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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 23, 2017 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 2pm. more than a0 of the bbc‘s best known women broadcasters have written to the corporation's director—general demanding he "act now" to deal with the gender pay gap. the point of the letter is to say in 2020 it will be fifty years since the equal pay act of 1970 — tony, we all love the bbc we want to carry on working for it, i think we need to do things a little bit quicker. a 20—year—old man has died after being confronted by a police officer in a london shop. new insights into the relationship princess diana had with her sons regrets about a final phone call. william harry open up in a documentary on the 20th anniversary of her death. international trade secretary liam fox has given his backing to a two year transitional deal with the eu after brexit. frankly i've waited a0 years to leave the eu, 2a months would be a rounding error. gay men and sex workers will be
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allowed to donate blood after restrictions are relaxed in england and scotland. and at 2:30pm, as mps leave westminster for the summer recess, the week in parliament gives them an end of term report. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. some of the bbc‘s most prominent women broadcasters have written an open letter to their boss, the director—general, calling on him to take urgent action to ensure women are paid the same as men doing the equivalentjob. the a0 signatories include claire balding and fiona bruce. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn said the pay gap was "appalling" and called for a pay audit of every organisation. 0ur media correspondent david sillito reports. alexjones of the one show, mishal husein, sue barker, three of more than a0 famous names
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calling on the bbc to act now on its gender pay gap. this open letter to the papers says that this week's annual report confirmed what many had long suspected, that women were being paid less than men for the same work. 0n the whole i think it is fantastic that so many wonderful women have been prepared to stick their head above the parapet. we have got stick, we knew we were going to get stick, that is why it was never going to be an easy thing to do. but it is not about getting whacking great pay rises for women who are already well paid. it is about pay parity and getting fairness for everybody. 0n the list revealed this week the 20 highest—paid male stars received more than £12 million. the top 20 women less than half that. this, they say, is not a call for more pay, it is a demand for fair pay, the letter saying the bbc has known about the pay disparity for years. "we all want to go on the record to call upon you to act now."
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the point is to set, absolutely set, in stone if you are doing exactly the samejob as a man, you have to be on the same rates. and the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says the corporation needs to look at itself, but added this went much wider than the bbc. this gender pay gap is appalling. we would insist on a strong gender pay audit of every organisation and we would also look at a 20—1 ratio between the chief executive and the lowest paid staff in every public sector organisation. in response the bbc said its overall pay gap is 10%, less than the national average of 18%, and it is working towards eliminating it altogether, but today's signatories want that to happen sooner rather than later. a short time agojane garvey, the instigator of the letter, told the bbc the reasons behind it.
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the reason for the letter is obvious. the figures that came out last week that sell something that a lot of us have suspected for a long time. somehow seeing it all in black and white just made a load of people, not just and white just made a load of people, notjust women, think, hang on, what? 2017 and there has been legislation about this since 1970. it has got to stop and we have got to do something about it really quickly. it's been an interesting 36 hours of my life. have had a great deal of help, farfrom a hours of my life. have had a great deal of help, far from a solo project and i want to thank everyone who has helped me because they really have. some people were more enthusiastic than others. some people took more persuasion but on the whole i think it's fantastic
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that so many wonderful women have been petty stick their heads above the parapet. we have got stick, we knew we would get stick, that is why it would not be an easy thing to do but it is not about getting pay rises for women who are already well paid. it is about pay parity and getting fairness for everybody. would you be happy to see male colleagues' pay go down to reach parity? i would be delighted if some of our better paid male colleagues we re of our better paid male colleagues were prepared to make that kind of gesture. what we want to guard against is cuts lower down in the bbc. that would be unfair and u nfortu nate bbc. that would be unfair and unfortunate and i don't think there isa unfortunate and i don't think there is a single woman who signed that letter who doesn't love the bbc and what it stands for every bit as much asi what it stands for every bit as much as i do. this is notjust about the top end, on—air talent, this is women in general. this is about everybody at the bbc, about
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fairness. that is what we are in pursuit. in a way we should not have the do this. why should women have to get together and put themselves out there in this slightly uncomfortable way? but our alternative was to just do nothing and say nothing and i'm afraid the evidence suggests that hasn't been great for us. tony hall says he wa nts to great for us. tony hall says he wants to have this problem is by 2020. what you say to that? the point of the letter is to say 2020 would be 50 years since the equal pay act 1970. tony, we all love the bbc, we want to carry on working for it. i think we need to do things a bit quicker. that's jane garvey who presents women's hour on radio four. let's get a different perspective on the this story. josh doody is an author and salary coach. he joins us via webcam from florida. josh, good to have you with us here on bbc news. let me ask you first of
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all, is there a different approach in the way that men and women generally negotiate their salaries? i think there are two answer to your question. the first is before the negotiation begins, ifind that women are more often than not inclined to accept an offer or not negotiate as hard as men, so i think men are more aggressive and whether 01’ men are more aggressive and whether or not they engage to negotiate the salaryjob offer. or not they engage to negotiate the salary job offer. 0nce or not they engage to negotiate the salaryjob offer. once the go shooting i think the tactics men and women can employ to improve their conversation are the same. what sort of things do you advise the people who you coach when they're approaching salary negotiations and before you answer that question, and thus an idea of the range of organisations you deal with, all private sector, some public sector organisations, government agencies? almost always private sector, larger companies you have heard of and i negotiate behind—the—scenes for them. almost all private sector and
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i tend to work with software developers and engineers that are going to largerfirms developers and engineers that are going to larger firms that we interact with everyday. so i think we can assume a lot of it is in the new media age of things. what are the sort of things and advice you offer? a few things. one is to determine before you get a job offer, what would be appealing, what is your minimum salary. 0nce offer, what would be appealing, what is your minimum salary. once you get thatjob offer ask for time to dig is over and then formulate your counter offer, which i recommend between ten and 20% of their offer, deliver that offer and then negotiate the final details of the offer once the company responds to your counter offer. that's it in broad strokes. should people be afraid of pitching for a higher figure than they honestly expect to get all is it a bit like, for those who buy property, you ask for less than you're willing to pay, in this
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case you ask for more than you're willing to accept? right, i think there is little downside there just because it is important to remember that by the time you actually get a job offerfrom a company, they're invested in bringing you on board. they want to bring you want your tea m they want to bring you want your team —— that team so when you counter offer, the worst thing you can expect is no, we made your best offer and we will stand back but sometimes they work with you and improve your offer to convince you to come on board said their goal is to come on board said their goal is to close that deal and bring you onto their team so they can start using you in a productive capacity for their business. anybody contacted you from the bbc yet? not yet! josh, negotiate and salary coach, thank you for being with us here on bbc news. i wonder if i asked him that question in a week's time what a nswer question in a week's time what answer i would get? prince william and prince harry have spoken candidly about their relationship with their mother, princess diana, in a documentary marking the 20th anniversary of her death.
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they describe her sense of fun, but also speak of their regret that their last conversation with her was a rushed phone call. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell‘s report, contains some flash photography. to the watching world, she was the princess whose image appeared constantly on front pages. it was a glamorous but necessarily limited impression of the real person. now nearly 20 years after diana's death in the car accident in paris, her sons william and harry have spoken in an itv documentary about diana, the mother who did so much to shape their childhood. we felt, you know, incredibly loved, harry and i. and i'm very grateful that that love still feels there. it was that love that even if she was on the other side of the room, as a son you could feel it. the person who emerges from william and harry's description is a woman with a strong sense of fun. when everybody says to me, you know, "so, she was fun,
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give us an example." all i can hear is her laugh in my head. and that sort of crazy laugh where there wasjust pure happiness shown on her face. one of her mottos to me was that you can be as naughty as you want, just don't get caught. and they talk about their mother's death. they recall the last time they spoke to her and they reflect on the overwhelming public reaction and how they coped with the week which culminated in herfuneral. as william himself has said, it is a tribute to diana from her sons in which they recall the woman they hope the world will remember. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let's talk now to the royal historian hugo vickers who joins me via webcam. thank you for being with us this
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afternoon. this will, i suspect for you to have brought back a lot of memories. absolutely. the most extraordinary thing about the death of the princess of wales was it hit the whole world like a nuclear explosion and it was greatly different from the way news has come out before and as you will remember, we heard about it much later than people in australia because of the difference in time so by the time britain woke up everybody was in a state of shock and you will remember the great reaction that followed it, something we have never seen before, with people putting down flowers, lighting candles and messages, it was extraordinary. notjust in london but all over the world. one of the hardest things for any child to lose a parent at a young age is just to have that kind of relationship cut off before it is full, before the point at which the child is ready to break away from the parent but it must be acutely
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painful for them because their mother was almost owned by the world as much as she was owned by their family? there are two things lurk. first of all, there is never a good age to lose a parent but it can't be much worse than in the early days of a teenager and in this case it was more difficult cars they had a hard time because the parents were separated and there was the awful publicity going on which must have been, well, they were aware of at that point and then of course you are right, the princess of wales belonged to the world. i remember in a different way, when winston churchill died, we had to realise that we loved him as a father but he belonged to the world but they had to go through a public form of grief at the funeral for which i think they got great admiration. di get an impression from this documentary that this is part of a process for
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the princes of laying some ghosts to rest? yes, i think it is and they made it clear in one of the interviews are direct this would be the only time they're going to engage in this sort of documentary and the anniversary being 20 years, i suppose after that it will be to some extent laid to rest. but every time you speak in public and you open your soul and you tell people things, it goes on record and we will know that little bit more about them, what they are thinking, what they thought and what they have gone through. that will always be with them. thank you for being with us. the documentary, diana, 0ur mother: her life and legacy, will be screened on itv on monday at 9pm. a 20—year—old man has died in east london after being apprehended by a police officer in a shop. cctv footage has emerged of the officer wrestling the man to the floor of the shop in hackney, early yesterday morning. andy moore gave us this update form the scene. well, this video has been shared
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widely on social media and has provoked anger among some people, especially in the black community. 0ne especially in the black community. one man said to me today no white kid would have been treated like this. you can see the young man running into the shop behind me, filmed on security camera pursued by a uniformed release officer. there isa a uniformed release officer. there is a struggle, eventually they young man falls to the floor. at some stage you can see something being put in his mouth. eventually he is restrained with handcuffs, two officers are involved. the independent police complaints commission took over this enquiry very soon. they say there is evidence that something was found in the mount‘s throat at the scene. we have heard from the borough commander in hackney today. he said no police officer was exempt from
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the law and would not wish to be. he said there would be a lot of speculation in the next few days about how the young man died. the headlines on bbc news... more than a0 of the bbc‘s best known female personalities have written to the corporation's director—general to "act now" to deal with the gender pay gap. a 20—year—old man has died after being confronted by a police officer in an east london shop. new insights into the relationship princess diana had with her sons william and harry — in a new documentary to mark 20 years since her death. the head of the powerful trade body representing all german car manufactures has told the bbc that a long transitional deal after brexit is needed — otherwise there'll be a threat tojobs and investment in britain. the president of the german automotive industry association — has accused britain of abandoning pragmatism for ideology
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over the issue. the international trade secretary, liam fox, has suggested that a transitional deal could last up to 2022. ‘s about the practical issues we would face, getting any new immigration system into place, any custom issue into place and that is practical. we would want to get out of the way before the election. i did think people would want to have it dragging on but i think it is reasonable to have a transition that makes it as smooth as possible. that's what businesses would want us to have in written and what our investors abroad would want to see. —— asked had in the uk. police in the us state of texas say eight people have been found dead in a lorry at a supermarket car park in the city of san antonio, in an incident they believe was linked to people trafficking. at least two of the victims were school age children. 28 other people were severely dehydrated and are being treated at local hospitals.
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san antonio is a few hours' drive from the border with mexico. the rules on blood donation are to be relaxed in england and scotland to allow more gay men and sex workers to take part. experts say there is clear evidence it is safe for those groups to give blood after abstaining from sex for three months, instead of 12. hiv charities have welcomed the changes. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. giving blood is not for everyone. rules on safety mean those at high risk of infectious diseases, such as hiv and hepatitis b and c, are restricted from donating. but the rules are changing. gay men will no longer have to abstain from sex for 12 months. that will be reduced to three months before they can give blood. people who have had sex with high—risk partners or in a high—risk place, will also have the deferral period reduced to three months. and for the first time, sex workers will be allowed to donate blood after abstaining from sex for three months. the reason for the change is that
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scientists say new testing techniques have established infectious diseases such as hiv and hepatitis b and c show up in the bloodstream well within three months. technologies to pick up the presence of a virus and other infections in the blood have greatly improved. so we can now pick up viruses at a much earlier stage in the infection. therefore, it is much easier to tell if a blood donor has the virus. the changes have been welcomed by charities including the national aids trust, who say they were based on the latest scientific evidence rather than prejudice. a man was arrested at luton airport last night, after allegedly trying to open an emergency door on board a flight. police were called to the airport shortly before 11pm to reports 0ne witness told the bbc the man was
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wrestled to the floor by passengers. police were called to reports of a disruptive passenger. a man was arrested on suspicion of endangering an aircraft. he was initially taken to hospitalfor an aircraft. he was initially taken to hospital for treatment to an aircraft. he was initially taken to hospitalfor treatment to minor injuries and is now in custody. senior democrats have described as "disturbing" president trump's assertion that he has complete power to pardon. mr trump sent a long series of tweets on saturday, as media reports emerged that he has been looking at ways to pardon himself, and his family, if a special investigation finds them guilty of colluding with russia during the us election campaign. from washington, laura bicker reports. donald trump hoped this week would be a celebration of all that is made in america, including this new state—of—the—art aircraft carrier. instead he finds himself gearing up for what could be one of his biggest battle. he is clearing the decks and finding new staff to fight off claims
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the kremlin helped him win the white house. his core message has become engulfed by the many investigations, instead this is the kind of sales pitch he'd prefer americans to hear. americans steel and american hands have constructed a 100,000 tonne american steel and american hands have constructed a 100,000 tonne message to the world. america might is second to none. donald trump is upgrading his team just as the investigation into whether or not russia meddled in the us presidential election has widened its scope to reportedly include the trump finances, the president is thought to be furious. and this enquiry is no longer outside the white house gates. it is within his inner circle, including his own family, who are due to give evidence later this week. mr trump's son—in—law jared kushne is one of his closest advisers, seen so often at his side but rarely heard. he has done some talking though to russians during the campaign.
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he'l be asked about that in congress on monday. donald trumpjunior is also in discussions about testifying after it was revealed he met with a russian lawyer who had offered incriminating information about hillary clinton during the campaign. white house spokesman sean spicer often struggle to convey the president's message about russian influence amidst the barrage of questions about russian influence. if the president puts russian salad dressing on his salad tonight, somehow that's a russian connection. he's now saying farewell, resigning because he reportedly didn't want to work for this man, the slick, outspoken wall street financier anthony scaramucci will now be in charge of rebranding team trump. donald trump relishes a good fight. he's described the inquiry into his campaign's links with russia as a witchhunt, a hoax. he's getting combat ready, just in case investigators do not agree with him. when you go to the cinema —
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a film about toilets may not be what you want to see on the big screen. but sanitation is the subject of a new bollywood movie out next month. it's a big issue in india where around half a billion people don't have access to adequate facilities. the film called ‘toilet‘, is a love story set against the backdrop of the indian prime minister's initiative to provide more households with toilets. the bbc asian network's shabnam mahmood has more. singing song, dance and plenty of laughs. but this indian movie also uncovers the taboo subject of open defecation. it's very relevant and people will understand what, in this film, we are trying to say, in a very commercial manner. i personally feel it is probably the toughest scene i've ever done. ijust couldn't get myself to pick
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up my sari and squat. i felt violated, i felt humiliated. it was very, very, very disturbing. around 5a6 million people in india don't have access to a functioning toilet. many women tend to venture out at night to avoid being seen, which puts them at risk of attack, even rape. for men, they can go anywhere, it really isn't a threat to their security or their health. but for women, you know, you can be pregnant, you can be on your period, there are so many aspects, what do you do? you don't have access, you can't go free yourself or relieve yourself for ia hours and in those ia hours, you are walking, you are cleaning your house, you are taking care of your children, you are working your fields, there's a lot that they do. the inspiration for the film comes from prime minister modi's clean india campaign of 201a, in which he promised sanitation for millions of households.
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he has given his backing to the movie. when he became the prime minister, the first thing he started, he started talking to people about swachh bharat, that is clean india sofa him, this subject is very close. he knew about it and was very happy. why do we need a bollywood movie? no, it's not needing a bollywood movie, it takes time but surely it will change a lot. so this is just a small, little contribution for keeping the airclean. it's notjust about providing the infrastructure, the challenge is to change the mindset of people. if you pray in the house, we cook in the house, we feed, we eat, blah, blah, blah, how can we have a bathroom, how can we do our business in the same area? it is a very big mindset issue. meanwhile, toilet: ek prem katha hopes to get its message across, bollywood style. former great british bake 0ff hosts mel and sue are to present
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the return of bbc classic show the generation game. it's been commissioned for an initial four—episode run, although a launch date has yet to be set. it was presented for many years by sir bruce forsyth. the new show will combine aspects of the original series with new games. hope fully it will still have that wonderful array of prizes that used to be there on the generation game, i have happy memories of food mixers, which sounded exotic in the 19705! let's mixers, which sounded exotic in the 1970s! let's cross to a very exotic weather forecaster! how are you? 1970s! let's cross to a very exotic weatherforecaster! how are you? i was dancing to that theme tune, you couldn't see me that, i'm glad! the weather is very mixed today. for some of us it's better than it was yesterday. for some of us, worse. it
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is that changeable. a chance of downpours almost anywhere for the rest of the date was. we have thunderstorms around, too, not too many but a few across the south west. these are the temperatures we're getting. dependent on how much sunshine you get. in the rain it is:, sunshine you get. in the rain it is: , in sunshine you get. in the rain it is:, in the sunny spells a bit warmer. tonight, ali and damp across many eastern, central areas. warmer. tonight, ali and damp across many eastern, centralareas. —— tonight, it will be cloudy and damp. a very big contrast between the west and east. in the east we have the cloud, rain, relatively cold whereas, any western areas you will enjoy a stunning day and temperatures in glasgow could be the mid—20s but london, only 19. hello — this is bbc news. the headlines: some of the bbc‘s most high profile women have written
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to the director general, calling on him to correct gender disparity in pay. prince william and prince harry have spoken of their regret that their last conversation with their mother was a "desperately rushed" phone call. a 20—year—old man has died after being confronted by a police officer in east london. cctv footage has emerged of the officer wrestling the man to the floor of a shop in hackney. the head of the powerful trade body representing all german car manufactures has told the bbc that a long transitional deal after brexit is needed — otherwise there'll be a threat tojobs and investment in britain. police in the us state of texas say eight people have been found dead in a lorry at a supermarket car park in the city of san antonio, in an incident they believe was linked to people trafficking. now on bbc news, the week in parliament. hello there and welcome
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to the week in parliament. on this programme, the last prime minister's questions before the summer recess sees jeremy corbyn and theresa may go into battle on some familiar themes. 3.8 million people in work are now living in poverty. we created the national living wage. that was the biggest pay increase for people on lowest incomes ever. with mps and peers heading off on their summer break, we ask three experts what we have learnt from this parliament so far and what we can expect in the future. also on this programme, the government announces it's bringing forward the date when the state pension age will rise to 68. there is a balance to be struck between
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funding of the state pension in years to come, whilst also ensuring fairness for future generations of taxpayers. but first, there was a rowdy end of term sort of feel to

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