyer, didn't go to work the next day and just went and took it, pretty much. well, it was a bit more than that.
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you met him, you chatted, you did the pleasantries and then what did you do? well, i had seen him across the street, i saw him with my bike and i thought i willjust be friendly, be nice, ask a couple of stupid questions about the bike, "is it even a girl's bike? "is it the right size? "can i ride it?" i was nervous but i think he believed everything i was saying and i said, ok, i'm going to take it for a test ride and i had thought about this the night before. i had a bunch of old keys which were, strangely enough, the keys for the locks that they had cut off my bike the night before, so i thrust those into his hand and said, can you hold these, i'm going to ride it? and he said ok and i walked down the pavement a little bit, and he said ok and i wobbled down the pavement a little bit, kind of fell off a couple of times to make it more realistic and off i went. and you pedalled like the wind, did you? i really did, faster than i ever have before for quite a long time. i didn't look back, i did know where i was, ijust kept going. i didn't look back, i didn't know where i was, ijust kept going. eventually, i found my way back to a meeting spot that i had
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arranged with my friend who was watching the whole thing from the corner and, yeah, a lot of adrenaline going on. let's talk about the safety side of this, because you did inform the police and say this is what i'm going to do and they did advise against it. why did you decide to do it? because it could have been dangerous. it could have been but i think anyone who owns a bike knows how i felt. i was so angry, someone else had my bike, which i love. kof i did phone the police, i did give them lots of evidence because we had a number of screenshots from the conversation between the person who saw the sale online and the guy who had presumably stolen it. i did consider that it might be dangerous but i was quite confident that i could pull it off. and you did and there is your splendid bike behind you. right here, very happy. toa to a craze that has delighted and
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infuriated an estimated billion people across the world. it took the inventor of the rubiks cube a month to solve his own puzzle more than 40 yea rs to solve his own puzzle more than 40 years ago. these days, the best of the best can do it in seconds. the quest to become the fastest cuber in the world. these elite players can solve the puzzle in less time than it takes to say the rubik's cube, invented in 1974 by hungarian erno rubik. cheering and applause believe it or not, 5.9 seconds wasn't enough for a new record at this year's world championships in paris. the ultimate crown for the classic cube taken instead by 15—year—old american max park, worked out on average over several rounds. no surprises then that the craze is known as speed cubing. one of the coolest things is that speed cubing is almost like the olympics where you have many, many different events. you can see people solving with their feet, solving one—handed, solving blindfolded. it's a skill rubik says was scarcely imaginable when he invented the famous cube in 1974.
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when i tried to market the cube as a product, the opinion of the trade was it's not possible to sell because it's too difficult. and the public proved it is possible. there are 43 quintillion ways — that's 43 with 18 zeros — to scramble the rubik's cube. but, of course, only one elusive solution. for the man who came up with the much—loved coloured block, it's more than just a puzzle and something closer to the heart. it's important to keep it, to try it, and to work with it — so that's, that's many — the same thing — the main thing are the same, like love. the old school toy that can be used anywhere and never runs out of battery is holding its own in the digital age, inspiring new generations of players
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to ever—greater heights. well, that has set the bar high for favourite report of the week already on monday. now, roger federer has become the first person to win the wimbledon men's singles eight times. he won in straight sets against marion cilic in yesterday's final and took on a record extending 19th slam title as he rewrote tennis history and became the first to win in the open area without dropping a set. i had an amazing amount of friends and family and people from around the world who came to support me, last really. i also had the finals and the people who already work here at wimbledon this time, so we are up work here at wimbledon this time, so we are up there, almost 80 of us, celebrating the win afterwards, so that was a beautiful moment, just
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having that one hour away from the press, away from, you know, the attention of the world watching anja celebrating with friends and family and my kids and my wife and my pa rents, and my kids and my wife and my parents, it was great. i had a great time and! parents, it was great. i had a great time and i was very thankful that i could get that our in before i had to go into two and a half hours of press co nfe re nces . to go into two and a half hours of press conferences. and here you are again this morning. you have broken your tie with pete sampras, you are level with him on seven wimbledon titles. given what he meant you when you were growing up, how special and achievement is that the you? it is very special but it is borderline strange for me, because pete will always be my hero and just because i have surpassed his feat here at wimbledon, it doesn't change anything for me, he is still my guy. after our match in 2001, to think that one day i would surpass him, i never thought that would be possible in my wildest dreams, so i take it as it is and i really run with it, i enjoy it. i'm happy, the people and fans were happy for me again yesterday,
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so it was just another incredible day here at wimbledon. wimbledon has been too kind, too nice to me after all these years and to be the record—holder, for the first time for a male to win eight wimbledons, i will always be that guy, it is very, very special and pete remains my hero for life, of course. how tempted are you by the prospect of being world number one? it looks almost certain that you or rafael nadal will take over from andy murray at some point in the near future. it is a fantastic storyline for the next few months. absolutely, it'll be a three, four—way race — and maybe a two—way race between me and rafa when andy dropps his world and rafa when andy drops his world number—one ranking — but if all of a sudden, andy starts winning again, we all have to start winning again but at some stage, if he starts dropping points, we will get there. i hope it is me, and not rafa, because it would mean a lot to me to get back to world number one. i was just trying to explain to the press that i haven't thought
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about it a whole lot yet. i have to speak to the team and decide how much i'm going to chase it for the near future, so if i maybe get to world number one just one more time in my career, or maybe finish the year as world number one, which is an even bigger deal, but for me, it makes no difference being world number one for a week or year—end number one, at this stage of my career. so i need to have a meeting and discussion with my team over the next couple of weeks. 0ur favourite question generally is how long are you going to play for? i know you can't possibly answer that question. you have one two grand slam since you turn 35. ken rosewall, in the early 1970s, one won three. this it using your expertise, your guile, against guys who are half your age? how does it
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feel to play against players half my age? it feels also again quite different, because i loved the times when i came on tour and i played the likes i knew from the video games or from tv and here i am playing against them, and now i am on the opposite side, i am the guy they know from tv and, i don't know, it is quite different, you know to what it used to be, but i'm enjoying myself and i like to guide them and help them along the way and if they have any advice to see, i was happy to give because it is so important to give because it is so important to share experience and knowledge about the game and the game will a lwa ys about the game and the game will always move on and be bigger than any athlete, so i'm happy that i can be in the sport for as long as i have been and we will see how much longer i will be around. and a final thought. have you learned a great dealfrom other sports men and women in other fields? i'm dealfrom other sports men and women in otherfields? i'm thinking of someone particularly like usain bolt, who is likely to make
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headlines in london over the next few weeks. i get inspired and a big way by the likes of usain bolt ul michaeljordan or lebron james way by the likes of usain bolt ul michaeljordan or lebronjames all valentino rossi or michael schumacher, guys who have been at the very highest level for a long time because i will marvel at what they did when i was younger. i couldn't understand how they would get match ready, day in, day out practice. every day they would give it 100% and i struggled with that in a big way when i was younger so eventually, i also found my way how it is possible and how i need to motivate myself and what team i need around me to be able to do that, so, yes, i feel like it around me to be able to do that, so, yes, ifeel like it has been really important to me in my life to have inspiring figures wherever i look andi inspiring figures wherever i look and i take it mostly from sporting legends. congratulations again, roger, it is an extraordinary achievement to win an eighth title 14 years after your first. enjoy the moment. thank you very much. in a moment, the news at one but first,
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weather update. high, from any of us, the weekend was disappointingly cloudy, but as we go back to work, high pressure builds on and we have the sunshine back with us. this was the sunshine back with us. this was the sunni seen earlier in the day and hour, south of wales. thank you for that picture. you can see the extent of the sunshine on the satellite picture, high pressure making the sunshine hazy. across the west of scotland, different conditions with a weather front bringing cloudy skies. in across the western isles, the highlands and up into shetland and 0rkney, where they could be one or two passing showers. through the rest of the day, little change, high pressure stays with us and in the sunshine, it feels pleasa ntly and in the sunshine, it feels pleasantly warm, temperatures climbing to 27 or 28 degrees in the warmest spots around the greater london area but fairly widely, temperatures into the low 20s. we said she showers breaking out across the western isles in the late part
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of the afternoon but the many others, relatively comfortable night's sleep but perhaps a little on the warm side of the south of wales and southern parts of england, with temperatures staying on the high side. tuesday, more of this fine weather to come for most of the day. high pressure still with us, areas of high cloud in the sky that will make the sunshine rather hazy. we should see brighter conditions across 0rkney and shetland, so more sunshine here. later in the day, some storms moving in towards southern parts. another warm day, if not hard, temperatures could reach 28 degrees on tuesday. the humidity levels picking up a little bit and the heat. to spark of some part —— will start to spark off some thunderstorms. through tuesday evening and night time, they will make their presence felt across southern england, the midlands and parts of wales. some of these storms could bring us hop a month's worth of rainfall in a few hours so we could see some localised flooding in the heaviest of the storms, which will then drive northwards across
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northern england, northern ireland and southern parts of scotland perhaps. then it stays hot and humid across eastern part of england, where temperatures could reach 30 degrees on wednesday. the heat and humidity could again spark of some pretty big thunderstorms late in the day. eventually, the humidity levels will drop in the air will turn a little bit fresher as we get towards the end of the week. that is your weather. a second round of talks in brussels on the uk's departure from the eu — the brexit secretary says it's time to get down to business. top of the agenda is the rights post—brexit of eu citizens here, and britons in europe the talks come as downing st said ministers will be warned to keep cabinet discussions private, after a series of lea ks. the first contracts are awarded for the high speed 2 rail line between london and birmingham — details of the final route are still to come. an american neurologist who's offered to treat the terminally ill baby, charlie gard, has met his doctors
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in london for the first time. a man with motor neurone disease begins his high court challenge to overturn the ban on assisted dying. and the duke and duchess of cambridge take the family on a four day tour of eastern europe.
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