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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 23, 2017 6:00pm-7:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 6pm: the bbc‘s director general, lord hall, says he'll ‘value the contribution‘ of more than a0 female presenters — who signed a letter demanding the corporation tackle its gender pay gap. has been legislation about this since 1970. it's got to stop and we got to do something about it really quickly. a 20—year—old man has died after being confronted by a police officer in a london shop. regrets about a final ‘phone call. 20 years after the death of diana — william and harry open up about the relationship with their mother, in a documentary marking the anniversary of her death. also in the next hour: victory at lords for england‘s women in the world cup. in a nail—biting finish, the lionesses beat india with only nine runs to spare in the world cup. and chris froome is set to confirm his fourth tour de france title in a couple of hours — cementing his position as the most successful british rider in the race ever. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. the head of the bbc has said he will ‘value the contribution‘ of more than a0 senior women — who signed a letter demanding the corporation tackle its gender pay gap. lord hall says work is already underway to address the pay disparity. his comments come after some of the bbc‘s most prominent women broadcasters — including claire balding and fiona bruce — wrote an open letter to their boss demanding ‘immediate action.‘ the labour leaderjeremy corbyn said the pay gap was "appalling". 0ur media correspondent david sillito reports. alexjones of the one show, mishal husein, sue barker, three of more than a0 famous names calling on the bbc to act now on its gender pay gap. this open letter to the papers says that this week‘s annual report
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confirmed what many had long suspected, that women were being paid less than men for the same work. 0n the whole i think it is fantastic that so many wonderful women have been prepared to stick their head above the parapet. we have got stick, we knew we were going to get stick, that is why it was never going to be an easy thing to do. but it is not about getting whacking great pay rises for women who are already well paid. it is about pay parity and getting fairness for everybody. 0n the list revealed this week, the 20 highest—paid male stars received more than £12 million. the top 20 women less than half that. this, they say, is not a call for more pay, it is a demand for fair pay, the letter saying the bbc has known about the pay disparity for years. "we all want to go on the record to call upon you to act now." the point is to set, absolutely set, in stone if you are doing exactly the samejob as a man, you have to be on the same rates. and the labour leaderjeremy corbyn
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says the corporation needs to look at itself, but added this went much wider than the bbc. this gender pay gap is appalling. we would insist on a strong gender pay audit of every organisation and we would also look at a 20—1 ratio between the chief executive and the lowest paid staff in every public sector organisation. in response the bbc said its overall pay gap is 10%, less than the national average of 18%, and it is working towards eliminating it altogether, but today‘s signatories want that to happen sooner rather than later. jane garvey, who initiated the letter, spoke about the reasons behind it. i think the reason for the letter is pretty obvious.
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the figures that came out last week backed up something a lot of us have suspected for a very long time. somehow seeing it in black and white made a load of people, notjust women, think, hang on, 2017 and there has been legislation is about this since 1970. it has got to stop and we have got to do something about it really quickly. how easy hasn‘t been to get your colleagues on board? it‘s been an interesting 36 hours, i have had a great deal of help and i want to thank everybody who has helped me so much because they really have. some people were more enthusiastic than others, some talk more persuading, but on the whole i think it is fantastic that so many wonderful women have been prepared to stick their head above the parapet. we got stick, we knew we would and that‘s why it was never going to be an easy thing to do but it‘s not about getting whacking great pay rises for women who are already well paid.
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it‘s about pay parity and getting fairness for everybody. would you be happy to see male colleagues‘ money go down or somewhere in between to achieve this parity? i would be delighted if some of our better paid male colleagues were prepared to make that kind of gesture. we want to guard against cuts lower down the bbc, that would be unfair and very unfortunate and i don‘t think there‘s a single woman who has signed that letter that doesn‘t love the bbc and what it stands for as much as i do. this isn‘t just about the well—paid top end on—air talent, is it? it‘s about everybody at the bbc, it‘s about fairness and that‘s what we are in pursuit of here. of course we shouldn‘t have to do this, why should a group of women have to get together and put themselves out there in this slightly frankly uncomfortable way? but our alternative was to do nothing and say nothing and i‘m afraid the evidence suggests that
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hasn‘t been great for us. tony hawks said he wanted to have this problem solved by 2020, what do you say to that? that would be 50 years since the equal pay act of 1970. tony, we love the bbc, we want to carry on working for it, we need to do things a little bit quicker. a 20—year—old man has died after being apprehended by a police officer in an east london shop. the metropolitan police said the man was followed on foot after officers tried to stop a car in hackney yesterday. they say he was taken ill after apparently trying to swallow an object, and was pronounced dead in hospital a short time later. 0ur reporter andy moore is in hackney east london. this happened early yesterday morning. police were following a car,
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a passenger got out of the car and when he went into the shop behind me. there was security camera footage of what happened and that has been widely shared on social media and has caused a lot of anger. one man said to me today no white kid would have you can see the young man running into the shop behind me, filmed on security camera pursued by a uniformed release officer. there is a struggle, eventually they young man falls to the floor. at some stage you can see something being put in his mouth. the young man is handcuffed, face down on the floor with his hands behind his back. at some stage he becomes unresponsive, then he‘s helped by police, medics, paramedics. he‘s taken to hospital but died later on. this video has been widely shared on social media and it has caused a lot of anger, especially among the black community. there is a lot of anger
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being expressed down here and i think we can hearfrom pauline pierce, an activist here in hackney. to me that boy should be alive sitting in a cell, being able to tell his side of the story but instead he‘s laying in amok waiting in a morgue waiting for an autopsy and waiting to be buried and we have got to pick up the pieces. the community has got to pick up the pieces and it‘s not right. the independent police complaints commission took over this investigation very early. they say they have security camera footage from the store. there‘s 15 cameras in there so they will have lots of video images. they will have video footage from the camera that was worn by police officer, there were several independent witnesses. the independent police complaints commission said they had been contact with the family to to explain to them what they are doing. we have also heard from the borough commander
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of police in hackney, he said a lot of people will be looking at that video and be concerned about what it shows. he said they should keep in touch with the ipcc to see what statements they make in the next few days, and he also said police officers are accountable for their actions. they are not beyond the law. they wouldn‘t wish to be. so that the situation down here. princes william and harry have spoken candidly about their relationship with their mother, princess diana, in a documentary marking the 20th anniversary of her death. they describe her sense of fun, but also speak of their regret that their last conversation with her was a rushed phone call. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell‘s report contains some flash photography. to the watching world, she was the princess whose image appeared constantly on front pages. it was a glamorous but necessarily limited impression of the real person. now nearly 20 years after diana‘s death in the car accident in paris,
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her sons william and harry have spoken in an itv documentary about diana, the mother who did so much to shape their childhood. we felt, you know, incredibly loved, harry and i. and i‘m very grateful that that love still feels there. it was that love that even if she was on the other side of the room, as a son you could feel it. the person who emerges from william and harry‘s description is a woman with a strong sense of fun. when everybody says to me, you know, "so, she was fun, give us an example." all i can hear is her laugh in my head. and that sort of crazy laugh where there wasjust pure happiness shown on her face. one of her mottos to me was that you can be as naughty as you want,
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just don't get caught. and they talk about their mother‘s death. they recall the last time they spoke to her and they reflect on the overwhelming public reaction and how they coped with the week which culminated in herfuneral. as william himself has said, it is a tribute to diana from her sons in which they recall the woman they hope the world will remember. nicholas witchell, bbc news. earlier i spoke to the royal historian hugo vickers who gave me his recollections about the death of diana, princess of wales. the most extraordinary thing about the death of the princess of wales was it hit the whole world like a nuclear explosion
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and it was greatly different from the way news had come out before and as you will remember, we heard about it much later than people in australia because of the hour difference and so by the time britain woke up everybody was in a state of shock and you will remember the great reaction that followed it, something we had never seen before, with people putting down flowers, lighting candles and messages, it was extraordinary. notjust in london but all over the world. one of the hardest things for any child to lose a parent at a young age is just to have that kind of relationship cut off before its full natural development, before the point at which the child is ready to break away from the parent, but it must be acutely painful for them because their mother was almost owned by the world as much as she was owned by their family? there are two things there. first of all, there is never a good age to lose a parent but it can‘t be much worse age to lose one than in the early days of being a teenager and in this case it was more difficult because they had a hard time because the parents were separated and there was the awful publicity going on which they must have been, well, they were aware of at that point and then of course
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you are right, the princess of wales did belong to the world. i remember in a different way, mary soames said when winston churchill died, we had to realise that we loved him as a father but he belonged to the world and so they had to go through a very public form of grief at the funeral for which i think they got great admiration. do you get an impression from this documentary that this is part of a process for the princes of laying some ghosts to rest? yes, i think it is and they made it clear in one of the interviews i read that this would be the only time they‘re going to engage in this sort of documentary and the anniversary being 20 years, i suppose after that it will be to some extent laid to rest. but every time you speak in public and you open your soul and you tell people things, it goes on record and we will know that little bit more about them, what they are thinking, what they thought and what
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they have gone through. that will always be with them. the documentary, diana, 0ur mother: her life and legacy, will be screened on itv on monday at 9pm. police in the us state of texas say eight people have been found dead in a lorry at a supermarket car park in the city of san antonio, in an incident they believe was linked to people trafficking. at least two of the victims were school age children. 28 other people were severely dehydrated and are being treated at local hospitals. san antonio is a few hours‘ drive from the border with mexico. earlier i spoke to our correspondent laura bicker in washington. if you listen to the immigration and customs department, the homeland security department, they will say this is very common and in fact one county in the state of texas, 500 bodies of would—be immigrants have been found since 2009. this is because people
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from the likes of mexico are looking for a better life. some will pay traffickers to get across the border, others will find ways to evade security checkpoint at borders and walk there themselves. the heat is not only exhausting but there are very few water supplies around. in this case, in a walmart car park, someone noticed people were being transferred through a tractor and trailer. the police chief seems to have gone into the back of the trailer and found a horrible scene. he said some of the people were so hot to the touch, there was no air conditioning or water, 20 of the people were in serious condition, eight people were found dead when he started to extricate those within the trucks. so unfortunately this is the kind of incident they are trying to prevent. i have got a statement from the immigration and customs
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enforcement department who say this ranks as a stark reminder of why human smuggling networks must be pursued, caught and punished. the head of the powerful trade body representing all german car manufactures has told the bbc that a long transitional deal after brexit is needed — otherwise there‘ll be a threat tojobs and investment in britain. the president of the german automotive industry association has accused britain of abandoning pragmatism for ideology over the issue. the international trade secretary, liam fox, has suggested that a transitional deal could last up to 2022. it‘s about the practical issues we would face, and i think we would want to get it out of the way before the election. i don‘t think people would want to have it dragging on but it would be perfectly reasonable to have a transition that makes it as smooth as possible. that‘s what businesses would want
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us to have in britain. i think we would have to be very clear that it was time—limited and it was limited in its scope. a scottish man has been shot during a robbery hours before he was due to get married in the philippines. tarek naggar was outside a shop in cebu city when three men demanded he hand over his wallet, and was shot in the chest when he refused to give it up. the 44—year—old from milngavie in east dunbartonshire, has undergone surgery for his injuries and remains seriously ill in hospital. the rules on blood donation are to be relaxed in england and scotland to allow more gay men and sex workers to take part. experts say there is clear evidence it is safe for those groups to give blood after abstaining from sex for three months, instead of 12. hiv charities have welcomed the changes. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. giving blood is not for everyone. rules on safety mean those at high risk of infectious diseases, such as hiv and hepatitis b and c,
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are restricted from donating. but the rules are changing. gay men will no longer have to abstain from sex for 12 months. that will be reduced to three months before they can give blood. people who have had sex with high—risk partners or in a high—risk place, will also have the deferral period reduced to three months. and for the first time, sex workers will be allowed to donate blood after abstaining from sex for three months. the reason for the change is that scientists say new testing techniques have established infectious diseases such as hiv and hepatitis b and c show up in the bloodstream well within three months. technologies to pick up the presence of a virus and other infections in the blood have greatly improved. so we can now pick up viruses at a much earlier stage in the infection. therefore, it is much easier to tell if a blood donor has the virus. the changes have been welcomed by charities including
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the national aids trust, who say they were based on the latest scientific evidence rather than prejudice. some breaking news: they not unsurprising announcement that chris froome is about to win his fourth, in fact, he has won the tour de france. he was the overall leader going into the final stage in paris, and although he disappeared into the pack, he was guaranteed victory. victory puts him among the best riders in the history of the sports. the first brit to win four times. graduation is to chris froome in paris. he has won his fourth tour de france. the headlines: the director
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general, lord hall, says he will value the contribution of a0 female presenters who have signed a letter demanding the corporation tackle the gender pay gap. a 20—year—old man has been —— has died after being held by a police officer in a shop in london. new insights into the relationship princess diana had with her sons, william and harry, are contained in a documentary to be broadcast tomorrow night, 20 years after her death. a new two day strike has been called by the opposition in venezuela later this week. it comes after another round of protests and violent clashes against the government of nicolas maduro. several people were injured in the clashes amongst them a violinist famous for playing his violin in front of police lines. greg dawson reports it has become a near daily occurrence in venezuelan. protesters versus police. molotov cocktail ‘s
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verses tear gas. these people were marching towards the country‘s supreme court, which they believe is biased in favour of nicholas madero. the president who they claim is turning into a dictator. we have to help our children. we are fighting for them and these boys cannot be left alone. while others are in we are risking our lives should like these people are risking their lives for us all. on friday opposition politicians elected 33 newjudges to form a so—called shadow supreme court. president maduro rejects them as well as ongoing calls for a general election in his country. and he has support, too. for every anti—government demonstration there isa anti—government demonstration there is a rally in favour of the venezuelan leader. this particular gathering was to back the president‘s plans for a new assembly to rewrite the constitution. the
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last four months, venezuela has been locked in an impasse of political crisis and violence demonstration. scores of people have been killed since the protests began. nicholas doro says they are about by right—wing extremists. 0n doro says they are about by right—wing extremists. on thursday millions of venezuelans are joined a general strike called by the opposition. president midge ure recalled the effects minimal as plans to press ahead with the vote for a new assembly next week. former great british bake 0ff hosts mel and sue are to present a new version of a bbc classic show, the generation game. it‘s been commissioned for an initial four—episode run, although a launch date has yet to be set. it was presented for many years by sir bruce forsyth. the new show will combine aspects of the original series with new games.
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i hope the fondue sets and the cuddly toy will be there on the conveyor belt, too. it wouldn‘t be the same otherwise. when you go to the cinema, a film about toilets may not be what you want to see on the big screen. but sanitation is the subject of a new bollywood movie out next month. it‘s a big issue in india, where around half a billion people don‘t have access to adequate facilities. the film called ‘toilet‘, is a love story set against the backdrop of the indian prime minister‘s initiative to provide more households with toilets. the bbc asian network‘s shabnam mahmood has more. singing song, dance and plenty of laughs.
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but this indian movie also uncovers the taboo subject of open defecation. it‘s very relevant and people will understand what, in this film, we are trying to say, in a very commercial manner. i personally feel it is probably the toughest scene i've ever done. ijust couldn't get myself to pick up my sari and squat. i felt violated, i felt humiliated. it was very, very, very disturbing. around 5a6 million people in india don‘t have access to a functioning toilet. many women tend to venture out at night to avoid being seen, which puts them at risk of attack, even rape. for men, they can go anywhere, it really isn't a threat to their security or their health. but for women, you know, you can be pregnant, you can be on your period, there are so many aspects, what do you do? you don't have access, you can't go free yourself or relieve yourself for ia hours
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and in those ia hours, you are walking, you are cleaning your house, you are taking care of your children, you are working your fields, there's a lot that they do. the inspiration for the film comes from prime minister modi‘s clean india campaign of 201a, in which he promised sanitation for millions of households. he has given his backing to the movie. when he became the prime minister, the first thing he started, he started talking to people about swachh bharat, that is clean india so for him, this subject is very close. he knew about it and was very happy. why do we need a bollywood movie? no, it‘s not needing a bollywood movie, it takes time but surely it will change a lot. so this is just a small, little contribution for keeping the air clean. it‘s notjust about providing the infrastructure, the challenge is to change the mindset of people. if you pray in the house, we cook in the house, we feed, we eat, blah, blah, blah, how can we have a bathroom,
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how can we do our business in the same area? it is a very big mindset issue. meanwhile, toilet: ek prem katha hopes to get its message across, bollywood style. now, would you take the advice of an unqualified stranger? a novel scheme is popping up in london, relying on volunteers sharing their problems, as well as listening to other people‘s. dougal shaw has been to take a look. a problem shared is a problem halved, or so they say. but would you share your problems with a complete stranger? and would you share them spontaneously in public? that is what one clinical psychologist is hoping as she launches a bold experiment in london, despite challenging weather conditions. her team create pop—up problem—solving booths and then invite members of the public to open up about the issues weighing on their minds. so what is the big idea behind it all?
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problem—solving booths are all about people realising we can all help each other all the time. we don‘t really have a culture or permission to ask. i‘m a trained clinical psychologist and i generally work in a clinic and at the end of the day i used to think, gosh, if only all the people i‘ve met in private in this clinic today could talk to each other, because actually they‘re suffering with really similar things. the problem is, i keep waking up thinking i have to do this, do this, do this. every time there's more things that people are asking me to do. that's exactly what i go through. while we were there, there was a trickle of participants rather than a deluge but those who took part seemed to embrace the idea, volunteering to both share their problems and listen to other people‘s. so many people in london have anxiety or claim to. do you think possibly, maybe because of... you know, not so much your upbringing but your parents? ah, no, ithought maybe because of...that i would be more tolerant.
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trained psychologists are always on hand if serious cases emerge. the results of the scheme are still being assessed. the national health service and the mayor of london‘s office are backing the project. it‘s about opening up conversations around mental health and well—being just to destigmatise these things, get people talking and maybe do something about it. if successful, the scheme will be rolled out across the country. dougal shaw, bbc news, london. health of the weather. another one of those days where you may see some sunshine but also some heavy torrential downpours in places. a big threatening cloud in the
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distance. still some heavy showers this evening affecting parts of it went and wales. the worst will fade through the night but we keep outbreaks of rain affecting northern england, pushing south into parts of the midlands. clear skies overnight across western areas with some fog. most of us in double figures but some sports in the west will be dipping into single figures. east and west spectra monday. easter in areas with cloud close to low pressure, outbreaks of rain. to the west, righteous guys. that‘s how we start the day. sunny spells across much of south england and wales bus ploughed outbreaks of rain through parts of the midlands, lincolnshire into yorkshire north east england. 0n the other side the pennines, some sunnier spells. a fine day for northern ireland on monday, and from scotland. especially in the west, it will turn out to be a very warm day. through the day, outbreaks of rain affecting parts of central eastern
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england, patchy in nature. a few brighter skies, some sunny spells. we could see the odd sharp showers here. the cloud and rain along the north sea coasts, maybejust 15 here. the cloud and rain along the north sea coasts, maybe just 15 or 16 degrees. the real work across western parts of the uk, widely in the low 20s. some sports into the mid—20s. monday evening is shaping up mid—20s. monday evening is shaping up that way, and so some patchy rain. gradually clearing overnight as we take a look at the pictures on tuesday. the shower during tuesday but most places will avoid those and stay dry. after a rather cloudy start, some spells developing. de silva bit cooler on the north sea coast compartment elsewhere. the gap between weather systems doesn‘t last too long, because the big picture for wednesday shows another area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic. that will spread rain right across the uk on wednesday. freshening winds. well that‘s as good as the way, fresh air by the time we get a birthday with sunshine
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and showers. another week of changeable weather. turning wet again on wednesday and windier by them as well. dozens of the bbc‘s best known female personalities demand equal treatment on pay. female personalities demand in an open letter, they call for urgent action, to ensure women get the same as men for doing the samejob. it‘s not about getting wacking great pay rises for women who are already well paid, it‘s about pay parity and getting fairness for everybody. it‘s about pay parity and getting princes william and harry speak candidly about their mother, princess diana, 20 years after her death. all i can hear is her laugh in my head, and that sort of crazy laugh where there was just pure happiness shown on her face. it‘s a revolution in generating power, the world‘s first floating wind farm, arriving off scotland‘s east coast. england‘s women win cricket‘s
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world cup, in a nail biting victory, over india at lords. world cup, in a nail biting victory, the world cup, in a nail biting victory, yellowjersey of 110w the yellowjersey of chris froome now gets to the finishing line. and triumph for chris froome in paris, as he wins the tour de france for a fourth time. in paris, as he wins the tour de good evening. some of the bbc‘s best known female personalities, have written an open letter to the corporation‘s director— general, calling for urgent action to ensure women are paid the same as men for doing the same job. to ensure women are paid the same the presenters claire balding,
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fiona bruce and jane garvey are among more than a0 signatories. fiona bruce and jane garvey the labour leaderjeremy corbyn said the pay gap was "appalling," and called for a pay audit of every organisation. 0ur media correspondent david sillito reports. alex david sillito reports. jones of the one show, mish‘ husain alexjones of the one show, mishal husain and sue barker, more than a0 of the most famous female presenters at the bbc, calling on the corporation to act now to end its gender pay gap. good morning, friends, thanks for tuning in... that list was the trigger for the letter today, publishing the bbc‘s highest—paid stars. in the top 20 names was only one woman. the best paid men were being paid more than twice what the top women were earning. this open letter to the papers said that this week‘s annual report confirmed what many have long suspected, that women were being paid suspected, that women were being pa id less suspected, that women were being paid less than men for the same work. on the whole, i think it is
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fantastic that so many wonderful women have been prepared to put their head above the parapet. we got stick, we knew we would, that was why it would never be an easy thing to do. but it isn‘tjust about, it is not about, getting whacking great pay rises for women who are already well paid. it is about pay parity and getting then is for everybody. the letter today says that the bbc has known about the pay disparity for years, we want to go on record to call upon you to act now. women‘s hour... when programmes such as women‘s hour went on as 60 years ago, equal pay for equal work was a pressing issue. the fact it remains an issue despite law changes in the 19605 an issue despite law changes in the 1960s and 70s after pressures from the women‘s movement is a sign of how tough it is to find quick solutions. attitudes of their age and experience and authority affect the pay divide, but it is worth noting that in the top 20 there is
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noting that in the top 20 there is not a single black or asian presenter. it comes at a time where the bbc is facing opposition over plans to change terms and conditions for the rest of staff, paid a fraction of what any star gets. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says this taps into a wider issue of fairness and pay. this gender pay gap is appalling, we would insist on a strong gender pay audit as every organisation, and we would also look ata organisation, and we would also look at a 20—1 ratio between the chief executive and lowest paid staff in every public sector organisation. executive and lowest paid staff in every public sector organisationm response, the bbc said today the overall pay gap there is 10%, less than the national average of 18% but it needed to go further and faster to close the pay gap. the director—general said he is confident that next year‘s figures will look very different. david sillito, bbc news. we can speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth... and alex, as we‘ve seen, politicians are also calling for more action on women‘s pay. politicians are also calling
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yes, politicians are also calling there has been condemr from yes, there has been condemnation from several senior politicians about the gap between the highest paid men and women at the bbc, justine greening, equalities minister, said it was shocking and prime minister theresa may said the bbc had to look at the whole question of what it paid men and women. in april this year, the government introduced a new requirement where any company with more than 250 employees needs to publish details of the gender pay gap which needs to happen by april next year. so we will see different sectors coming under the spotlight. the government hopes that kind of transparency and public pressure will ensure organisations take action. labour wants concrete measures, “— action. labour wants concrete measures, —— more concrete measures, across—the—board, limiting measures, —— more concrete measures, across—the—boa rd, limiting the difference between the highest and lowest earners. what is clear is revelations at the bbc have sparked a wider political debate and one thatis a wider political debate and one that is likely to continue for some time. alex forsyth, thank you. prince william and prince harry
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have spoken candidly about their relationship with their mother, princess diana, in a documentary marking the 20th anniversary of her death. the 20th anniversary they describe her sense of fun, but also speak of their regret that their last conversation with her was a rushed phone call. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell‘s report, contains some flash photography. nicholas witchell‘s report, to the watching world, she was the princess whose image appeared constantly on front pages. she was the princess whose image it was a glamorous but necessarily limited impression of the real person. but necessarily limited now nearly 20 years after diana‘s death in the car accident in paris, her sons william and harry have spoken in an itv documentary about diana, the mother who did so much to shape their childhood. we felt, you know, incredibly loved, harry and i. and i‘m very grateful that that love still feels there. it was that love that even if she was on the other side of the room, as a son you could feel it. the person who emerges from william and harry‘s description is a woman
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with a strong sense of fun. and harry‘s description is a woman when everybody says to me, you know, "so, she was fun, give us an example." you know, "so, she was fun, all i can hear is her laugh in my head. and that sort of crazy laugh where there wasjust pure happiness shown on her face. where there wasjust pure one of her mottos to me was that you can be as naughty as you want, just don't get caught. you can be as naughty as you want, and they talk about their mother‘s death. they recall the last time they spoke to her and they reflect on the overwhelming public reaction and how they coped with the week which culminated in herfuneral. and how they coped with the week as william himself has said, it is a tribute to diana from her sons in which they recall the woman they hope the world will remember. the woman they hope nicholas witchell, bbc news. the woman they hope the head of the powerful trade body that represents all german car
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manufacturers says a long transitional deal after brexit is needed, otherwise there‘ll be a threat to jobs and investment in britain. a threat to jobs and investment the president of the german automotive industry association has accused the uk of abandoning pragmatism for ideology over the issue. pragmatism for ideology the international trade secretary, liam fox, has suggested a transitional deal could last for three years. police in texas say eight people have been found dead, in a lorry in a supermarket car park, in the city of san antonio. investigators believe they may be linked to people trafficking. at least two of the victims are children and 28 other people were discovered severely dehydrated. are children and 28 other people san antonio is just a few hours‘ drive from the border with mexico. a 20—year—old man has died in east london, after a confrontation in a shop with a policeman. cctv footage has emerged of the officer wrestling the man to the floor, in the store in hackney, early yesterday morning. in the store in hackney, our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is there... it
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daniel sandford is there... has been a painful weei this it has been a painful weekend for this east london community. rashan charles, the young man who died, western —— was well known and widely liked. people here conceive that he was involved in criminality, he was shot and stabbed in the past but they say he did not deserve to die. the moment when rashan charles ran into his local late—night shop in the early hours of saturday morning, pursued by a police officer. morning, pursued at first, the arrest was calm but then the officer threw him to the floor and grabbed him around the neck. later, he was joined by what appears to be a plainclothes officer. just over one hour later, rashan charles was declared dead at the royal london hospital. rashan charles was declared dead the independent police complaints commission, which is examining his death, says an object was removed from his throat at the scene. says an object was removed as the cctv from the shop was viewed on social media by people in haggerston,
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there was a growing collection of flowers and candles today, and growing anger. pauline pearce, who became well—known for chastising rioters on camera in 2011, told me that she knew rashan well. that boy should be alive today, sitting in a cell somewhere able to tell his side of the story but instead he is laying in a morgue waiting for an autopsy, and waiting to be buried. we‘ve got to pick up the pieces, the community has to pick up the pieces. the pieces, the community has many people visiting the shop and the neighbouring barbershop were clearly upset. and the neighbouring i am angry, i am sad. and the neighbouring i feel for his family and mother. and the neighbouring i know him personally, it is disgusting. the death follows a similar incident last month, also in east london, there is growing anger here that young men are dying during arrests, even when no weapons are involved. this has become a big issue for
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police. every death leads to support for campaigns like black lives matter, which began in america after numerous shootings of black people there. studio: daniel sandford in east london there, thank you. the world‘s first floating wind farm is about to take shape off the coast of scotland. is about to take shape off tonight, the first of five turbines arrives there. the revolutionary technology will float far offshore, generating power from strong sea winds, to provide energy for 20,000 homes. winds, to provide energy 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin has been following the vast turbine‘s journey from norway to scotland. in the half—light of a summer night in norway, a landmark in the history of energy floats upright in the chilly water. these five towering turbines will cross the north sea to scotland, to form the world‘s first large—scale floating wind farm. this is engineering on an absolutely gargantuan scale. what you can see is taller than big ben.
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but that‘s only part of it — there‘s a third more under the water, weighted heavily at the bottom with iron ore, to keep the thing floating stable in the water. the turbines will be tethered to the sea bed with thick mooring lines 15 miles off the coast of peterhead. being able to use floating offshore wind farms gives us much more flexibility when it comes to locating these farms around the world. to locating these farms but a note of caution among the enthusiasm. scientists warn that far more investment in additional new technologies is needed to combat climate change. this monumental kit comes dear, but the price should fall. we think that this is a game changer, this project, for enabling us in the future to reduce the cost and develop wind farms without any subsidies. to reduce the cost and develop wind the first turbine is hauled from the fjord by tugs. it‘s nearly 12,000 tonnes of steel and ballast. each blade is as wide
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as the wingspan of an airbus. the power of engineers to capture wind energy at sea is growing far faster than anyone dreamed off. wind energy at sea is growing far roger harrabin, bbc news, norway. wind energy at sea is growing far a wind energy at sea is growing far big day of sport, all a big day of sport, 0lly foster has all of the details from the bbc sport centre. england have won the women‘s cricket world cup for a fourth time. it was a sell out at lord‘s for their final against india, and there was a thrilling finish. for their final against india, anya shrubsole won the match for them with six wickets. david 0rnstein was at the match. for them with six wickets. there was a time when women‘s cricket barely even registered with many sports fans. cricket barely even registered now you can‘t keep them away. cricket barely even registered almost 27,000 would fill lords, millions more watching around the world. lords, millions more only a match, yet so much more. lords, millions more england won the toss and opted to bat. the loss of sarah taylor
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handed india the impetus. if this was an advert for the women‘s game, natalie sciver was providing the promotional material though elsewhere runs were in short supply and, even when england looked to kick on, moments of indian magic checked their momentum. moments of indian magic chasing 229 to win, india looked to be cruising and, at one point, needed just 38 runs with seven wickets in hand. but england dared to dream and clawed their way back from a seemingly irretrievable position. and clawed their way back from alex hartley and anya shrubsole did the damage, shrubsole taking six wickets in a devastating spell that broke india and guided england to glory. broke india and guided a breathtaking end to a truly groundbreaking tournament. david 0rnstein, bbc news, lords. this year‘s tour de france has finished in the last few minutes. as is customary, the leader is never challenged on the final stage, so it‘s been another victory lap on the champs elysees
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for chris froome. on the champs elysees 0ur sports news correspondent richard conway is in paris. richard, a fourth title for froome and perhaps his sweetest? think so, there are greé on i think so, there are great scenes on the champs—elysees here, chris froome crossed the line and celebrated with team sky colleagues, a difficult year but the chance to put that behind them, the controversial things we‘ve seen in the last year, and to celebrate. after the last year, and to celebrate. more than 83 hour saddle, after more than 83 hours in the saddle, and over 2000 miles of racing, chris froome has earned his champagne. so too his team sky collea g u es champagne. so too his team sky colleagues who, at critical moments in this epic race, were there when he needed them most. yesterday‘s decisive 1a mile time trial in marseille sealed a fourth tour de france victory for him, and as per tradition, the final stage is a chance to celebrate. 0rganisers wa nted chance to celebrate. 0rganisers wanted the race this year to be a closely fought affair and of course they plotted and delivered on that
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wish. as the peloton arrives in paris, it is chris froome who has prevailed once again. so, prevailed once again. the celebrations can truly bei now so, the celebrations can truly begin now for chris froome, up there just a few metres from where we are standing, the ceremonies are beginning to take place and the national anthem will ring out for the fifth time in six years on the shon is a loser, a sign of british dominance in this race in recent yea rs dominance in this race in recent years —— champs—elysees. it‘s his fourth title, could he go on to a fifth or sixth and make true tour de france history? studio: richard conway in paris, many thanks indeed. it‘s been a thrilling final round at the open championship. jordan spieth led by three shots overnight and is currently two clear heading down the 18th, but it‘s been far from plain sailing for the american. but it‘s been far from plain sailing our sports correspondent, andy swiss, is at royal birkdale. jordan spieth! andy swiss, is at royal birkdale. he began with a three shot lead and the open for the taking, but not for long. shot lead and the open at the first hole, a nightmare start
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forjordan spieth while playing partner matt kuchar set about ramping up the pressure. spieth was suddenly wilting, and soon the pair were level. ahead of them, a brilliant round from china‘s haotong li set the target, butjordan spieth‘s meltdown continued, blasting so far right he ended up playing from the nearby practice ground. for the first time, he was trailing but, just when he needed it, a flash of inspiration restored his lead. a flash of inspiration from a flash of inspiration there, he held on for victory. the from there, he held on for victory. the most eventful finale from there, he held on for victory. the most eventfulfinale is, the most deserving of champions. we most deserving of champions. thought it would be straightforward we thought it would be a straightforward win forjordan spieth, but it was anything but. at just 23 he becomes the youngest 0pen champion since seve ballesteros in 1979, a dramatic day and a thrilling victory, 0lly foster rack red kale.
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studio: andy swiss at royal birkdale. sammy kinghorn is aiming for a third gold medal tonight at the world para athletics, follow her progress on the website. details of england and scotland at the women‘s euros, scotla nd euros, are currently losing to portugal. that‘s it. portugal. hello. this is bbc news. more now on some of the bbc‘s most high—profile female personalities who have called on the corporation to "act now" to deal with the gender pay gap. in response, director general tony hall has said work is already under way to close disparities and accelerate further change. josh doody is an author and salary coach. he spoke to my colleague shaun ley. i think there are two answers to your question. the first is, before the negotiation begins, i find that women are more often than not inclined to accept an offer or not negotiate as hard
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as men, so i think men are more aggressive in whether or not they engage to negotiate the salaryjob offer. 0nce negotiating, i think the tactics men and women can employ to improve their conversation are the same. —— their compensation. what sort of things do you advise the people who you coach when they‘re approaching salary negotiations — and before you answer that question, give us an idea of the range of organisations you deal with. all private sector, some public sector organisations, government agencies? almost always private sector, larger companies you have heard of, and i negotiate behind—the—scenes for them. almost all private sector, and i tend to work with software developers and engineers that are going to largerfirms that we interact with everyday. so i think we can assume a lot of it is in the new media age of things. what are the sort of things and advice you offer? a few things.
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one is to determine before you get a job offer, what would be appealing, what is your minimum salary. once you get thatjob offer, ask for time to think it over and then formulate your counter offer, which i recommend between ten and 20% of their offer, deliver that offer and then negotiate the final details of the offer once the company responds to your counter offer. that‘s it in broad strokes. should people be afraid of pitching for a higher figure than they honestly expect to get, or is it a bit like, for those who buy property, you ask for less than you‘re willing to pay, in this case you ask for more than you‘re willing to accept? right, i think there is little downside there just because it is important to remember that by the time you actually get a job offerfrom a company, they‘re invested in bringing you on board. they want to bring you onto their team, so when you counter offer, the worst thing you can expect is they say no, we made your best offer and we will stand
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back but sometimes they work with you and improve your offer to convince you to come on board so their goal is to close that deal and bring you onto their team so they can start using you in a productive capacity for their business. anybody contacted you from the bbc yet? not yet! another one of those days where you may have seen some sunshine but there have also been torrential downpours in places. some threatening cloud in the distance from a weather watcher. heavy showers out there this evening affecting parts of england and wales. the worst of them will fade tonight, but outbreaks of rain in northern england pushing further south into the midlands. the clearest skies over night will be in western areas, with the odd folk patch. some spots in the west will dipping into single figures. east —
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west split on monday. eastern areas keep plenty of cloud close to the areas of low pressure some outbreaks of rain. west, brighter skies. areas of low pressure some outbreaks of rain. west, brighterskies. sunny spells to begin with across much of south—west england and wales, but cloud outbreaks of rain through parts of the midlands, lincolnshire into yorkshire and north—east england while, on the other side of the pennines, some sunny spells. another fine day on the way for northern ireland on monday and much of scotland. in the west, it will turn out to be a very warm day. on through the day, and outbreaks of rain affecting parts of central and eastern england. if you brighter skies, some sunny spells in east anglia and the far south—east, the odd shop shower, but plenty of sunshine. cloud and rain on the north sea coast, eb 15 or 16 degrees. it will be warm in western parts, widely in the low 20s, with some spots into the mid—20s. still
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some spots into the mid—20s. still some patchy rain on monday evening in the far east, gradually clearing overnight. 0n in the far east, gradually clearing overnight. on tuesday, the odd shower around through tuesday, but most shower around through tuesday, but m ost pla ces shower around through tuesday, but most places will avoid those in state drive. after a cloudy start, pleasa nt state drive. after a cloudy start, pleasant sunny spells developing. —— most pleasant sunny spells developing. —— m ost pla ces pleasant sunny spells developing. —— most places will avoid those and stay dry. the gap between weather systems doesn‘t last too long. the big picture for wednesday shows another area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic. that will spread rain across the uk on wednesday, with a freshening wind. 0nce that‘s moved out of the way, fresh air by the time we get to thursday, with sunshine and showers. so another week of changeable weather, briefly warmer, especially early in the week, but turning wet again on wednesday and windy by then, too. this is bbc news. i‘m shaun ley. the headlines at 7pm: the bbc‘s director general, lord hall, says he‘ll ‘value the contribution‘ of more than a0 female presenters — who signed a letter demanding the corporation tackle
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its gender pay gap. there‘s been legislation about all this since 1970. it‘s got to stop and we‘ve got to do something about it really, really quickly. a 20—year—old man has died after being confronted by a police officer in a london shop. regrets about a final phone call. 20 years after the death of diana — william and harry open up about the relationship with their mother, in a documentary marking the anniversary of her death.
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