Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2017 5:00am-5:31am BST

5:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm david eades. our top stories: the us house of representatives votes overwhelmingly for new sanctions on russia, iran and north korea. moscow says it will "complicate relations." after the migrant crisis, europe's top court to decide if refugees must file for asylum in the first country they reach. another milestone for green motoring: the uk's set to ban new diesel and petrol vehicles from 2040. and i'm rachel horne. and in the business news: after the disappointing growth outlook the uk received from the imf last week, today we get some real numbers for the british economy. and after "emmissionsgate" is a new scandal brewing for vw? if so this time it's not alone, all the main german car makers are accused of having operated a cartel. but did they? hello. thank you very much for being
5:01 am
with us here on bbc news. just as president trump has been trying to improve relations with russia, the us house of representative has voted in new sanctions against moscow, and they've done so in a way which makes it very difficult for mr trump to do much about it. the sanctions target key russian officials in retaliation for interference in last year's us election and in eastern ukraine. they also target north korea and iran, as sarah corker reports. i, donald john trump do solemnly swear... throughout his first six months in office, president trump has been dogged by allegations that moscow interfered to help get him elected. this new bill is likely antagonise the kremlin and complicate mr trump's plans to improve relations with russia. on this vote, the yays are 419, the nays are three. these tougher sanctions passed
5:02 am
overwhelmingly by the house expand restrictions on doing business with russian companies, and limit the president's authority to roll back the sanctions. we simply cannot allow any foreign power to interfere in our electoral process. given our president's complete unwillingness to hold russia accountable for their attack — let's not mistake it for anything else, it was an attack on america — it has become necessary for congress to assert its role in this area and ensure that russia will be held accountable. russia has denied any meddling in the election and prior to tuesday's vote, its foreign ministry said: and this comes as three separate investigations looking into whether donald trump's campaign team colluded with the russians over the elections, something he strongly refutes. on tuesday, jared kushner,
5:03 am
the president's son—in—law, was questioned by the house intelligence committee. the new sanctions also target north korea and iran over ballistic missile tests. the bill must now pass the senate before it can be signed or vetoed by the president. the white house says they are reviewing the legislation, but yet again, the intense focus on russia is overshadowing donald trump's agenda. sarah corker, bbc news. asi as i mentioned, north korea and iran are affected as well. our correspondent karen allen is in seoul. what is the view from there? i should think there would be some pleasure that the sanctions are going through? yes, but no official response from seoul on this. it is perhaps not that surprising. but it
5:04 am
does concur with the approach that the president he has taken, a twin track approach. on one hand, trying to keep sanctions tight, and squeeze the nurse or north korea, while at the nurse or north korea, while at the same time giving the door open for the possibility of some kind of military talks. —— noose. no talk from pyongyang on those. but this is a sign that pressure is being kept up. and that is something that president moon discussed with president moon discussed with president trump when he visited a little over a month ago. but a key point is that this is a tightening up point is that this is a tightening up of sanctions. we do not know much about them, but the sanctions are meant to target the shipping industry and also the use of labour, export of labour and illegal, forced labour, by north korea into other countries like china and russia. so it will be seen as a positive move, certainly from seoul. but at this
5:05 am
stage, and no official response yet. do you get a sense from a south korean perspective that there are at least some encouraging signs from the un or the us that they are very much being supported, if you like, in terms of what many have seen as north korea's increasingly unpredictable approach to its own international relations? well, the us is south korea's biggest ally. there are 28,000 american troops are stationed here. there was a very strong, robust response from the us when that intercontinental ballistic missile was fired, white, nearly a month ago, he, from north korea. ——
5:06 am
what, nearly a month ago, here. month ago, he, from north korea. —— what, nearlya month ago, here. many people in south korea still have relatives across the border in the north. it is not necessarily a hostile relationship. that is why they're beginning to talk about things like trying to unify families, reunite families that have been divided across the border. we are hoping to hear more about that in the next few days. as there is a desire that although support from the us is important, and is imperative, because it is the us that has that clout, internationally, the leadership here in south korea is very keen to retain some ownership over a problem which it says is very nuanced, and it wants to be able to keep the door open for the possibility of re— engaging, in whatever degree it can, with pyongyang. thank you very much for joining with pyongyang. thank you very much forjoining us from seoul. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news around the world. huge forest fires in the south east of france are being fanned
5:07 am
by unusually hot, dry and windy weather. the island of corsica, and areas near nice and saint—tropez are badly affected. dozens of homes have been evacuated. some roads and railways have been temporarily closed. ajudge will decide today whether the 11 month old baby, charlie gard, should be able to leave great ormond street hospital in london, to die at home. lawyers for the hospital say a hospice would be a more appropriate place for charlie, who is suffering from a rare inherited disease. charlie's parents fought and lost a long legal battle to allow charlie to undergo experiemental therapy in the us. one of the vatican's most seniorfigures, cardinal pell, has appeared in court in australia to face multiple charges of historical sex abuse. the former archbishop of sydney and melbourne insists he's innocent. details of the charges haven't been made public. the migrant crisis of 2015 and 2016 was a particularly grim moment in history, of course,
5:08 am
but was it, in legal terms, "exceptional circumstances" ? well the european court ofjustice has to decide that, in the course of the day. it matters, to many migrants and many governments, because it should then be clear whether some of the european union's key rules on asylum applied at the time. the so—called "dublin regulation" puts the burden on refugees to file for asylum in the first european country they arrive in, and this case involves austria and slovenia. bethany bell reports from the border town of spielfeld. these two and their children were not given asylum, unlike many others. the austrian authorities
5:09 am
decided they should be deported back to croatia, their point of entry into the european union, under the eu's dublin regulations. so was it right to send them back at a time when the borders were open? the case of the two sisters is now before your‘s top court, along with a similar case from slavonia. the court's decision could affect the lives of a lot of people. —— slovenia. one of them is this man from afghanistan. he first came to austria last year, but in november was deported back to croatia. translation: i tried so hard. was deported back to croatia. translation: itried so hard. i did everything i could. i did football, i was doing a german course. at school, i was in a choir. and i was at my interview and they said no. they said no, you need to go back. croatia was very good. it was winter
5:10 am
and we did not have blankets. it was very cold. -- croatia was very cold. european court of justice very cold. -- croatia was very cold. european court ofjustice has to rule on whether the asylum rules we re rule on whether the asylum rules were applicable during the exceptional circumstances of the migrant crisis. some lawyers believe that this case could have indications for countries like italy, facing mass arrivals in the future. but others are not so sure. i don't think so because the situation in 2015 were special. government actively contributed. they use buses to bring people from one border to the next. that is why in this case we would not talk about and a regular border crossing. and as long as we don't have another situation like this, i don't dig will rise again. 0k, ok, let's pick up all or the business shoes to make news with
5:11 am
rachel. later this morning the uk will unveil its latest growth numbers for the three months to the end ofjune. —— the business news. earlier this week the international monetary fund warned that weaker economic activity means both the us and uk will expand more slowly than expected this year. however in the numbers due out this morning, economists are expecting the uk's growth rate will have risen slightly in the last three months to 0.3%. following the brexit vote, the pound fell. this put pressure on prices — last month inflation stayed above the bank of england's 2% target rate. and higher prices — partly from imported goods — are having an impact on consumer spending. according to visa, household expenditure fell 0.3% last month, the lowest figure in almost four years. but government figures suggest uncertainty isn't deterring investors.
5:12 am
the uk continues to be the top investment location in europe, with more than 2,200 new foreign direct investment projects announced in the last year — that's 2% up on the year before. and on tuesday bmw announced it had chosen oxford as the location of where it will build its new fully electric mini. also in the programme, volkswagen is set to hold an emergency supervisory board meeting later today regarding allegations that the carmaker operated a cartel alongside audi, porsche, mercedes and bmw, to control pricing on parts. if true, the reports would be a further blow to the german car industry, which is trying to recover after the recent vw emissions scandal. we'll have a report from berlin in world business report in 20 minutes. before then, you can get in touch with me and the team on twitter. thank you very much for that rachel. you certainly cannot get away from cars, though, because all sales of new petrol and diesel cars in the uk
5:13 am
will be banned from 2040 as part of an effort to reduce air pollution. the government is expected to announce that more than £250 million offunding, for announce that more than £250 million of funding, for local councils, to tackle emissions from diesel vehicles. we have come a long way in terms of design, but for 100 years, we have been relying on vehicles with an internal combustion engine, burning petrol or diesel. but is that about a change? several major carmakers including bmw, one, and although, have already announced ambition to make ambitious plans for electric ca rs. make ambitious plans for electric cars. and now the government is signalling the end of petrol and diesel engines in the uk with a ban on sales by 2040. —— have already announced ambitious plans. it is pa rt announced ambitious plans. it is part of the air quality strategy, which includes 255 million for local
5:14 am
councils. it will include a ban on sales of petrol or diesel vehicles in the uk, as well is a consultation ona in the uk, as well is a consultation on a diesel scrapping scheme. it follows a pledge earlier this month by emmanuel macron. the ban will also be introduced there in 2040. campaigners are likely to complain that the government has not gone far enough orfast that the government has not gone far enough or fast enough, while that the government has not gone far enough orfast enough, while labour say that 40 million people are living in areas with illegal levels ofair living in areas with illegal levels of air pollution, and that action is needed now, not in 20 years' time. stay with us on bbc news. more to come, including, canned can dogs smell parkinson's disease? the new trial that offers hope to millions worldwide. mission control: you can see them coming down the ladder now.
5:15 am
it's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight for the first crash in the 30 year history of concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner. it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in sperm quantity and an increase in malfunction of sperm unable to swim properly. thousands of households across the country are suspiciously quiet this lunchtime as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the us house of representatives has voted overwhelmingly to impose new sanctions on russia,
5:16 am
iran and north korea. moscow says it will complicate relations. after the migrant crisis, europe's top court is set to rule on whether refugees must file for asylum in the first country they arrive in. a bbc panorama investigation has found evidence that suggests a widely—prescribed antidepressant may have played a role in one of america's worst mass shootings. two uk—based psychiatrists have told the programme they think the shootings might not have happened ifjames holmes hadn't been taking the drug sertraline. manufacturer pfizer says a causal link between sertraline and homicidal behaviour has not been established. shelleyjofre reports. did you have any doubt that you would end up killing someone? no, it
5:17 am
is something i had to do. we need a rescue. . . is something i had to do. we need a rescue... james holmes talking in prison after the so—called batsman killing. five years ago he fired into a pack cinema killing 12 and injuring dozens more. the attack left his pa rents injuring dozens more. the attack left his parents utterly bewildered. you can't believe it is possible for anyone to cause that much harm, let alone the man who raised. the suspect is in a gas mask. did antidepressants play a role in his crime? the prosecutor says, no way. you know who agrees with me? the defence team that refuse to put on evidence of that nonsense. that's what you think, nonsense?” evidence of that nonsense. that's what you think, nonsense? i do. is it nonsense? it wasn't explored at james holmes‘ trial. it nonsense? it wasn‘t explored at james holmes‘ trial. his defence focused on his mental state instead. jurors are very suspicious of
5:18 am
theories that a defence lawyer presents, even with mental illness, which is an established area of medicine. panorama has learnt in preparation for the file two years ago the defence brought uk—based psychiatrist professor david healy to evaluate the evidence and meet holmes in prison. professor healy came toa holmes in prison. professor healy came to a controversial decision. holmes in prison. professor healy came to a controversial decisionlj came to a controversial decision.” believe if he hadn‘t taken sertraline he wouldn‘t have murdered anyone. his evidence was never tested in court. panorama has scrutinised what happened after james holmes took the drug, a notebook provides some clues. holmes wrote in his notebook how his id session with killing evolved. intense aversion of people, cause unknown, began long ago suppressed by greater fear of others. and after he started taking sertraline, no more fear. hatred on chacked, starts
5:19 am
small, buys stun gun and folding knife —— unchecked. committed, shotgun. professor peter tyrod, world expert on personality disordered, thinks the medication may have played a part in homes‘ chrome. his symptoms were exactly right for giving sertraline, no question about that. his underlying personality, there is a certain detachment from people, like an alien species —— homes‘ crime. and that sort of person worries me a great deal when i am prescribing. pfizer says sertraline has helped many. mind, mental health charity, advises anyone concerned not to stop medication suddenly without speaking to their doctor and says severe side—effects are incredibly rare. shelley jofre reporting there. let‘s take a look at some of the other stories making making the news. for the first time in spanish
5:20 am
history, a sitting prime minster will testify in court when mariano rajoy appears as a witness today in a long—running corruption trial that has rocked his conservative popular party. the trial centres on allegations of a kickback scheme, where companies bribed former popular party lawmakers and civil servants to get contracts. rajoy is not personally accused of corruption. new research reveals in less than 40 years, sperm counts have fallen by more than half in western countries. scientists say the results indicate a potential threat to fertility in industrialised countries. no similar pattern was seen in south america, asia and africa. a study into the brains of american football players has found 99% of the professional nfl athletes tested had a disease associated with head injuries. the report published in thejournal of the american medical association is the largest study of its kind, according to its authors. brains were donated from more than 200 deceased players, some as young as 23.
5:21 am
in a statement the nfl said it was grateful for the study and the "value it adds in the ongoing quest for a better understanding of cte". researchers say it‘s a significant step in identifying who‘s at risk of the brain disease but more studies are needed. this is the largest study today individuals with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or cte. the conclusions being drawn are that this is a problem and it is not going anywhere and it can‘t be ignored. it is something that we have to address. it is quite a remarkable number, 99% of former nfl players diagnosed using the strict criteria for cte. in sport, britain‘s adam peaty who became the first swimmer ever to go sub 26 seconds in the 50m
5:22 am
breaststroke on tuesday. the 22—year—old broke his record not once, but twice, as he reached the final at the world aquatics championships in budapest. he‘s already retained his 100m title in the same discipline when he took gold on monday but the olympic champion clocked 25.95 seconds in his 50 metres breaststroke semi—final, going even quicker than he‘d done when setting a new world best in the heats earlier in the day. and peaty is hoping he can go even quicker in wednesday‘s final. for a long time humans have known that dogs can smell things we can‘t. from hunting to bomb detection, dogs‘ noses can be very useful. now a new trial has just started to see if dogs could help doctors diagnose parkinson‘s disease more quickly. our correspondent tim muffet has more. kiwi is demonstrating a remarkable skill. this is one of our fully trained dogs, and it is looking for cancer cells in a human sample. dolls can smell the odour of human
5:23 am
disease. it sounds incredible. when we have disease or infection we have a biochemical change in our body and this changes our smell. -- dogs. the ability of dogs to snip at canas has been acknowledged for years but now kiwi and other medical detection dogs are beginning a new challenge. what we hope to do is train them to find the odour associated with parkinson‘s disease. if they can do this they can revolutionise the way in which parkinson‘s is detected. parkinson‘s disease is a degenerative neurological condition with no cure. les milner died in 2015 having had it for 20 years. seeing him change, ijust... we didn‘t know what it was. seeing him change, ijust... we didn't know what it was. parkinson's can cause wadi tremors and leave sufferers unable to speak or walk but as there is no diagnostic test in its early stages of sufferers often miss out on medication that can help —— body. often miss out on medication that can help -- body. we didn't understand what can happen. joy,
5:24 am
however, has a highly developed sense of smell. she noticed something different about les ten yea rs before doctors something different about les ten years before doctors diagnosed parkinson‘s. years before doctors diagnosed parkinson's. i started complaining about his smell. so, what was this smell like, that you could detect on your husband ? smell like, that you could detect on your husband? i would describe it as a very strong musky smell. after his diagnosis, pro three noticed the other smell on other sufferers.” said to him, those people smell the same as you said to him, those people smell the same as you “— said to him, those people smell the same as you —— joy noticed. he said, what are you talking about? i said that people who have parkinson‘s in the group smell the same as you. joy's the group smell the same as you. joy‘s sense of smell it is so strong that doctors say it is rarely seen in humans. for dogs, however, it is a different story. some breeds of dog have more than 200 million scent receptors in their nose, that is compared to around 5 million for a human. many believe that by harnessing that incredible sense of smell, more medical conditions could be sniffed out earlier. these
5:25 am
medical detection dogs live with families and come to the testing centre during the daytime. backed by the charity parkinson‘s uk swabs from parkinson‘s sufferers will be introduced to see if the dogs can identify them. people might present ata identify them. people might present at a neurological clinic or they might go to casualty because they have had a full or because they have had some other event that is not usualfor had some other event that is not usual for them. had some other event that is not usualfor them. and very had some other event that is not usual for them. and very rarely what they think they might have is parkinson‘s but if we can develop an early test, it really improves the patient well—being if they know what‘s going on. patient well—being if they know what's going on. the research and training will take six months but 200 years after the condition was identified it is hoped dogs will soon help doctors diagnosed parkinson‘s alea. you‘re watching bbc news. —— earlier. good morning.
5:26 am
there‘s rain in the forecast for the next few days, but for the next few days, certainly not all the time wi1 wet but certainly not all the time with wet and windy weather for just about all of us. some dry weather as well. usedin all of us. some dry weather as well. used in areas will start the day dry. further west, this area of cloud hurdling in from the atlantic and this cloud will bring outbreaks of rain. initially across northern ireland, western scotland, into wales and the south—west. and as we go through the day the rain will move into the midlands, north—east england, eastern scotland, eventually limping its way into east anglia and the south—east, although it is just patchy rain. some strong wind with the wet weather. as it clears away, things will brighten up. so while the rain holds on in the north and east of scotland well into the afternoon, for south—west scotla nd into the afternoon, for south—west scotland and northern ireland with the bright skies and blustery showers as well. temperatures, no great shakes, and 16— 19 degrees, brightening in northern ireland. across lincolnshire, east anglia,
5:27 am
into the south—east, saying cloudy in the afternoon with splashes of rain at times, but bright sky is developing in the south—west and wales, not feeling too bad, 20 in exeter. through wednesday night into the early hours of thursday we lose the early hours of thursday we lose the rain from eastern areas. a lot of dry weather through the night. however, up into the north—west, quite hefty showers in northern ireland and western scotland. temperatures 11— 15 degrees. on thursday, low pressure the dominant feature of the weather. in fact it is unusual to see a low this deep on the weather charts at this time of year. it means there will be strong wind, especially in the north—west, and a lot of showers in north—western areas. even further south and east, we will see some showers, although they will move quickly with the strong wind, those showers will be heavy, possibly thundery, sunny breaks and 17. 20 degrees in london. salary on friday again. some sunny spells in between. late in the day some more persistent
5:28 am
rain pushes in across south—west england and wales. the rain should move through on friday night into the early hours of saturday. so as the early hours of saturday. so as the persistent rain clears away we are back to a mixture of sunny spells and showers for the weekend. some rain in the forecast but not all the time. you are watching bbc world news. i am david eades in these the headlines: —— and these are. the us house of representatives has voted overwhelmingly to impose new sanctions on russia, iran and north korea. moscow says the move would, as they put it, "complicate relations." the european court ofjustice is expected to rule whether refugees must file for asylum in the first eu country they arrive in. it could decide the future of several hundred people who entered europe during the migrant crisis of 2015 and 2016. in the uk, the government‘s expected to announce that all sales of new petrol and diesel cars will be banned from 2040 as part
5:29 am
of efforts to reduce air pollution. one of the vatican‘s most seniorfigures, cardinal pell, has appeared in court in australia to face
5:30 am

112 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on