Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 21, 2017 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 8pm: the white house press secretary, sean spicer, has resigned after president trump appointed anthony scaramucci as his as his communications director. and friction with sean. this is the white house. iwant and friction with sean. this is the white house. i want to make sure our cultural template is that we put the president first. the nspcc expresses alarm at a bbc investigation which found children being groomed on the live video—streaming app, periscope. 16 children are interviewed as part of a major child abuse investigation involving up to 70 police officers in cheltenham. the hunt for missing raf airman corrie mckague — police say the search of a huge landfill site has failed to find his body. also in the next hour — an ongoing cholera epidemic which is sweeping war—ravaged yemen. it's believed to be the largest ever recorded in a single year — with one person dying every hour in the country from the disease.
8:01 pm
and how a music video performed by schoolchildren in a yorkshire village has caught the attention of one of the biggest music stars in the world. good evening and welcome to bbc news. president trump's press secretary sean spicer has resigned. it follows the president's appointment of a former wall street banker, anthony scaramucci, as his new head of communications — and reports in the us media suggest mr spicer resigned in protest at the appointment. mr spicer‘s performance in the post had been heavily ridiculed — not least by the us tv comedy show saturday night live, on which he was regularly impersonated by hollywood actress melissa mccarthy.
8:02 pm
our chief correspondent gavin hewitt has more. a dramatic day at the white house. sean spicer, the white house press secretary, and one of the faces of the trump administration, has resigned. spicer has been involved in a number of high—profile controversies. early on, he found himself having to defend the crowd size at donald trump's inauguration, compared to that of barack obama. this was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period, both in person and around the globe. the pictures clearly suggested otherwise. then there were sean spicer‘s about comments hitler and the use of chemical weapons that drew international criticism. we didn't use chemical weapons in world war ii, you know, you had a... you know, someone as despicable as hitler, who didn't even sink to the, to the using chemical weapons. sean spicer found himself under close scrutiny
8:03 pm
from donald trump, who prizes good on—camera performances. in particular, president trump began looking for a strong defender as his problems mounted, in particular with the investigation into whether there was collusion between the trump campaign and russia during last year's election. so today the president appointed anthony scaramucci, a wall street financier, as his communications director. shortly after, sean spicer abruptly resigned, suggesting some turmoil inside the white house. in recent times, there were indications sean spicer was being sidelined. he was giving fewer and fewer on—camera briefings. but his allies say there was a deeper problem. he was out there defending white house policy, only for the president himself to issue a tweet later that seemed to change the plans.
8:04 pm
—— change the facts. today's moves indicate that donald trump, under pressure, sees the need to have an able communicator who will both defend and fight for his presidency. gavin hewitt, bbc news, washington. let's speak to our washington correspondent gary o'donoghue. you get the sense there are an awful lot of tensions in the white house is over this. yes, there is a big shuffling going on right now. we've not only got anthony scaramucci coming in as communications director, the departure of sean spicer, that well mount face around the world, but we also have a new press secretary, sarah saunders, announced today, stepping up from deputy to do that kind of work. she has built a better relationship with the media than the sean spicer had. and i think perhaps we will start to
8:05 pm
see is a bit more openness, they have been cutting back for example, severely cutting back on on camera briefings, which has not gone down well at all. you may see a bit of a reversal of that as we did today with anthony scaramucci coming out and answering questions. and he a nswe i’s a and answering questions. and he answers a lot of questions. he's a very different operator, that is quite clear, from sean spicer, from the get go. he did one of those, it's a classic technique in communications, you let them ask questions until they are worn out and that gets a lot of stuff out of the way quickly. it consigns it to a single news cycle if possible. he a nswered single news cycle if possible. he answered all questions about whether there any tensions with the present‘s chief of staff, whether or not he had any problems with sean spicer, he said he loved and
8:06 pm
respected him. he talked a lot about how he would handle things and talked about he would try and build a bit ofa talked about he would try and build a bit of a different relationship with the media. said he still took issue with some bias in the media, but a much more conciliatory tone i think, if nothing else. we will see how that works in practice but i think they are trying to turn over some sort of page in terms of the poor relationship, the terrible relationship they have with many branches of the media. thank you. sean spicer‘s replacement is his deputy sarah huckabee sanders. in the last hour, she read out a statement to journalists at a news conference about president trump's reaction to his press secretary's resignation. i'm grateful for sean's work on the half of the administration and the american people. i wish continued success as american people. i wish continued success as he american people. i wish continued success as he itioves oi'i american people. i wish continued success as he itioves onto pui’sue i'iew opportunities. just look at his great television ratings. sean will continue to serve the administration
8:07 pm
through august. the president has also appointed anthony scaramucci as communications director. i have a statement on his appointment as well. anthony is a person i have great respect for. he will be in a pool important addition to this administration. he has been a great supporter and will now help implement key aspects of our agenda while leading the communications team. we have accomplished so much and we are being given credit for so little. the good news is that people get it even if the media doesn't. while anthony scaramucci has just finished his first news conference in his new role. this is what he has been saying. i would love to have sean here. he decided he thought it would be better to go. and it speaks volumes to who he is as a human being and a team player. his attitude is anthony is coming in, let me clear the slate for him. i don't have any friction with him.
8:08 pm
this is the white house, the usa, we are serving the president. i want to make sure our are serving the president. i want to make sui'e oui' camps make sure our camps cultural template is that we put the present's agenda first which is perfectly american people we serve his interests. so if we have a little bit of friction inside the white house as a result of that, we can all live with that. i'm used to dealing with friction. anthony scaramucci. at about half past eight we scaramucci. at about half past eight we will be speaking to someone from the bull and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight are laura hughes, political correspondent at the daily telegraph, and the political reporter at the guardian, jessica elgot. a bbc investigation has found evidence of children as young as nine being groomed on the live—streaming app periscope. launched two years ago, periscope allows its millions of users to broadcast live from their phone. it can also reveal their location.
8:09 pm
but our team found children streaming video live from their classrooms and even their bedrooms — leaving themselves open to abuse. twitter, which owns the app, says it has zero tolerance for this kind of conduct. our correspondent angus crawford reports. not learning, but broadcasting, live from the back of a lesson. viewers sent her direct messages. another school, another class. more questions from total strangers. but this isn'tjust an innocent chat. are you in high school? yes, we are. we found pupils live streaming across the country. and they've all been using this — periscope, an app owned by twitter, which allows users to broadcast live from anywhere. and our investigation found children using it in their own bedrooms and being groomed in front of our eyes. this child is still in her school uniform, probably 12, no more than that.
8:10 pm
talking straight into the camera and there is one, two, three, four, five, six, seven requests already. one of them is asking the size of her bra. another one has justjoined. someone hasjust asked her to unbutton her shirt. the age limit is meant to be 13, but we easily find children younger than that. this little girl is really young. hi. so right now it's my first time playing this app. i don't even know what to do. i'm nine. i actually look seven. "up top, please." what do you mean by, "up top, please? " we passed the details of all these children to the police, and showed what we found to the nspcc‘s head of online safety. hi.
8:11 pm
oh, my gosh. well, it's very disturbing, isn't it? to see children as young as nine when they're so vulnerable and being so clearly groomed for sexual purposes by a pack of people online. it's really shocking. what's really worrying about periscope is the way it uses maps. if i go live from here on a street corner in west london, then anyone can zoom in and find out exactly where i am. twitter refused an interview request, but said in a statement, "periscope has a strong content moderation policy and encourages viewers to report comments they feel are abusive. we have zero tolerance for any form of child sexual exploitation." but our investigation showed children openly being groomed. the question for periscope — can young people really broadcast to the world and stay safe?
8:12 pm
wth me is journalist and broadcaster kate bevan, who specialises in technology and social media. thank you for coming in. where does responsibility lie for keeping people safe and ensuring the kind of conduct we have seen there does not happen? i think it depends how old you are. but certainly for young children you have to ask where are the parents, why are children as young as nine and younger online without supervision? and of course it is up to twitter as well to provide a safe space and respond to any kind of reports of that kind of grooming. but twitter cannot keep every person say. you also have to ask where your responsibility is. what about the edge checks that are meant to be put in place. if you are not meant to have most of these apps
8:13 pm
until you are at least 13. we're supposed to be getting age verification with pawn websites but thatis verification with pawn websites but that is very fraught. how'd you do it, do you do it by credit credit ca rd it, do you do it by credit credit card ferries location? age verification isn't the answer, the pa na cea . verification isn't the answer, the panacea. i'm glad i don't have children trying to navigate this. it comes back to what age are you as a pa rent comes back to what age are you as a parent comfortable with your child being online unsupervised. what can a company like twitter do to police something that is built to be a live at that can be streamed and seen anywhere? twitter has made a decision about what it wants periscope to be. it knew what it was getting when it bought it and it has made that decision. it is alive at that anyone can jump made that decision. it is alive at that anyone canjump into made that decision. it is alive at that anyone can jump into at any time and broadcast at any time. and thenit time and broadcast at any time. and then it is up to the individuals, ask, to decide how we work within that. twitter cannot release millions of users, hundreds of millions, across countries across
8:14 pm
the world, and have appropriate policing for an eight—year—old, is not appropriate for a 30—year—old. what is appropriate for a 15—year—old in the uk is not necessarily appropriate for a 15—year—old in the middle east. i think the only thing twitter can do is respond proactively and quickly when something is reported to them. but otherwise it is up to the individuals to look after themselves as well. you would expect them to say we have zero tolerance for this kind of behaviour. it is against the law, of course they would say that. we'll have zero tolerance for it. but that suggests that they try to moderate it in some way. they will certainly respond to as i'm pretty sui’e certainly respond to as i'm pretty sure they have algorithms that will pick up that kind of behaviour. we are learning artificial intelligence is very good at that. but it can't be everywhere at every time. kids are very canny and using devices when parents are not paying
8:15 pm
attention. what can parents do to try to block device? turn off the route, take the device off them. no technology on the bit —— in the bedroom, turn off the wi—fi, take the sim card out. thank you for coming in. the headlines on bbc news: white house press secretary sean spicer resigns a bbc investigation finds evidence of children as young as nine being groomed on the live streaming app periscope. 16 children interviewed as part of a major child abuse investigation in gloucestershire. sport now, and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. jordan spieth leads the open heading into the weekend at royal birkdale.
8:16 pm
the two time major winner was the only player to go under par in both of his first two rounds... and is two ahead of the field. rory mcilroy had a two—under—par round of 68 today — making the most of the best conditions earlier in the day. he's on one under — tied for seventh. ian poulter is just three shots off the lead with one birdie and one bogey in a consistent round this afternoon. but out front — spieth has made a mockery of the wind and rain to move up to six under par as he hopes to add the open to his masters and us open titles. poulter finished second at royal birkdale when the open was last held there in 2008. he had to contend with some of the worst of the weather this afternoon but leaves himself right in contention for the weekend. a very tough day on the golf course, 35 mile an hour gusting wind. a win
8:17 pm
switch on 13 which went from an off the rights to down off the right and all of a sudden it cools down 20 degrees. so it was a crazy hour to finish the round. they stopped play 01’ finish the round. they stopped play or allowed us to finish the whole we we i’e or allowed us to finish the whole we were on because there were some casual water on the greens they wa nted casual water on the greens they wanted it to soak through which it normally does on links golf courses. it was a crazy day. just had to hang tough, try to commit to shots and there is only one blemish on the card. so with just a few pairings left out on the course... here's how things stand. spieth wasjust one spieth was just one over for his round today. brooks koepka isjust to finish off his round. chris froome is just two stages away from a fourth tour de france title
8:18 pm
after maintaining his lead... and keeping his rivals at bay... on stage 19... as drew savage reports. 1938 miles done, 216 to go. chris frewen ever 1938 miles done, 216 to go. chris frewen evei’ closei’ 1938 miles done, 216 to go. chris frewen ever closer to that fourth tour victory and joining the ranks of cycling all—time greats. like the legendary eddie merricks, he would not have expected much action today. the train was too flat to allow his rivals of jack tries to attack. the action was provided by this man who broke clear to pick up a win14 dimension data. chris frewen was
8:19 pm
happy to roll across the line, his lead 23 seconds all he needs is one more good day. chelsea have completed the signing of spain striker alvaro morata from real madrid for a fee believed to be around 60 million pounds the 24—year—old has signed a five—year deal and willjoin the chelsea squad on their preseason tour of asia. he scored 20 goals in la liga and the champions league for real last season. british diver grace reid has finished an impressive fourth in her world championship debut in budapest... in the three metre springboard. reid was the first gb woman to reach the olympic final in this event in rio last year... and scored a personal best total of 336.70 from her five routines. china's tingmao shi took gold. meanwhile tom daley and matty lee qualified for the ten metre platform final... that's tomorrow night. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour thank you.
8:20 pm
16 children have been interviewed by social services and police this evening as part of a major investigation into child abuse in cheltenham. officers have searched properties and seized mobile phones and computers. steve knibbs has the details. tonight, this is still a live investigation. police are describing it as significant. information first came to light last friday of allegations of recent and non—recent child sexual abuse. yesterday, a number of police officers, accompanied by social care teams, visited four homes in cheltenham. -- 70 —— 70 police officers. at the same time, 16 children of all ages were also spoken to at a number of locations in cheltenham. that is a sensitive part of the investigation. let's get more on that from the man leading the enquiry. we spoke to those children, along with colleagues from social care, from children's services. to do that, we used specially trained police officers from our child
8:21 pm
protection teams. what we would call a joint visit. that consisted of a social worker and police officer, and just explore if the child is happy, if there is anything the child wants to disclose, and just make sure the child is happy and safe. all 16 children involved are now back with theirfamilies and are being supported by police and social care teams. in terms of the evidence seized during searches, it is things like computers, laptops, tablets and phones. they are now being forensically examined by a high—tech team. no arrests have been made. this is a live investigation in the early stages. the priority for everyone involved, police and social care teams, is the safeguarding and welfare of the 16 children at the centre of a major investigation of child sexual abuse in gloucestershire. the ongoing cholera epidemic
8:22 pm
in yemen is one of the largest recorded in a single year in modern times, according to oxfam. more than 360,000 people are said to have been infected in the country, one of the poorest on the arabian peninsula. it's a nation devastated by a war between forces loyal to its president and those allied to the houthi rebel movement. amid this, a preventable deadly disease is spreading. nawal al—maghafi reports. another crisis has hit yemen. people here question how much more they can take. war and poverty have combined to mean cholera swept through this country faster than any on record. unless treated quickly, this waterborne disease can kill. most have walked hours to get treatment, but only be fortunate to make it in time. aid agencies are doing
8:23 pm
what they can, but the magnitude of this outbreak is outstripping their ability to respond. one person dies in yemen every hour from cholera. this is the world's largest humanitarian crisis, and it's completely man—made. pockets of famine are growing. cholera is spreading. and civil servants like the doctors and nurses here haven't received a salary in over ten months. there's one thing that people here keep telling me, and it is that they feel completely forgotten by the world. people face the biggest threat in rural areas. in this one village alone, 20 people have died in the space of three months.
8:24 pm
hours from the nearest town, it was impossible for people without money to get help. abdullah has recently become sick. together with his sister hind, they can't afford the medicine for the illness. the truth is that for many in this country there is no escaping cholera. here on the edge of the village is the only source of water. the people know it is infected, but with no other options, they continue to rely on it. joining me is iona craig — a journalist who focuses on yemen and visited the country to report on the cholera outbreak earlier this year. thank you forjoining us. how
8:25 pm
difficult is it forjournalists to effectively report on yemen? it's very difficult to get there in the first place. certainly even once you have a visa to get into the country is very difficult. there are no civilian flights going into the north at the moment, the saudi coalition has blocked them since august last year. it is very difficult to get there in the first place and then getting around the country is also not easy. but it is probably easierfor country is also not easy. but it is probably easier for women and your coi’i’espottuehce probably easier for women and your correspondence has been doing a very good job. tell us what you saw last time you went, the sheer scale of the problem. one of the biggest problems is it is a rural population, even before the war, 65% of the population lived in rural areas and they are very remote areas. some places can only be accessed on food, you can't even get
8:26 pm
accessed on food, you can't even get a vehicle there. i went to some of those areas and people there had not seen any state agencies or aid agencies for over ten years. they are very remote places and more places are moving there because they are not getting their salaries, there are notjobs in the cities, or there are notjobs in the cities, or there is fighting in the towns and cities. so the rural population from what i've seen over last year is growing. so it is even harderfor aid agencies now to get them because of the war. in those other people that really suffering. we have spoken to one charity that is working in yemen tonight. they said the politicians on both sides of the conflict do not seem to realise quite how bad this cholera outbreak has become. how can that be the case? i think because they are not on the ground, they are not watching it. and also because there is so little reporting from yemen because it is so hard for international reporters to get into the country
8:27 pm
and report on what is going on. and also because it has happened so quickly. this is just also because it has happened so quickly. this isjust since also because it has happened so quickly. this is just since the end of april. and those figures have soared to over 300,000 now. it is the fastest—growing outbreak ever. and i think from that point of view everybody is still playing catch up on the situation there. and it is very easy for the belligerence on both sides of the war but certainly for those outside the country to ignore what is going on because they are not seeing it. if reports start to increase them, how much more must the international community do? how much can they do, compared with other crises like ebola for example, this seems to have been really overlooked. in yemen it is a man—made crisis. i think there are many countries international ‘s, the uk, the us have been fuelling this war directly with arms and weapons
8:28 pm
to the saudi led coalition, who are very much party to the conflict. and it has been incredibly ethical to bush on the political front which is obviously what is needed. in order to find a political resolutions conflict. in the meantime it is about getting aid into the country which is repeatedly being delayed, and getting aid around the country which has also been blocked by local forces. and there isn't the pressure being put on any parties to go to the negotiating table and try to at least reach some sort of cessation of hostilities or some way to ease the pressure on the civilian population who are really suffering the most from this conflict. all around the country now, this outbreak isn't restricted. thank you talking to us. suffolk police say an extensive search of a landfill site has failed to find the remains of a missing raf airman. corrie mckeague disappeared last september after a night out with friends in bury st edmunds. cctv cameras showed him going into a bin loading bay.
8:29 pm
ben ando reports. after 20 weeks and having sifted through thousands of tonnes of rubbish at this landfill site in cambridge, the police have turned up nothing. it's tough, it's dirty, it's expensive, but now, says the officer in charge, it has to stop. we searched over 6,500 tonnes of waste, excavating a huge area. without anything further to tell us where he might be on such a vast site, the search cannot continue. 23—year—old corrie mckeague disappeared during a night out in bury st edmunds. he told friends he would walk home but never made it to the raf base nearby. months of searching led nowhere, though police knew his phone seemed to track the path of a bin lorry and that took them to the landfill site. his disappearance prompted a huge social media campaign. his family crowd —funded their own investigation. six weeks ago, his girlfriend april, who was pregnant at the time he went missing, revealed she'd
8:30 pm
had his daughter. for his mum, nicola, herself a police officer in scotland, stopping the search is hard to accept. i do believe they should search the area and be able to come back and say that either he is in there or he's not. how can theyjust leave him in there? if... how can theyjust leave him in there? his family said they would be happy to use the fund to pay for more searching and say they are urging the police not to close this investigation because a breakthrough could be just inches away. this is bbc news. coming up in the next few minutes we will have the latest on the royal visit to germany, including how one member of
8:31 pm
the party staged a very public sit down protest on the tarmac of the airport. it has certainly been a day of mixed fortunes. some warm and sunny weather in the east. further west there has been heavy downpours. some outbreaks of rain in cumbria. it is this band of rain which produced heavy downpours. that will be nudging northland eastwards across england as we head through tonight. it will be followed by further showers rattling in across parts of the south west and south wales. so that sets the scene for tomorrow. still no pressure in the west bringing the blustery showers to south wales, south—west england, some showers south wales, south—west england, sott‘ie showei’s ovei’ south wales, south—west england, some showers over northern england. all the showers move slowly northwards and eastwards through the day. scotland and northern ireland get away with a largely dry picture, elsewhere, temperatures around 22. sunday is another side day but the showers further and fewer between.
8:32 pm
some drier and brighter weather between the showers and temperatures in the sunnier spells are likely to reach around 16 to 22 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines at 8.30pm: the white house press secretary, sean spicer, has stood down after the appointment of anthony scaramucci as president trump's communications director. a bbc investigation finds evidence of children as young as nine being groomed on the live streaming app periscope. 16 children have been interviewed by social services and police as part of a major child abuse investigation involving up to 70 police officers in cheltenham. over 360,000 people in yemen are said to have been infected in one of the largest cholera epidemics recorded — in just a single year — in modern times. more now on the news that president trump's press secretary
8:33 pm
sean spicer has resigned. it follows the appointment of a former wall street banker, anthony scaramucci, as his new head of communications. mr spicer had been lampooned in the past, as he found himself trying to defend the president against a sceptical media. mr scaramucci told journalists at the white house this evening that he admired the decision by the former press secretary to stand down. i would love to have shown here, he decided it would be better to go, and for me it speaks volumes as to who he is as a human being, who he is asa who he is as a human being, who he is as a team player. his attitude is, if anthony is coming in, let me clear the slate for him and i do appreciate that, i love him for it. ido appreciate that, i love him for it. i do not have any friction with sean, this is the white house, we are serving the president. i want to make sure that our cultural template is that we put the president's agenda first, which is perfect for
8:34 pm
the american people, and we serve his interests. we have a bit of friction inside the white house as a result of that, then that's ok. we can all live without, i'm a business person, i'm used to dealing with friction. —— we can all live with that. let's talk to niall stanage — associate editor of the american political newspaper, the hill — whojoins us from washington and has just got back from that white house briefing. so many questions, she was quite patient wasn't he? he was. he took questions from a number of people in the room. he went fairly deliberately threw people, where it's sean spicer had sometimes been criticised for selecting questions from a sympathetic media outlets. i thought it was an effective performance in fairness, by anthony scaramucci at his first time on the white house podium. how much will we see white house podium. how much will we see of him, because he did announce that sarah huckabee sanders, sean spicer was my deputy, would take ovei’ spicer was my deputy, would take over the role? she's the one who will to field the questions normally. that would be the
8:35 pm
assumption. having said that, one of the reasons people tell me anthony scaramucci has been hired for this job in the first basis because of his effectiveness as a television communicator. that is clearly something that president trump values of very highly, scaramucci has much more experience doing basically tv work man he does in strategic communications. i think we will have to see. he certainly did not come across as a shrinking violet earlier on. he was asked several times how he will get the white house back on track, and he said you have to eat an elephant one bit at a time. having previously said everything is on track and that is fine. slightly contradicting. what will his biggest challenges be? a couple of things. the first is that president trump's approval ratings are historically low. in the high 30s, which is dismal, really. the other challenge which is a bigger one and one that the communications operator at the white house has grappled with for a long
8:36 pm
time is the fact that president trump goes off on his own direction quite often. that obviously makes it difficult to have a strategy in place for longer term communications. that may improve because scaramucci and tromp purportedly get along better on a personal level than spicer and tron, but it would be a challenge for any white house communications director. —— than spicer and tromp. white house communications director. -- than spicer and tromp. he has also faced questions about his relationship with reince priebus. what are the chances of him stay in that post? we will hear more about that post? we will hear more about that in a few hours, because he is purportedly going to join scaramucci for a tv interview on a network here later tonight, but this has certainly been seen in washington as a defeat for reince priebus and sean spicer. both of whom are seen as representing a more orthodox or conventional strain of the
8:37 pm
republican party. scaramucci is much more, basically trump ‘s circle of friends, a new york guy, a business quy- friends, a new york guy, a business guy. i think this is seen as a defeat for reince priebus as well as for sean spicer. saturday night live need to start auditioning for a scarily cheap character, don't they? thank you very much. —— for a scaramucci character? with millions of children across england and wales beginning their school holidays this weekend, officialfigures have revealed the extent of exclusions. the region with the greatest number of exclusions is yorkshire and the humber, where just over 50 thousand pupils were excluded for a fixed period of time. almost 600 of them were permanently expelled from their schools. our correspondent, dave edwards reports from the charity in sheffield using ex—offenders to reduce those numbers. hate speeches, hate students, yet done with the police all time. a
8:38 pm
violent, horrible girl. we were always messing about, getting in trouble with police, smashing windows, drinking school, pretty much saying screw education. all these young people have had problems at school. most have been excluded. so, they have been sent here to interchange in sheffield. this is the crime room, designed to shock. showing the youngsters where people who make bad decisions mightjust end up. i was young, i made a lot of mistakes... this man knows it only too well. he was thrown out of his school at 1a, and turned to a life of crime. he was jailed for ten yea rs of crime. he was jailed for ten years for manslaughter. for me it is about redemption. i made a lot of m ista kes about redemption. i made a lot of mistakes in my life. it's notjust responsibility, i feel mistakes in my life. it's notjust responsibility, ifeel i have mistakes in my life. it's notjust responsibility, i feel i have a moral obligation because i see these young people and i see the potential in them, but i also see if they go
8:39 pm
way words, the missed opportunities for life. like myself. a specialist centre which aims to change peoples attitudes and behaviour. as. as well as help them get qualifications. the youngsters themselves say it works. when you show be there is more to life than just messing about and acting like the big one, that does not get you nowhere. if i didn't coitie not get you nowhere. if i didn't come here, iwould be imprisoned, i really would. they encourage me from their past and tell you you don't wa nt their past and tell you you don't want to go down this road, i've been there, i've done it before. this is hollybrook academy, a sheffield primary school where a group of younger children have been chosen to work with him. i was being bad because of my anger and people taking the mick out of me. then i beat them up. i got on report.|j ke pt beat them up. i got on report.|j kept hitting people. i got in trouble. i got excluded. kept hitting people. i got in trouble. igot excluded. iwas jumping on tables, i was shouting,
8:40 pm
being disrespectful. the prevention is better than the cure, we are trying to nip it in the bud early on and identify groups of young people who could benefit from intervention. without education, where would you be? at this school, no one has been permanently excluded all year, as the number of exclusions rises across the country, could this approach be part of the solution? the duke and duchess of cambridge are heading home at the end of their five—day tour of poland and germany. earlier, the royal couple, who were joined on the trip by prince george and princess charlotte, enjoyed a special performance by the hamburg symphony orchestra earlier. our royal correspondent peter hunt reports. at first, they were just world spectators. —— royal spectators. watching as hamburg ‘s young are encouraged to take up music,
8:41 pm
something kate did in her youth. did you play an instrument once in your life? yes, the flute. one day, william will be centre stage. not this day, it was left to his wife to take up the batting he declined. later, at airbus, the couple will have learned about the potential challengers brexit may pose. for now, the aircraft manufacturer with parts in the uk used people and parts in the uk used people and parts freely across europe. before leaving, the closest worlds get to bring a child to work day: george and charlotte were shown the type of helicopter their dad uses as an air
8:42 pm
ambulance pilot. george will follow in his fathers the steps one day, as king. being a pilot also seems attractive to three—year—old. this is the sort of moment when being on public display has its drawbacks. a sit down tarmac protest from a princess who, like any two—year—old, is not overly keen on delayed gratification. they are the future of the british monarchy, and this, flying the flag abroad will increasingly be their future. this week, william and kate had a clear—cut mission, to deliver the uk government's message that while britain is leaving the eu, it will not be walking away from europe. heading home and celebrations tomorrow, when george turns four. toddler tantrums, a great leveller! a video performed by schoolchildren in a village near hull has caught the attention of one of the biggest music stars in the world.
8:43 pm
westfield primary school in cottingham created their own version of will i am's "fiyah". now the man himself has told them on twitter that he loves it and he's retweeted it to his millions of fans. simon spark reports. westfield primary school have just got a little bit more famous in the last few hours. their idea for an end of school video took off pop superstar‘s will.i.am's latest single fire. but what they didn't expect was that he'd see it, like it and retwee it to 13 million people. like it and retweet it to 13 million people. this is why he liked it — it's a professional looking, perfectly choreographed attempt, with remarkable similarities to the original video. from the phone swipe moves to the individual break—outs. the school tweeted will.i.am saying: we only have a few days left at school, please watch our fire power. to which he replied: i saw
8:44 pm
this video and it put the biggest smile on my face. this made me so happy. it's awesome, guys. thanks for the love. #wow. and this morning, their year six teacher,= broke year six teacher broke the news to the children, those who hadn't already heard anyway. their parents were waking their children up to tell them about it and they all came in this morning and we all sat in the classroom and we had the tweet up on the board to show them it and they were just over the moon. absolutely over the moon, they couldn't believe it. great. but it was the teaching assistant who put it all together. we tried to up our game this year to get noticed by will.i.am but i was quite proud of this one. it looked quite good. westfield primary‘s new will.i.am has been realising just what it means. that is absolutely brilliant, 'cause it's. .. the person who's actually wrote the song and seeing a primary school doing it is actually really good. it's awesome. i actually can't believe he actually watched it.
8:45 pm
it gave me an experience to share that i can dance and i'm confident to do it. some of the moves are quite difficult for us so we had to change a few. but we've tried to be creative as much as we can. what a way to end your primary school days. i think they will remember this so much more than they will remember the saps, the exams, this is the way to go. the headlines on bbc news: sarah huckabee sanders is announced as the new white house press secretary after sean spicer resigned. a bbc investigation finds evidence of children as young as nine being groomed on the live streaming app periscope. 16 children are interviewed as part of a major child abuse investigation involving up to 70 police officers in cheltenham.

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on