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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 18, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. increases in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century. dementia and lifestyle could be to blame — experts behind the study say it's deeply concerning. good morning, it's tuesday the 18th ofjuly also this morning: just a handful of survivors have received any of the money these are some of the donations made to g re nfell these are some of the donations made to grenfell tower. just a handful of survivors have received any of the money or donations raised by the public after the grenfell tower fire. we have a special investigation. "stop carping". theresa may tells conservative mps to end the backbiting that's divided the party since the general election.
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price pressures are piling up, and the pound in our pocket isn't going as far, so ahead of official figures this morning, i'll be looking at the cost of food, and pies in particular. in sport, hannah cockcroft dominates the women's 800m t34 with gold at the world para athletics championships in london. it's a truth universally acknowledged that after the sun... usually comes rain. matt's got the weather — live from jane austen's former home. good morning. 200 years after her death, we will be taking a look outside to find out what it was like. they rust on in the forecast after a hot and sunny one. i will have all the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. improvements in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century, according to a leading health academic. professor sir michael marmot, from university college london, says the rate of increase has almost "ground to a halt" since 2010. in the uk as a whole, women can expect to live to 82
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on average, and men to 79. our health correspondent, nick triggle, has more: life expectancy has been rising for the last century but now a leading health expert is raising concerns it could be tailing off. sir michael marmot points at the rate of increase being halved since 2010. historically, life expectancy at birth has risen by one yearfor every five years for women and one year every 3.5for every five years for women and one year every 3.5 for men. since 2010, however, that has slowed to one year for every ten for women and one for every six for men. sir michael says the situation needs to be urgently looked at. this is historically highly unusual because over a long period of time, for 100 years, life expectancy has been improving, year
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on year. in britain as it has in many, on year. in britain as it has in any, on year. in britain as it has in many, many, many, many other countries. and now it has slowed, it is almost flat. which means that we have fallen behind some of the healthier countries. that's terrible. he says it's not possible to say exactly what caused it but he says austerity could be a factor and funding the nhs and social credit in particular had been miserly —— social care. dementia may have also played a role. the department of health say it is providing funding to it short life expectancy continues to rise and the ageing population is well cared for. —— to ensure. theresa may has told conservative mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" that has split the party since the general election. at a tory reception in the commons last night, the prime minister also warned the alternative to her in number ten would bejeremy corbyn. alex forsyth is in westminster for us this morning. the cabinet meets later and mrs may is likely to give them
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a similar message? a few afew might a few might have their heads to the floor. there have been reports of briefings, gossip, leaks from the very highest level of government around the government table. she is trained to lead a party which is divided on some key issues like brexit. put the two together and you get lots of jostling. lots brexit. put the two together and you get lots ofjostling. lots of positioning. not least from some of those who might have half an eye on what happens when theresa may is no longer the party leader. now aware of all this, the prime minister who was at a reception of all this on the house of commons last night when she reportedly said to her mps, no more backbiting, go away, have a good break for the summer and come back ready to do some serious business in westminster in the autumn. and we think she will set of
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the similar when her cabinet meets this morning, reminding them of the need to keep their conversations private. this is an attempt to restore some discipline, some party unity, in public at least. thank you very much. we shall be speaking to the home secretary amber rudd about that a little later in the programme. the cost of insuring a car has risen to its highest ever level. the association of british insurers says the price of the average policy has gone up by 11% in a year to £11811. they are now calling on the government to introduce a new system for calculating compensation payments. buying a knife over the internet is set to become more difficult under new government proposals, which aim to restrict children's access to weapons. customers in england and wales would be required to collect their purchase in person and show id. a similar proposal is already being considered in scotland. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, has more. this is the sharp end of the battle against knife crime in britain.
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police in birmingham make yet another stop, and find yet another knife. without good reason, it is illegal to carry anything bigger than a three—inch penknife. but this is what police have found in london, including a so—called zombie knife, shown to the home secretary. why? it is illegal to buy a knife if you are under 18, 16 in scotland. but some young people are getting them delivered. the plan is to change the law so knives purchased have to be picked up in person with id. some types of knives cannot even be sold. police may even get powers to seize them. we need to give more powers to the police, to break the cycle of danger and violence in communities. after all, police report knife
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crime has started rising. scotland is already considering the changes proposed today in england and wales. this young man did not suffer a serious injury, despite being stabbed, but every knife on the streets can result in at least one life lost. tom symonds, bbc news. the family of an autistic seven—year—old boy are beginning a high court challenge against an nhs decision to deny him a life—changing drug. the child has a rare condition, which puts him at risk of severe brain damage. nhs england says the drug is too expensive and there's no evidence it will work. but if the challenge is successful, in future, funding decisions could be based solely upon the welfare of the child. president trump's efforts to replace barack 0bama's healthcare system have run into more problems. donald trump made repealing 0bamacare a key election campaign
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pledge, and he delayed congress's summer holiday until the legislation was overturned. but two more of the president's own senators now oppose his reforms. there is now speculation that trump's plans will be abandoned. children who have been sexually exploited are being refused compensation on the grounds they "consented" to their abuse, according to campaigners. a coalition of charities — including barnardo's and victim support — are calling for an urgent review of the criminal injuries compensation authority's guidelines. the government says the issue of compensation is currently being examined as part of an independent inquiry. one parent told us how his teenage son was groomed and abused, yet refused compensation. we have changed his name and voice in order to protect the victim's anonymity. to have one organisation amongst so many now saying, "you were to
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blame." it has such a negative effect on the child. i'm sure not the only parents with children in this situation. ——i am sure we are not the only parents with children in this situation. it is difficult to accept. heath charities say pregnant mothers should be encouraged to use e—cigarettes to help them quit smoking. the smoking in pregnancy challenge group says midwives and health professionals should be more aware of the benefits of encouraging women to vape when they are expecting. the duke and duchess of cambridge — along with their children, prince george and princess charlotte — are continuing their tour of poland. today they'll visit the stutthof concentration camp in gdansk. last night, prince william delivered a speech in warsaw in which he praised the country's courage, fortitude and bravery. 0ur royal correspondent, peter hunt, reports. at three, he is far too young to know if he is a reluctant royal,
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but prince george definitely wasn't keen to embrace warsaw without his father's helping hand. polish is now the second most spoken language in the uk. such links, diplomatic, military, cultural, offer much promise for the future. he didn't utter the word brexit that it influenced his speech as it will the time william and kate spent here. on this tour, the couple will be confronted with the horror of poland's recent past when they visit the concentration camp near gdansk, one of several weather nazis
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murdered jews and others. the quarters where people died are on display for visitors including royals. so, too, the crematorium where the pluck —— there is a park. snow, driving winds and plunging temperatures might not conjure up images of your perfect wedding day but for one british couple antarctica proved to be the ideal location for tying the knot. tom sylvester and julie baum said their vows at the rothera research station on adelaide island to the west of the antarctic peninsula. the bride's dress had orange fabric from an old tent and wedding pictures were taken in temperatures of —9c. but they all look happy, don't they?
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maybe he has got some thermals on underneath. you know what the weather was like on your wedding day? torrential rain. sunshine and showers. torrential rain. good for photographs, isn't it? dark sky. cloudy, at bit gloomy. prelates. you wait —— you won't forget, will you? —— um brel is. how can that guy even speak. ——. —— umbrellas. hannah cockcroft is one gold away from completing the treble at the world para athletics championships. she claimed her second gold last night with victory in the t34 800m. teammate kare adenegan took bronze behind her. richard whitehead had to settle
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for bronze in the t42100 metres. afterwards he said he's not retiring, and criticised the ipc for removing the event from the pa ralympics in tokyo in 2020. england were thrashed by south africa in the second test at trent bridge. the hosts lost by 340 runs and were all out for just 133. the series is now level at 1—1 with the third test at the oval next week. and britain's tom daley and daniel goodfellow missed out on a medal in the ten metre synchro platform final at the world diving championships in budapest. they qualified from the preliminaries in second place, but could only finish fourth in the final. imight get i might get the voice is sorted later. apologies for that. johanna
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konta is in later. can't wait! we need some time with you and content later, please, director. ——johanna konta. today we are remembering jane austen, who spent much of her life in hampshire, and it didn't take much persuasion to convince matt to head there for us this morning. where exactly are you, matt? good morning. we have come inside the house now and we are in the dining room. this of course is jane austen's former home, where she spent the last eight years of her life finishing and also writing some of her most famous works, on this very table. if you think that writing table is small, you are not mistaken. she didn't have much in the way of papers or any parchment around at the time but it is exactly 200 years since her death and today the royal mint are releasing a
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special £2 coin, and i am lucky enough to have it with me, showing the portrait of her head on it. that will be in limited circulation from today at eight locations in and around this area, and then it will come out later on to the general public. also today, the bank of england will be unveiling the new £10 note with jane austen on it, she will be replacing charles darwin. but it is an amazing location here. if we take a look at the weather, we don't really need to be sheltered from it today because it is already warm out there and a warm day in store for much of the uk. they will be thunderstorms developing across the south later. storms rumbling away across northern france and over the next few hours they will push their way towards the channel islands. eventually by the start of the afternoon, maybe mid—afternoon, reaching the far south—west of england. for the rest of your cracking day in store. early mist and fog patches clearing and then a dry and sunny day with a good deal
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of sunshine. strong sunshine around. across in the far north of scotland, shetland has a bit more cloud berlot righter than it was yesterday and across western and northern scotland we could see temperatures of 25 to 27 through the afternoon. further south, lots of sunshine per northern england but always a bit more cloud than what we saw during yesterday. turning the sunshine a bit hazy in places. most places will be dry, but later on we will start to see those storms pushing into the south. northern ireland, a sunny and hot one, highs of 21 degrees. a bit more breeze across eastern areas, a cooler david yesterday, but it is in the west where we will see the real heat peak. 27 to 29 celsius across some parts of western england and into the south—west of wales. —— south—east of wales. isolated, sporadic storm starting to break their way through. those storms will gradually push their weight northwards as they go through the night. they will be very much hit mist, affecting mainly parts of
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england and wales, pushing northwards towards northern england and the midlands by the end of the night. lightning storms to begin with, and some big downpours to go with, and some big downpours to go with them. hale and gusty winds mixed in as well. hit and miss, some will stay dry. a humid night across much of the uk and into tomorrow those storms will push their weight northwards across parts of northern ireland and scotland through the morning. brightening up for england and wales with some sunshine around, low cloud towards the south—west but as temperatures peak through wednesday afternoon, 30 celsius in the east. we could see some more intense thunderstorms develop. exactly where they are going to be open to a little bit of uncertainty. they will gradually clear away through thursday and something brighter and thicker will emerge in the west. and we will look around the west. and we will look around the house, i know, a little bit later. that is a jane austen's fan's perfect place. you can spot all the
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various nods towards her and her work throughout the morning. the front page of the times, prince george makes most of the papers and we will be talking about theresa may. i think possibly an awkward meeting last night. theresa may being urged by cabinet ministers to sack as they call it testosterone fuelled donkeys. also this story is interesting, about life expectancy, increases in life expectancy are grinding toa increases in life expectancy are grinding to a halt. we will be asking why that matters and what it means. prince george also on the front page of the mirror, his royal shyness. sara payne's mother will be on the programme around 9am this morning, talking about her daughter, who would be 25 now if she was still with us. that is the front page of the daily mirror this morning. the
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guardian are talking about schools, and this is in the papers. it is unusualfor and this is in the papers. it is unusual for the guardian to carry a picture of ed sheeran, he had a cameo in game of thrones. it wasn't for very long, it was a ten second scene. people complain about everything. and he looks the part, doesn't he? the daily express, a diet to beat alzheimer's. healthy foods will boost your brain and again its george with his bottom lip out, making most of the papers. big moves in the business world. philip green runs top shop, which is part of arcadia, which is part of his family business which runs all of those things —— topshop. and karen brady has been appointed to chair
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his entire empire. karen brady's new job is effectively to oversee the business as chairman. corporate governance has been a big issue in philip green's businesses, especially bhs, for a while. so she is now in charge. and the car rental company with a £30 million pay—out over repairs. it was bubbling around a little bit yesterday. europe car might have to pay compensation for overcharging people when repairs are done. i have had to pay... as soon as you pick up the car take a video from every angle —— europcar. as you pick up the car take a video from every angle -- europcar. and they may have to pay everybody back who was overpaid. well, £30 million is not everybody who has ever paid but they think the total cost will come to that. you look at any compensation claim, as we have talked about in the past, it can
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increase as investigations go on. that could be worth keeping an eye out for if you have had any issues. who would want to be england cricket captain? what a who would want to be england cricket captain? whatajob! who would want to be england cricket captain? what a job! it is a tough job. the back page of the times has a picture ofjoe root after a terrible defeat for england yesterday, and he is facing up to the realities of life as england captain, and what do you have to do as england captain? score runs, keep your head in the game and not get distracted. that is the challenge. very quickly, this is my favourite picture today. arsenal are on tour in china. can we see that? trying out martial arts in shanghai yesterday at the launch of their tour, in fantastic kind of silky pyjamas. we haven't got much time left, so will quickly move on. the daily mirror. quite a bit of work went into this. they have compared disney films with famous
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philosophers. which one is a worthy individual and which one is disney. don't be afraid of enemies who attack you. be afraid of friends who flatter you. or it takes a great deal of bravery to stand up to your enemies, but a great deal more to stand up to your friends. that second one is disney, surely. the first one is dale carnegie, the second is professor doubled. and someday you will find that there is far more happiness in another —— another‘s happiness. —— dumbledore. there is a full list, if you want to see more. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. almost £20 million has been raised for the victims of the grenfell tower fire, and 40,000 boxes of goods have been donated. butjust £500,000 of that has so far been distributed to the families affected.
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there are concerns much of the money isn't reaching people quickly enough. meanwhile, the grenfell fire response team says the total amount of financial assistance provided to families so far totals more than £5 million. breakfast‘s tom burridge has more. it is second—hand clothes heaven. some of the items we have had have been absolutely beautiful. we have had things like this. lovely. this is the grenfell tower fire appeal in action, a red cross sorting centre in cheshire. donations in the green bags will be sold in red cross shops. black bags are for recycling. brand—new items will go straight back to survivors of the fire, or relatives of those who died. back to survivors of the fire, or relatives of those who diedm back to survivors of the fire, or relatives of those who died. it is about turning all the different donations we have had into cash, which automatically will then go to the appeal. to appreciate the scale
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of donations, you have to fly through this london warehouse a week after the fire. it is estimated 174 tons of stuff was donated. so far, they have sorted half of it, and ten tons has gone back to the victims. no amount of money is enough for the loved ones of those who died. research by the bbc shows that several appeals and charities have now raised nearly £20 million. some question why only a small part of that has made it through. we feel that has made it through. we feel that it that has made it through. we feel thatitis that has made it through. we feel that it is betraying the public‘s generosity, because they gave money to help directly those who were affected. and it is not clear that it is happening. it is like there is a filter, and organisations rather than individuals are getting the financial support. charities say the complexity and the scale of what has happened here means everything takes time. the thing about these things
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that we have learnt from the 7/7 attacks, and indeed from the response to the manchester attack, that it takes longer than you might think for people to come forward to seek theirfunding. think for people to come forward to seek their funding. i have forgiven, you know, the bombers who did this to me. thelma lost her left foot in the london 7/7 means. she received money donated by the public. the london 7/7 means. she received money donated by the publiclj the london 7/7 means. she received money donated by the public. i used to get myself daily physiotherapy support at home. my determination was to walk again, as i was told the chances were highly unlikely. was to walk again, as i was told the chances were highly unlikelym took 15 months to distribute all the money raised for victims of those attacks, like thelma. thelma is now attacks, like thelma. thelma is now a trustee of the london emergency trust. it is distributing £4.8 million of the grenfell appeal. so far16 million of the grenfell appeal. so far 16 people have received payments. you are in a state of
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total confusion, a lot of people are suffering from post—traumatic stress. you are trying to understand what has happened, the implications for your life going forward, has changed for ever. even here, in rural cheshire, what happened in london tower block is by no means. rural cheshire, what happened in london tower block is by no meanslj can't london tower block is by no means.” can't watch it on tv now. you know, it makes you cry. it is emotional even now, just the thought of what is yet to be found, and the people. whether donating an old top or tenner, people have been moved to act. the challenge for the charities is ensuring it all benefits those who have lost so much. for more information on where the grenfell money has gone, you can go to bbc. co. uk/realitycheck, or follow them on twitter @bbcrealitycheck. you are watching breakfast. still to come on the programme this morning: with pride, and some prejudice, matt is at jane austen's house museum in hampshire this morning, where they are remembering the author's life and work 200 years on. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. moped delivery drivers are taking their fears over recent acid attacks to parliament this afternoon. they are concerned about the rise in attacks, and are calling for the government to take action. last week, a series of acid attacks on moped riders in london left several with facial injuries, and some are now refusing to make deliveries in certain areas due to feeling at risk. the home office says it is reviewing the law and looking at response to the attacks. calls are expected to grow for the bank of england to increase interest rates after the latest inflation figures are published this morning. the cost of living has been rising faster than earnings since last yea r‘s brexit referendum, with the headline rate already well above the official target of 2%. the impact of brexit is also seen as the reason for a slowdown in europeans coming
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to london to work. analysis by centre for london shows a 15% fall in the number of national insurance registrations since this time last year. train passengers will soon be able to judge the punctuality of their journeys with much greater accuracy. it is because punctuality statistics will be given to the nearest minute, instead of to the nearest five or ten minutes. each train operator will publish the results from next spring, allowing passengers to scrutinise the punctuality of individualjourneys. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube board, there are severe delays westbound from upminster, due to a signal failure at bromley—by—bow, and that is also causing minor delays on the hammersmith & city line between liverpool street and barking. 0n the roads, in brentford, the a4 is blocked out of town near boston manor way. it is because of an accident there. and, in south—east london, catford hill is closed between the south circular and exbury road, that is near st dunstan's college, due to a burst watermain. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate.
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good morning. it was a very warm, humid night last night. we are hanging on that air today. now, we have got a bright start. a bit of cloud around, but sunny spells should develop, and yes, it is still going to feel very warm. now, this cloud will start to the then break and we will get the sunshine breaking through. the uv levels, of course, high, pollen levels high as well. now, we will start to feel an easterly wind developing. feel that across the essex coast, helping a little, perhaps, is not going to feel quite as warm as it did yesterday. we are going to be
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looking at a maximum of 26, maybe 27 celsius. we had a bit of a breakdown from this warm, hot and humid weather overnight tonight. some heavy, thundery showers moving through. frequent lightning expected through. frequent lightning expected through this evening. gradually, early hours tomorrow morning, they will have cleared. the minimum temperatures, though, again a very uncomfortable night. within the m25, 1819dc. a bit of cloud around tomorrow. the chance of a shower, but still feeling warm, especially overnight. and things getting a little bit cooler as we had further through the week. there is more on the donations given to survivors and relatives of those who died at grenfell on bbc radio london, with vanessa feltz. she will be finding out why only a small amount has got through to the people it was donated for. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. commentator: british tennis history has been made. it has been 39 years. she's the first british woman to reach a wimbledon semi—final since virginia wade in 1978. the new world numberfour,
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johanna konta, will be here after eight. how do you balance childcare with work during the school holidays? in an hour, we'll be asking whether it's ever 0k to leave children home alone? and take a look at this — if you're very lucky, you mightjust spot a fairy. it's100 years since the cottingley hoax — but were the photos actually real? we'll attempt to find out before seven. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. improvements in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century, according to a leading health academic. professor sir michael marmot, from university college london, says the rate of increase has almost "ground to a halt" since 2010.
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in the uk as a whole, women can expect to live to 82 on average, and men to 79. theresa may has told conservative mps and ministers to stop the "backbiting" that has split the party since the general election. during a reception in westminster last night, she warned that the alternative wasjeremy corbyn in number ten. it is understood that mrs may will meet with her cabinet later this morning, reminding them to keep details of meetings private following a series of leaks last week. the cost of insuring a car has risen to its highest ever level. the association of british insurers says the price of the average policy has gone up by 11% in a year to 484 pounds. the body is calling on the government to introduce a new system for calculating compensation payments. buying a knife online is set to become more difficult under new government proposals. ministers want to tighten the law to stop children accessing weapons by ordering them on the internet and getting them delivered. under the plans, anyone buying a knife in england and wales would have to pick it up in person. a similar proposal is already being considered in scotland. heath charities say pregnant mothers
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should be encouraged to use e—cigarettes to help them quit smoking. the smoking in pregnancy challenge group says midwives and health professionals should be more aware of the benefits of encouraging women to vape when they are expecting. the duke and duchess of cambridge — along with their children — will continuing their tour of poland today. last night, prince william delivered a speech in warsaw in which he praised the country's courage, fortitude and bravery. later, william and kate will visit the stutthof concentration camp in gdansk as their tour of eastern europe continues. the advertising standards authority has signalled its readiness to ban commercials, which include sexist stereotypes. examples given by the authority include adverts which show women having sole responsibility for cleaning, and men failing to carry out simple household tasks. the watchdog believes such portrayals are damaging
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because they could contribute to gender inequality. i have just been looking at things that used to be said in ads. a woman looks at the camera and says "so easy, even a man can do it." imagine if that happens now. family around a table. who pours the gravy? does it matter? who cares? this is what they mean. in the famous advert, it was the mother. is it? they never changed it to be the dad of kids. your testing me on advert knowledge. —— you're. as it matter who pours
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the gravy? do you remember when hannah cockroft came in? she had a goal in mind. she spoke specifically about her target. i think it was winning everything. essentially. good morning everyone. it was a good day for britain. it was a good day for britain at the world para athletic championships at the london stadium. they added another three gold medals.. hannah cockroft followed her success in the t34100 metres on friday with another gold in the 800 metres. she can complete the treble with victory in the 400 metres on friday. to go out in front of everyone was amazing. to do this again five years down the line, it brings so many memories. they have kept me and kare where we are. we can bring home more medals to team gb. sophie kamlish set a world record time in the t44 category in the heats last night.
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she also did that at the paralympics in rio last year but missed out on a medal in the final. last night though she went on to secure gold. unkind are still not really believing it. it's obviously the only other international medal i got was a bronze in the 200. ——i am still not really believing it. i'm really amazed. earlier yesterday 0livia breen claimed her first individual major title. she only managed to finish 12th in the t38 long jump at the paralympics last year, but made up for that with a gold and a personal bestjump. richard whitehead, who won the t42 200 metres gold on saturday, took bronze in the 100 metres last night. . afterwards though he said was unhappy that the ipc have decided to withdraw the 100 metres event from the paralympics ahead of the tokyo games in 2020. are not just fighting
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are notjust fighting on my behalf to. it's not about giving in, it's about accepting challenges. that's what really frustrating me, notjust as an athlete, an individual. the ibc are stepping back and letting the athletes dictate the programme, it's ridiculous. england lost the second test against south africa at trent bridge yesterday — by 340 runs. they were all out for 133 in their second innings. it was a disastrous day for the hosts, who lost regular wickets throughout. skipperjoe root cleaned up by chris morris, with what was possibly the best ball of the day. south africa dominated in all departments though, and won the game with well over a day to spare. the series is now level at 1—1 with the third test at the oval next week. it has been a bit of a contrast in emotions in terms of the first two test matches but we obviously need
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to look at certain areas. we don't wa nt to to look at certain areas. we don't want to dwell too much on them. we need to stay tight as a squad and make sure when we turn up at the 0val we are absolutely ready to go and make sure we can continue in the series. england's women will be hoping to fair better than their male counterparts when they also take on south africa in their world cup semi final in bristol later this morning. the winner will take on either australia or india in the final at lord's on sunday. what has given the girls of massive confidence, the types of games we have one, we have one in different ways. we have one scrappy games and ones where we have just piled points ones where we have just piled points on and the tight contest with australia. the tour de france gets back under way this morning after a rest day and chris froome says he hopes he'll get stronger over the last six stages. 2017 has been the defending champion's toughest tour yet, after losing the leader's yellow jersey on thursday and winning it back on saturday. of course, it was a different ——
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disappointment to lose it. i had a bad day. but a feeling better and better as the race goes on and hopefully that means we have time things really well coming into this race. i came in really fresh and i hope that means that going into the third week now, that's going to put me in better shape than some of my rivals. the pairings have been announced for the first two rounds of this week's open at royal birkdale. defending champion henrik stenson will play alongside former world number one and two time major winnerjordan spieth. rory mcilroy will partner the current world number one dustin johnson and local lad tommy fleetwood will tee off with us 0pen champion brooks kepka. it's going to be an experience for me that i will never forget. it's very rare that you get a tournament this close to home. everybody wants to talk about that and it is, it's a massive privilege to be playing at a tournament so close to home. it's
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going to be a great week for me. he says his goat to get used to being recognised locally. —— got to get used to. in the papers today he said, "nobody has fainted when they have met me, yet." we're told that if something appears too good to be true, it probably is. and it seems that may be increasingly pertinent when it comes to online dating. "catfishing" is when someone steals a person's identity to lure unsuspecting victims into a relationship. today the stockport mp, ann coffey, will call for the law to be changed to make the practice illegal. we'rejoined by the model, matt peacock, who's been targeted by scammers in the past. good morning. this has happened directly to you. what did they use? images? it came around four years ago when i started to get messages on online profiles of people saying
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they were talking to people using my pictures but not my name. how do they put two and two together? through myjob. they put two and two together? through my job. people they put two and two together? through myjob. people recognised me from different things. usually a friend would say, no, that's actually matter. and they were pretending using your image. —— matt. the whole thing. online dating profiles. based on the picture and used that. yes to meet or chat to girls. the guy was doing it, he had been talking to a girl for about eight months and ended up using it to get everything. what impact hasn't had on you and your family? it caused a few problems at home. she was getting messages at home saying that your husband has messaged under a different name. they were using reaches of my niece and nephew so it has caused problems
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with my brother. your wife has been told by people you are cheating on her. randomly. it would show a different name and she would say no, thatis different name and she would say no, that is not matt. every time i got a message of the girl saying you have been messaging me under a different name. it's spooky, its sinister. how worried where you and what could you do about it? at first, ijust rushed it off but it got sinister when i got a message from a young girl who had been talking to a guy using my images to eight months. he talked her into sending videos and pictures. she was quite a vulnerable person. she wanted to commit suicide over it and it was at that point i thought right, i have got to do something about this. i got a private detective involved. we got one of the guys doing it and went down and confronted him and he was a
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bit of a sorry individual himself and broke down. two weeks later, he carried on. did you talk to the police? at that point i thought i needed to go to the police so rebecca and i went. the police said that he is not breaking any laws. and then i thought right, i have got to do something about this. i got the mp together. the laws are forged in the dark and they have not kept up in the dark and they have not kept up with the social media of today. we went through that and here we are today. she will take it to parliament today and you are hoping there will be a the law? that is my and goal. you don't ever see an online gambling company losing money to fa ke online gambling company losing money to fake profiles because money is involved. has it made you think about your social media presence? obviously, the pictures are yours.
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wheeler it has. i have been a stubborn character and thought why should i have to make everything of mine private? should i have to make everything of mine private ? also, should i have to make everything of mine private? also, i use it for business as well. i get business through social media. i'm going to do it the hard way now and get it changed. thank you very much. the government says it wants to work with private enterprise and social media. it is 200 years since the death of jane austen, one of the country's best—loved authors. matt is in hampshire for us this morning, where they are remembering her life with pride, and perhaps some prejudice. good morning, yes, no prejudice here. we are the bbc, of course. as you can see, the home where she spent the last eight years of her life was very unpretentious. this was the room she shared with her
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sister, cassandra. they were very close indeed. herformer home is now a museum and around that there are 41 special exhibits, such as this, all commemorating the 41 years of her life. this is an extract from winston churchill's memoirs, which just stated how much her books gave him comfort during this period of sickness. also seeing some of the exposed beams and woodwork from this property, and some of the things that were around at the time. but it is quite a small, fairly humble room as well, and from this house, of course, she wrote such great and fantastic works. we will be taking a little bit more of a look around the property as we go throughout the morning. and we may have come inside but it is very pleasant out there this morning. a dry start forjust about all, with a lot of sunshine around. very warm out there today but just be around. very warm out there today butjust be warned across southern areas, you may be heading to work dry but there may be thunderstorms later. they push towards the channel
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islands and by the end of the day there could be across some southern counties of england. for most of you it isa counties of england. for most of you it is a day of sunny spells. the best of the sunshine the further north you are. the exception probably being around shetland, where we will continue to see some low cloud around at times. even here, brighter than yesterday. northern scotland could hit 27 degrees in the sunshine. not far off that in parts of northern ireland. lots of sunshine for northern england but with more of an easterly breeze, eastern parts could be a good five degrees cooler than yesterday. the further west you are the hotter it will be. temperatures across western england and eastern wales could hit 27 to 29 degrees. by the end of the afternoon we will be seeing some sporadic thunderstorms.
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mainly big lightning displays pushing across parts of the south—west and maybe south wales. as they start to push into night across southern counties of england, torrential downpours will come with them. gusty winds as well. they are very much hit and miss. don't treat the position of those showers to literally on the graphics, but where you do see them there could be some storms and a sleepless night for some of you. working towards the wales and east anglia as we end the night as well. temperatures turning increasingly monkey from the south. it will be a little bit fresher further north at the monkey a works northwards tomorrow. with its thunderstorms pushing into northern ireland and scotland. again, very much hit and miss. brighter weather across england and wales but with low cloud across the far south—west. as temperatures peak tomorrow across eastern areas, 32 for some in eastern areas, 32 for some in eastern england, we could again get some isolated but torrential thunderstorms developing. they will rumble on into wednesday night, eventually clearing through thursday morning in eastern counties of england and eastern scotland. right conditions in the west with a few showers later on. by thursday the humidity is over and it is dry and bright once again. i will have more later on. we will look forward to thursday. thank you very much. just
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checking what is coming up later, because i heard a rumour that might because i heard a rumour that might be some pies in the studio. time for some business now, and sean has got the pies in this morning. we have learnt a lot this morning about how to display pies. that is a lovely display. a lot of time and effort has gone into this. some meat, some butter pies. is that made with butter? it has a certain amount of butter in it. hold fire, we will explain. it is notjust a gratuitous pie—fest this morning. we are really talking about prices, as later this morning we will get the official figures which tell us how quickly prices on the whole are rising. food prices are one area particularly on the up, and if we take a look at the humble pie, you can see why. for example, the lard in the pastry crust of our pie comes in from italy. bringing in things from abroad is costing more because of the weaker pound. and, even if you buy within the uk,
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the price of raw materials, as they call them, are generally on the up as well, ingredients like the potato, butter, and flour that goes into our pie. not everything is going up, though. experts reckon fuel prices are generally lower, so delivering those pies around the country could cost slightly less. so plenty of costs for those who make and sell our food to take into account. one man who does that is paul bowen, from bowen pies in lancashire. good morning. we will get onto the quality of our display a little later but lots of different things taken into later but lots of different things ta ken into account. later but lots of different things taken into account. what is a big thing you are seeing it a moment? the big thing for us as price increases across the board. so our raw materials have gone up quite dramatically. wages have gone up quite a lot, twice last year, business rates again is another killer. and everything in general, really. nothing is ever coming down.
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it is always on the up. so everything is always on the up for you. if we start with the raw materials and the stuff you are getting from other suppliers. when you talk to them about prices going up, do you feel they are passing on what costing them, or are they trying to get more out of your? no, they will always... say it has gone up they will always... say it has gone up10%, they will always... say it has gone up 10%, they will come in for 15, giving you a chance to look around, and then they will drop the prices, because they know as soon as anyone puts the prices up you will shop around and from that they will do some more negotiations back down. but you are supplying other people, as well, with these pies, and customers are buying them. are you having to put your prices up as a result? yes. so how much more? a meat pie has gone up around 10p within a year, which doesn't sound a lot, but to the averagejoe, you know, that comes into a small business like ourselves, they will think i am trying to rip them off.
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you know, 10p is nothing compared to the major cost. so that change of 10p, do you see customers changing the type of pie they are having? yes, we have the butter pie here, which people see as a cheaper alternative to a steak pie. there is alternative to a steak pie. there is a25 alternative to a steak pie. there is a 25 the difference, but although it is only 25p, they will often swing towards it. —— 25p difference. is only 25p, they will often swing towards it. -- 25p difference. what is in towards it. -- 25p difference. what isina towards it. -- 25p difference. what is in a butter pie? it isjust butter and potato, a little bit of our own seasoning in there. as simple as that. getting a little plug—in that, we like that. a butter pie is pretty muchjust utter, a bit of pastry, nice bit of pie in the middle —— butter. they were a childhood creation that gained worldwide attention. the cottingley photos are a series of images showing fairies at the bottom of a bradford garden. they have since been described
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as an elaborate hoax, but were the photos actually genuine? 100 years on, david sillito has been to find out. iam i am christine lynch, the daughter of friends in griffiths. the little girl in the cottingley photos that eve ryo ne girl in the cottingley photos that everyone has seen. the photograph with the five little fairies in front of her. 100 years, it is unbelievable. 100 years since that photograph was taken. so this is the plate. it is a strange feeling holding these glass plates of little frances griffiths and the ferries.
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it was her cousin elsie who took them, and years later admitted they we re them, and years later admitted they were a hoax —— fairies. it was the elsie a bit of fun, but not for frances she was a very honest person, and she really said it spoiled her life. and the pictures taken by the stream in 1917 caused a sensation. sir arthur conan doyle, author of sherlock holmes, for they we re author of sherlock holmes, for they were proof that fairies really existed. when the hoax was revealed, frances was upset. suddenly of ron thought that all of it was made up. what they ignored was that frances maintained she had seen fairies, and that this photograph was not a fake. are you not embarrassed to say i believe in fairies? no, because i do believe in fairies? no, because i do believe they are genuine. i do believe. this is the actual garden, then,is believe. this is the actual garden, then, is it? it is the garden, yes. the fairy garden. an artist bought
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it just over the fairy garden. an artist bought itjust over a year ago. did you know about the fairies? no, we didn't actually know. no one told you? no. it really is quite magical down here, and nothing has changed in100 down here, and nothing has changed in 100 years. you can see exactly what would have inspired the imagination of two little girls. the fairy mania they inspired seems like another age. however, 100 years on, believe has not disappeared. a professor of art is took these pictures of what he thought were insects. when he displayed them, people from around the world were convinced he had photographed fairies. i was getting fairies from peru being sent to me, from finland, from israel, from australia, people sending their photographs of fairies. are these people who really believe? yes, people who have had
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encounters, and are sending us teachers of their encounters. so for most of us, cottingley is a picture ofa most of us, cottingley is a picture of a hoax put, but not the christine. all these years these photographs were believed, then they we re photographs were believed, then they were not believed. but that one thing that was hanging here all that time, that genuine article, has been hanging here that time, and nothing has been done about it. a secret world that only a few of us can see. 100 years on, belief is still very with us. feel free to get in touch with us about that. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: a woman's place is in the kitchen, and it's up to the man to bring home the bacon. two increasingly outdated statements, but are advertisers doing enough to challenge gender stereotyping? we will be discussing this after 8:30am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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the bbc has found that only a small amount of the cash and items donated to the survivors and relatives of those who died at grenfell tower has actually been received by those in need. £20 million of cash was donated, out of which less than 5% has been given out. there are concerns much of the money isn't reaching people quickly enough. the thing about these things that we have learnt from the 7/7 attacks, andindeed have learnt from the 7/7 attacks, and indeed from the response to the manchester attacks, that it takes longer than you might think for
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people to come forward to seek their funding. for more information on where the grenfell money has gone, you can go to bbc.co.uk/realitycheck or follow them on twitter @bbcrealitycheck. moped delivery drivers are taking their fears over recent acid attacks to parliament this afternoon. they are concerned about rising cases, and are calling for the government to take action. last week, a series of acid attacks on moped riders left several with facial injuries, and some are now refusing to make deliveries in certain areas. the home office says it is reviewing the law. train passengers will soon be able to judge the punctuality of their journeys with much greater accuracy. it is because punctuality statistics will be given to the nearest minute, instead of to the nearest five or ten minutes. each train operator will publish the results from next spring, allowing passengers to scrutinise the punctuality of individualjourneys. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, there are severe delays westbound from upminster due to a signal failure at bromley—by—bow, and that is also causing minor delays
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on the hammersmith & city line between liverpool street and barking. on the roads, in brentford, the a4 is blocked out of town near boston manor way. it is because of an accident there. in south—east london, catford hill is closed between the south circular and exbury road, that is near st dunstan's college, due to a burst watermain. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it was a very warm, humid night last night. we are hanging on that air today. now, we have got a bright start. a bit of cloud around, but sunny spells should develop, and yes, it is still going to feel very warm. now, this cloud will start to thin and break, and we'll get this sunshine breaking through. the uv levels of course high, pollen levels high, as well. now, we will start to feel an easterly wind developing. you will feel that across the essex coast, helping a little, perhaps. it's not going to feel quite as warm as it did yesterday. we are going to be looking at a maximum of 26, maybe 27
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celsius. now, the met office has issued a yellow warning for heavy rain. we had a bit of a breakdown from this warm, hot and humid weather overnight tonight. some heavy, thundery showers moving through. frequent lightning expected through this evening. gradually, early hours of tomorrow morning, they will have cleared. the minimum temperatures, though, again another very uncomfortable night within the m25, 18 or 19 degrees celsius. a bit of cloud around tomorrow. the chance of a shower, but still feeling warm, especially overnight, and things getting a little bit cooler as we head further through the week. i will be back in half an hour, hope you canjoin i will be back in half an hour, hope you can join me i will be back in half an hour, hope you canjoin me then. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. increases in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century.
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dementia and lifestyle could be to blame — experts behind the study say it's deeply concerning. good morning, it's tuesday the 18th ofjuly. also this morning: these are some of the 170,000 tons of donations made by the public after the grenfell tower fire. butjust a handful have made it to survivors — we have a special investigation. commentator: it's been 39 years since a british woman can say, "i am a wimbledon semifinalist." she made history at wimbledon. johanna konta will be right here on the sofa. that's in the next hour. it's behind hit shows like the crown and house of cards — more than a million people now
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subscribe to the tv and movie streaming service netflix. i'll ask how it's faring against rivals like amazon, you tube and terrestrial tv. in sport , hannah cockcroft is one gold away from a treble at the world para athletics championships. she claimed her second gold medal last night with victory in the t34 800m. matt's got the weather — live from jane austen's former home. morning. that is right. she spent the last eight years of her life here. we will be looking at how her life and works are being commemorated 200 years after her death. a beautiful start the day but they could be some storms in the forecast later. join me for the details in the next 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. improvements in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century, according to a leading health academic.
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professor sir michael marmot, from university college london, says the rate of increase has almost "ground to a halt" since 2010. in the uk as a whole, women can expect to live to 82 on average, and men to 79. our health correspondent, nick triggle, has more. life expectancy has been rising for the last century but now a leading health expert is raising concerns the increases could be tailing off. sir michael marmot, who has advised both the government and world health organization, points out that the rate of increase has halved since 2010. historically, life expectancy at birth has risen by one year for every five years for women and one year every 3.5 for men. since 2010, however, that has slowed to one year for every ten for women and one for every six for men. sir michael says the situation needs to be urgently looked at. this is historically highly unusual because over a long period of time, for 100 years, life expectancy has been improving, year on year in britain as it has in many, many, many, many other countries. and now it has slowed, is almost flat, which means that we've fallen behind some of the healthier countries.
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that's terrible. he says it's not possible to say exactly what had caused it but he says austerity could be a factor and funding for the nhs and social care in particular had been miserly. dementia is also likely to have played a role. the department of health says it's providing funding to ensure life expectancy continues to rise and the ageing population is well cared for. we will talk to the man behind the research in a few minutes. theresa may has told conservative mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" that has split the party since the general election. at a tory reception in the commons last night, the prime minister also warned
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the alternative to her in number ten would bejeremy corbyn. alex forsyth is in westminster for us this morning. the cabinet meets later and mrs may is likely to give them a similar message? we know the cabinet meets later and we will be speaking to the home secretary later. since the election which left theresa may's authority weekend, there has beenjostling, reefing and lea ks. weekend, there has beenjostling, reefing and leaks. this isn'tjust leadership gossip. this is also about some people in the party trying to influence its direction are the key issues like brexit. last night, theresa may at a reception here in the house of commons, said to hermps, here in the house of commons, said to her mps, this has got to stop. no more backbiting, no more carping and in the autumn and get down to
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serious business. it is thought she will say something similar to her cabinet ministers this morning, warning them to keep their internal discussions private. this is an attempt to rear sort —— put some discipline into the party. it is unlikely she was to these internal battles being played out in the public altogether. the cost of insuring a car has risen to its highest ever level. the association of british insurers says the price of the average policy has gone up by 11% in a year to 484 pounds. the body is calling on the government to introduce a new system for calculating compensation payments. buying a knife over the internet is set to become more difficult under new government proposals, which aim to restrict children's access to weapons. customers in england and wales would be required to collect their purchase in person and show id. a similar proposal is already being considered in scotland. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, has more. this is the sharp end of the battle against knife crime in britain. police in birmingham
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make yet another stop, and find yet another knife. without good reason, it is illegal to carry anything bigger than a three—inch penknife. but this is what police have found in london, including a so—called zombie knife, shown to the home secretary. why? why, i agree. it is illegal to buy a knife if you are under 18, 16 in scotland. but some young people are getting them delivered. the plan is to change the law so knives purchased have to be picked up in person with id. some types of knives cannot even be sold or passed around. police may also get stronger powers to seize them. we want to make sure that we extend the power of police, to take away these dangerous knives and to make them less available to young people so we can start to break that cycle of danger
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and of violence that's so blighting communities. after all, police reported knife crime has started rising. scotland is already considering the changes proposed today in england and wales. this young man did not suffer a serious injury, despite being stabbed, but every knife on the streets can result in at least one life lost. tom symonds, bbc news. the family of an autistic seven—year—old boy are beginning a high court challenge against an nhs decision to deny him a life—changing drug. the child has a rare condition, which puts him at risk of severe brain damage. nhs england says the drug is too expensive and there's no evidence it will work. but if the challenge is successful, in future, funding decisions could be based solely upon the welfare of the child. children who have been sexually exploited are being refused
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compensation on the grounds they "consented" to their abuse, according to campaigners. a coalition of charities — including barnardo's and victim support — are calling for an urgent review of the criminal injuries compensation authority's guidelines. the government says the issue of compensation is currently being examined as part of an independent inquiry. one parent told us how his teenage son was groomed and abused, yet refused compensation. we have changed his name and voice in order to protect the victim's anonymity. to have one organisation amongst so many now saying, "you were to blame", it has such a negative effect on the child. and i'm sure we're not the only parents with children in this situation. it has such a negative effect on the child that it is difficult to accept. president trump's efforts to replace barack 0bama's healthcare system have run into more problems. donald trump made repealing 0bamacare a key election campaign
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pledge, and he delayed congress's summer holiday until the legislation was overturned. but two more of the president's own senators now oppose his reforms. it means that the president's plans could be abandoned. heath charities say pregnant mothers should be encouraged to use e—cigarettes to help them quit smoking. the smoking in pregnancy challenge group says midwives and health professionals should be more aware of the benefits of encouraging women to vape when they are expecting. the duke and duchess of cambridge — along with their children, prince george and princess charlotte — are continuing their tour of poland. today they'll visit the stutthof concentration camp in gdansk. last night, prince william delivered a speech in warsaw in which he praised the country's courage, fortitude and bravery. our royal correspondent, peter hunt, reports. in warsaw, on a trip to highlight the links that bind the uk and poland, prince william talked about how such centuries—old ties were still going strong.
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polish is now the second most spoken language in the united kingdom with a generation of young people growing up who feel both british and polish. such links, diplomatic, military, cultural, offer much promise and opportunity for the future. he didn't utter the word brexit but it influenced his speech as it will the time william and kate spend here. on this tour, the couple will be confronted with the horror of poland's recent past when they visit the stutthof concentration camp near gdansk, one of several where the nazis murdered jews and others during the second world war. the living conditions where more than 60,000 people died are display for visitors including royals. so, too, the camps crematorium where a memorial plate reads, "hitlerism, in it's madness and hatred, brought this fate
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upon many nations". i want to explore one of our main stories in a little more detail. over the last century, the number of years we can expect to live has been steadily rising. but a leading expert now says the rate in which life expectancy is increasing, has slowed — almost "grinding to a halt" in fact. let's take a look at the figures. at the moment, the average person in the uk can expect to live to around 81 years old. but until 2010, life expectancy in england was rising much more quickly. that was mostly down to improvements in healthcare and medicine, as well as various lifestyle factors that helped us live longer. however, new figures suggest average life expectancies have practically levelled off. the author of this new report thinks that might be down to greater pressure on health services and the rise in dementia diagnosis. how long you live also depends on where you live — with life expectancy lowest in the north—west.
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and highest in the london borough of kensington and chelsea. the author of the report, professor sir michael marmot, says the results need urgent attention. hejoins us now. are you worried by these figures?” am extremely worried. we expected that for then life expectancy would improve about one year every 3.5 yea rs improve about one year every 3.5 years and four women one year every five years. and now the rate of increase has halved. and when people have asked, well, aren't we reaching the limit and the answer is, no, we are not. countries such as japan, hong kong, singapore, quite apart from the nordic countries, have longer life expectancy. and it is still increasing. ours has levelled off. in the us, it actually declining and i think we want to look more like nordic countries or
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hong kong and we do like the united states. uninterested in why you think it matters. why would we want to live longer and longer? life expectancy is a summary figure that is an indicator of how healthy we are. the figures that you quoted at the beginning saying that life expectancy is shorter in the north thanit expectancy is shorter in the north than it is in the south—east. in kensington and chelsea for example, where you quite rightly said there is the longest life expectancy, there are huge inequalities. in the worst off part in kensington and chelsea, life expectancy was 16 yea rs chelsea, life expectancy was 16 years shorter than in the best off part. it's no accident that grenfell tower was in the worst off part of kensington and chelsea. and then along with shorter lives, there is more of those lives spent with illness and disability so it's not just living longer, its living
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healthier that we're concerned about. lets look at what you asked specifically say. —— what you are specifically say. —— what you are specifically say. —— what you are specifically say in. is it down to how much money people have? specifically say in. is it down to how much money people have ?m specifically say in. is it down to how much money people have? if you have very little money and money matters. one of my recommendations has for some years now been that eve ryo ne has for some years now been that everyone should have at least the minimum income necessary for a healthy life and we are some way short of that. the national living wage is actually below the minimum necessary for a healthy life. and the proportion of the population who fall short of that has been rising so money is part of it but if you have enough money above batch threshold, other social factors are still vitally important and it sta rts still vitally important and it starts at the beginning of life. quality of early child development, how well we are doing at school and
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typically at school we see that more deprived areas have a smaller proportion of young people getting five gcse. the kids on free school meals are doing worse. but in london, for example, the gap in school performance between children eligible for free school meals and the average is much less than the rest of the country. we can narrow the gaps and we look at employment, working conditions, how much money people have and then circumstances in old age. ijust want to stop you because we are short of time. just, you seem to identify an issue around the middle classes. is that lifestyle or what is going on there?
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i talk about the social gradient, so people in the middle have worse health than those at the bottom. sorry, have worse health than those at the top but better health than those beneath them. and we think that lifestyle is a consequence of these social conditions in which people live and work. and let me just mention two things that may relate to the elderly. one is that spending on adult social care has been reduced by more than 6% since 2010, at a time when the elderly population has increased by one sixth. and the second is that the historical increases in nhs spending has been very much less dance 2010. —— less since 2010. would you like to be outside
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enjoying the sunshine with a book and a cup of tea? that is where matt is. sorry to interrupt you, can we have the weather, please? it didn't ta ke have the weather, please? it didn't take much persuasion to come out and have a cup of tea and a good read. we are on the grounds ofjane austen's former home in hampshire. it is 200 years since she passed away and today is a special date in that she is being fully commemorated in various respect. the royal mint is releasing a £2 coin in her honour and later today, mark carney from the bank of england will be unveiling a new £10 note on which jane austen's portrait will replace that of charles darwin. you can understand just where some of the inspiration from her stories came from. a beautiful inspiration from her stories came from. a beautiful scene, inspiration from her stories came from. a beautiful scene, a inspiration from her stories came from. a beautiful scene, a beautiful setting and a beautiful morning in hampshire this morning, as it is across many parts of the country. if
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we ta ke across many parts of the country. if we take a look at the forecast through today, it will not only be a dry day but pretty worn one. there isa dry day but pretty worn one. there is a word of note dimension, and thatis is a word of note dimension, and that is that there will be some thunderstorms later across the south. at the moment they are in northern france and you will get some lightning in the channel islands in the coming hours and by the time we get to the afternoon some of those will push into the south coast of england. for most of you it is a sunny day. the best of the blue skies further north, the exception being shetlands. a brighter day than yesterday, the cloud will eventually break up. mostly dry, 27 the high in the north of scotla nd mostly dry, 27 the high in the north of scotland around them murray first and the northern highlands. not far from that around northern ireland as well. it is not quite as warm as it was yesterday, whereas in the west it will be a good deal warmer. hazy sunshine for many. temperatures across western england and wales peaking at 27 to 29 degrees, the hotspot probably somewhere around the south—west midlands towards the bristol and cardiff areas. you can see in the charts some big storms
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possible by the time you finish the afternoon. don't take the positions of the storms to literally as we run through the night. they will be some nasty thunderstorms with torrential downpours, giving some minor flooding for some. gusty winds possible as they drove their weight northwards. the further north you are, you should spend a night dry. more so than the muggy conditions we have further south. sporadic thunderstorms through that day on wednesday morning. not everyone will see them. brighter conditions for a time across england and wales, but temperatures will boost the heat. 31 celsius possible in eastern england at this time, west favoured for the hottest of the weather. as you see the humidity and heat combined, we could set off some further storms. especially from wales, the midlands and into northern england. we could finish the day with some nasty conditions around. they will ease off into the north sea into
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thursday. still a bit of cloud and outbreaks of rain across eastern areas, but brightening up from the west. just a few showers. by the time you to thursday it is going to feel much, much pressure. the old saying, three fine days and a thunderstorm probably holds true. some big storms again later. now, if you don't mind, i have some important work to do. idid i did notice he was halfway through when we went to him, so that is fake tv reading for you there. and he has gone back to the middle again. caught you out, son, caught you out. trains, topshop and telly. sean is here with a few more headlines form the world of money. good morning. at the moment, trains are officially on time if they arrive within five or even ten minutes of the time they are due. but, from today, the trade body the rail delivery group will publish average national punctuality statistics to the minute, and from next spring, train companies will do the same with their own routes.
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sir philip green has appointed baroness karren brady as the chairman of taveta, the parent company in charge of the tycoon's arcadia retail empire, which includes topshop, miss selfridge and burton. netflix added 5.2 million new subscribers to its tv and film streaming service in the last three months, which means it now has over 100 million people signed up worldwide. the company said it is proof that investment in new shows and movies is paying off, as online television becomes more popular. and just a few minutes ago royal mail said it has seen revenue from delivering parcels increase but from letters that was down 4%, even though that 4% is a bit redder than expected after a surprising amount of political party letters that you might have had through your door, delivered in the run—up to the
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election, gave them a bit more to do than they thought. i am disappointed, because letters are lovely to receive, mostly. not enough people are writing them, though. a few people commenting on your incredibly long tie this morning. when there is only that much of a gap at the back... i have a nightmare with my tyres. can i read tie it for you —— ties. a nightmare with my tyres. can i read tie it for you -- ties. naga taught me how to do a double wins the other day. —— double windsor. almost £20 million has been raised for the victims of the grenfell tower fire, and 40,000 boxes of goods have been donated, butjust £500,000 of that has so far been distributed to the families affected. there are concerns much of the money isn't reaching people quickly enough. meanwhile, the grenfell fire response team says the total amount of financial assistance provided to families so far totals more than £5 million. tom burridge has more.
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it is second—hand clothes heaven. some of the items we've had through have been absolutely beautiful. i mean, we've had things like this. lovely. this is the grenfell tower fire appeal in action, a red cross sorting centre in cheshire. donations in the green bags will be sold in red cross shops. black bags are for recycling. brand—new items will go straight back to survivors of the fire, or relatives of those who died. it's about turning all the different donations we've had into cash, which automatically will then go to the appeal. to appreciate the scale of donations, you had to fly through this london warehouse a week after the fire. it is estimated 174 tons of stuff was donated. so far they have sorted half of it, and ten tons has gone back to the victims. no amount of money is enough for
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the loved ones of those who died. research by the bbc shows that several appeals and charities have now raised nearly £20 million. some question why only a small part of that has made it through. we feel that it's betraying the public‘s generosity, because they gave money to help directly those who were affected, and we're not too clear that it's happening. it's like there's a filter, and organisations rather than individuals are getting the financial support. charities say the complexity and the scale of what happened here means everything takes time. the thing about these things that we've learnt from the 7/7 attacks, and indeed from the response to the manchester attack, is that it takes longer than you might think for people to come forward to seek theirfunding. i have forgiven, you know, the bombers who did this to me... thelma lost her left foot in the london 7/7 bombings. she received money
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donated by the public. i used it to get myself daily physiotherapy support at home. my determination was to walk again, as i was told the chances were highly unlikely. it took 15 months to distribute all the money raised for victims of those attacks, like thelma. thelma is now a trustee of the london emergency trust. it is distributing £4.8 million of the grenfell appeal. so far, 16 people have received payments. you're in a state of total confusion. a lot of people are suffering from post—traumatic stress. you're trying to understand what has happened, the implications for your life going forward, is changed forever. even here, in rural cheshire, what happened in a london tower block is by no means lost. i can't watch it on tv now. you know, it makes you cry. it's emotional even now,
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just the thought of what's yet to be found, and the people. whether donating an old top or tenner, people have been moved to act. the challenge for charities is ensuring it all benefits those who have lost so much. extraordinary to see those pictures in that warehouse, as well. for more information on where the grenfell money has gone, you can go to bbc. co. uk/realitycheck, or follow them on twitter @bbcrealitycheck. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: she is the first british woman to reach a wimbledon semi—final since virginia wade in 1978. the new world numberfour, johanna konta, will be here after 8:00am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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mayor of london sadiq khan has reiterated his opposition to us president donald trump being allowed a state visit when he comes to britain. in an interview with cnn, mr khan said the president had policies that many in the uk disagree with, and therefore he didn't think it was appropriate to roll out the red carpet. last week, the white house confirmed mr trump's visit here has been delayed until next year. moped delivery drivers are taking their fears over recent acid attacks to parliament this afternoon. they are concerned about rising cases, and are calling for the government to take action. last week, a series of acid attacks on moped riders left several with facial injuries, and some are now refusing to make deliveries in certain areas. the home office says it is reviewing the law. train passengers will soon be able to judge the punctuality of their journeys with much greater accuracy. it is because punctuality statistics will be given to the nearest minute, instead of to the nearest
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five or ten minutes. each train operator will publish the results from next spring, allowing passengers to scrutinise the punctuality of individualjourneys. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, there are severe delays westbound from upminster, due to a signal failure at bromley—by—bow, and also severe delays on the hammersmith & city line for the same reason. on the roads, in brentford, the a4 is blocked out of town near boston manor way. it is because of an accident there. in south—east london, catford hill is closed between the south circular and exbury road, that is near st dunstan's college, due to a burst watermain. finally, over to west london, and fulham road is closed westbound from edith grove to gunter grove for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it was a very warm,
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humid night last night. we are hanging on to that air today. now, we have got a bright start. a bit of cloud around, but sunny spells should develop, and yes, it is still going to feel very warm. now, this cloud will start to thin and break, and we'll get this sunshine breaking through. uv levels of course high, pollen count very high, as well. now, we'll start to feel an easterly wind developing. you're going to feel that across the essex coast, helping a little, perhaps. it's not going to feel quite as warm as it did yesterday. we're looking at a maximum of 26, maybe 27 celsius. now, the met office has issued a yellow warning for heavy rain. we had a bit of a breakdown from this warm, hot and humid weather overnight tonight. some heavy, thundery showers moving through. frequent lightning expected through this evening. gradually, early hours of tomorrow morning, they will have cleared. the minimum temperature, though, again another very uncomfortable night within the m25, around 18, 19 celsius. a bit of cloud around tomorrow. the chance of a shower, but still feeling warm, especially overnight,
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and then things getting a little cooler as we head further through the week. there is more on the donations given to survivors and relatives of those who died at grenfell on bbc radio london, with vanessa feltz. she will be finding out why only a small amount has got through to the people it was donated for. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. improvements in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century, according to a leading health academic. professor sir michael marmot — from university college london — has called for an urgent investigation into the causes of the slowdown, which he suggests could be linked to rising rates of dementia. the department of health says the nhs has recently been rated the number one health service in the world and life expectancy continues to increase. spending on adult social care has
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been reduced at a time when that elderly population has increased by one sixth will stop the second thing is that the historical increases in nhs is spending have been very much less sense 2010. theresa may has told conservative mps and ministers to stop the "backbiting" that has split the party since the general election. during a reception in westminster last night, she warned that the alternative wasjeremy corbyn in number ten. it is understood that mrs may will meet with her cabinet later this morning, reminding them to keep details of meetings private following a series of leaks last week. the cost of insuring a car has risen to its highest ever level. the association of british insurers says the price of the average policy has gone up by 11% in a year to 484 pounds. the body is calling on the government to introduce a new system for calculating compensation payments. buying a knife online is set to become more difficult under
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new government proposals. ministers want to tighten the law to stop children accessing weapons by ordering them on the internet and getting them delivered. under the plans, anyone buying a knife in england and wales would have to pick it up in person. a similar proposal is already being considered in scotland. heath charities say pregnant mothers should be encouraged to use e—cigarettes to help them quit smoking. the smoking in pregnancy challenge group says midwives and health professionals should be more aware of the benefits of encouraging women to vape when they are expecting. the duke and duchess of cambridge along with their children, prince george and princess charlotte — will continue their visit to poland later, after arriving in warsaw yesterday. it's part of a five day visit to eastern europe. last night, prince william praised poland's courage, fortitude and bravery in a speech. on the agenda today is a trip to the former stutthof concentration camp in gdansk. the advertising standards authority
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has signalled its readiness to ban commercials, which include sexist stereotypes. examples given by the authority include adverts which show women having sole responsibility for cleaning, and men failing to carry out simple household tasks. the watchdog believes such portrayals are damaging because they could contribute to gender inequality. we will be discussing that later.= ali. -- hi, sally. is there anything in that cup this morning? are you accusing me of fake drinking? it was a good day for britain at the world para athletic championships at the london stadium.
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they added another three gold medals.. hannah cockroft followed her success in the t34100 metres on friday with another gold in the 800 metres. she can complete the treble with victory in the 400 metres on friday. to go out in front of the whole crowd was amazing. the further we get to do this, again, five years down the line, it brings so many memories. the fact i've been supported by the national lottery now for five years so thank you to them and their players, they have kept me and kare where we are. we can bring home more gold medals and bronze medals to team gb and just do everyone proud and i hope everyone enjoys what we're doing. sophie kamlish set a world record time in the t44 category in the heats last night. she also did that at the paralympics in rio last year but missed out on a medal in the final. last night though she went on to secure gold. i'm kind of still not really believing it because obviously the only other major international medal i got was a bronze in the 200 in 2013 so it's been quite a long time. i'm just amazed.
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you know, i'm always like, oh, she's like the girl version ofjonnie peacock, just not as good. so now it's like, oh, now i'm world champion as well? earlier yesterday olivia breen claimed her first individual major title. she only managed to finish 12th in the t38 long jump at the paralympics last year, but made up for that with a gold and a personal bestjump. richard whitehead, who won the t42 200 metres gold on saturday, took bronze in the 100 metres last night. . afterwards though he said was unhappy that the ipc have decided to withdraw the 100 metres event from the paralympics ahead of the tokyo games in 2020. i'm notjust fighting on my behalf but obviously you've got a young south african, you've got dave henson that want to continue, they're the future of the sport. it's not about giving in, it's about accepting challenges. that's what really frustrates me, not just as an athlete, but as an individual. that the ipc are kind of stepping back and letting the athletes dictate the programme, it's ridiculous.
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why is that happening? really good question. some other athletes have complained about the double athletes. he is a double amputee. the way he runs potentially puts others in danger and the 100 metres is long enough to get a rhythm going and therefore they are saying there are too many variables and he could knock other people out. richards point is that has never happened before. he is really good, he is really fast and really competitive. other people perhaps are feeling a bit threatened. really, really disappointing for him. england lost the second test against south africa at trent bridge yesterday — by 340 runs. they were all out for 133 in their second innings. it was a disastrous day for the hosts, who lost regular wickets throughout. skipperjoe root cleaned up by chris morris, with what was possibly the best ball of the day. south africa dominated in all departments though, and won the game with well over
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a day to spare. the series is now level at 1—1 with the third test at the oval next week. it has been a bit of a contrast in emotions in terms of the first two test matches but we obviously need to look at certain areas. but we don't want to dwell too much on them. we need to stay tight as a squad and make sure when we turn up at the oval we are absolutely ready to go and make sure we go 2—1 up in the series. england's women will be hoping to fair better than their male counterparts when they also take on south africa in their world cup semi final in bristol later this morning. the winner will take on either australia or india in the final at lord's on sunday. what's given the girls massive confidence is the type of games we have won as well. we've won in different ways. we've won games where we've just piled runs on the board, we've won a scrappy game against the west indies the other day and we held our nerve in that tight contest with australia so i think those sort of experiences throughout the tournament will only do us good. the tour de france gets back under
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way this morning after a rest day and chris froome says he hopes he'll get stronger over the last six stages. 2017 has been the defending champion's toughest tour yet, after losing the leader's yellow jersey on thursday and winning it back on saturday. of course, it was a disappointment to lose it in the pyrenees when i had a bad day. but i am feeling better and better as the race goes on and hopefully that means we have timed things really well coming into this race. i came in really fresh and i hope that means that going into the third week now, that's going to put me in better shape than some of my rivals. tour de france does seem to have some of the best press conference locations in the world. the pairings have been announced for the first two rounds of this week's open at royal birkdale. defending champion henrik stenson will play alongside former world number one and two time major winnerjordan spieth. rory mcilroy will partner the current world number one dustin johnson and local lad
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tommy fleetwood will tee off with us open champion brooks kepka. it's going to be an experience for me that i will never forget. it's very rare that you get a tournament this close to home. i know everybody wants to talk about that and it is, it's a massive privilege to be playing at a tournament so close to home and it be the british open so it's going to be a great week for me, no matter what. of course tommy fleetwood is from southport which is just down the road. it's the dream, isn't it? for children, the summer holidays — stretching out for weeks ahead — are likely to be an exciting and highly anticipated break from the classroom. but for many parents, they can be a logistical nightmare. the children's charity, the nspcc, says it's seen a rise in calls from people concerned about children being left home—alone or in the care of siblings. we'll discuss this in a minute. but first, this is what some of you had to say on the matter.
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i think leaving kids when they are under 13, i think leaving kids when they are under13, i i think leaving kids when they are under 13, i would worry as a teacher if kids were being left at home alone. as long as the child understands that they have been left alone and they can be sensible while they are left alone. going away on holiday and leaving a 14—year—old, no. but talking about a 14—year—old looking after a kid while you go to the supermarket, i can't see the problem. my children were never left on their road. that's probably old school. a lot of people have got to work, i understand that. but i don't think children should be left on their road. tentative when there we re their road. tentative when there were more than one of them at home and over12,13. were more than one of them at home and over12, 13. and were more than one of them at home and over 12, 13. and probably not for very long, maybe just down to the shops or get a newspaper or
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something like that. i wouldn't leave a really young child at home. joining us now to discuss the issue further is paul kelly, an educational and child psychologist. there is no law, is there? about what the right age is? as we can see, everybody has a different view. what are your thoughts? there isn't an age specifically in law. the guidance says that babies, topless and very young children should be left alone but after that, it's up to parents to individually make that decision. it is tricky for parents but there is good information around to guide them. you are a psychologist. what influences that have on the child they are regularly left at home. can it have a detrimental short—term, long—term, is that? there is no easy as that. it depends on the child and their level of responsibility, independent
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and skills and also whether they feel comfortable or worried about being left at home alone. how do you even start then? do you have compensation with your child ? even start then? do you have compensation with your child?” would recommend that people gradually built those independent skilled and while the carers are in the house with the child, the child gets comfortable with making decisions on the road or what to do in emergency, who to call for help and having that overview while you are around in the house means you can step in if things go wrong and you can gradually built those independent skills that in the future you might think, yes, i can p0p future you might think, yes, i can nor) by future you might think, yes, i can pop by next—door chairman is to get something, ifeel my pop by next—door chairman is to get something, i feel my child pop by next—door chairman is to get something, ifeel my child is pop by next—door chairman is to get something, i feel my child is safe seat built up over time. every pa rent seat built up over time. every parent knows, for example to 12 —year—olds, that could be quite different and you treat one in the opposite way to how you treat one. elements definitely. age doesn't
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have any bearing on this, the independents, skills and responsibility of each child could be different. some children with additional needs might not reach that point where they able to be left independently.” that point where they able to be left independently. i suppose, we don't want to be told at what age you can leave a child or not it is there enough guidance out there?” think it is tricky for parents. i think, instead of looking for a number, they need to look through a list of skills and think, "what will i need to know that my child can do out of the house? also setting ground rules. can my child cook? can they have access to the internet? will i set ground rules to make sure there is safety around that? at what stage would you report a child being left at home alone. is that when you can see it having an effect on them or they are clearly worried? at what
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stage do you step in? the guidance says about risk of harm. if you feel that was a risk of harm and obviously there is a boundary crossed over into a dangerous area. doctor paul kelly, thank you very much. sure people will be watching this and going through this in your mind as well. some people on summer holidays as well. did you have an age for your girls? no, nota did you have an age for your girls? no, not a set age. and again, you have to play things slow, go out for ten minutes, or whatever. test the water. wise advice. did you study jane austen at school?” water. wise advice. did you study jane austen at school? i did, yes. have a favourite one? probably pride and prejudice. it is 200 years since the death of jane austen, one of the country's best—loved authors. matt is in hampshire for us this morning,
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where they are remembering her life with pride, and perhaps some prejudice. is that the front door? it is the front door, but louise said she liked pride and prejudice, this is the gusty she was thinking of when she read it. tall, dark, handsome, or as the cameraman says, i look a bit more like the artful dodger —— darcy. and of course, it is the 200th anniversary. big commemoration is taking place, including the launch of the £2 coin and a £10 note as well. we are taking a close look around the property and gardens through the rest of the morning. lovely start to the day in hampshire this morning, as it is for many of you. taking a look at the forecast, it is shaping up to be a very warm day for the vast majority but there will be some thunderstorms later on. they are already in parts of
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northern france and they will be with you in areas around the channel islands through the morning and into the early afternoon. the lightning storms to go with it, drifting towards the south coast later but in the minority. most will state dry today, lots of sunshine around in scotland, where temperatures will peak between 25 and 27 degrees. some of the warmest conditions around the murray first and north—west highlands, where there could be the outside chance of a shower. the cloud and shetland will eventually break up and into northern england, a fine day in store. the western side of the pennines form of the east, thanks to a bit of a breeze developing through the day. we could hit 27 to 29 degrees in western parts of england, including the west midlands, down towards the bristol area and the south—east of wales. cloud will turn the sunshine hazy across england and wales, but turning our attention to the far south—west, we could see some thunderstorms ending the afternoon. they will drift into other parts of southern england and also across parts of the midlands and wales overnight. they will be torrential in places, fairly sporadic, though.
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some will mist them all together and they will be reaching northern england by the time we reach dawn. muqqy england by the time we reach dawn. muggy night for all, temperatures not dropping below the high teens across southern areas. a little bit fresher further north. across southern areas. a little bit fresherfurther north. into tomorrow, the storms will continue tomorrow, the storms will continue to push off into northern england and northern ireland. very much hit mist, some will avoid them and stay dry altogether. staying grey in the far south—west. tomorrow will be even hotter than today. very humid in eastern areas. 31 to 32 celsius in eastern areas. 31 to 32 celsius in eastern parts of england, but that will be enough to set off further storms. some of the worst of those tomorrow could be across wales, the midlands and northern areas of england. they will clear out of the way as we go into thursday. only slowly, but brighter and fresher conditions developing the thursday. one or two showers in the thursday. one or two showers in the west later but that old adage of three fine days and then a thunderstorm certainly rings true. that is how the weather is looking.
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thank you so much, mr darcy.“ that is how the weather is looking. thank you so much, mr darcy. if you have just turned on your telly and are wondering what is going on, matt is at jane austen's former are wondering what is going on, matt is atjane austen's former home, and he is dressed as mr darcy, but eve ryo ne he is dressed as mr darcy, but everyone is saying he looks a little bit more artful dodger. tall, dark and handsome, let's be honest. one out of three is not bad. travellers with cancer pay nearly four times more for travel insurance than the rest of us, even after they have beaten the disease. that is according to new research, and sean has more. it can cause additional stress that you don't need when you have costs like that going up. yes, this is research out this morning from macmillan cancer support. they found that, on average, those that either have or have had cancer pay about £133 for an annual travel insurance policy, compared to a national average ofjust £37. pavitter is one person who had to cancel a trip after her insurer found out she had cancer
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and then wouldn't cover her. when i was diagnosed with cancer, in december 2015, it was really difficult to go away on holiday, paying £600 for the insurance especially, because i have other health conditions. diabetes type two and also stoma, so that makes the insurance premium even higher than the normal person, who were just have cancer, probably. so it wasn't feasible for us to travel at all that time, so we had to cancel. macmillan cancer support have been calling for the insurance industry to do more about keeping those prices a bit lower, but what can they do? lyn hughes is the editor of travel magazine wanderlust, and joins us from our london newsroom. good morning. you work in the industry, but you have also had direct experience of this kind of thing. does this story sound
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familiar to you? it sounds very familiar. my late husband had cancer, and for the first few years that he had cancer, hejust felt incredibly fit and well. and of course, he was a travel nut anyway, he was involved with the magazine as well. but also, like so many people, when they do get that diagnosis, what do they want to do? they want to go and do all the things that, you know, have been on their bucket list for years, that they have a lwa ys list for years, that they have always wanted to do, just in case. and so his urge to travel was even greater. but when he came to get insurance, the prices werejust terrible. you know, really, really, so many times more what's that he would normally pay. the insurance industry sake that there is insurance widely available for those who have cancer, or even those who have been in remission, because macmillan cancer support is saying there are some examples where people cannot get cover even if they have beenin cannot get cover even if they have been in remission for many, many
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yea rs. been in remission for many, many years. are the industry doing enough? i think they really could do more. i mean, looking at it from their point of view, they say that, of course, if somebody does have a problem when they are away and they have got cancer, and the medical bills are going to be so much more. there is also a greater risk of people cancelling their trip if, for instance, they suddenly have to have some medical treatment, an operation is brought forward, or whatever. but having said that, something like one in two of us get cancer now in our lifetime. the rate of cancer has grown so much. but also the survival rates have grown, and so many people go into remission and they are healthy, they are fit, you know, they want to travel. but of course, they want to travel. but of course, they are finding these costs prohibitive. but one of the problems there, i guess, prohibitive. but one of the problems there, iguess, is prohibitive. but one of the problems there, i guess, is that if costs are higherfor those there, i guess, is that if costs are higher for those with cancer or for those who have had cancer, somebody somewhere has to pay more for those
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expenses. so do you think generally premiums on the whole, on average, should be higher to bring down the cost for those who have cancer?” don't think it is necessarily that, although yes, that would help. i think it is more a case that they do need to review how much it really is costing them. because there is a bit ofa costing them. because there is a bit of a feeling that survival rates have actually increased, but also, people who are say 65 or over are much better and healthier than they used to be, even if they do have some sort of pre—existing condition. but it feels as if the insurance industry, perhaps, hasn't moved on to appreciate that actually, you know, if you take a group of people who have got pre—existing conditions such as cancer, actually it is only a very, very small proportion who may run into problems when they are abroad. thank you very much. so there are other insurers out there who do specific policies for this kind of thing, but macmillan cancer
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support saying that costs are still too high. they were a childhood creation that gained worldwide attention. the cottingley photos are a series of images showing fairies at the bottom of a bradford garden. they have since been described as an elaborate hoax, but were the photos actually genuine? 100 years on, david sillito has been to find out. i am christine lynch, the daughter of frances griffiths, the little girl in the cottingley photos that everyone has seen. the photograph with the five little fairies in front of her. 100 years, it is unbelievable. 100 years since that photograph was taken. so this is the plate. it is a strange feeling holding these glass plates of little frances griffiths and the fairies.
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it was her cousin elsie who took them, and years later admitted they were a hoax. it was for elsie a bit of fun, but not for frances griffiths. she was a very honest person, and she really said it spoiled her life. and the pictures taken by the stream in 1917 caused a sensation. sir arthur conan doyle, author of sherlock holmes, thought they were proof that fairies really existed. when the hoax was revealed, frances was upset. suddenly everyone thought that all of it was made up. what they ignored was that frances still maintained that she had seen fairies, and that this fifth photo was not a fake. are you not embarrassed to say i believe in fairies? no, because i do believe they are genuine. i do believe. this is the actual
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garden, then, is it? it is the garden, yes. the fairy garden. an artist, luke horsman, bought itjust over a year ago. did you know about the fairies when you bought the house? no, we didn't actually know. no—one told you? no. it really is quite magical down here, and nothing has changed in 100 years. you can see exactly what would have inspired the imagination of two little girls. the fairy mania they inspired seems like another age. however, 100 years on, belief has not disappeared. a professor of arts took these pictures of what he thought were insects. when he displayed them, people from around the world were convinced he had photographed fairies. i was getting fairies from peru being sent to me, from finland, from israel, from australia, people sending their photographs of fairies. are these people who really believe?
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yes, people who have had encounters, and are sending us pictures of their encounters. so, for most of us, cottingley is a picture of a hoax, but not for christine. all these years, these photographs were believed, then they were not believed. but that one thing that was hanging here all that time, that genuine article, has been hanging here all that time, and nothing has been done about it. a secret world that only a few of us can see. 100 years on, belief is still very with us. fascinating. what do you think?” don't know, i have not encountered them personally. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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the bbc has found that only a small amount of the cash and items donated to the survivors and relatives of those who died at grenfell tower has actually been received by those in need. over 150 tons of items were donated, and out of the £20 million of cash received, less than 5% has been given out. some local people say the public‘s generosity has been betrayed. the british red cross said the response had been off the scale. the thing about these things that we have learnt from the 7/7 attacks, and indeed from the response to the manchester attacks, is that it takes longer than you might think for people to come forward to seek theirfunding. for more information on where the grenfell money has gone, you can go to bbc. co. uk/realitycheck, or follow them on twitter @bbcrealitycheck. mayor of london sadiq khan has reiterated his opposition to us
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president donald trump being allowed a state visit when he comes to britain. in an interview with cnn, mr khan said the president had policies that many in the uk disagree with, and therefore he didn't think it was appropriate to roll out the red carpet. last week, the white house confirmed mr trump's visit here has been delayed until next year. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, there are minor delays on the district line westbound from upminster, due to a signal failure at bromley—by—bow, and also severe delays on the hammersmith & city line for the same reason. on the roads, in brentford, the a4 is blocked out of town near boston manor way. it is because of an accident there. in tottenham, the a10 is partly blocked northbound at white hart lane, because of a crash. in south—east london, catford hill is closed between the south circular and exbury road, that is near st dunstan's college, due to a burst watermain. finally, over to west london,
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and fulham road is closed westbound from edith grove to gunter grove for gas works. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it was a very warm, humid night last night, and we're hanging on to that air today. now, we have got a bright start. a bit of cloud around, but sunny spells should develop, and yes, it is still going to feel very warm. now, this cloud will start to thin and break, and we'll get this sunshine breaking through. uv levels of course high, pollen count very high, as well. now, we'll start to feel an easterly wind developing. you're going to feel that across the essex coast, helping a little, perhaps. it's not going to feel quite as warm as it did yesterday. we're looking at a maximum of 26, maybe 27 celsius. now, the met office has issued a yellow warning for heavy rain. we had a bit of a breakdown from this warm, hot and humid weather overnight tonight. some heavy, thundery showers moving through. frequent lightning expected through this evening. gradually, early hours of tomorrow morning, they will have cleared. the minimum temperature, though, again another very uncomfortable night within the m25, around 18, 19 celsius. a bit of cloud around tomorrow.
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the chance of a shower, but still feeling warm, especially overnight, and then things getting a little cooler as we head further through the week. that's it. there is more news on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. increases in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century. dementia and lifestyle could be to blame — experts behind the study say it's deeply concerning. good morning it's tuesday, 18th july. also this morning. these are some of the 40,000 boxes donated by the public
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after the grenfell tower fire. butjust a handful have made it to survivors — we have a special investigation. it's been 39 years since a british woman can say i'm a wimbledon semifinalist. she made history at wimbledon. johanna konta will be right here on the sofa. good morning. from today, there's going to be more transparency about how punctual your train journey is — to help improve passengers trust in the industry. i'll have more on that in a moment. in sport, hannah cockcroft is one gold away from a treble at the world para athletics championships. she claimed her second gold medal last night, with victory in the t34 800m. it's a truth universally acknowledged that after the sun... usually comes rain. matt's got the weather — live from jane austen's former home. it is 200 years today sips her
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death. it will be commemorated with a new £2 coin and a £10 note. we are here at herformer a new £2 coin and a £10 note. we are here at her former home in a new £2 coin and a £10 note. we are here at herformer home in hampshire to ta ke here at herformer home in hampshire to take a look round. you mentioned rain, funnily enough there is some in the forecast. it will be a pretty warm day. more details in 15 minutes. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. improvements in life expectancy in england are levelling off for the first time in a century, according to a leading health academic. professor sir michael marmot, from university college london, says the rate of increase has almost "ground to a halt" since 2010. in the uk as a whole, women can expect to live to 82 on average, and men to 79. our health correspondent, nick triggle, has more. life expectancy has been rising for the last century but now a leading health expert is raising concerns the increases could be tailing off. sir michael marmot, who has advised both the government and world health organization,
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points out that the rate of increase has halved since 2010. historically, life expectancy at birth has risen by one year for every five years for women and one year every 3.5 for men. since 2010, however, that has slowed to one year for every ten for women and one for every six for men. sir michael says the situation needs to be urgently looked at. this is historically highly unusual because over a long period of time, for 100 years, life expectancy has been improving, year on year in britain, as it has in many, many, many, many other countries. and now it has slowed, it's almost flat, which means that we've fallen behind some of the healthier countries. that's terrible. he says it's not possible to say exactly what had caused it but he says austerity could be a factor and funding for the nhs and social care in particular had been miserly. dementia is also likely
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to have played a role. the department of health says it's providing funding to ensure life expectancy continues to rise and the ageing population is well cared for. theresa may has told tory mps and ministers to end the "backbiting" that has split the party since the general election. during an event last night, the prime minister also warned her mps that the alternative to her in number 10 would bejeremy corbyn. alex forsyth is in westminster for us this morning. the cab neats later, alex, and you know, there seems to be a clear message here, from theresa may, isn't there. yes, because in the past few days in particular, the newspapers have been filled with reports about briefings, gossip, lea ked reports about briefings, gossip, leaked details of what is being said within the conservative party. etch at the most senior levels of government round the cabinet table, so theresa may has reportedly said to mp, this has to stop. it has been going on since the election, which
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left theresa may's authority somewhat weakened, and she is leading a party which is divided on keyish us like brexit. so there is a lot of positioning not least from some of those who have an eye on what might happen when theresa may is no longer the leader. aware of this the prime minister last night said to mps no more carping, no more back biting, go off and have a break and come back in the autumn and get on with the serious business of government. we understand she will say something similar when the cabinet meeting happens later on this morning, telling minister there's that the discussions they have must remain private. this is theresa may trying to reassert her authority and restore some discipline to the party. she will hope to stop some of these internal battles being played out in public, but she won't be able to stop them all together. thank you. we will speak to the home secretary about that and other matters later on. in about 25 minutes time. the cost of insuring a car has risen
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to its highest ever level. the association of british insurers says the price of the average policy has gone up by 11% in a year to £484. the body is calling on the government to introduce a new system for calculating compensation payments. buying a knife over the internet is set to become more difficult under new government proposals, which aim to restrict children's access to weapons. customers in england and wales would be required to collect their purchase in person and show id. a similar proposal is already being considered in scotland. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, has more. this is the sharp end of the battle against knife crime in britain. police in birmingham make yet another stop, and find yet another knife. without good reason, it is illegal to carry anything bigger than a three—inch penknife. but this is what police have found in london, including a so—called zombie knife, shown to the home secretary. why?
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why, i agree. it is illegal to buy a knife if you are under 18, 16 in scotland. but some young people are getting them delivered. the plan is to change the law so knives purchased have to be picked up in person with id. some types of knives cannot even be sold or passed around. police may also get stronger powers to seize them. we want to make sure that we extend the power of police, to take away these dangerous knives and to make them less available to young people, so we can start to break that cycle of danger and of violence that's so blighting communities. after all, police reported knife crime has started rising. scotland is already considering the changes proposed today in england and wales. this young man did not suffer a serious injury, despite being stabbed, but every knife on the streets can result in at least one life lost. tom symonds, bbc news. children who have been sexually
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exploited are being refused compensation on the grounds they "consented" to their abuse, according to campaigners. a coalition of charities — including barnardo's and victim support — are calling for an urgent review of the criminal injuries compensation authority's guidelines. the government says the issue of compensation is currently being examined as part of an independent inquiry. president trump's efforts to replace barack 0bama's health care system have run into more problems. donald trump made repealing 0bamacare a key election campaign pledge, and he delayed congress's summer holiday until the legislation was overturned. but two more of the president's own senators now oppose his reforms. it means that the president's plans could be abandoned. heath charities say pregnant mothers should be encouraged to use e—cigarettes to help them quit smoking. the smoking in pregnancy challenge
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group says midwives and health professionals should be more aware of the benefits of encouraging women to vape when they are expecting. the duke and duchess of cambridge — along with their children, prince george and princess charlotte — will continue their visit to poland today. it's part of a five day tour to eastern europe. last night, prince william praised poland's courage, fortitude and bravery in a speech in warsaw. on the agenda today is a trip to the former stutthof concentration camp in gdansk. and the prince and princess are on the front—pages of most papers. look he has his bottom lip out here on the front—page of the times and daddy is thank you. we will speak to the home secretary about that and other matters later on. in about 25 minutes time. and the prince and princess are on the front—pages of most papers. look he has his bottom lip out here on the front—page of the times and daddy is having a chat there. "come
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orange it's all right." on the front page of the daily mirror they have a story about sarah payne, we will speak to her mum at about 9.00. she has written a series of letters to her daughter. our next guest made history at wimbledon last week by becoming the first british woman to reach the semi—finals since virginia wade in 1978. johanna konta's performance has also seen her rise to a career high ranking of number four in the world. shejoins us now, but before we chat, let's relive some of those memorable moments. that was a great moment with the chelsea pensioner. good morning and huge brilliant congratulations, well done. thank you. how are you? i am good. it was interesting for the first couple of days after i finished, i was still full of energy and then it is only more now i started to relax, i feel i'm a bit tired. it was a long five weeks. how wear we re tired. it was a long five weeks. how wear were you , tired. it was a long five weeks. how wear were you, it is five weeks for you, how aware were you during that
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fortnight of the intense interest of how much love you were getting from the crowd, from everybody reading the papers and everybody watching you at home? well, i thinki the papers and everybody watching you at home? well, i think i was mostly wear of the amazing support i was getting on the court on centre court, court one, i mean, when you hear so many people really cheering for you, hoping for you, hear so many people really cheering foryou, hoping foryou, it hear so many people really cheering for you, hoping for you, it does give you goose bumps. it is overwhelming. i tried to obviously keep myself in a bubble as enough as possible, in terms of media and trying not to read too many paper, watch too much news and try to relax away from the court, but definitely, i felt the love. in that situation, so you are on, you are on ken terse court, breaking records, reaching the semifinals, you can hear the crowd roaring for you, it is hard to control yourself not to fist pump and try and get the crowd behind you more, you have a job to do. and try and get the crowd behind you
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more, you have ajob to do. it's and try and get the crowd behind you more, you have a job to do. it's a fine line, for me, obviously, there isa fine line, for me, obviously, there is a focus that i need to have to make sure i that i am focussing o on what i am trying to chee, my game plan but there is another elm of andy talks about this, using the crowd and using their emotion, but it is when you step up for a match point or a break point, and they are cheering for you, you, it does catch you bait. i do feel it. iwant cheering for you, you, it does catch you bait. i do feel it. i want to ask you about that, exactly. the points moment. you have a love little routine, don't you. before every point. just talk us through that. it remind me a little tiny bit ofjonny wilkinson about the take a kick. what is that about, how does it work for you? i guess with every athlete routine is a habit and it is something that you create to deal with stress, to deal with also being present, it is interesting, i know my ball toss and the way i bounce
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the ball. it is something that developed. i don't, the ball. it is something that developed. idon't, i the ball. it is something that developed. i don't, i don't remember ever like learning it or developing it. it is slow and deliberate. and i have seen it in slo—mo, how the ball is turning in my hand. i think don't think about it because i will mess it up. it is second nature. and that sort of is what has to happen. also, imean sort of is what has to happen. also, i mean watching you, you just have nerves of steel. that is what it appeared to me. how do you get to that point? are you thinking about each individual point or how do you hold it like that? well, for me it was always about keeping things in really good perspective, for me it was being clear on the game plan, that i want to execute out there, that i want to execute out there, that keeps it on a working mind set, and then, keeping things in good perspective, when you know, i'm on a big stage, i'm in front of a massive crowd. i feel lucky, fortunate,
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big stage, i'm in front of a massive crowd. ifeel lucky, fortunate, so to really make sure i also cherish each moment i get to experience. garbine muguruza went on the win wimbledon, beating venus, have you watched that final or...” wimbledon, beating venus, have you watched that final or... i didn't. i was out. i was following and i heard it was a great first set. venus started producing error after error. did part you think why couldn't she do that against me in the finals and do you think 0k next timei the finals and do you think 0k next time i will add this to my game? i will work on a backhand slice or a booed serve to take you on an extra level? after each match and each opponent, i definitely do, we do talk about with my team, they look back what i can do better next time in the same situation or adapt it to
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a different opponent. it is the case with venus. i have played her a few times this year already and last year. i knew going into the match that she was going to bring her a game. i wasn't surprised with the level that she was playing at and she was playing so well already that championships. next time there is a couple of things i want to do better, but there is sometimes things on the day where your opponentjust things on the day where your opponent just plays things on the day where your opponentjust plays that much better. that's part of the game. we last spoke in march, april time. we filmed with you and filmed training and saw all the hard work that goes into what everyone sees when you come out on court at wimbledon. in that time, from then until now, how much has your life changed? can you walk down the street? do people recognise you ? walk down the street? do people recognise you? i think on the back of wimbledon and during wimbledon i get recognised much more and i was just in liverpool yesterday, i was doing fitness testing and i got recognised in liverpool! i thought, ididn't recognised in liverpool! i thought, i didn't think i would! i was like, "0h i didn't think i would! i was like,
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"oh wow, this has really become quite national." it's really humbling because the, i mean it's only ever support that i get and when people come up, it's always congratulating me and so it's a nice feeling. so you're number four, come on, number one? well, i'm working towards that. that's something i have always wanted to achieve. so, but yeah, i'm going to be working towards being the best. the us open is the next major coming up, isn't it? it is. high hopes? well, definitely. i go into every event trying to be involved until the very last match. that's a hard court. that's your favourite surface?” don't have a favourite surface, but i have played results wise a little bit better on the hard courts recently. we have a treat for you. you know you were talking about muffins. did you really cook muffins? i did. i baked... are the muffins? i did. i baked... are the muffins alive? throughout the whole
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tournament you were baking. sally has been baking for you. what's your recipe, raspberry and white chocolate? i made a chocolate and ba na na chocolate? i made a chocolate and banana one, white chocolate and raspberry one. sally, can you unveil it? white chocolate and raspberry. excuse me. it is rather tight this tin! hold on! you jammed it on. laughter this is going so well! would you like to take these muffins away with you? they are beautiful. ah, thank you. you're so welcome. you entertained us so well. it has been a brilliant experience to watch you go through wimbledon. careful with that lid! thank you. lovely to see you. jo will be hoping to follow in the footsteps of dorothy round. she won
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wimbledon twice in 1934, 1937 and i did not know this, she happens to be related to matt. matt, tell us about her! yes, she is my gran's cousin. she won the australian open and was a semifinalist at the us open as well. taking three mixed doubles titles at wimbledon too. so there you go! studio: do you want to tell us about the weather. we got distracted.” will do, yes. iam the weather. we got distracted.” will do, yes. i am a failed sportsman and failed mr d'arcy as well. we are in the ground of jane austen's former home in hampshire. todayis austen's former home in hampshire. today is the 200th anniversary of her death of the she was won of the world's most popular writers of regency fiction. her books rich in
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comedy, romance, satire and wit and walking amongst the beautiful fragrances of the garden, many of the plants back in her time were around. you can understand where the romance bit came from. in many of the films depicting her novels, it rains. the women are always carrying the sun parasols. it was always fine. maybe the sun par polls will come in handy today. not only will it bea come in handy today. not only will it be a sunny day, but it will be a warm one as well. before we start to see some thunderstorms develop across the south later on. now, to start with, most are dry. the best of the sunshine the further north you are. more cloud in the south. the thunderstorms are already in northern parts of france pushing towards the channel islands and by the end of the afternoon they will be across southern most counties of england. most though will continue with the dry weather and even a better day to come across orkney and shetland compared to yesterday with the cloud breaking up the sunshine and temperatures in northern
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scotla nd and temperatures in northern scotland could peak at 27 celsius. not far behind that as well in northern ireland, a difference through eastern parts of england. more of an easterly breeze developing and that will stop the rise in temperature a bit. you have to come to the western side of england, where temperatures will peak at the highest. as you can see from the charts, some isolated, but intense thunderstorms will move in later on. many lightening storms to begin with, but they will turn to torrential storms too with some hail and gusty winds with them as well. as we finish the day they will move in across other parts of southern england and into wales, the midlands and across parts of east anglia too. some of the storms could daus some minor flooding. some of the storms could daus some minorflooding. not everyone some of the storms could daus some minor flooding. not everyone will see them. so don't take the position of showers on the charts too literally, but tomorrow will start ona literally, but tomorrow will start on a much muggier note than today. some of the heaviest of the rain to start wednesday, likely to be across
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parts of north wales and the north midlands and into northern england. very much hit and miss. some of the most prolonged downpours could be in northern ireland. what you will notice tomorrow, when the sun comes out how hot and humid it will be. temperatures in eastern parts in england tomorrow to peak at 31 or 32 celsius. always more cloud towards the south—west. that could spark off afternoon storms across england and wales. they will rumble on into the night, moving off into the north sea for thursday, but for thursday we have brighten skies again. a few showers in the west later on, but it will be a big temperature change for many. temperatures down a great deal after what we will see through today. temperatures and tomorrow, in the high 20s, maybe low 30s. by thursday, we are talking low 20s. at the very best for many of you. that's how it's looking from this growerious setting, it is back to you both in salford. matt, thank you very much. lovely to
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hear about your cousin as well. grandmother's cousin. isn't that a cousin of his? no. you weren't listening, were you?” count those as cousins. ok, well, your rules normally apply. if you miss something in breakfast like that if you came in half—way through, you can catch up on the iplayer, it is available throughout the day. you can go back and watch it again. so she joined us about 8.10am. almost £20 million has been raised for the victims of the grenfell tower fire and 40,000 boxes of goods have been donated, butjust £500,000 of that has so far been distributed to the families affected. there are concerns that much of the money isn't reaching the people who need it quickly enough. the grenfell fire response team says the total amount of financial assistance provided so far totals more than £5 million.
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tom burridge has more. it is second—hand clothes heaven. some of the items we've had through have been absolutely beautiful. i mean, we've had things like this. lovely. this is the grenfell tower fire appeal in action, a red cross sorting centre in cheshire. donations in the green bags will be sold in red cross shops. black bags are for recycling. brand—new items will go straight back to survivors of the fire or relatives of those who died. it's about turning all the different donations we've had into cash which automatically will then go to the appeal. to appreciate the scale of donations, you had to fly through this london warehouse a week after the fire. it's estimated 174 tonnes of stuff was donated. so far they have sorted half of it, and ten tonnes has gone back to the victims. no amount of money is enough for
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the loved ones of those who died. research by the bbc shows that several appeals and charities have now raised nearly £20 million. some question why only a small part of that has made it through. we feel that it's betraying the public‘s generosity because they gave money to help directly those who were affected and we're not too clear that it's happening. it's like there's a filter and organisations rather than individuals are getting the financial support. charities say the complexity and the scale of what happened here means everything takes time. the thing about these things that we've learnt from the 7/7 attacks and indeed from the response to the manchester attacks, is that it takes longer than you might think for people to come forward to seek theirfunding. i have forgiven, you know, the bombers who did this to me... thelma stober lost her left foot in the london 7/7 bombings.
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she received money donated by the public. i used it to get myself daily physiotherapy support at home. my determination was to walk again as i was told the chances was highly unlikely. it took 15 months to distribute all the money raised for victims of those attacks like thelma. thelma is now a trustee of the london emergency trust. it's distributing £4.8 million of the grenfell appeal. so far, 16 people have received payments. you're in a state of total confusion. a lot of people are suffering from post—traumatic stress. you're trying to understand what has happened, the implications for your life going forward, is changed forever. even here, in rural cheshire, what happened in a london tower block is by no means lost. i can't watch it on tv now. you know, it makes you cry. it's emotional even now, just the thought of what's yet to be found and the people.
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whether donating an old top or a tenner, people have been moved to act. the challenge for charities is ensuring it all benefits those who have lost so much. for more information on where the grenfell money has gone, you can go to bbc.co.uk/realitycheck or follow them on twitter @bbcrealitycheck. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. the oranges building on the map. it will turn warm, if not hot. morning a bit of high cloud making the sunshine hazy. temperatures getting up into the mid 20s. freshener the north east of scotland, north east england. temperatures 17—22 but plenty of sunshine in northern ireland,
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through much of northern england. the higher cloud in central and southern areas breaks up from time to time to give us some sunny spells. temperatureing getting up to 29 degree, with all that heat you notice, storms developing across the south, those pushing their way northwards overnight, so you could be woken up by some of the thunderstorms as they push northward, some torrential rain, hail, strong gusty winds associated with those as well. going into wednesday morning, during wednesday, the storms continuing to move northwards as we go through the day, and then more rain spreads in from the west, so those two merging together, quite a messy mixture of rain and storms. down to the south—east, temperatures still getting up to 30 celsius, fresher though the further north and west you come. temperatures about 18 or 19. the fresher weather is coming in from the weather front. it will push eastwards, so fresher air developing
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into thursday, and the outlook stays u nsettled. into thursday, and the outlook stays unsettled. temperatures back to where they should be for the time of year and there will be rain round, especially on friday. bye. this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and ben bland. stronger than a house of cards. the streaming giant netflix wows markets as it surges past 100 million customers. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday, 18thjuly. shares in netflix surge during after hour trade — as it beats expectations —
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boosting its revenues. also in the programme.... renegotiating trade in north america — the us says better access and reducing its trade deficit is at the top of its priorities when taking on nafta. european markets... they are all in the red. all eye to the uk and inflation figures due out in a few hours time.
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