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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 25, 2017 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. a fully—electric version of the mini is to be built at bmw's plant in oxford. the company says it has received no guarantees about post brexit trading, from the uk government. based on that confidence in our industrial strategy and in their brilliant workforce in oxford, i'm delighted that they were able to make this landmark investment. the number of nhs vacancies in england in the first part of the year, is up to 86,000, a rise of 10% on last year. the judge in the case of charlie gard says he will make a final ruling tomorrow, on where the terminally ill boy should be allowed to die. doctors say he should be in a hospice, but his parents have want their son to return home. house—builders could be banned from selling new homes as leasehold in england, as increasing annual charges make future sales,
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tough for buyers. and in the next hour we'll get the latest from the us, where pressure is mounting on the president and the attorney general. the white house says it will reach a decision "soon" on us attorney generaljeff sessions, who has been publicly humiliated by president donald trump. relatives of some of the soldiers who died during the battle of paschendale have attended the unveiling of an art installation in honour of the victims, which is made of mud. the german car manufacturer bmw says it has decided to build an electric version of the mini at its cowley plant in oxford. the new model is due to go into production by the end of 2019. the electric motor, gearbox and battery pack will be produced at bmw's plant in leipzig in germany, before being brought to the uk and installed in the body
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of the mini at the factory of the mini at the factory at the cowley plant in oxford. the company says it has not received any assurances or commitments from the british government regarding trading arrangements after brexit in 2019 — and nor has it requested any. the uk government has called the move a "landmark decision" and a vindication of the government's of its industrial strategy. 0ur transport correspondent richard westcott reports. they make two thirds of the world's minis. we now know that the new electric mini will be made here too. it is great for the business and we are very thrilled a that we will be part of this huge success, hopefully. it means there is no problem with the thought of them closing it down because of brexit so it is very good news. bmw, who make it, had hinted for months that the work
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could go to the netherlands. the new model will be made on the same production line as other minis so it will not mean extra investment orjobs but it is a boost for the government as they try to persuade car—makers to stay in the uk after brexit. we are determined to make britain the go—to place for the next generation of vehicles. they've got a fantastic workforce in oxford already and that combination of planning for the future has convinced them to back britain. the uk car industry has been pushing hard for up brexit deal that still allows free trade with the eu. since the referendum vote, nissan has promised to make models nissan has promised to make two new models for the sunderland plant. toyota is spending a quarter of £1 billion updating this factory near derby. still, experts say the real test is yet to come. i don't think this tells us very much about brexit at all. this is an adaptation of an existing car. the big questions will be when bmw produces a new mini and companies like vauxhall produce the next generation astra, will they produce in the uk or will the uncertainty about our relationship with europe put them off staying in the uk?
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a good day for the uk car industry but the government is still under enormous pressure to cut a brexit deal that secures its long—term future. 0ur political correspondent iain watson, who's at westminster, told me a short time ago that it's not clear yet whether any inducements have been offered, in the past, by the government to foreign car firms to be persuade them to invest in the uk. the god what exactly what was agreed with nissan or toyota. -- still we haven't exactly got to the bottom of what was agreed. what is interesting is that both the government and bmw say assurances were not sought or given over investment in oxford. that could be other reasons for this in any case. the government are saying they have not reached a deal
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with bmw. in recent weeks, we have seen from prominent leave campaigners in the cabinet, they are making it clear they are relaxed and reconciled about a transitional period post brexit after we leave in 2019 and the kids still in effect have many of the same rules and regulations and this avoidance of a cliff edge up until the next general election. the chancellor and others in government would be happy if that arrangement continued for even longer whilst a trade agreement is hammered out. and may well be the case that foreign investors are taking note of that very clearly. the unions say it is because of the very experienced workforce in 0xford. 0thers very experienced workforce in 0xford. others are saying it is a logical place for bmw to go because thatis logical place for bmw to go because that is where they currently assembled most of their minis in any case. what is interesting is whether there will be pressure from german manufacturers to press for a deal
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the government wants to get post brexit because a lot of the key components will come from germany in any case. the government will be pleased that clearly have an ally who will point out it is in their interest as well to keep cross—border production and those kind of relationships going in the manufacturing industry. thank you for joining manufacturing industry. thank you forjoining us, mattias holbeck from the business school at oxford university. is there a sense that this is vindication of the government's industrial strategy, as it has been saying all day? or is it simply the fact that the numbers make sense to make this vehicle here
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in oxford? well, bmw is making a very rational choice. but it is great news for the uk because this could well have gone the other way. there are other plants which have more volume and capacity. it already assembles the hybrid countryman. it does make sense from bmw's point of view from a long—term prospective. we heard from the head of the german car manufacturers association a few days ago that it was important there was a transitional period in place after brexit. the eu think that is the ken of thing that helps bmw make this decision? the suggestion there could be that now as far as uk policy is concerned ? could be that now as far as uk policy is concerned? a cliff edge would be very detrimental to the
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current supply chain. notjust across europe but across the globe. the idea you could bring in 350 trucks to an assembly plant and if that was disrupted through complex customs arrangements, that would be very bad indeed. everybody hopes for agreement but we don't know yet. this decision was made prior to knowing what this type of agreement would look like. it is a big vote of confidence by an important car manufacturer like bmw in battery technology and electric cars. but they are way behind tesla, apparently? they are starting from a greenfield site. they have taken over an old gm plant but there are designers knew and they started an electric vehicle from scratch. bmw is known for its engine technology
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and pleasure to drive is its slogan. if you have built all your expertise and skills and knowledge into a combustion engine, turning that over to an electric motor is much harder. they are doing well. of course tesla is well ahead in terms of the game. peugeot and astra has yet to announce whether or not their new models will be built in the uk. will bea models will be built in the uk. will be a big test of the industrial strategy for a brexit post world, wanted? of course. plans have to bid for new models. the electric mini is essentially the electrification not an existing model. it would only have made sense for it to be placed in oxford or in holland. but for astra that is an open bit. the citroen group are about to take over
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vauxhall. we will see how strong the bid is for that model in the uk. we will hope that there is more certainty by the time that decision has to be made. do you think there probably will have to be some ken of post brexit deal that will allow favoured trading for certain sectors including the car industry if the uk leaves the single market and the customs union? so the customs union in my mind is the big problem because it would add huge complications to the flow of goods. we have just done the numbers for the whole of the uk. about 40% of components for uk built cars come from the uk, 60% come from abroad. you need 2000 components per car. 60% of those having to cross a customs barrier to get to the assembly plant, that as huge
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convocations and is a big disadvantage. i think the uk car industry now needs to lobby very ha rd industry now needs to lobby very hard for a tariff free or customs barrier free hard for a tariff free or customs barrierfree mode of hard for a tariff free or customs barrier free mode of trading post brexit. thank you. my pleasure. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages. our guestsjoining me
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tonight are lucy fisher, senior political correspondent at the times and the journalist and broadcaster aasmah mir. the latest attempt to repeal obamacare the latest attempt to repeal obamaca re has cleared the latest attempt to repeal obamacare has cleared in the senate. senators will begin the discussion. let's go to the white house. president trump is about to speak. the lebanese flag is also flying. there is a suggestion that perhaps the future of america's top law official is in doubt after some public tweets criticising jeff sessions. the president of the united states will be giving a briefing and an address in the next few minutes. we will get back to you
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here on the bbc news channel. as far asjeff sessions is concerned, the issueis asjeff sessions is concerned, the issue is the president has been publicly critical in a number of tweets about him, concerning the fa ct tweets about him, concerning the fact that he recuse himself from the investigation into the russian alleged involvement in last year's presidential election. what is the presidential election. what is the president going to be saying, do you think? well, good question. he will ta ke think? well, good question. he will take several questions from us media. i'm sure he will be asked aboutjeff sessions. he was asked earlier in the day by a wall street reporter and he had no new information. they could be waiting to bring it out during this press
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conference or he could dodge and evade it again. he was asked about this yesterday during an event with white house interns and he rolled his eyes and told the reporter to be quiet. they could be playing at close to the desk, but we have been given an indication from the white house that some sort of resolution will happen soon. we will all wait around. it appears we are operating on their schedule. he has appearing with the lebanese prime minister. are we expecting anything substantive in terms of middle eastern talks or anything? good question. you can never really tell with this white house. middle east peace has been a focus of donald trump. he appointed his son—in—law to oversee peace negotiations in the middle east. there has not been
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significant progress at this time, but that doesn't differentiate this administration from many others prior to it. i think the us media u nfortu nately prior to it. i think the us media unfortunately in these types of situations are going to be much more interested in domestic politics. there might also be comments about health care. there is a lot going on in washington, dc. right now, it is very inwardly focused and not too focused on global affairs. we will end it there. thank you. as i say, as soon as the president emerges from the white house with the prime minister of lebanon, saad hariri, we will bring that to you here on the bbc news channel. the headlines on bbc news:
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a fully—electric version of the mini is to be built at bmw's plant in oxford, as the company insists it neither sought nor received any assurances from the government, post—brexit. the number of nhs vacancies in england in the first part of the year, has risen to 86,000, up 10% on last year. the judge in the case of charlie gard says he will make a final ruling tomorrow — a hospice may be the only option for the child, after the parents asked for their son to return home to die. sport now, and time for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. adam peaty has broken his own world record for the second
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time in the same day at the world aquatics championships in budapest. the olympic gold medallist broke the 50 metre breaststroke record this morning in the heats after saying he "wasn't really up for it" well he's just gone and done it again in the semi finals clocking a record breaking 25.95 seconds. the last few days have been emotional. i said the last few days have been emotional. isaid i the last few days have been emotional. i said i was not going to waste an opportunity because i don't know when it will be my last. ijust went out there and did what i do. the 2012 olympic champion greg rutherford says he's "gutted" injury has ended his hopes of competing at next month's world athletics champonships in london it means rutherford won't compete in the same stadium he won olympic gold 5 years go. he says he'll now focus on becoming a three—time european champion next year. sprinter richard kilty won't be there either. he was expected to compete in the men's 4x100 metre relay but the european indoor champion has broken a finger on his changeover hand.
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there has been more criticism of the rugby football union's decision to not renew the contracts of england's women's 15 a side players. in a letter seen by bbc sport the shadow sports minister dr rosena allin—khan tells chief executive ian ritchie of her "deep concern". sarah hunter says the focus will remain on the world cup next month. we were fully aware of and understood the situation when the new new contracts were coming out. it is something i never thought would happen in a million years. i'm excited the team have benefited from it, but right now our focus is purely on getting to ireland and doing well at that world cup. we're not thinking about anything else or let anything else distract us. it is about as being the best we can be when we get out to ireland. there is no point being on a full—time
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contract sitting in a gym all day playing six times a year. they have to play more than 20 times a year to be competitive. i'm working on the kids below. the women and girls strategy has doubled the number of participants. it is special and moving us forward. that is where we are going. manchester united manager jose mourinho says he is looking for a midfield player and a wide attacker ahead of next season. speaking ahead of his teams us tour game against barcelona, mourinho said no further progress had been made. he has been linked with chelsea midfielder nemanja matic, england midfielder eric dier and inter milan's ivan perisic as he pursues his dream of winning the premier league with united. i think this season we are better prepared for that than last season. last season was a game of words and
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a game of feelings and a respect for history of the club, than a statement based on our potential to win the premier league. i think this season we are better equipped. the former scotland international phil bardsley hasjoined premier league side burnley on a two—year—deal. bardsley has been at stoke city since 2014. he moves to turf moor for an undisclosed fee, and is burnley‘s fourth signing of the summer. just two games to keep you across at the women's euros tonight germany are leading russia 1—0 at the moment and in the other match it's1—1 between sweden and italy. that's all sport for now. i'll have more at 10:30pm. some breaking news from switzerland. police have arrested a chainsaw
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wielding attacker who yesterday entered and insurers offers in a swiss town and wounded two staff members, two other customers worse treated for shock whilst a fifth person was hurt during the police response. the authorities had issued an international arrest warrant for the suspect who has now been cocked. the number of nhs vacancies in england rose by almost 8,000 between january and march, compared with the same period last year. that's according to the latest figures from nhs digital. a total of 86,000 posts were vacant over the three months. of these, more than 11,000 nurse and midwife posts remained vacant, which accounts for the highest proportion of shortages. looking after people when they are at their most vulnerable, providing compassionate and professional care is the main challenge and biggest reward for michelle turner. it is a tough job that carries enormous responsibilities. it is a privilege to be a nurse
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and devalued in thejob that i do. people put their lives in your hands on a daily basis and it is the biggest privilege that you can have. finding more nurses seems to be a problem. around 86,000 posts are recorded as vacant. in march, 30,000 jobs were advertised, for those in more than the previous year. the majority that were filled were nurses and midwives. many hospital trusts are struggling to recruit and retain staff. they are needing to think about more flexible ways of using the staff they already have. at the royal blackburn,
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there are still 100 nurses they need at the royal blackburn, they are still 100 nurses short of where they want to be. managers have had to come up with ways to deal with the pressure of staff shortages. we cope with that on a daily basis, we are flexible and supportive. but we maintain safety, it is our number one priority. the information for england reflects similar problems across the uk. experts warn recruitment is a long—term issue with no quick fix solutions. it is difficult because of the time it takes to train doctors and nurses. it is difficult. we've mitigated that risk in the past by getting stuff from overseas. particularly from the european union. particularly from
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the european union. it is becoming harder with brexit. we've got issues around morale and retention. the department for health says staffing is a priority and more money is being invested in front—line positions. when it comes to assessing the level of staff shortages, it has limitations and these figures highlight the ongoing problems the nhs faces with the recruitment and retention of clinical staff. with me is roy lilley, a former nhs trust chairman and now a health writer and commentator on nhs issues. thank you for coming in. have you seen a situation as bad as this in terms of the profession failing to retain nurses and get nurses into the profession? now, i have not. in a sense, the sky is black with chickens coming home to roost. we are now reaping the dis— benefits of what has gone before. it started after the banking crisis when the coalition government cutback on a
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lot of expenditure across the public sector. the nhs was ring fenced and had a bit more, but training places we re had a bit more, but training places were cut then. it takes three years to train and nurse, seven years to get a doctor to be basically trained. a lot longer after that. then of course since we've had the brexit issue which has unsettled a lot of the european nationals working in the nhs. and applications tojoin the working in the nhs. and applications to join the nhs from the working in the nhs. and applications tojoin the nhs from the eu have dropped by 93%. that is a lot in anybody‘s language. on top of that, the government made changes to the bursary ostensibly to free up the number of training places but it has put people off and we have got a huge number of nurses who are at or above retirement age and they are leaving. last month there was some desperate data we are seeing nazis actually leaving the nhs to go and
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work somewhere else. on top of that, there are all the other professions that work in the health service and generally a feeling that it is becoming less of an option of choice to work in. the news is always depressing. pressures. it is a fabulous place to work and there is a strong sense of vocation, but it is getting more and more difficult to recruit. how are your colleagues coping with this? only having to buy in staff? that puts more pressure on finances and so on? exactly. you have reported the trouble the bbc has had with agency nurses. they cost a lot more than conventional nurses. the problem with that is the regulators, the nhs regulators, have clamped down on hospitals and said you shall not recruit more agency nurses because there is a cost cap
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on it now. there is a thing called an internal bank which is a bit like an internal bank which is a bit like an internal bank which is a bit like an internal agencies so nurses can doa an internal agencies so nurses can do a bit of extra overtime, but it isa do a bit of extra overtime, but it is a tough old job. they are doing three days back—to—back 12 hour shifts. it is getting tougher. no doubt about it, there are shortages on the wards, there is a question — mark over safe staffing. it is not just nursing, it is across the professions. thank you. survivors of the grenfell tower block fire will get the chance to question the judge who will lead the inquiry into the disaster at a public meeting this evening. sir martin moore—bick is consulting residents on what they want his inquiry to cover. our correspondent dan johnson is there. what has come out from the meeting?
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there is still a lot of emotion and frustration coming from this community. the panel will realise a lot of people don't have faith in their ability to do a properjob on this enquiry. a lot of questions about the terms of reference and there's been some confusion about exactly what powers the enquiry has. a lot of questions for the enquiry cheer about whether he will be to hold individuals to account whether he can bring criminal charges and put people in prison. the chair has been at pains to repeatedly try explain the purpose of the function of the enquiry is to establish the fa cts of the enquiry is to establish the facts and get a full picture of what went wrong, what caused the fire and how it spread, but not to apportion blame or to hold people criminally accountable. that is for other investigations. that has brought a response from some people who have said it is pointless. it is a futile
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effort going through this enquiry if it is not going to result in individuals being held accountable. this meeting has been fractious, particularly at the start. people wearing their opinions loudly. the chairare wearing their opinions loudly. the chair are struggling to be heard at times. he has promised he will take as much time as is needed to let eve ryo ne as much time as is needed to let everyone have their say. he will consider all views on exactly what this enquiry should focus on but there has also been frustrating things have not moved quicker. people have been given more time to give opinions on the terms of reference for this enquiry but others have been telling the enquiry panel they think more should have happened now six weeks on from the fire and the frustrating things haven't even really started moving yet. thank you. more news coming up in a couple of
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minutes. first, the weather. to finish the day, the showers over the midlands will fade. later in the night, wales, northern ireland and south—west england will turn increasingly breezy. single temperatures in some eastern parts. early—morning temperatures in some eastern parts. ea rly—morning brightness temperatures in some eastern parts. early—morning brightness in the east. wet in the west, windy as well. heaviest rain for northern ireland, scotland and northern england. pushing eastwards. we finished the day with patchy rain in eastern areas. in the west, after the wet start, save your plans for the wet start, save your plans for the afternoon. dryer and brighter. temperatures down on recent days. we finished the day with frequent showers for scotland and northern
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ireland. goodbye. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at 20:30: bmw has confirmed that cowley, in oxford, will be the main "production location" for a fully electric version of the mini. the company says it has "neither sought nor received" assurances over any post—brexit trade deal from the uk government. based on that confidence in our industrial strategy and their brilliant workforce at oxford, i'm delighted that they were able to make this landmark investment. the judge in the case of charlie gard says he will make a final ruling tomorrow on where the terminally ill boy should be allowed to die. the judge says a hospice may be the only option, but his parents have asked for their son to return home. house—builders could be banned from selling new homes as leasehold in england, as increasing annual charges make it impossible for some buyers to sell their properties. the white house says it will reach
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a decision "soon" on the future of the attorney general jeff sessions. he's been publicly criticised on several occasions recently by the president. talking about president trump, he is speaking now live at the white house with the lebanese prime minister. let's hear what is going on. i appreciate his leadership and the united states leadership in the world today. we discussed the situation in our region. and the effo rts situation in our region. and the efforts we in lebanon are making to safeguard our political and economic stability while combating terrorism. i thank president trump for his support our army and security agencies as well as the support to maintaining peace and stability on
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our southern border. where our government is committed to the united nations security council resolution as well as all resolutions. we also discussed the pressures lebanon is facing as a result of 1.5 million syrian displaced people in our country. result of 1.5 million syrian displaced people in our countrylj outlined... the lebanese prime minister saad hariri, having talks with president trump at the white house. in a joint press conference, they have been discussing various issues and the president has been referring to the decision by the senate to discuss a new possible replacement of obamacare, the affordable care act. so a lotto in gone. let's go back. united states of america for their support to the lebanese people, driving to keep their country a
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moderation of dialogue, coexistence and democratic governance in our region. thank you. thank you very much. margaret, please. hello, margaret. hello, mr president. mr prime minister, a question for you also ina prime minister, a question for you also in a second. he spoke earlier today in the wall street journal and we have seen those comments, but everybody here is probably hoping the you can talk more about this. you have called york attorney general billy goat and criticised his decision to recuse himself on the russian matters. and your catchphrase or motto was, you are fired. would you talk to others about whether you have lost confidence injeff about whether you have lost confidence in jeff sessions, about whether you have lost confidence injeff sessions, whether you want him to resign on his own. whether you are prepared to fire him
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if he does not and why you are letting it twist in the wind rather than making the call for him.|j letting it twist in the wind rather than making the call for him. i do not think i am doing that, but i am disappointed in the attorney general. he should not have recused himself. almost immediately after he took office. and if he was going to, he should have told me prior to taking office and i would have quite simply picked somebody else. sol think that is a bad thing not for the president, but for the presidency. i think it is unfair to the presidency. and that is the way i feel, thank you. thank you. mr prime minister, could you tell us what do you think about the saudi led blockade of qatar? this is something that has been of great concern to the us in terms of resolving, do you think qatar is doing enough on terror and if so, would you like to see president trump increase the pressure on the
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saudi coalition to use it blockade. mr president, any more of your thinking and going forward the path with the attorney general sessions and a timeline for making a decision? thank you. thank you. there is an effort by kuwait, they are reading this effort. and i think they made some progress. we believe that dialogue is the best way in improving this relationship between saudi arabia and qatar. i believe may be the united states also could help in solving this issue in the gulf. denise. i have one question for the president and also for the prime minister. congress introduced additional sanctions against his beloved, what is your position towards these sanctions and the role
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it is playing in the region?|j towards these sanctions and the role it is playing in the region? i will be making my position clear over the next 24 hours. we going to what is exactly taking place. i had meetings with some of my very expert military representatives and others so i will be making that decision very shortly. the role in syria and the region pushed mark of hezbollah. shortly. the role in syria and the region pushed mark of hezbollahlj region pushed mark of hezbollah.” will be talking about that tomorrow. prime minister... in lebanese. saad hariri, the prime minister of
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lebanon, speaking. another question. hello, blake. president trump, hello, thank you. indulge us for a second... why should he remain as the attorney general? and secondly, and a separate topic, with the health care vote that came about, still a long way to go. at what point do you feel
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that republicans come if they cannot get something done, should just say, we gave it a go, let's move on to tax reform instead ? we gave it a go, let's move on to tax reform instead? i want the attorney general to be much tougher on the leagues from intelligence agencies. which are wreaking like rarely have they ever leaked before ata rarely have they ever leaked before at a very important level. these are intelligence agencies, we cannot have that happen. we know many of my views in addition to that, but that is one of the very important thing is one of the very important thing is that they have to get on with. i told you before i am very disappointed with the attorney general. but we will see what happens. time will tell. time will tell. on health care, i am extremely happy that we got this vote. they say, if you look historically, this is the tough vote to get. now we are all going to sit together and we are going to try and come up with something that is really spectacular. we have a lot of options and a lot of great options,
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and the republicans senators really we nt and the republicans senators really went out there. it is not easy when you have 52 senators and a block of 48 voting against you, no matter what it is and how good it sounds, it is very hard to get the kind of numbers that we got. we ended up with 51 votes, to whatever. yes, 51-50. so with 51 votes, to whatever. yes, 51—50. so we had two republicans that went against us, which is very sad, very, very sad for them. but i am very, very happy with the result. i believe now we will over the next week or two come up with a plan that is going to be really, really wonderful for the american people. obamacare is a disaster, it is failing on every front. it is too expensive. it gives horrible cove rage. expensive. it gives horrible coverage. it was gotten by a lie, 28 times it was a lie, you can keep your doctor, you can keep your plan, always. and the people are sick of it. and we are going to come up with
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a great health care that satisfies the needs of the people that we serve, which is the people of the united states. i will say and i said right at the beginning, health care isa right at the beginning, health care is a whizz difficult because you have two we've a very narrow path, like a quarter of an inch wide, right down the middle. if you go a little bit too far right, you lose three people on the left and if you go too far left, you lose five people on the right. it is a very, very complex and difficult task. but it is something i actually know quite a bit about. i want tojust thank some of the republican senators who thank some of the republican senators who we re thank some of the republican senators who were really fantastic in getting this here, especially john mccain for making the trip. but you are going to have a great health care. this is the beginning of the end for the disaster known as obamacare. thank you very much. mr president... how can the united
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states help lebanon cope with the massive number of refugees of syrian refugees, and is there a way you can help others return of refugees to their home country? well, we are helping. and one of the things that we have made great strides that is getting rid of isis. we have general that do not like to talk, they like to do. we were with general matters la st to do. we were with general matters last night. and the success they have had against isis is fantastic. we have had more progress in the la st we have had more progress in the last four or five months than previous, i could really say the previous, i could really say the previous administration made in eight years. and then we have to see what we have to see. but i will tell you isis in syria, isis in iraq, isis in other locations, we have made tremendous strides. our military is an incredible fighting force. and as you know, i led the,
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—— i let the commanders on the round do what they had to do. before, they had to call into this beautiful house and speak to people that did not know what was happening. where they work, what locations. practically, probably never heard of the countries they were talking about all the towns. i let the generals do what they had to do. and we have made tremendous plans. we we re we have made tremendous plans. we were discussing it before, we have made tremendous gains with respect to isis in syria, iraq and other places. a sad? i am to isis in syria, iraq and other places. a sad? lam not to isis in syria, iraq and other places. a sad? i am not a fan, 0k? he will tell you that we had 58 out of 58, you could even say 59 out of 59 when we lodged the tomahawk missiles. i am 59 when we lodged the tomahawk missiles. lam not 59 when we lodged the tomahawk
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missiles. i am not a fan of assad. i certainly think that what he has done to that country and to humanity is horrible. sol done to that country and to humanity is horrible. so i have been saying that for a long time. i am not somebody that will stand by and let him get away with what he tried to do, and he did a number of times when president obama drew the red line in the sand, and then he should have crossed the red line. because some horrible acts against humanity took place including gas. and the killing through gas. that was a bad day for this country. and i go a step further that had president obama, cross that line and done what he should have done, i don't believe you would have russia and i do not believe you would have iran to anywhere near the extent and maybe
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not at all in syria today. thank you very much. ok, president trump with the prime minister of lebanon, saad hariri. and the president taking questions from the journalists not just about the middle east, but about domestic policy as well, primarily concerning his own top law official in the united states, jeff sessions. the president said he is disappointed in his attorney general because he should not have recused himself from being involved in the inquiry into whether or not russia medalled in last year's presidential election and he said that if he knew thatjeff sessions was going to recuse himself, he would not tens —— put himself forward as his pick to become attorney general. jeff sessions recused himself because
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during election campaign, he had had meetings with the russian ambassador and this was not declared at the time that he put himself forward to become attorney general. as a result, he could frankly have not been involved in any kind of investigation involving the russians because of a clear conflict of interest. but the suggestion is that president trump believes that if jeff sessions had stayed as being possibly able to handle that inquiry, he would have shut the whole thing down. that leads to another question, well, if he wanted jeff sessions to stay in place and shut the whole thing down, what does that suggest may have happened in relation to members of his team and the russians during the election campaign. so murky waters. the president also said he was very pleased that the senate was moving the debate repealing and replacing obamacare or the the debate repealing and replacing obamaca re or the affordable the debate repealing and replacing obamacare or the affordable care act. so the president speaking with
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the leader of lebanon at the white house. the headlines on bbc news: a fully—electric version of the mini is to be built at bmw's plant in oxford, as the company insists it's received no assurances about post—brexit trading. the number of nhs vacancies in england in the first part of the year has risen to 86,000, up 10% on last year. the judge in the case of charlie gard says he'll make a final ruling tomorrow on where the terminally ill boy should be allowed to die. doctors say he should be in a hospice, but the parents want their son to return home. an update on the market numbers for you... back to one of our top stories. the
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high courtjudge back to one of our top stories. the high court judge overseeing back to one of our top stories. the high courtjudge overseeing the case of the terminally ill baby charlie gard will make a decision tomorrow. the child's mother connie yates appeared in court today. great ormond street hospital says it is practicalfor him to ormond street hospital says it is practical for him to go ormond street hospital says it is practicalfor him to go home. our medical correspondent has more details. the legal battle over this desperately sick boy now centres on where and how soon he dies. charlie needs a mechanical ventilator to breathe. he is stupid and he cannot move. yesterday, his parents gave up theirfight to move. yesterday, his parents gave up their fight to take into the united states and agreed more treatment —— he is fed by tubes and he cannot move. his mother was back in court today to make sure he does not die in the intensive care unit where he has been since october. the lawyer of the parents said it was their last wish that charlie dies at home. lawyers said they would pay private
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nurses to take over his care and later look to recover the cost from the nhs. but the court heard there we re the nhs. but the court heard there were practical issues to be resolved. for example, whether charlie's ventilator would fit through theirfront charlie's ventilator would fit through their front door. in a statement, great ormond street hospital said it wanted to honour the wishes of the parents, but the ca re the wishes of the parents, but the care plan must be safe... the dispute over where and how soon charlie should die typifies the utter breakdown in the relationship between the parents and the hospital. thejudge mrjustice
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francis said this was a matter that was crying out for mediation. great ormond street hospital says it has offered that, but the parents have refused. the judge offered that, but the parents have refused. thejudge said offered that, but the parents have refused. the judge said the parents we re refused. the judge said the parents were entitled to decide where they spent the next couple of days, but this should not extend into weeks, that would be unacceptable as it would simply extends the grieving process. this woman lost her son when he was five. he was profoundly disabled and fed by tubes. she also search for a cure for his condition. i have got to learn to let them go at all sorts of levels. stuff happens and they must not be big bitter because that will eat them, there is no point. they have got to look at the positive things. the hospital has offered a compromise. for charlie to be transferred to a hospice where doctors from great ormond upward supervise his palliative care and death after a
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period of some hours. charlie's pa rents say period of some hours. charlie's parents say they want to days, not ours, and a hospice is the second best option. two men have been hurt ina best option. two men have been hurt in a suspected acid attack in east london. police are describing a noxious substance that was thrown at them in bethnal green at seven p:m.. there has been a sharp rise in acid attacks in recent weeks. the north wales police and crime commissioner has been accused of abusing his position because of his opposition to fracking. critics say arfon jones' stance might have influenced police, to stop sending officers to anti—fracking protests in lancashire, although he has no power over police operations. matthew richards reports. fracking is drilling into the earth before a high—pressure water mixture is directed at rocks, releasing gas inside. it attracts environmental protesters wherever it is used.
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dilling has not started at this site near preston but opponents have been here for a month. lancashire police drafted in support to help them manage the protests but after ten days at the site, support from north wales will not be provided. arfon jones, a vocal critic, is the area's police and crime commissioner. he denies claims he has abused his position to stop the assistance, but admits his views may have had some influence. i was consulted when lancashire cork county council considered this and was overruled by westminster, my views are well known. might that have plagued the decision of the force? you would have the asked them that, that is probably a factor, but the main factor is the resources and demand on north wales police during the summer. the four stage due to high demand in north wales over the holiday season... police and crime commissioner is
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have no direct control over operational matters, they can express personal opinions and many plot to kill each party political. arfonjones says his views are known inside and outside the force and has welcomed news public money will no longer be spent providing what he calls public security. it was one of the bloodiest battles of the first world war in which nearly half a million troops were killed or wounded. the battle of passchendaele saw the british launch a series of failed assaults against german forces in belgium. today, relatives of some of the soldiers who died attended the unveiling of an art installation made in honour of the victims. caroline davies reports. over the top and into the unknown, this was the battle of passchendaele, one of the deadliest episodes of the first world war. today, 100 years on, a specially commissioned sculpture was unveiled
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in trafalgar square. rebecca's great—grandfather harry moorhouse and his son were killed on the same day. they were both in the same battalion and when ronald was wounded, the son, the father set out to find a doctor. he was insistent that he would get help for him but, unfortunately, he was shot as he went out to find the doctor. by then, ronald was dead anyway. it was a hideous waste of life. the battle raged on for three months. 500,000 people were wounded or lost their lives. the british gained five miles. passchendaele was one of the biggest and bloodiest battles the british army has ever fought. it is important because it shows how intense and appalling the first world war was. it was one of the darkest years in british history. constant driving rain turned the battlefield into a sea
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of mud, which drowned many of the men fighting there. the sculpture is to remember the men who died and their bravery. it's not the only way passchendaele is being remembered. to help the next generation understand the brutality of the battle, the british legion has created these 360—degree videos. like these cadets, they want the public to download and watch them for free. it makes it much more real. so you get more respect for how horrific it must have been. all the effects are so much more real, like the explosions and the mud and rain. it's a lot more realistic. it definitely gives depth to the knowledge you're gaining. you get to see lots of different bits around you. what they would see. also, the information is given to you, you take it in much better. the mud soldier will be worn away by rain, falling to the air. but the hope is, the memories it invokes will not wash away so easil,'y.
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a lovely day today, temperatures peaking at 25, 20 six celsius. there is a change on the way and that begins tomorrow, wet and windy weather sweeping the country. but for a time. not a complete wash—out. this is the cloud responsible. it does leave most of us going into the night dry and clear. the fading across the midlands. dump in the north east of scotland. eastern areas see the temperatures in the single figures. most in the teens, especially in the west were northern ireland, wales, south—west england,
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turn increasingly wet and windy. the driving force is this low—pressure which will remain for the rest of the week. first punch is this clutch of weather fronts from west to east across the country. if you want to do something tomorrow, first thing in the morning, you see the driest and brightest weather. it thoroughly wet start in the west. things gradually brighter and here as the rain spreads north and east lingering across the far of scotland. cloud and patchy rain towards the south and east. temperatures down on what we have seen, the high teens and low 20s. or if you want to head out and get plans under way, in the west, the afternoon is best, have a lazy lunch and enjoy the afternoon. a bit of a breeze but most places will be dry with some showers in northern ireland and the south—west of scotland. showers across some western areas to end the day and they become more frequent in scotla nd they become more frequent in scotland and northern ireland on thursday. low—pressure gets close.
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so we also have stronger winds. showers become heavy and thundery. largely dry with sunshine innings and wales. there will be showers developing and some of you avoid them altogether, but into that regime of temperatures staying in the teens. as will be the case on friday, the swell of the winds indicating low—pressure remaining, showers made frequent in the west of scotland. something much wetter to finish the day and overnight, heavy rain across england and wales to the start of the weekend. the weekend summed up in one picture, rain will spotting, sunshine and showers and temperatures for most staying in the teens. goodbye for now. donald trump used similar words as he had on twitter to describe the attorney general. and disappointed in him. he should not have refused
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himself immediately after taking office. his son-in-law has again been questioned over russia. the us congress is set to slap new sanctions on russia. in other news, muslim leaders
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