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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 20, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at four. after four days of brexit talks the eu's chief negotiatior says there remain ‘fundamental‘ disagreements" — and the uk must clarify its position on a number of issues. i say by way of conclusion the first round was about organisation. this week has been about presentation. the third round must be about clarification. brexit secretary david davis said the talks had been robust, but there's a lot to be positive about. we conducted this round constructively and at pace... now i hope this is a model we can continue going forward. to coin the phrase, michel, the clock is ticking. within the last hour both sides have released their documents, lots in green but a lot in red including disagreements on the future role of the european court ofjustice. also coming up this hour. two "dark web" marketplaces — selling drugs and weapons — are shut down by the us
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justice department. there's been a 10% rise in recorded crime in england and wales, the largest annual increase for a decade. one in three cases of dementia could be prevented if people look after their brain throughout their life, according to new research. and it's william vs kate. the duke and duchess go head to head in a boat race during their royal visit in germany. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the eu's chief negotiator has said that brussels and the uk have "fundamental" disagreements about citizens‘ rights. speaking after the latest round of talks, michel barnier also called for clarification on a number of issues including the financial settlement. the brexit secretary, david davis, described the talks as robust and insisted there was a lot to be positive about. with the latest on the negotiations
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here is andy moore. brexit secretary david davis looked happy enough this morning as he came back to brussels to lead the british side one day four of these negotiations. behind the scenes, 98 british officials have been going through the detail in talks that were supposed to be about the substance of brexit. there were three main topics of discussion, the rights of citizens, both eu citizens living in the uk and britons living in the eu. the financial settlement, the so—called divorce bill britain will have to pay. and then there is the question of the irish border, a new frontier between the eu and uk. the message from the eu's chief negotiator was that he was still unsure about precisely what the uk's position was on many issues. translation: we require this clarification on the financial
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settlement of citizens‘ rights, on ireland, with the two key points of the common travel area and the good friday agreement, and on the other separation issues. michel barnier said there was fundamental diversions on certain issues. david davis said the talks had been robust but constructive, and he admitted there was a lot left to talk about. all in all, the second round of negotiations has given us a lot to be positive about, and it highlighted the need for both sides to demonstrate a dynamic and flexible approach. we conducted this round constructively and at pace and i hope this will continue. to coin a phrase, michel, the clock is ticking. the negotiations began on monday. even then, there were fears in europe that what was seen as a divided cabinet in london might make britain's position unclear. i think what the eu is finding frustrating is that they are not sure what the uk government wants, and that there is no coherent strategy or vision coming from the uk of what the uk, at a political level, wants the relationship
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to look like after brexit. the next round of talks is due to begin at the end of august. there are difficulties to come, most clearly over the eu insistence that the european court ofjustice should oversee the rights of eu citizens in the uk. so far at least, that has been a red line for britain. on the thorny question of the divorce bill, michel barnier said an orderly exit required britain to settle its bill. mr davis said britain recognised its rights and responsibilities. andy morgan bbc news. meanwhile the international trade secretary, liam fox, has suggested that getting out of the european union and freeing britain to negotiate new trade deals with the rest of the world — could take a further two years after the official date of exit in march 2019. dr fox was speaking to the bbc during a visit to the world trade organisation in geneva. we are going to leave in march 2019.
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icampaigned to i campaigned to leave the european union, i believe it is the right course of the united kingdom and we are going to leave the european union. but if we can do it in a way that minimises upheaval to businesses, that provides the greatest amount of certainty and stability, then that is clearly a sensible thing to do. and if we have an implementation phase between us leaving the european union and whatever arrangement we will have the eu, don't have a problem with that. for me there is no ideological barrier to that. it would be a purely practical decision on time, based on could we put new custom arrangements in place. and new immigration arrangements in place. they won't happen overnight. frankly, i've been waiing to the european union for a long time, another two years wouldn't be too much to ask. breaking news, sir vince cable has
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become the new leader of the liberal democrats, he was the only one standing after no other members put themselves forward, tim farron stood down as leader because he said he was not able to reconcile the demands of his christian faith with leading political party. let's to now to keir starmer, you can be the first person to react to that news. good luck vince, he's got a lot of work to do. fine, a quick short answer. now about brexit what was your reading about what michel barnier and david davies had to say. david davis said talks had been robust, michel barnier said there was a lot more than the uk to come forward with. off i was hoping to hear that had been really good progress. but the differences had been resolved and i was really hoping that we could hear that the next phase, do for october, could be brought forward. that would begin a
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new relationship to the future. what we did here was concerning, there are still fundamental differences between the two sides. and that is deeply concerning, both about the progress of the talks of course because the clock is ticking but also when it comes to eu citizens in this country and british people in europe, we have families who are desperate and anxious to have their issues resolved and know where they stand. and for them to hear that there are still fundamental differences i think will lead to many sinkings of hard this evening about their future. the fundamental issue at the heart of that problem issue at the heart of that problem is the model that exists for dispute settlement. the eu says that should be the european court ofjustice. the uk policy is that they don't wa nt the uk policy is that they don't want the european court ofjustice involved yet that does not seem to be room for much compromise. the prime minister has been obsessional about the european court ofjustice from the start. simply saying no
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international court, the european court ofjustice international court, the european court of justice can't international court, the european court ofjustice can't have a role in any of this. it has run straight into this problem for eu citizens. and this is a micro example of what will happen in the next two years. you say that but if this is not sorted the talks will go nowhere. this issue will keep coming up. we wa nt to this issue will keep coming up. we want to 28 countries to agree on eu systems. and eventually 28 countries to agree a final agreement. we need a body that can resolve disputes. and to tell the others that the body we propose is the supreme court in london is an unlikely scenario for those other countries. the prime minister and the government simply have to wake up, cbs shift position. because this and pass dead—end needs to be resolved so we can move onto other issues. is there a phone line you can pick up to say, do this,
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this is the answer. there needs to be some body that can resolve disputes so that in years to come when they have a problem, have a court or a body like the court that they can go to and it won't be the high court in london because however good ourjudges are they are playing our law, not the international agreement. it sounds like you think it should be the ec]. they are one option although labour has been more flexible this week, we understand why it must be an international body, the ec] could do it, there are other ways that could resolve it, if the government gave ground and said this is a different proposal i suspect talks would progress. but all the government has done it seems is restate their position. what do you say to viewers who might be thinking would it not be lovely if uk politicians could all speak with one tongue on this, we are all in this together? we voted out and we need everyone to do that. rather
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adds my being at individuals on a political basis why can't we find the way forward. i think there is a lot to be said for ensuring that we all act in the national interest in this because we need a good dealfor britain, we need a good dealfor our communities and future generations. we have to scrutinise the government was doing and challenge them where we made mistakes because if no one challenges the government where they made mistakes then we will build in fatal flaws in the agreement that we reach. give these initial talks to not resolve the is you of eu citizens, that the issue. it is clear these dogs cannot progress. there's a timetable that can be quite short. if you talk to any business, whatever its nature and size, they will say, we are anxious
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to know what the next stage will bring. anxious to know what the position will be in march 2019. and get on with these talks will be their plea. because they say, understandably, we cannot change the way we work at the drop of a hat in march 2019, we need a good period of time to know what the future holds for us, they will have wanted to hear today that there had been much better progress than there has been. sir keir starmer, thank you. let's go to christian fraser in brussels, he's been following events with a nice colour chart! yes, this is the joint paper the two sides have put out in the last hour. i'll flick through this and you will see various points which have bits in green and the bits in red which still need to be resolved and bits in yellow with the uk needs to clarify its position. if you are counting, 22 green bits, 1a in red
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and eight in yellow which the uk site needs to discuss that. that seems to tally with what david davies said, they have made progress on quite a lot of things when it comes to citizens rights. the view on this side is that they are quite close on a number of issues. the thorniest issue is the ec]. what they see in briefings from the eu side is that if eu citizens are to maintain the rights they have now, the ec] is the only court to interpret that. what the british side says, they've put forward an alternative scenario, they are saying, if we have an international treaty that carries legal and constitutional force. it can't be easily and picked by a change of government. there would be reassu ra nces government. there would be reassurances for eu citizens in britain, and if you were from new zealand, living in the uk, would you
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expect in new zealand court to uphold your rights in the uk, probably not. so there's a in london, a sense ofjudicial imperialism. that's the way they talked about the eu approaching this. let me speak to ian wishart, brexit correspondent for bloomberg. i think it's right, it's a complicated is it with a lot of technical problems but you get the impression they've made a lot of progress in these last four days. this looming obstacle of the european court of justice, this looming obstacle of the european court ofjustice, and it gets sorted and nothing else matters. the daily telegraph asked michel barnier where you are prepared to compromise and is there another country that has a court and side withjurisdiction another country that has a court and side with jurisdiction in a sovereign country, there is no example of that and that is the point of the uk is making. the
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problem is the european union are about rules. if the rules say that they must stick to it and this is what is making things difficult because the uk are saying, we want this, we want that, can you show flexibility here and there. whereas the eu which must keep 27 other countries happy is saying, these are the rules, this is what you must do. it makes it difficult when they see eu law must be upheld by the ec]. where do you go from there. the next negotiating round next month will be difficult to try to move that obstacle. the guardian has picked out one issue, it is agreement on tra nsfera ble out one issue, it is agreement on transferable rights. those uk citizens who live, say, in france, perhaps they have retired to france, they would not, at the moment be able to move their rights to germany. and some people in britain might say, hang on, if eu citizens in the uk will have exactly the same
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rights why would that apply to uk citizens abroad. both sides from the beginning has said said, we want citizens in the eu and the uk to be treated the same as now. yet the offers for short of that. the uk says, we will offer most rights to eu citizens and the eu says, if you claim residence in one country in europe you can't have the same rights if you move to another. you get the feeling this will be smoothed over easily. so they want reciprocal rights and it depends which side the uk move, its not set in stone. not set in stone, if the uk decides to be strict about this the eu says, we will be too. let's see what agreement we can reach. what about the issue that seems to be frustrating michel barnier and the others, the financial settlement. he said, this week they settlement. he said, this week they set out a fort and legal calculation
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away to cut the final figure. it doesn't suit either side to come up with a number, does it. and both sides have said that they won't come up sides have said that they won't come up witha sides have said that they won't come up with a number for a year or something. how do we calculate that bill, what all our methodology be. and it is strange because for all the talk of negotiations this week all that has happened in the negotiating room is that uk officials have asked question after question after question, how did you reach that calculation to the eu. that seems to suggest that we are underprepared. are we? probably deliberately underprepared. they don't want to say to the eu, this is what we will offer. it's got a long way to go, these negotiations. as long as they stay in the room and say can we ask more questions about the legal basis i think that satisfies the uk side of the mum and
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if not the eu. ian, thank you very much. the two man went for lunch and they did talk at the uk residence, they did talk at the uk residence, they are also setting out a plan for future talks, coming together at the end of august and september. i shouldn't think much will be sorted before october. that will be the point when the european council meets and they will want to see that there has been serious movement on some of these unresolved issues. christian, thank you. the headlines on bbc news. it's just after quarter past four. brexit secretary david davis and the eu's michel barnier have outlined progress made in their latest round of talks. mr barnier said there were still fundamental disagreements over citizens‘ rights. he says the uk needs to clarify its position on a number of issues. two. web places selling drugs and weapons have been closed down by the us justice department. there‘s been a 10% rise in recorded crime in england and wales —
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the largest annual increase for a decade. in sporty us open champion brooks koepka has a share of the lead. it has been a nightmare start for rory mcilroy, four over par after his first five holes. and tom westley will make his england debut in the third test against south africa, the essex batsman will play at number three after receiving his first call—up. more about those stories just after half past four. an underground website that allowed the sale of drugs and hacking softwa re the sale of drugs and hacking software has been closed down by the united states. the us attorney generaljeff sessions described alphabay as the largest criminal
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website on the internet. today the us department ofjustice announced the takedown of the dark web marketplace alphabay. it is the largest dark web site takedown in history, alphabay claim that this group serviced more than 40,000 illegal vendors, people who sell illegal vendors, people who sell illegal products, for more than 200,000 customers. by far most of this activity was in illegal drugs, pouring fuel on the fire of the national drug up at around the time of the takedown of this site there are more than 250,000 listings for illegal drugs and toxic chemicals on alphabay. more illegal drugs and toxic chemicals on alpha bay. more than illegal drugs and toxic chemicals on alphabay. more than two thirds of all listings on alphabay, as of earlier this year, 122 vendors
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advertised one substance and more advertised one substance and more advertised heroin and we know of several americans killed by drugs on alphabay. ]eff sessions also took the opportunity to confirm that he intends to stay in his job as you as a general despite criticism from president trump over his decision to remove himself from the russian election meddling probe.|j remove himself from the russian election meddling probe. i have the honour of serving as attorney general. it is something that goes beyond any thought i would have ever had for myself. we love this job, we love this department and i plan to continue to do so as long as that is appropriate. let's speak to our correspondent in washington, gary o‘donoghue. he looks like the cat who‘s got the cream. this is a big development on the criminal side. yes, they are very pleased about this. notjust yes, they are very pleased about this. not just because yes, they are very pleased about this. notjust because alphabay is the biggest trading place on the
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dark web for opioids, guns, malware, child pornography, not only because of that but because of the international co—operation and coordination and have pulled off. there were people from europol at this press conference today, it turns out the person running alphabay is a canadian citizen living in thailand. people are all over the world. i think they are quite pleased they got this thing shut down. it had only been up and running for two years. springing up after a previous incarnation of something similar called the silk road. but this had become much, much bigger. and at the same time that this one was pulled down, a couple of weeks ago, they were working in conjunction with european police, and dutch police have pulled down another one which again was run by
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germans, i believe, and had servers in holland and lithuania. i think they are pleased with this one. lot of people around the world now needs to be afraid of the knock on the door. the whole point about the dark web and weighs into it, there are certain browsers you can use, —— ways to get into it, some people use browsers to mask their identity because they want for instance to use the service in another country. they want to mask their ip address to use a service not available in their own country. so there can be semi—innocent reasons for using it but many people use it so they can hide their identity and by these illegal things and pay for them with virtual currency, as we know. and
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haveit virtual currency, as we know. and have it sent to a po box and pick it up. so the idea that law enforcement is catching up and getting as technologically savvy as the people in creating this stuff in the first place is likely to be a discouragement. they have little doubt that other alternatives will spring up quickly. this is a big deal. when i heard that i was going to interview you i thought that for the first time this year we would not use the word donald alderwood trump! but this is not possible because jeff sessions trump! but this is not possible becausejeff sessions is someone president trump has turned a bomb. it's president trump has turned a bomb. it‘s amazing, jeff sessions was the first senator to come out and support donald trump in the latter‘s election campaign. he was the earliest supporter and was tipped for all sorts ofjobs. president trump made him attorney general in spite of a lot of criticism, he had
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a rough ride and his past was raked up a rough ride and his past was raked up and donald trump stood by him. yet the problem seems to have come when he recused himself from the russia inquiryjust after becoming attorney general. he had problems in his testimony when he forgot a couple of meetings he had tarred with the russian ambassador and donald trump said if i had known he was going to recused himself i would not have given him the job. was going to recused himself i would not have given him thejob. jeff sessions, being asked about that, he said, well, here i am. he knows that he can be fired by the president but i think he knows that would be worse for the president because it would leave the deputy attorney general in charge, who the president does not much like either! gary, thank you! the latest increase in crime figure said there was a 10% rise in crime
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to the end of march, violent crime and 10%, robberies increasing by 16%. we spoke with the home office minister — nick hurd — a little earlier. the bits that we are concerned about is where crime may be falling or it is changing. we‘re quite clear from the data we get from hospitals that there has been a worrying increase in violent crime. we have known about that for a while. we are determined to stay on top of that. which is why we‘ve passed new laws to for example ban the use of zombie knives. tougher sentences for possession. we‘re consulting on new laws to make it harder for young people to buy knives online. the police have been more proactive in terms of enforcement. just recently, operation sceptre led to 1200 seizures of knives in one week and 300 arrests. there is a concerted effort from the police to bear down on emerging crime. danny shaw said the figures could be
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used by police unions to argue for increased staffing. thomas to cross the border we are seeing crime increases. not a blip, we‘ve seen at quarter on quarterfor increases. not a blip, we‘ve seen at quarter on quarter for the past couple of years. if you look for example at violent crime we are seeing an 18% rise in thicknesses of violence against the person, a significant increase. if you look into that category one subcategory of that is knife crime, which is up 20%. 20% increase in offences involving knives and other sharp instruments. some areas are more effective than others, areas like london are more affected by knife crime than others and are also traditional crimes that were believed to on the decline like burglary and car crime, car crime is up burglary and car crime, car crime is up by burglary and car crime, car crime is up by 11%. those were crimes people thought were flattened out and
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replaced by online fraud. now we seem individual crimes go up as well. some can be explained by the way that police record crimes, they are more consistent than before, they are not putting down no crime in such large numbers as they did but some of it is genuine. experts at the office for national statistics say these are genuine increases in crime. is there a correlation because we are also looking at the lowest number of police officers in this country is as 1985. the police federation of england and wales would say of course there is a correlation, they will say, we told you so, we told you if you kept cutting you would see increases in crime. it‘s difficult to say whether there really is a correlation between the fallen police officers, it‘s now the lowest level, says the home office, since 1985, and increases in crime because numbers have been falling for some time and crime is also
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falling. but the key issue is that this will strengthen police arguments for sailing, enough is enough, we need extra resources now to boost numbers on the front line. to tackle increases in crime so it will strengthen their hand in that respect. vidic and duchess of cambridge entered into friendly, edition with each other in heidelberg when they took part in a boat race in the town which is twinned with cambridge. a tight race but prince william‘s side secured the win with apparentlyjust metres to spare. back to one of those breaking stories, we‘ve had confirmation that sir vince cable is the new leader of the liberal democrats after nominations for the post closed with no challengers coming forward. the coronation is now under way. we have heard from one of his predecessors, nick clegg,
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wishing him luck in his new role. he says that he will need all his experience as britain negotiates over brexit. we are expecting to hear from over brexit. we are expecting to hearfrom sir vince over brexit. we are expecting to hear from sir vince cable outlining his plans for the future of his party, in the next or so. let‘s have a look at the weather. quite a turnaround in weather fortunes, in the last couple of days we‘ve had flooding incidents, some of the recent ones in lancashire and north wales with floods in this part of the world. things have changed. the humidity that fed these enormous storms has been swept away by weather fronts. behind, storms has been swept away by weatherfronts. behind, fresh air is heading in over the whole of the country. if you have been outside you will have noticed it does not feel as humid and as much fresh air gigs coming in the clouds break and
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we‘ll see sunshine working across most areas. it‘s still a bit cloudy across the north east, still with some rain left. showers of northern ireland and some rain in wales and south—west england this evening. overnight more rain coming, wales and south—west england, overnight, the driest weather in the north and east. i might come 11—16d and tomorrow an area of low pressure of ireland bringing heavy rain to northern ireland, wales and south—west england, some areas picking up over one inch of rain today, the 25 millilitres, also windy so if you are planning to go camping taken note of that. we could have gale force gusts of wind for reasonable weather of the north—east. that‘s the weather. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: after four days of brexit talks — the eu‘s chief negotiatior says there remain ‘fundamental‘ disagreements" — and the uk must clarify its position on a number of issues. the usjustice department announces the shutdown of two "dark web" marketplaces that allowed thousands of vendors to anonymously sell illegal drugs and weapons.
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and vince cable is the new leader of the liberal democrats, with no other candidate having put themselves forward for the role. there‘s been a 10% rise in recorded crime in england and wales — the largest annual increase for a decade. we may hear from we may hearfrom sir vince we may hear from sir vince cable we may hearfrom sir vince cable in the next few minutes and we will ta ke the next few minutes and we will take you to that. but first, we will try and get the sport. the royal birkdale gets the best of the weather. the leader board is dominated by the americans but it has been a tough start for rory mcilroy. let‘s go live to the course
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now. the best conditions are just about now. this morning at 6:35 a:m.,a about now. this morning at 6:35 a:m., alot about now. this morning at 6:35 a:m., a lot of rain and wind when the first players went out. but the last players coming through on the fourth hole at the moment finishing. it has meant the leader board depends on when you started today. at the top, the americans. jordan spieth and brooks koepka, both on five under alongside matt kercher who is still playing. jordan spieth, he is top of the leaderboard and in the clubhouse. he had five birdies, an excellent round. he won two majors in 2015 and has been a little bit of form since then. looks like he is particularly playing well. he does like the open and these conditions out on the coast at the seaside playing on a links course. after his round, he spoke to us to tell us what he thought of birkdale. maybe a bit surprised at being able
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to start this open extremely and not have to grind too much the next view. but this course and is open, at the open championship and specifically this golf course, i know conditions change this entire leaderboa rd. know conditions change this entire leaderboard. it is a really good start. i know even par tomorrow would be as good or even better. it is important to get the right numbers today. those numbers very important as he said and also in the red is brooks koepka, who had another fantastic round in terms of his back nine and an amazing shot where he chipped out of the bunker on the 17th, straight into the hole. he is the us open champion so he‘s looking for back—to—back majors, which is something that isn‘t done very often. an amazing shot from him. the other players out and about at the moment, rory mcilroy and
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dustinjohnson. at the moment, rory mcilroy and dustin johnson. they are at the moment, rory mcilroy and dustinjohnson. they are struggling to get through. dustinjohnson, the world number one is one under. but rory mcilroy has had a bad afternoon and he has had the better of the weather because it has been like this, but he is on five over after seven holes. really struggling today. he is looking for his fifth major title but it is not going in the right direction at the moment. 0k, the right direction at the moment. ok, thank you very much. essex batsman tom westley will make his england debut after being selected for the third test against south africa. westley will bat at three at the oval, replacing gary ballance after he broke his finger. westley has already scored a century against south africa for the england lions this season and has scored almost 500 runs for essex in the county championship. you can see the full squad on the bbc sport website. we are going to hand back to simon
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for some breaking news. sir vince cable, just taking to the podium. let‘s hear from sir vince cable, just taking to the podium. let‘s hearfrom him. applause friends, can i thank you for that reception. can i thank tim and joe for what they have just said. tim, as we have been reminded took over the leadership of the party at a time of crisis. he rebuilt morale, self belief and strengthened the idealistic core of the party. he put us at the centre of the national
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debate about europe and rebuilt our membership to record levels. we are very indebted to him. i now inherit a party which is considerably stronger than the one he inherited, which now has a national reach at record levels. thank you, tim. applause joe was an invaluable colleague the department of business. we work together for five years. she department of business. we work togetherforfive years. she is department of business. we work together for five years. she is one of five of our common steam who are ministers in government and we had a co mforta ble ministers in government and we had a comfortable number in the house of lords. we provided, to coin a phrase, what can be called strong and stable government. certainly by comparison with the two years we had since. in that government, she
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played a critical role, a highly effective minister and part of the team. she piloted through important bits of legislation. shared parental leave, which tens of thousands of young parents can now take advantage of. consumer protection legislation, protecting pubs from the predatory practice of pub companies. and all the time dealing with quite a lot of foot dragging from our coalition partners. she worked with me on pushing very hard to have women properly represented at the top of british business. getting a woman on every boa rd of british business. getting a woman on every board of a footsie company and succeeded. except that in the last two years without the driver leadership, it has gone backwards. another of her accomplishments, and
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i think we forget some of the things the lib dems did in government, she was part of a team of lib dem ministers in my department, she and ed davey, norman lamb, jenny willet, we inherited a big campaigning issue of the past, the post office network was collapsing. it was disintegrating. we stop that happening and we turned it round. by the time we have left, it was growing. so there is a legacy of very real achievements and i take my hat off to jo, very real achievements and i take my hat off tojo, who was a wonderful colleague. i know she will be an outstanding support as deputy leader of the party and thank you very much for your comments. applause ijust want i just want to make three brief points of my own. first of all, we
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have this gigantic space in the middle of british politics. the two major parties have been captured by ideologues, ideologues on one hand who hate europe and on the other hand, who hate capitalism. and as a result, british politics is now more polarised and more divided than at any time any of us can remember. and what is now very badly missing is the basic common—sense, the kind of moderation, the mutual respect with british politics at its best. my aim, is that the party and i will occu py aim, is that the party and i will occupy that space in british politics. my second comment flows from that, which relates from what
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is now happening around brexit. because i fear we are heading for a disastrous outcome. these negotiations are now being led by a government that is dysfunctional, it is disorganised, it is disunited. they‘re negotiating strategy, if we get beyond the anodyne phrase of brexit, it means brexit was based on theresa may‘s lancaster house speech. which was made at the time very different from now, when the complexities were not understood and when she had serious political authority. which has gone. and what i think will happen now, is we will be offered a combination of a good deal, a bad deal or no deal at all,
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crashing out of the european union with all the costs associated with that. the liberal democrat response to this is two fold and absolutely clear. first of all, we want to work with like—minded people in other parties to save, to reinforce those aspects of the european project which are so important to us as a country. the first is the single market and its full freedoms. let‘s not forget this is not something that was imposed upon the uk by the european commission. it was a british project designed by a british project designed by a british prime minister, mrs thatcher originally, to serve british interests. including free trade in services. then there is the customs union, which i know because i
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presided over the fortunes of british manufacturing industry for five years, is absolutely fundamental to the business model of what remains of our manufacturing industry. and then there is the research collaboration which is crucial to the future of our universities. and indeed very specific areas like atomic cooperation. and then there is those areas of common ground like dealing with global threats to the environment, climate change, dealing with issues of international security. those are the aspects of europe we must fight to keep. i am not pessimistic, i don‘t believe actually that this will be delivered. i think in practice, we are faced with a much more disastrous outcome of crashing out of the european union. what we now
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need is an exit from brexit. and the exit from brexit comes as a result of the policy that we have adopted, which is that we must consult the british public at the end of the process , british public at the end of the process, to put to them the choice — do you wish to accept what is coming down the track, jumping off a cliff and hoping there is a tree to catch you? ordo and hoping there is a tree to catch you? or do you want to stay within the european union? and making it absolutely clear that option is still available. now, how people decide will depend, to a great deal, i think, on what is happening to the economy over the next year or two. and the outlook isn‘t great. i think there is a deeper problem about the way in which the economic debate has
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evolved. i first got into parliament 20 years ago and i‘ve spent much of that time debating with people like ed balls and gordon brown, george osborne, ken clarke. whatever your tribal feelings, these are serious people who talk economic policy seriously, because they realised that economic competence determines people‘sliving standards, determines our ability to fund our health service, schools, police and the rest of it. what has happened in the last two years is, it‘s gone away. you saw what happened in the general election. the conservatives campaigned without any numbers and the labour party campaigned with numbers that didn‘t add up. we in turn, were praised by the economist,
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by the institutional of fiscal studies, for basic economic literacy and competence. and i believe that will resurface as an absolute essential issue and i want us to be at the heart of all that. but in my view, the world isn‘tjust about economics and making numbers add up. that is important, but actually i came into politics as a radical and a reformer and i want to put up the centre of what i do, addressing some of the inequalities that this figure british societies. and i think that can be done, i think it can be done because i think at heart the british public are humane, tolerant and i think we can appeal to that instinct. which is in very marked
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contrast to the icy indifference of this conservative government. i am ambitious for this country and i am ambitious for this country and i am ambitious for this country and i am ambitious for our party. in difficult times, we have shown enormous resilience. but i now believe we can fight our way back, breakthrough and make an enormous success of our party and eventually in government. thank you. applause studio—macro so the new liberal democrat leader, sir vince cable saying there was a need to prepare foran saying there was a need to prepare for an exit from brexit. lots of reaction, nick clegg wishing him luck in his newjob, which he took on unopposed, the coronation taking place in the last hour in central london and vince cable with his team. we will get more reaction shortly. one in three cases of dementia could
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be prevented if they looked after their lifestyles. now there is another reason to stay active, keeping fit can reduce your risk of getting dementia as well as protect against heart disease and cancer. keeping the mind active throughout life, like with this spanish class, helps to build what the study calls, cognitive reserve. strengthening the brain so it can function in later life, despite damage. it's not surprising to me that learning a language will help because there is a lot of memory recall, keeping
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everything firing, which you tend to stop doing when you stop studying. learning anything, especially a language, possibly would give somebody who might be worried about alzheimer's, the chance to test their synapses. the main risk for dementia is old age, but the lancet study says 35% of cases could potentially be prevented if nine other factors were addressed. they are... lack of education, hearing loss, smoking, depression, social isolation, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. it is never too early, so starting off with education as a child and in secondary school and throughout your aduu secondary school and throughout your adult life, having an enriched environment where you socialise, exercise and do cognitively stimulating things. so do that and don‘t smoke, try not to be obese, try and be active and these things can makea
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try and be active and these things can make a difference. hobbies like dancing are not just can make a difference. hobbies like dancing are notjust exercise, they prevent people from being cut off from their community. social isolation is not good for your brain and actually trying to maintain social networks, keep your brain active, whether that is doing a crossword puzzle, learning to dance or higher education later in life, i don‘t think it matters, it is about keeping your brain active and healthy. alzheimer's disease accou nts healthy. alzheimer's disease accounts that two thirds of dementia cases and there is still no drug which can slow its progress. the alzheimer‘s society says dementia is set to be the 21st—century‘s biggest killer and we need to be aware of the risks and making positive lifestyle changes. fergus walsh, bbc news. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day, but first , the headlines on bbc news:
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brexit secretary david davis and the eu‘s michel barnier have outlined progress made in their latest round of talks. mr barnier says there remain "fundamental‘ disagreements" and the uk must clarify its position on a number of issues. two "dark web" marketplaces selling drugs and weapons are shut down by the the usjustice department. there‘s been a 10% rise in recorded crime in england and wales — sir vince cable has been elected leader of the liberal democrats without anybody else putting themselves forward for the role. we are going to be looking at chel costs. —— childcare costs. summer holidays are just around the corner, but parents face higher childcare costs than ever. on average, almost £750 per child over the full six week holiday. it‘s putting pressure on families already facing higher prices and meagre wage rises. we‘ll find out how parents are coping. profits at sports direct have plummeted nearly 60%. underlying pre—tax profit fell to £113.7 million — that‘s less than half what they made last year.
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the retailer says it‘s because of the weaker pound, which means it costs more to import goods from abroad. chief executive mike ashley said it had now taken steps to "minimise the short—term impact of currency volatility". the warm weather injune got us out spending in the shops. official stats show that uk retail sales were better than expected last month. the amount of stuff we bought was up 0.6% compared with may. there was a boost from higher sales of summer clothing, shoes and household goods. the amount of money we spent on goods was also up by 0.4%. school‘s will all soon be out for the summer, but as temperatures rise, so too does the cost of holiday childcare. the family and childcare trust has given the bbc exclusive access to figures that showjust how much of a squeeze holiday care puts on family finances. since last year, the average cost has risen by 4%. so for one child, it‘s £124 per week of childcare.
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many families will struggle to afford that, especially as cheaper, council—run options are hard to find. so how do parents juggle that with work? lucie stephens, head of co—production, new economics foundation. thanks forjoining us. that is a significant rise and a huge cost for families, what can government and businesses and employers do about it? it is a huge amount of money and pa rents a re it? it is a huge amount of money and parents are stuck in a difficult situation having to compromise between finding the type of affordable, quality care that suits their children and their family needs or taking significant chunks of time off work and in some cases, families are looking at stopping work completely in order to care for their children. we believe there are different ways in which that is happening and i have been working
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with families who are taking control of childcare themselves and design options that work better for them and their families. there options that work better for them and theirfamilies. there is a group in hackney called the grasshoppers nursery where their parents work alongside childcare professionals. they do shifts, taking it in turns as parents and get a discount on their fees as a result. it is making childcare more affordable and it is better for the staff who are being paid above average wages and staying in place for much longer. if we look at other countries and how they do things, we hear about scandinavian countries doing it correctly, what can we take from them? we need to start thinking about good quality, affordable childcare as a critical infrastructure for this country, alongside road and rail. it is in vital we invest in early years and young people and that will prevent further cost rising later on in our lives. if you are a parent and you
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are worrying about the rising cost and cannot afford it, what should you be thinking about? some of the things we are thinking billy maka seeing as parents coming together and looking at ways in which they can design childcare differently. it is about building up models but work for them. for example, one is about building up models but work forthem. for example, one in is about building up models but work for them. for example, one in seven people are self employed and groups of those self—employed people are coming together and building childcare that works for them, working with professionals. thank you forjoining us. we‘re looking at the cost of summer holiday childcare across the bbc all day today. find out more at bbc.co.uk/business or follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #childcare. lots more coming up at 5pm cover but now let‘s get the weather. the weather has calmed down from
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where we had localised flooding in lancashire and north wales. this is the scene in rhyl and similar scenes in the blackpool area. the humid air feeding those massive storms has been swept into europe following we have fresh air moving in. if you have fresh air moving in. if you have been outside, i am sure you have been outside, i am sure you have noticed the less humid feel. we have noticed the less humid feel. we have had a rain band, but it is clearing out of the way. we have had some sunshine but a few showers for north—west england and lots the northern ireland. through this evening and overnight, there will be showers working across wales and south—west england. the showers in north—west england die away for a time but later in the night another band of rain will work up from the south as freshening winds moving. it
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will be a mild night, 11, 16 celsius but becoming dry across eastern scotla nd but becoming dry across eastern scotland as the rain clears out of the way. this is the weather chart for friday. low pressure, not what you want to see injuly. wetter conditions are on their way with gale force gusts. similar conditions the northern ireland but across northern, eastern scotland and eastern england, the weather isn‘t bad. sunshine around and it should feel pleasant. the rain making a late day appearance at the golf at royal birkdale. looking ahead to the weekend, the same area of low pressure will be loitering around. ringing spells of rain, heavy, thundery slow—moving downpours, but it is not a complete write—off. across the midlands, south east england, there should be some sunshine. north—west scotland faring reasonably as well. but there will
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be plenty of showers close to wales and south—west england. some of them heavy, thundery and slow—moving and the weather might be great, cloudy and dump across north—east england and dump across north—east england and south—east scotland. by sunday, the low—pressure has moved eastwards. showers are widely, but the showers pretty heavy and widespread across eastern parts of the country. it is one of those weekends. new chance your luck and there will be sunshine to be found but heavy downpours from time to time as well. that is your latest weather. today at 5 — more talks in brussels and more clarification needed on brexit according to the eu‘s chief negotiator. michel barnier says there have been areas of agreement, but fundamental differences remain. i say by way of conclusion the first round was about organisation. this week has been about presentation. the third round must be about clarification. brexit secretary david davis said the talks had been
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robust, but there‘s a lot to be positive about. we conducted this round constructively and at pace. now i hope this is a model we can continue going forward. to coin a phrase, michel, the clock is ticking. we‘ll have the latest from brussels. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00pm. crime figures in england
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