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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 18, 2017 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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'on. if this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm: appalling conditions in youth custody centres make a tragedy "inevitable". that assesement comes from the chief inspector of prisons, who says he's staggered by the decline in standards in england and wales. we are unable to say that any other young offenders institutions or secure training centres, we couldn't consider any of them as safe to hold children and young people. inflation is now at 2.6% — the first fall since october — but prices are still rising faster than wages. after g re nfell tower, a bbc investigation reveals how councils are failing to offer social housing despite a statutory duty to do so. president trump's political difficulties over obamaca re continue as republican fail to reach agreement on a replacement. here's what's coming
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up in the next hour. sexist ads, endorsing stereotypes could be banned, under plans from the industry watchdog. how can such a pretty wife... make such bad coffee? i heard that! sexist ads could be banned under plans from the industry watchdog. and 200 years after she died, an image of jane austen and 200 years after she died, an image ofjane austen is unveiled on the new £10 that. —— beeney £10 note. good evening and welcome to bbc news. not one of the youth custody centres in england and wales is safe for children or young people. that's the shocking warning by the chief inspector of prisons who says a tragedy is inevitable
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and the decline in standards is "staggering". describing the men's prison system, peter clarke says he is often appalled by the conditions in which inmates are held. the government has acknowledged that prisons have faced a number of challenges, and says it's taken immediate action to, amongst other things, boost the number of prison officers. our home affairs correspondent june kelly has more. medway secure training centre in kent, where young offenders are held, totally rehabilitated. in two months ago and undercover investigation by bbc panorama shone a light on daily life in medway. teenage inmates were seen being mistreated and abused. a member of staff was sacked and the police launched a criminal investigation.
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medway, then run by gas is now the responsibility of the prisons and probation service, but it is still struggling and only last month inspectors denounced it as "inadequate". and it is not alone according to the damning report today by the prisons watchdog. the chief inspector of prisons says he was so alarmed at what was found that he alerted ministers earlier this year. violence, giving rise to repressive regimes, more discipline, longer being locked in cells. i have seen children being held in cells for 22 hours a day, not eating any of their meals in association with other children. when inspectors went into feltham young offender institution in west london, they found that violence was so acute that the site was unsafe for both staff and boys. jennifer blake, who runs an anti—gang charity, was in feltham last month.
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their toilet systems are overflowing. the stench in there, the fact that they're more afraid to be inside the prison than outside because of the gang rivalry inside the prison. she began offending when she was 13 and spent 20 years involved in knife crime, drugs and robbery. through my own life experience, i know that i wasn't stopped and i went down the wrong path. so if these young people are not stopped, they will take it through to their adulthood and they will continue reoffending. the ministry ofjustice said no minister was available for interview, and in a statement, it said: when it comes to adult jails, today's report warns that prison reform will be blighted without less violence, fewer drugs and more time spent out of cells. all these require additional staff. with me is faith spear,
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a prison reform campaigner. she's also a former chair of the prison watchdog, the independent monitoring board at hollesley bay prison in suffolk who was sacked by the government in 2016 for speaking out about the state of prisons in the uk. thank you very much forjoining us. we find this dramatic warning from the chief inspector of prisons, saying that a tragedy is inevitable. is that an exaggeration, do you think? no, this has been brewing for yea rs. lots of think? no, this has been brewing for years. lots of campaigners have been speaking out about it. it is not a surprise to read the report today, because prisons are in crisis. reform is taking too long. and a lot of recommendations from the inspectorate have been ignored by the ministers. but now, it is too late to ignore them and then needs
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to be action. no more talk, there needs to be action. just described from what you have seen and witnessed yourself in terms of what these youth custody centres are like. he has referred to appalling conditions. the first time i visited, there was a choke —— a group of children, we are talking about children, dressed in badly fitted outfits, they came in for a meeting. what age would they be? sort of 13, 1a, 15. they looked on their faces like they had absolutely no hope. when i chatted to them afterwards, some of them were saying, we are great. why are we —— we are hungry. why are we treating young people like this, why is it a cce pta ble young people like this, why is it acceptable that we can lock children away, for 23 hours a day with very little to do? why is it deemed acceptable? you're sings a crisis that has been
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building for years and is getting worse and worse? it has been brushed under the carpet, but there comes a time we can't do that any more, and ministers need to address these issues in the institutions. the
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inspector is frustrated and seems the government is not listening? yes, that is the problem. and they need to. they know what the problems are, and david lidington said in his first speech, we know what the problems are in had to deal with them. well, let's see, shall we? problems are in had to deal with them. well, let's see, shallwe?m is also a question of starving, extra staffing costs action money, and the government says budgets are tight? we are talking about children, about individuals. that has become a humanitarian issue now, and surely, that has to be dealt with. thank you for joining that has to be dealt with. thank you forjoining us, faith, prison reformer. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:a0 this evening in the papers — our guests joining me tonight
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are the broadcaster and campaigner, henry bonsu and the former trader minister, lord digbyjones. moron the breaking news this evening that there are serious flash floods on the lizard peninsula in cornwall, in coverack. the fire service say they have dispatched the number of cruise to the area. local people say that the coast guard have been rescuing people, the coast guard helicopter, has been rescuing people trapped in properties. you can see, there, just an idea of what that flash flooding looks like. we were seeing in the weather forecast, just how concentrated on cornwall that very heavy rainfall is at the moment. the fire service have said
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they have dispatched a number of units to the scene and that there were, in their terms, life—threatening incidents in coverack in particular, on the lizard peninsula in cornwall. the coast guard helicopter, we gather, has been rescuing people trapped in properties there. we will bring you more on that as it comes in. that is where coverack is. right on the lizard peninsula. a lot of flash flooding going on there, right now. the fire service have been telling us, that there have been telling us, that there have been life—threatening incidents. they have sent a number of coverack to the scene and the coast guard helicopter is rescuing people who are, it seems, stranded in their home. we are hoping to talk to
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people in the area in the next few minutes. we will bring you the latest from cornwall. we have a bbc news latest from cornwall. we have a bbc n ews tea m latest from cornwall. we have a bbc news team on the way to coverack to bring the latest information from there. there's been an unexpected fall in inflation. the rate, as measured by the consumer prices index, was 2.6% injune compared with 2.9% the month before. the drop is partly due to a fall in fuel prices. but some economists are warning the drop could be just a blip with inflation set to rise again. here's our economics correspondent andy verity. we're used to petrol being the motor of inflation, but last month it dragged it down. between may and june, the cost of fuel dropped by more than a percentage point and instead of edging higher, as many expected, inflation generally fell back from 2.9% to 2.6%. one of the biggest elements that held inflation down was culture and recreation. everything from theatre tickets, to sports tickets to video streaming on the internet and another big
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downward pressure came from these, cheaper tablet computers. this afternoon, the governor of the bank of england gave his reaction to the figures. i think the first thing is, one doesn't want to put too much weight on any specific data point. the bigger picture remains the same. the reason why inflation is above the 2% target is because of the depreciation in the pound following the referendum or associated with the referendum, and that's a judgement of the market. we'll see in the fullness of time whether that judgment is right, but it's the judgment of the market about the relative incomes in this country as a consequence of those decisions over the medium term. this carpet factory in kidderminster is an example of a growing business dealing with that weaker pound. it means it has to pay more than it once did to buy the yarn that goes into its carpets from abroad. it's adapted to that and more of its yarn now comes from british sheep. that's helped it to trim its costs and keep its price rises contained. our prices have had to go up. we've increased prices by around 2%
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this year and that's been a natural consequence of increased wage costs, yarn costs and energy costs. we have had to pass that on to our customers. while inflation is lower than last month, prices are still rising faster than the average worker's pay. the squeeze on living standards isn't over yet. it looks as if inflation might be dampened a bit by softer fuel price growth over the next few months, but underlying price pressures from post—brexit falls in sterling are still there and they look set to continue to push inflation up a bit further as we move to the end of the year. for now, the pressure on the bank of england to tame inflation by raising interest rates sooner rather than later has eased. in the city, they are still betting a rise in interest rates will be needed, but not until next march. andy verity, bbc news. with me is david page, senior economist at axa investment managers. 0ur
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our new supplies by this? we were, a bit. we thought it would stay stable at 2.9% notwithstanding the fall in fuel prices, so this falling back to 2.6% was a bit of a shock, but we will see how that pans out. the broad trend has been up and expected to go up in the coming months and thatis to go up in the coming months and that is the main story and the main take. what we think the factors were, in this drop, just fuel, and so on? as the report said, the inflation figure fell back because of pump prices and the impact on recreational prices. that is why it fell. why we were surprised by it was different. we broadly anticipated these falls but we expected to see food prices rise to offset it and a faster rising transport services costs but actually what we saw in june was falling food prices and non—airfare
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transport service costs also falling back. that didn't provide the offsetting factor so that is why the overall number came in softer. what are the implications of this? people are the implications of this? people are talking about the implications for interest rates, in particular. there was perhaps a little bit of talk about and interest rates rise. is that now of the agenda? for the short—term, it is. we have seen that the bank were considering august, and the softness in those numbers today and the softness of the services is something that might also dissuade them but over the medium—term, the bank of england is trying to balance whether the inflation target is worth the wait, because of the softening of economic activity and it is becoming more fretful over that. if there is evidence that we are seeing softer inflation coming about, that is something that will ease some of the angstrom at the bank but it is going to ta ke angstrom at the bank but it is going to take more than one month to see
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the bank of england relaxed its guard on this issue. and this has implications for wage settlements and what people are happy with, in terms of wage settlements. more importantly, how far household money goes. what we see is wage having almost flat lined up around 2% for quite some time now. below inflation? below the inflation rate, now. 0ver inflation? below the inflation rate, now. over the last 18 months we've seen now. over the last 18 months we've seen inflation rising from effectively zero, up to 2.6. now, we are seeing the money that households do have, going not as far. that means that they are not able to spend as much. some people are saying that there is not enough inflation in the system, at one stage, and now people are saying perhaps too much. the bank of england has target of 2% but in the short—term looks like we'll going to see this as it is and that will be
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causing some pain for some. let's ta ke causing some pain for some. let's take you back to those flash floods we have been reporting in cornwall, in coverack on the lizard peninsula. flash floods. the fire service say that there were life—threatening incidents. we heard the coast guard helicopter was rescuing people from their properties and we can talk on their properties and we can talk on the line to katie wainwright. hello, sorry it is carla wainwright. sorry. just explain what you have witnessed this evening. about lunchtime, i could see the sea was getting choppy and there was a storm coming in. it didn't really kick off until about 3pm. it literallyjust came over like a mass of mist, and the restau ra nt like a mass of mist, and the restaurant area has windows although
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they round and between 3pm at a:30pm could see anything beyond here, and we had massive hailstones coming down the size of 50p piece coins. it wasn't until a sort of cleared up at a:30pm and we could see to the other side of coverack, we could see a strea m side of coverack, we could see a stream coming down the main road and going straight off over the wall, into the sea, and we realised how bad it had been and how much water and rain had come down. there was a business owner who was saying a forefoot torrent had swept through the village. is that how you would describe it? that was from the opposite side, but from where we are, we have one of the best views of the hill. it literally onlyjust started to ease off, now. when we first managed to see it ever was
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about a:30pm. still water coming down the hill, but we could not believe it. one of the locals that had been in the pub. i've only been down here for a month, myself, but the local said they had never seen it that bad, even in winter. we have heard reports, i don't know if you saw them, the coast guard helicopter risking people from homes and properties. we saw the helicopter around. idid properties. we saw the helicopter around. i did not see them rescuing anyone. 0ver around. i did not see them rescuing anyone. over at the bay hotel on the other side, the lower ground floor there was completely flooded and they lost all their electricity. we have been quite lucky, apart from a few broken window panes, we have not got that much damage. we have a lot of people coming in from the village and from other plays saying that their houses on the lower floors have been completely flooded and that has happened to the bay hotel, as well. the fire service has been
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talking about life—threatening incidents. we can see that tuitt, major flooding incidents. we can see that tuitt, majorflooding in incidents. we can see that tuitt, major flooding in coverack, incidents. we can see that tuitt, majorflooding in coverack, please avoid this area and do not attempt to drive through floodwater. is eve ryo ne to drive through floodwater. is everyone safe and well as far as you know? as far as i know, everyone is fine. it is quite a small village, so, word does tend to spread fast, so, word does tend to spread fast, so we have not heard anything and hopefully that is a good sign. thank you for being with us on bbc news. thank you. you're watching bbc news. the headlines: flash floods have hit the lizard peninsula in cornwall and the fire service has dispatched a number of fire crews to the area. the chief inspector of prisons says he is staggered by the decline in
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standards in prisons in england and wales. inflation is running at 2.6%. that is the first goal since 0ctober, although prices are still rising faster than wages. —— the first fall ‘s since a burger. —— since october. the aftermath of last month's fire at grenfell tower exposed social inequalities in the borough, in particular the kind of affordable housing offered to those on the lowest incomes. most councils have a statutory duty to offer half of accommodation in all new large building projects as social housing. but bbc news has found that the council where grenfell tower is located — kensington and chelsea — agreed that developers could give them nearly £50 million instead of building the required social housing last year. and as michael buchanan reports, the council is far from alone in doing so. a rarely seen view of one of britain's richest areas. the kensington and chelsea, like everywhere else, does have social housing, just not enough of it.
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this man is currently living in a local hostel, desperate for a home. i have tried to get a house for two years. it is just impossible to get any sort of housing. i have tried so many times, and they just won't listen to you. they say there is nothing for you and they can't help. they won't even get me on the housing list. just minutes away, a huge new development in knightsbridge that kalpesh will never live in. there will be shops, offices and luxury flats. council rules say half the homes should be affordable, but the architects said the flats were too big, the service charge would be too expensive. so kensington and chelsea council allowed the developers to pay them £12 million, which they should now spend on affordable homes. research for the bbc shows that in 2016, kensington and chelsea agreed to take nearly £a7.5 million
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from developers in such deals. of the money property companies have paid them, more than £9 million remains unspent. however, just 336 affordable homes were built in the area over five years. in one year, just four were actually added. we are exporting the poor population. the leader of the labour group of the council is appalled. one of the great things about living in london is that you do have a balanced population, and i do think we have a duty not to produce the prettiest ghost town in western europe. our first loyalty should be to maintaining and strengthening our communities, and we have fallen down on that job terribly. kensington and chelsea told us they are struggling to provide affordable homes, due to being a small, densely packed area with limited sites and high land values. they say they do what they can, sometimes pushing developers to give more. but ultimately, they say
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they have limited capacity to provide housing. average house prices around here are more than £1 million. despite that, the council has a target of building 200 affordable homes each year. developers, however, seem increasingly keen to ignore such goals. kensington and chelsea is an inner borough, and it also has relatively high land values. therefore, there is more likelihood of developers wanting to build entirely private schemes and give the payment to the council in lieu of a affordable housing coming through as part of the new—build application. lots of english councils take money from developers instead of forcing them to build affordable homes. but in kensington and chelsea, many luxury flats lie empty. it's the only london borough with a falling population. striking such deals can make sense but onluy if
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the money is properly used. republicans in the us congress say they'll press ahead with a vote to repeal health care reforms — known as 0bamacare — even though there's no agreement on what will replace it. the announcement was made after efforts to approve a new system collapsed. president trump later took to twitter and urged republicans to work on a new plan from a clean slate. he is having problems with his own side on this, isn't he? it is falling apart, to be honest. we had the promise to repeal and replaced at the centre of the campaign, the centre, really, of republican
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political strategy for the last seven yea rs. political strategy for the last seven years. that, increasingly became difficult. he got it through the house but it was not going to get through the senate. this morning we had a leader of the senate saying, we are just going to repeal it, then force people to come to some sort of new plan over the next few years. now three republican senators are going to oppose the idea of a simple repeal. that means they cannot even get that done. the president was at a photo opportunity this morning. he said he was disappointed with the way the democrats had behaved and some members of his own party. democrats had behaved and some members of his own partylj democrats had behaved and some members of his own party. i am disappointed because, for so many years, i have been hearing, repeal and a place, i am sitting years, i have been hearing, repeal and a place, lam sitting in years, i have been hearing, repeal and a place, i am sitting in the 0val and a place, i am sitting in the oval office, right next door, pen in hand, waiting to sign something, and i will be waiting and eventually, we're going to get something done, and it is going to be very good, but obamacare is a big failure. it has to be changed. we have to go to a
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plan that works, are much less expensive plan, in terms of premiums, and something will happen and it will be very good. may not be as quick as we had hoped, but it is going to happen. essentially what he is arguing is that he's going to let obamacare, as he puts it, "fail", because premiums are rising in some places, there is not enough coverage competition and he says at that point democrats will come back them and ask him to a deal but at the moment neither replacement nor repeal. he made such a big deal of this on the campaign trail. overturning obamacare. but he has really struggled and laboured with this for months, ever since getting to the white house. there are a few problems here. number one, the rob oliver —— the republican party didn't decide what it wanted to put in its place. it had a mantra for the past seven years about repeal or
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replace, but it could never work out the differences between the right and left of the party in terms which could go in its place. that is the first problem. the second big problem, donald trump's popularity at the moment is pretty low, 36% approval ratings. historically low for someone six months into their ten year. that means he doesn't have the political cloud he could have expected to have with his own party on capitol hill at this point in his presidency. the third problem is the politics of it. backing districts, backing the states, is very hard, once people have had something, to ta ke once people have had something, to take it away from them. and this could have taken health care cover away from tens of millions of people. all of those factors have come together into this kind of toxic cocktail that has meant it has absolutely ground to a halt. thank you for being with us, gary
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o'donoghue, our correspondent in washington. the duke and duchess of cambridge have described as "shattering" their visit to a former concentration camp, part of their five day tour of poland and germany. the royal couple met holocaust survivors at stutthof, near gdansk, where 65,000 people were killed during the second world war. prince william hailed the country's "incredible bravery" during the nazi occupation. our royal correspondent peter hunt was travelling with them. poland, a country with a troubled past, provides presidential—style security for visiting royal dignitaries that leaves little to chance. part of that past is captured here at stutthof, a concentration camp turned museum with evil on display, the shoes of those murdered here. it's an education for all visitors. with two survivors, tens of thousands perished here. the duke and duchess paid their respects at the camp's jewish memorial and reflected.
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"what the nazis did here", william and kate wrote later, "was a terrible reminder of the cost of war". they described their visit as "shattering". in what was a friendless, soulless place, as teenagers manfred and zigi formed a friendship for life. they walked out of these death gates in the ‘a0s, alive against the odds. this was the only camp i thought i was going to die, because it wasn't only from sickness or starvation, but also the weather. in november here, it was well below zero and we wore stripy pyjamas. that was all we had. it was an extremely emotional event for me, in that 70 plus years since our liberation, i have never set foot either in germany or poland. i put all that behind me.
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at this brutal camp and at the others, so many people died, including 3 million polishjews. the hope is that this royal visit will help to educate the young and ensure that the horrors of the holocaust are never forgotten. these visits change tempo and mix the solemn with the less so at dizzying speed. but despite such changes, the memories of stutthof will linger long in royal minds. peter hunt, bbc news, gdansk. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines at 7:30pm: jane austen has become the first woman to appear on a £10 note. historic figures have been appearing on note since 1970 — we're going to be looking back at how things have changed. free—for—all that, you's the weather.
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the weather's on the change, before it arrives, some of us will get thunderstorms. others may have already seen thunderstorms, spreading up in the near continent, the channel islands, across the surface of england. during two nights, those will move rapidly southwards. some places will avoid them and stay dry, but you do get a storm, it could give a lot of rain ina storm, it could give a lot of rain in a short space of time. rain, hail, gusty winds — probably saying dry tonight across scotla nd probably saying dry tonight across scotland however. these downpours will continue to journey northwards tomorrow. writing opera time across england and north wales. but further rain pushing and later in the day. in east anglia and the south east, and other warm day, 32 degrees possible. i fresher feel to the end of the week with some dry spells and rain times. hello, this is bbc news.
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the headlines at 7:30pm: flash floods hits the lizard peninsula in cornwall. the fire service says its despatched a number of crews to the area. appalling conditions in youth custody centres make a tragedy inevitable. that assesement comes from the chief inspector of prisons, who says he's staggered by the decline in standards in england and wales. we were unable to say that any of the young offender institutions or secure training centres that we inspect, we couldn't say that any of them were safe to hold children and young people. inflation has unexpectedly fallen, to 2.6% injune. it's the first fall since october 2016, although prices continue to rise. after grenfell tower — a bbc investigation reveals how councils are failing to offer social housing, despite a statutory duty to do so.
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president trump's political difficulties over obamaca re continue as republicans fail to reach agreement on a replacement. more now on the report by the chief inspector of prisons who has warned that not one of the youth custody centres in england and wales are safe for children. peter clarke says he is often appalled by the conditions in which inmates are held. in my view, some sort of tragedy would be inevitable, unless there were some very, very firm action taken to make these places safer. indeed, within four weeks of my letter, there was very nearly such a tragedy at one of the secure training centres, where a very young member of staff was attacked. i've had a reply setting out the aspirations of the future, the plans the government has to improve things. ijust hope these aspirations and plans are turned into reality.
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let's get more reaction to the report with labour's shadowjustice secretary, richard burgon. he's in our westminster studio. he's obviously alarmed by what's going on? this report makes very sobering and shocking reading. i think most people knew there was a prisons crisis, but many people thought it couldn't get worse. reading peter clarke's watch as it has gotten worse and the government has gotten worse and the government has failed to get a grip on this crisis, and there seems to be no prospect of turning it round. what would you do if you were in power? first of all, it was a grave mistake and highly irresponsible of the
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conservative government to decide to cut the number of prison officers by 6000 since 2010. that's a cut of a third of prison officers. that's make things less safe for prison officers, less safe for inmates and meant that prisons aren't rehabilitating people in the way they should be. that is leading society less safe, because less people are coming out and we set out in our manifesto that we would recruit nx 3000 prison officers as a start. we would also have not an adversarial relationship with our hard—working prison adversarial relationship with our ha rd—working prison officers adversarial relationship with our hard—working prison officers who are going to work and being attacked, insulted, spat at, kicked and punched. we would not take them to court on a whim. we would be listening to them and saying, how can we solve this crisis? but isn't this a prisons crisis that has been going on for years under both
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priorities, frankly, in government? when i spoke into prison officer is, they said both had never been perfect. but prison officers have said to me, since 2010, they have noticed a real decline. and since then, we have seen an explosion in our prisons. damon even before that, there was underfunding, let's be honest? prisons were never perfect, i never said it started in 2010, but that's what prison officers tell me, because you cannot take out one third of officers and not expect there to be consequences. it was necessary for the government to do this, but i think they thought, prisons are out of sight, out of mind, it doesn't matter. but it does matter, people should not be going to work expecting to be spat at, assaulted, kicked and punched. and people who are in prison, having
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their liberty denied alone as the row correct punishment should not be committing suicide. but hiring prison officers is going to cost a lot of money, it is a expensive promise from the labour party?m lot of money, it is a expensive promise from the labour party? it is not an expensive promise. the minister forjustice not an expensive promise. the ministerforjustice has not an expensive promise. the minister forjustice has a not an expensive promise. the ministerforjustice has a budget not an expensive promise. the minister forjustice has a budget of £7 billion per year. the amount of money we're talking about to recruit extra prison officer is to take it up extra prison officer is to take it up to 3000 extra would be around £20 million extra a year. in the grand scheme of things, not much at all. but anybody who reads peter clarke's reports, anyone who reads of young people in our prisons being locked up people in our prisons being locked upfor23 people in our prisons being locked up for 23 hours a day, anyone who sees that suicides have doubled, that assaults on prison staff have rocketed, must understand that action needs to be taken. thank you
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very much forjoining us. four crew members of the south yorkshire police helicopter have gone on trial accused of using the aircraft to spy on people, some sunbathing naked or having sex. the case relates to four alleged incidents between 2007 and 2012. a fifth officer has admitted charges of misconduct in a public office. danny savage has been at sheffield crown court for us. the south yorkshire police helicopter is a familiar sight in the skies above here. it's used as a valuable resource in the fight against crime. the allegation in this case it was misused on a number of occasions over a five year period. as a result, five members of its crew were charged. what did they do? videos were shown to the court today, the first one showed a woman sunbathing naked in her garden, the camera zooms in on her body. a second video showed anywayrieses sitting outside their canavan in doncaster. the next showed a couple
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having sex on their patio. they knew they were being filmed. the woman waves and a fourth shows somebody sunbathing naked. it was a deliberate invasion of their privacy, for the amusement of the crew. two police officers and two pilots are on charge here. they deny the charges. they blame another police officer for doing all of this. he pleaded guilty to misconduct in public office. the trial is expected to last for three weeks. flooding at coverack this evening. heavy rain and then a torrent of water running through the village, we we re water running through the village, we were hearing. we'rejust
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water running through the village, we were hearing. we're just hearing the latest information from the cost 90, the latest information from the cost go, the newquay coastguards, is at the rescue helicopter has rescued two people who were trapped in a house, and four still remaining there. not quite aware of the full circumstances of that, but all i said to be ok. earlier on, the fire service was saying there were live—threatening incidents they were attending, and that did cause a lot of worry. we were just speaking to an eyewitness from a hotel in a coverack who was saying as far as she was concerned, everyone in the village is actually ok. that is the latest, the coastguard rescue people trapped in a house. we talk now to a local councillor in coverack. thanks for being with us, what can you tell us for being with us, what can you tell us about it this evening? we are not able to touch base with the centre
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of the village, because the main road into coverack has been blocked by the largest rivers bursting its banks, coming straight across the words, watching the size of the road away, and carrying with it large boulders, the size of the man's head. so that's very, very dangerous, and a couple of feet of water are going straight across the road. the amount of water that has come from the land, carrying huge amount of soil with eight is making the sea waters for the first half a mile out from where i'm looking, further than that, it's the bright blue that we expect here in cornwall. this follows very heavy rainfall in the afternoon? it was enormously heavy rainfall, a tropical—type down for. having worked in the tropics, i know what
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is's like there. huge hailstones in it, about an inch across. we are really quite worried about the glass in the house will stop one of the panes of glass in the greenhouse has been broken, just by the size of the hailstones. gift us an idea of the size of the village, how many people will be affected by this? there are about 250 houses in total, i can't say exactly who's affected by it, because the village has been effectively cut in half. you cannot cross the river is. either where they normally go underneath the roads, there are now flowing across the top of the roads. the rivers further inland, of course, are flooded as well. they've broken their banks right throughout. we gather the coastguard helicopter‘s
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beenin gather the coastguard helicopter‘s been in action this evening, rescuing people from at least one house. do you know anything about that? we see it going around, it's doing good work. the police are here, everyone's trying to sort things out. one of the problems coming down the main road is all the manhole covers have lifted and washed away completely, so you have lots of very large holes in the road. it's dangerous for walkers, not just traffic. the road. it's dangerous for walkers, notjust traffic. the smaller roads on the other side of the village is still usable, but onlyjust. it's been quite dramatic, but we're each limited to our own neighbourhoods, small neighbourhoods, cause we can't get around. have you seen anything like this in coverack before? not this bad, no. i'm free global warming is taking its effect. the
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fire service was saying there were life—threatening incidents, do you know if everybody is safe or do you have any information on any potential casualties? the only one i heard about was one of the people who live near the main river, they had to get their mother out through the window, because the water was rising so rapidly. my wife and i we re rising so rapidly. my wife and i were busy this afternoon, paving out of the kitchen. white literally, it was coming in through the doors, even though they were close. the door ina even though they were close. the door in a garage was flooded anyway, and the door from the garage side, the water, simply with the pressure off eight, was forcing its way underneath it. and so was the main door to the outside. we were busy bailing out. it sounds like all this happens so fast, you really didn't
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have any time to make any preparations to defend your property two none at all. it was absolutely almost instantaneous. a number of us been to the local crematorium for the cremation of a resident from coverack, and we got back to the house where they were giving a wake, just to discuss things. i left there, and about five and it is after i arrived in my house, it started to rain very heavily. under and lightning, quite dramatic. again, almost as bad is in the tropics. it then poured with rain, and the hailstones started. and another resident, tony marsden, a business owner, where saying it was's a four—foot torrent sweeping through the village, does that sound right to you? absolutely. the water
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was coming down off the peer behind our house and pouring into the house. so i can quite confirm that the depth of water is immense. and of course, flowing very fast. see you cannot walk through it, because people get washed from underneath you. it sounds like you have your work cut out for you in terms of clear up operation. thank you very much for being with us, thank you for your time. this is our top story, flash floods in cornwall. appalling conditions in youth custody centres make it inevitable, according to the cheap inspector prisons. inflation is now at 2.6% —
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the first fall since october — but prices are still rising faster than wages. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. 200 years since the death of the authorjane austen, the bank of england has put her image on its new polymer £10 note. it was unveiled this afternoon at winchester cathedral, where she was buried in 1817, and will go into circulation in september. it's taken 200 years to put the ten into austen, but today this became britain's newest banknote. one of our greatest authors now adorns this latest addition to our currency, and all of it unveiled exactly two centuries
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after her death, in the place where she was buried. you really need to look at it in the round in order to capture it. and, obviously, jane austen — and this is not based in my opinion, but the opinion of the british people and scholars — is really at the top of the pantheon of british novelists. the new tenner is made of polymer and has multiple security features. it's also the first bank of england note to have raised dots to help blind and visually impaired people. forjane austen's army of devotees at today's ceremony, it was a moment to cheish. i like it, like all the touches they've got going on, winchester cathedral and the quill. so, overall, marks out of ten for the ten? ten out of ten for the £10 note! some people have needed a bit of persuasion over the jane austen image on the new note.
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compare it to the original portrait it was taken from, it's had critics talking of an austen airbrush. howeverjane austen looked when she died, 200 years ago today, £10 would have been worth around £1000. which you might call a good fortune. the new jane austen tenner comes into circulation september, a stylish addition to a catalogue of work universally acknowledged to be priceless. we'rejoined now from exeter by phil mussell, who is director of the magazine coin news. thanks for being with us. there we are,jane thanks for being with us. there we are, jane austen on the new ten, get to see. have we always had famous peoples faces on banknotes? not at all, daniel. the first game in 1970, shakespeare on the £20 note. before
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that we have britannia, st george the back, but no historicalfigures will stop. we had the ubuntu next, then florence nightingale. ever since the 1970s, a070 years. then florence nightingale. ever since the 1970s, 4070 years. what was the idea that? aesthetic reasons, seemed an icing to the? exactly, reasons, seemed an icing to the? exa ctly, d o reasons, seemed an icing to the? exactly, do something that looked good. a lot of people objected to the new decimal coins, so it was felt putting some iconic, british figures on bank of england notes was going to appease some critics. banknotes in general, when did they really start? banknotes have been around for quite some time, since the 1700. full. realistically, it was the second world war when he came into everyday use, because the government wanted the gold sovereigns and half sovereigns in circulation to come back into the
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government's coppers. so what the date was issued promissory notes to people saying the bank of england backs this note with its own promise. even now, you have, i promise. even now, you have, i promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of... on each note. you sent us the sum of... on each note. you sent us pictures of all banknotes, talk us us pictures of all banknotes, talk us through those? you've the original notes, they were just pieces of paper which said how much they were. they were one sided and we re they were. they were one sided and were white, just written on what the nile the nomination was. the old white fibrous, quite famous, people still remember those, they were the original banknotes. then you have the more pictorial ones, a bit more design. so the £1 notes came in
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1928, some nice, art deco pictures and design on the front of the note. during the war, dictates the colour, by 1940, during the war, dictates the colour, by 19a0, because they were concerned about forgeries coming in. you had the same design, but it went to look other. —— it went to bleed. later, 1960, you have an outdated design, but not until 1978, i think, you happy fast pictorial hand note with sir isaac newton on it. that was the first time a historical figure appeared on a £1 note. and have jane austen. thank you very much for joining us. we can probably all think of adverts that portray women as always in the kitchen, or men failing at simple household tasks. well, now the advertising standards authority is to crack down on ads that feature stereotypical gender roles.
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a review carried out by the asa has suggested that such commercials have a cost — for the individual, the economy and society. here's our media correspondent, david sillito. oven pride, so easy a man can do it! so easy a man could do it? orthis? girls do ballet and of course, boys, maths, or this. the advertising standards authority is looking at tightening up its rules on how men and women are portrayed in adverts. women, don't expect any help on a thursday. it's going to be ok for an ad to show a woman shopping or cleaning. it's going to be ok for an ad to show a man doing a diy task in the home. what we're going to be looking at is ads that go beyond that, ads that paint a picture that it's, for example, the woman's role to tidy up after her family, who trashed the house — that's herjob in life. we're worried about that sort of depiction. similarly, ads that might mock men for being hopeless at performing straightforward parental
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or household tasks just because they're a man. "look like a girl but think like a man if you want to be the boss." or this... "are you beach body ready?" the asa's concerns are about stereotypes or ads that pressurise women and men to look and act in a certain way. of course, things have changed since an era that produced this. the question is, what is the dividing line? how can such a pretty wife make such bad coffee? i heard that! nannette newman spent years over a washing—up bowl. at what point does that become gender stereotyping? one of the arguments is that ads are too orientated towards making women buy products that are for cleaning, cleaning the toilet, cleaning the house, washing—up and everything. well, you know, so what, really? people can either take it in or not, and very often, those women who are watching those ads, their husbands in the kitchen
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doing washing—up anyway. and some feel the asa is beginning to stray into politics. its primary role is to ensure that advertisers aren't misleading their audience. they shouldn't be making arbitrary judgments about gender stereotypes that they randomly decide they don't like. it's got nothing to do with them. and this isjust an organisation trying to put the left—wing agenda onto the free market and it has no place there. a move then against the sexist ad, the challenge is deciding what that exactly means. good evening, the weather is on the change over some of us, that change will be dramatic. blue skies and sunshine, most part today, but down
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to the south, clouds are gathering, and this weather watcher in plymouth ca ptu red and this weather watcher in plymouth captured a fork of lightning. as the thunderstorms journey north tonight at overnights, there is the risk in some places of travel disruption and localised flooding. your bbc local radio station will keep you up to date. these logs are cloud in a satellite picture are moving out of northern france, and the lightning became frequent during the latter pa rt became frequent during the latter part of the afternoon will stop these storms journeying northwards. some places will avoid these stories and stay dry. if you catch a downpour, it could give you a lot of rain ina downpour, it could give you a lot of rain in a short time, pale, gusty winds, particularly affecting parts of wales and northern ireland. all the while, scotland is an largely drive. in muggy night, in this south especially. these bands of rain continued to gerry northwards, things running across in wales in wales for a time, but then further
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thundery downpours bridging in from the west. ed that in east anglia, temperatures up to 32 degrees. in the west, more in the way of clouds, turning into rain in north wales and northwest england through tomorrow afternoon. thunderstorms across scotla nd afternoon. thunderstorms across scotland as well, turning weights across northern ireland. a band of rain from the west, back to contain thunder and lightning as well. through wednesday, big storms moving across northern england and perhaps scotland. as this band of rain moves eastwards, that introduces a big change into the feel of the weather. fresh air bridges in from the west during thursday. firstly not a bad day, a lot of dry weather, sunny spells great time, but temperatures down from what they have been. we
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stick with that fresher feel through friday and into the weekend, there will be sunshine, but also some rain at times. this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm: flash floods hits the lizard peninsula in cornwall. a coastguard helicopter has been airlifting people to safety. appalling conditions in youth custody centres make a tragedy inevitable according to the chief inspector of prisons — he says he's staggered by the decline in standards in england and wales. we were unable to say that any of the young offender institutions or secure training centres that we inspect. we couldn't say that any of them were safe to hold children and young people. after grenfell tower — a bbc investigation reveals how councils are failing to offer social housing despite a statutory duty to do so. and in the next hour we'll look
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at the speed of a tyrannosaurus rex. new research suggests the dinosaur would not have been able to move more than about 12 miles per hour.

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