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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 26, 2017 3:00pm-4:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at 3pm: back in court — a judge will decide soon whether ii—month—old charlie gard should be able to leave great ormond street hospital to die. the lawyer for parents of charlie say they have found a doctor who would be willing to look after he's left hospital. a drive towards cleaner air — the sale of new petrol and diesel cars will be banned from 2040. we have to get rid of petrol and diesel cars from our roads if we are going to make sure not only do we deal with the health problems air pollution causes, but also that we meet our climate change targets. president donald trump says the us government will not accept transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the us military — citing what he calls "tremendous medical costs and disruption". also in the next hour — huge wildfires in the south of france. thousands of people, including many british holiday—makers, have been moved to safety to escape the flames. the supreme court rules that charging to bring an employment tribunal case is unlawful — the government says it will now refund claimants‘ fees.
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can dogs sniff out parkinson's disease earlier? a trial has begun to find out. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a lawyer for the parents of terminally—ill baby charlie gard has told the high court that they had found a doctor willing to look after charlie so the family could spend time with him away from hospital during the last days of his life. the fate of the 11—month—old baby has been the subject of a bitter court dispute between his parents and the london hospital where he is being treated. our correspondent lisa hampele is at the high court in central london. yes, the high court in central london. it appears now ti
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has yes, it appears now that the family has finally accepted that charlie will not be able to die at home. we've heard from the court that a doctor is on his way here now. the court has adjourned until he arrives and the doctor will be questioned in court. thejudge and the doctor will be questioned in court. the judge wants to see his cv. he said that he will be able to provide an intensive care team to look after charlie in a hospice. now, yesterday, great ormond street hospital said that the best option they thought was for charlie to die ina they thought was for charlie to die in a hospice. they said it was not practicalfor him to die in a hospice. they said it was not practical for him to die at home. there were lots of reasons. you couldn't get the ventilator in the front door, the ambulance would come to the kerb and then charlie would have to be taken off the ventilator to get home. the adjournment is waiting for this doctor and it appears that the doctor says he can help the family go to a hospice. the reason why they want a different doctor and not the suggestion from great ormond street yesterday that thejudge was
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great ormond street yesterday that the judge was favouring is that they wa nt the judge was favouring is that they want more time with charlie. we heard yesterday that the decision to ta ke heard yesterday that the decision to take him to a hospice would have meant that he would have died within hours and the family said through their lawyer yesterday that that was brutal. that only a few hours after moving him, that was not what they wanted. so it seems now that this private team, this is suggesting that they can help and they will be able to provide the family with days with charlie before he is taken off the ventilator. the family have said all along that they want at least a week at home with charlie and they wa nt to week at home with charlie and they want to give him a bath and want him to sleep in his own cot and want to have a trangle time with the little boy that they're calling their warrior. lisa hampele, thank you. any developments and we'll bring them straight to you. new diesel and petrol cars and vans are to be banned from 2040, under government plans to try to combat air pollution. the proposals include a fund of more than £250 million for local councils, to speed up efforts
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to combat emissions from diesel vehicles though there is no commitment to a car scrappage scheme. there are currently 38.6 million cars licensed in the uk — fewer than 100,000 of those are electric—only. across the uk, there are just over 4,000 charging locations which compares with more than 8,000 petrol stations. but critics say the government should have done more to combat pollution right now. our first report is from our environment analyst roger harrabin. air pollution is linked to 40,000 premature deaths a year. the government was ordered by the court to publish a full strategy to clean up the air this month. the biggest problem is toxic n02 emissions from diesel vehicles. i go down the gym every day of the week, but i would not dream of running down here. i see guys and women running, etc, smog levels are too much. people tell me it's bad. i accept that. but there is nothing i can do about it personally. there is a lot of data coming
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out showing the effect on respiratory health, mortalities in newspapers all the time. so i'm massively concerned. electric vehicles are seen as the long—term solution. the government confirmed today its policy of banning the sale of new diesel and petrol cars by 2040. we have to get rid of petrol and diesel cars from our roads if we are going to make sure not only do we deal with the health problems that air pollution causes, but also that we meet our climate change targets. the good news is the car industry is already moving in this direction, so volvo and indeed just yesterday, mini, are both moving in this way. it's critically important we provide encouragement from government to help the car industry do the right thing. but what about pollution now? in the short—term, local roads will be altered and bus services improved with a £255 million additional package for cleaner transport. other measures may follow. london has deterred cars from coming into town with its congestion charge.
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in the autumn that will become a toxic charge for dirty vehicles in particular. we may see zones like that in other towns and cities in the country if councils cannot sort out their own problems. but neither councils nor government want to take the rap for charging diesel drivers for using cars that the government originally encouraged them to buy to reduce emissions that fuelled climate change. what we need now is some robust action taken by governments and not just relying on local authorities to make unpopular decisions. paying drivers to scrap old diesel cars is another idea, but the treasury said it is bad value for money. it will not happen, at least for now. so how useful is the government's new air strategy? we need to see the detail of what they are announcing. while we welcome the move to cleaner vehicles, it's far too long in the future to do anything about the air quality crisis that we have now.
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it seems that we have another secretary of failing to grasp what even he calls a public health emergency. we should've seen the environment secretary announcing today was paradigms shift, a system shift to put people at the heart of towns and cities and not more cars, however they are powered. and we need him to talk about a massive investment in public transport, about a proper network of clean air zones. much more investment is needed in cleaner transport, critics say. they will be looking to the chancellor and his to the chancellor's autumn statement to see how much the government is willing to spend to clean up illegally polluted air. so what do these proposals mean for the car industry? is it ready to produce electric cars only in less than 25 years? 0ur correspondent theo leggett has been examining whether the motor industry can deliver. newsreel: anglo-american corporation has resulted in a new small car... the internal combustion engine has been powering cars
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for more than 100 years, but is it nearing the end of the production line? the government wants to ban petrol and diesel cars by 2040, and make electric vehicles the norm. major manufacturers, such as volkswagen, bmw, and renault already have big plans for new battery—powered models. but they still make up a small share of the market. last year we sold 10,000 pure electric battery—powered vehicles in the uk out of a market of 2.7 million. it's a huge shift. that's what you need a good framework to encourage that shift. britain isn't alone in planning a ban. france also wants to get rid of petrol and diesel cars by 2040. india wants to phase them out by 2030. and norway is even more ambitious, its target is 2025. if the government wants us all to be one day driving electric cars like these then it will have to give
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some thought as to how to provide more of these, charging points. there are 37 million cars on the road today. if all of them will one day be electric powered we're going to need a lot more places to plug them in. so can it be done? industry insiders have their doubts. it's an incredibly target and one that will be hard to hit. car—makers are a long way down the road, they have electric cars on sale today and many more in the pipeline. but getting the infrastructure together to allow people to use these cars as a potential will be incredibly difficult. newsreel: here is a car that does not need gas... electric cars have had a bright future for many years but they are still a rare sight. there is little doubt that will change. but the road to complete infrastructure change will be a long way ahead. a lawyer has told the high court
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that the family have found a doctor willing to take care of charlie gard during the last days of his life. joining me now is richard hain, a consultant and clinical lead in paediatric palliative care at children's hospital, cardiff. this is a dreadful time for any family, but what are the priorities for the medical team in the coming hours or days of charlie's life? so, i can't, i have no special knowledge of charlie's case particularly. but generally speaking, when palliative ca re generally speaking, when palliative care teams, many of them doctors and many of them nurses are trying to ca re many of them nurses are trying to care for a child in the last days and hours of life, what we're trying to do is to make their life as co mforta ble to do is to make their life as comfortable as we can. and that involves clearly involves sometimes a lot of symptom control if that's necessary. some people need pain
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management. that's not true for everybody, but what is true is, it is always important for us to find out what the priorities are for the family, to the extent we can meet them and we try and facilitate that. what are the differences when you are dealing with a baby rather than an adult who can tell you about pain control and things like that? an adult who can tell you about pain control and things like that7m an adult who can tell you about pain control and things like that? it is very different. palliative care in children, including in babies, has really emerged from a tradition of caring from children. we have learned a lot from our sister speciality in adults, but it is a branch of the care of children rather than a branch of palliative ca re rather than a branch of palliative care in that sense and part of that difficulty is the difference in the way that children can express what they are feeling and expressing. we do try to find out as much as we can directly from children. even babies are able to communicate what they are able to communicate what they are feeling. babies have evolved over thousands of years to tell us
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if they are disstred so we can get some direct communication. we turn to the people who know them best, the family, mum and dad. for children who in hospital, babies who are in hospital, the nurses often know the child very well and we just dot best we can. we can't be as clear about what a child is experiencing as we can an adult, but we can certainly get some good idea and sometimes we just have to try certain things and see if they help. if we are not sure a child is in pain, sometimes we have to give them medication that helps pain and doesn't do anything and see if it helps. richard one would give anything not to be in the position of any parent like this, but if they wa nt to of any parent like this, but if they want to spend whatever time left with their baby with as little medical equipmentjust to have the final contact with the baby in its final contact with the baby in its final hours. is that always possible? it isn't always what
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families want. you're right, it often, that's an opportunity that pa rents often, that's an opportunity that pa re nts ca n often, that's an opportunity that pa rents ca n ta ke often, that's an opportunity that parents can take sometimes for the first time to have those moments, those minutes, hours, with their child. for some families that's not what they want, but where it is, it's something we work very hard to try and accommodate if it's possible, but it isn't always possible. i feel awful talking about this. i think a lot of people feel uncomfortable when at a time for this family and the doctors and nurses who have been looking after charlie, but when you lose that sense of privacy around something. how easy would it be to continue with that sort of brerbure on you? —— pressure on you? every family is different. every family is facing their own set of problems and has their own set of problems and has their own set of problems and has their own set of priorities. for some privacy is really important. for others, not so much. even where when it is important, it isn't
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a lwa ys when it is important, it isn't always possible. the bigger question of everything that goes before those last few hours and days and how that impacts, that's right it can be very difficult and trying to accompany people during that last few, that last time before a child dies is a very important part of what palliative care is about and relationships are very important. i'll end with an impossible question. how, when you've dealt with a case, involving anybody, how do you look back once death has occurred and say, "that was handled as we would have wished." how do you judge success for want of a better phrase? it is a perfectly reasonable question. it's difficult to define that ahead of time. there are some things that are obvious, keeping somebody ot of pain if pain is a problem, keeping, you know, if somebody is in pain at the time they
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daoushtion we clearly haven't done what we would have aimed to do. somebody once described it as trying to help parents and families take the path of least regret. for families to look back and say, "we wouldn't have chosen to lose our child, but if we had to do it, this is the way we would have wanted it to happen." 0ur is the way we would have wanted it to happen." our job is the way we would have wanted it to happen." 0urjob in palliative ca re to happen." 0urjob in palliative care is to take away the barriers to that so far as we can and to put in place things that can facilitate that. consultant richard hain thank you for your time. you're welcome. thank you for inviting me. the headlines on bbc news: ajudge will decide soon whether11—month—old charlie gard should be able to leave great ormond street hospital to die. the family told the court that the family found a doctor that could ca re family found a doctor that could care for charlie. a drive towards cleaner air — the sale of new petrol and diesel cars will be banned from 2040.
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president donald trump says the us government will not accept transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the us military — citing what he calls "tremendous medical costs and disruption". in sport, there's bad news for 12 times grand slam champion novak djokovic. the serb is out for the rest of 2017 due to an ongoing elbow injury which forced him to pull out of his quarter—final at this year's wimbledon. fast—bowler toby roland jones will make his debut for england in their third test against south africa at the 0val tomorrow. he'll replace mark wood who's not 100% fit. can adam peaty break the world record for a third time in 36 hours? he goes in the world 50 meters breaststroke final in budapest. i'll be back with more on those stories after 3.30pm. let's speak to someone from the
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british lung foundation. you back this? we are pleased to see that the government have published their clea n government have published their clean air plans today. air pollution is an invisible danger and it affects all our health. we are pleased about this commitment to phase out diesel and petrol vehicles by 2040. that's not for 23 years. we need more action in the short—term and what we don't have is a clear plan for local authorities to slash toxic emissions in our towns and cities. what we really need is national co—ordinated action. cities. what we really need is national co-ordinated action. let's define our terms here because the focus lately has been on diesel fumes which is supposed to be most harmful when a few years ago, that wa nt harmful when a few years ago, that want the case. what are the facts in terms of how much harm air pollution is doing people in this country?
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well, the evidence is clear that air pollution causes and is linked to a whole host of health problems. it has been linked to lung disease and heart disease. there is emerging evidence coming out linking it to things like type 2 diabetes or alzheimer's. so it is really a host of health problems. but also for people who are living with health conditions, things like asthma or copd, breathing in polluted air can exacerbate their symptoms and means they will find it harder to breathe and harder to manage their normal life. you would back the idea of this country being diesel and petrol free at any point because electric ca rs free at any point because electric cars will effectively do away with that problem, will they? well, i think that's a great ambition. i think that's a great ambition. i think it's great that the car industry and the got are going fob working on that transition, but what i will keep coming back to for the british lung foundation this is about protecting everyone's health. air pollution is a public health
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crisis and that's why we are pleased to see the government taking that seriously and we need urgent action to tackle that. the argument, of course, you hear these electric cars they need to get their power from somewhere. power stations also perhaps need to look at their act as well? what we would like to see in the long—term is a new clean ayr act which will look the different polluta nts which will look the different pollutants and emissions and bring ina new pollutants and emissions and bring in a new set of laws to bring those down. i think in the immediate term, we know it is vehicle emissions which are really damaging people's health in our towns and cities and that's why it is right that's what the plans are focussing on. there has been a campaign particularly in london where if you see a carjust sitting parked at the side of the road with the engine running you knock on the door and say, "look, could you turn your engine off?" is that something that makes a difference? is that something that should be enshrined in law? difference? is that something that should be enshrined in law7m difference? is that something that should be enshrined in law? it is something that not everybody
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realises, just turning off your engine when you come to a standstill, when you are dropping the children off at the school, it can make an impact on local air quality. i hope that's the sort of thing that people will listen to the m essa 9 es thing that people will listen to the messages coming out and think about how their actions could be contributing to cleaning up our air. thank you for your time. president donald trump has today announced that transgender people will not be allowed to serve in any capacity in the us military, due to what he called the "tremendous medical costs and disru ption" that accommodating them would entail. among the 1.3 million active duty service members in the us, it is estimated that between 2500 and 7000 identify as transgender. 0ur correspondent barbara plett usher is in washington and we can speak to her now. just how big a deal is this? is this about barack just how big a deal is this? is this about ba rack 0bama just how big a deal is this? is this about barack 0bama promising doing that donald trump wants to stop? is
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ita that donald trump wants to stop? is it a bigger issue than that? frlghts it a bigger issue than that? frlghts it is difficult to analyse how big a deal this is because it has come out of the blue. it is a cull of tweets this morning making categorical state m e nts this morning making categorical statements saying that trance gepder recruits or officers or soldiers are not allowed to serve in any capacity because the army should not be burdened with the medical costs or disruption. we have had the pentagon refer a ll disruption. we have had the pentagon refer all questions to the white house. it seems that the pentagon was not prepared to say this or respond to this. it looks as if it was taken by surprise. what we do know is that the policy to accept transgender recruits know is that the policy to accept tra nsgender recruits is know is that the policy to accept transgender recruits is under review. now that decision was made a year ago by the former administration that transgender recruits would be allowed to apply and to serve openly from july, 1st this year. when the new defence secretary came into under the new administration he said he no problem with that. then just before 1stjuly
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he said he had been faced with some questions. so they would extend a review for six months untiljanuary, 1st and the key point would be would this affect the readiness of the military, but he said this does not mean the outcold is prodissupposed and people who are already in the army and military who are transgender. it army and military who are tra nsgender. it is army and military who are transgender. it is different from that approach which is what we know publicly stated but the secretary of defence a couple of weeks ago. it is very difficult to say where it comes from and how significant it is. gosh, how many times have we spoken about the president's tweets without knowing where we're going with this. if we're talking about #,000, up to 7,000 transgender service members serving. if president trump has his way, what happens then? they get fired, do they? well, i guess. i don't know. i mean, presumably the
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pentagon would have something to say. there are policy and procedures in place. i don't know if mr trump can overturn them with a tweet. he's suggesting he is in consultation with the pentagon which would mean there had been some groundwork laid, but that's not what we have been told and that's not what the procedures in place. it is difficult to know. the policies that are under review is the recruitment of transgender candidates review is the recruitment of tra nsgender candidates so review is the recruitment of transgender candidates so mr trump for example raised issues about medical costs. yes, that's an issue. whether the army has to provide transition services for people transitioning from one agained are to another, that would affect people already serving because the announcement said those who apply as new recruits they have to have been sta ble new recruits they have to have been stable in their chosen gender for around 18 months. there are all sorts of questions around this issue which the four branches of the
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military had been looking into and which they had been discussing with the secretary of defence to what degree they have been discussing that with mr trump and whether that changes policy completely because of one tweet, we will is have to see. your friends at the white house, and twitter, do they have twitter up on big screens to see what comes next? i suspect they get the tweet alerts on their iphones! as we all do. it is how we all find out what's going on in this world. the supreme court has ruled that the government's decision to introduce fees for bringing employment tribunal claims is unlawful and must be quashed. the court said the practice of charging up to £1,200 pounds was preventing access to justice. the government says it will now halt the charges and refund people who have paid. 0ur legal affairs correspondent clive coleman reports. a massive victory for unison at the highest court in the land. workers fees for bringing claims to employment tribunals gone. tribunals hear a wide range of claims by workers including unfair dismissal, pay disputes and discrimination.
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bringing a claim was free untiljuly 2013 when the coalition government introduced fees. a claim for things like unpaid wages would cost a total of almost £390. for more serious crimes such as unfair dismissal, this rises to 1200. appeals against decisions can cost a further £1600. fees faced by people like ronnie, a courier taking his employer to task over his employment status. they are defending the claim. he could only pay to bring it with the help of his union. i don't earn a lot of money at the moment and i think i would never have gone to court if it wasn't for the help i am receiving. i do think there are a lot of people in the same position and it is very unfair.
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unison argued that the fees were discriminatory and denied workers access to justice. the court agreed. the fees order is unlawful under both domestic and eu law. because it has the effect of preventing access to justice. today's ruling is huge. it means that not only the order which introduced tribunal fees back in 2013 is quashed, it also means everyone who paid those fees, a sum amounting to some £32 million, will now get their money back. after a four—year legal struggle, unison were delighted. we knew from day one this was not just unlawful but immoral. that low—paid workers should be put in this position, that they were denied access to justice. small amounts involved, but it may include racial discrimination, sex discrimination, fair pay. obviously we're disappointed to get a judgment against us but we respect the judgment. we're going to take it fully on board, and comply with it and already today we are taking immediate action. tribunal charges stop today. workers across the country will be
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delighted that they can now bring claims without paying a fee. the government has changed its travel advice for tunisia. since the terrorist attacks in sousse in 2015 the government kept its assessment of thrafling to tunisia under review. it will continue to advice against travel to some areas of tunisia. more than 10,000 people in the south of france, including many british holiday—makers, have been moved to safety to escape rapidly spreading wildfire. a new blaze overnight has spread over a vast area, along the mediterranean coast. france has asked its neighbouring countries for more help to fight the fires. adina campbell reports. the latest fire devouring swathes of forest in southern france. firefighters overnight
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have been trying to keep the flames under control. more than 40 square kilometres of land has been affected along the mediterranean coast. at about midnight we were woken up and so i went down to the station at our site and there was an emergency news which is quite rare for our site. ijust looked up and it was like an inferno. there was just orange in the sky. it was amazing and a very, very scary sight to see. holiday—makers staying close to the popular st tropez holiday resorts have been moved to safety. including british tourists on a nearby campsite where some have ended up staying on beaches. there would have been a good 1,000 people on the beach. they had to stay there overnight. a lot of them with sleeping bags and it was quite a precarious situation.
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the fire was very close to the campsite. very strong winds. it could have spread very, very quickly. these wildfires have been raging here in the mountains for three days. they've also affected parts of corsica where hundreds of homes have been evacuated. france has already asked for europe's help to deal with the fires. 4,000 firefighters and troops, backed with water bombers, have been used to put out the flames. officials say at least 12 firefighters have been injured and 15 police officers affected by smoke inhalation. the head of the fire service in the south—east of france has said extra firefighters have been drafted in to keep the flames at bay. sport, business and headlines coming up. now the weather forecast. jay wynne has the forecast. thank you very much, simon. there has been quite a bit of rain around
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today. some improvement on the western side of the uk. but the eastern side will take longer. here is the most recent radar sequence which shows the rain moving from west to east. some showers following along behind and it west to east. some showers following alo north ind and it west to east. some showers following alo north ofi and it the north of scotland. windy too. but it is brightening up behind the rain. a little bit of sunshine but it is brightening up behind the rain. a little b the sunshine but it is brightening up behind the rain. a little b the day. hine but it is brightening up behind the rain. a little b the day. the showers around to end the day. the showers will keep going overnight tonight. the eastern side will be dry will keep going overnight tonight. the easte| night will be dry will keep going overnight tonight. the easte| night and be dry end of the night and we will see temperatures around ten celsius in aberdeen. 13 or sh—celsius for cardiff and for london. it is double figures across—the—board. a bright and breezy start for the eastern side of england and eastern scotland, but from early on, there will be showers out west and they will be showers out west and they will spread across all areas. it is sunny spells and showers through thursday. 17 celsius in glasgow and 21 celsius in london area. hello. this is bbc news at 15:30pm. the headlines: says they have found to spend his last days away from hospital care.
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a judge will decide this afternoon if the terminally—ill baby will be allowed to leave great ormond street hospital. new diesel and petrol cars by 2040 don't go far enough as they fail to tackle the immediate problem of air pollution. the economy grew by 0.3% between april and june. the office for national statistics said the increase was mainly driven by the retail and film industries. this is a steady performance in the second quarter. for 4.5 years we have created record levels of employment, so we should be proud of that but not complacent. president donald trump says the us government will not accept citing what he calls ‘tremendous medical costs and disruption.‘ more than 10,000 people in the south of france, including many british holiday makers, have been moved
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to safety to escape rapidly spreading wildfires. along the mediterranean coast. time for the sport. 12—time grand slam champion novak djokovic won‘t play again this year because of an elbow injury. it means he‘ll miss this year‘s us open in new york — the first time he‘ll miss a major since making his debut in 2004. djokovic retired hurt during his quarterfinal at wimbledon earlier this month and said at the time he was considering taking a break to recover from what is a long—standing injury. we will take a couple of months at least without the rackets, and then iam hoping least without the rackets, and then i am hoping that i can start after that to train. i‘m looking forward, to be honest, to build my body, my game, my team as well, obviously. i
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am happy to share that andre agassi is committed to staying with me next year. fast bowler toby roland jones will make his debut for england in their third test against south africa at the 0val tomorrow. he‘ll replace mark wood who‘s not 100 % fit. roland jones‘ middlesex team—mate steven finn has been placed on stand—by, but along with batsman tom westley, roland jones can look forward to earning his first cap under skipperjoe root. that consistency is why he is highly thought of. he has been taking a lot of wickets and is clumsily banging on the door. he bowls inconsistent areas and get the ball to move around. england will have defender casey stoney available for their final group game at the women‘s european championship in the netherlands. adam peaty was left stunned by his own performances
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as he continues to set the standard for great britain at the world aquatics championships. the olympic champion beat his own world record in the 50 metre breaststroke twice in one day, becoming the first person to swim the event in less than 26 seconds. he goes in the final after 5:00pm looking to set an even faster time. rebecca adlington says he is changing the face of the sport. what adam has achieved is unimaginable. it isa adam has achieved is unimaginable. it is a free cell time. i couldn‘t even achieve that, let alone on breast stroke. he had the top ten times in history. they are all adam peaty and it will keep getting quicker and being his name as well. no one is even close to him and that is the incredible thing. england will have defender casey stoney available for their final group game at the women‘s european championship in the netherlands. stoney missed the win over spain on sunday with a hamstring problem but trained today in utrecht. england face portugal tomorrow looking to make it three wins from three in group d.
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midfielderjade moore missed training but should also be available. manchester united manager jose mourinho says that some clubs are paying far too much for players this summer. his team of course spent 75 million on romelu lukaku earlier this month, but mourinho believes less wealthy clubs are overspending. we spent a lot of money in the striker, and if you don‘t do that then we have no striker, that‘s obvious that nowadays especially for the strikers the amount of money is amazing. every club is getting players, every club is investing a lot. i think some clubs obviously they are paying too much and by paying too much they create a very strange and out of control market. but this is the reality now. monaco‘s vice president has denied that they have reached an agreement with any club for their striker. the
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al madrid agreed £160 million for the france international who sprung into prominence in the last six months. they admitted they have had important offers, but said the club is still negotiating to extend his contract. that is all be sport for now. more in the next hour. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell says labour could support continued membership of the single market. mr mcdonnell‘s comments come after the labour leaderjeremy corbyn — interviewed on the bbc leaderjeremy corbyn — j that labour‘s position was straightforward. i think i can say thatis straightforward. i think i can say that is the one thing it is absolutely not. there is a deep divide in labour ranks of the issue of the single market. they believe it is inextricably
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linked to membership of the european union it would entail continued free movement and of labour were to back it, that would in effect be defying the will of the british people in the will of the british people in the referendum. then there are those in labour ranks who believe that we been leasing market would be catastrophic for the economy and would hurt terms of jobs would hurt people in terms ofjobs and incomes. there is a would hurt people in terms ofjobs and in omes. there is a would hurt people in terms ofjobs and in the s. there is a would hurt people in terms ofjobs and in the partyere is a would hurt people in terms ofjobs and in the party on is a would hurt people in terms ofjobs and in the party on this issue. as would hurt people in terms ofjobs and in the par weekend, ;sue. as would hurt people in terms ofjobs and in the par weekend, jeremy; you said at the weekend, jeremy corbyn appeared to rule out backing continued membership of the single market, that prompted a backlash from trade union leaders, prominent backbenchers, carwynjones in wales and now we have the shadow chancellor seeming to suggest that after all, labour hasn‘t quite closed the door to membership of the single market. have a listen. the position for us is
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straightforward, our objective is to have the access and that has been our objective since immediately after the referendum, in i made the speech immediately after the referendum the exact way that. whether we are in or out, we are not ruling anything out. what we are saying is, we are the fifth largest economy in the world. we have a special status in both our relationship with europe and the rest of the globe. therefore, we feel we can get a deal that achieves power of free access and the issue of is secondary. so what is going on? ithink of is secondary. so what is going on? i think what is going on is that of is secondary. so what is going on? i ti such hat is going on is that there is such a backlash against jeremy corbyn‘s hard—line lands on the thing market at the weekend from reading backbenchers, some trade unionists, that mr mcdonnell has decided to soften their wrist and is, just to muddy the waters a bit and beat albany option of the single
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market because of that backlash. the conservatives, after a pretty torrid time are looking at labour issues such as tuition fees and now this and may sounds blood. there is no doubt thatjeremy and may sounds blood. there is no doubt that jeremy corbyn‘s and may sounds blood. there is no doubt thatjeremy corbyn‘s critics will seize on this as a example of confusion, chaos, college what you will. the truth is, at the end of the day, there is going to be a moment when labour has to decide on the single market. at the moment, it is inelegantly sitting on the fence trying to reassure its brexit supporting voters in the north of england it is still taking a tough stand on a single market and immigration well not alienating those party members than voters in metropolitan seats who are much more worried about brexit. sooner or later there is going to come a moment when labour has to choose a musical market and between those two
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groups of labour voters. —— on the single market. we can get more details now on the government‘s decision to change its travel advice for tunisia. it no longer advises against travel to most of the country, including tunis and the major tourist destinations. since the tragic terrorist attacks at the bardo national museum and sousse in 2015 the government has kept its assessment of travelling to tunisia under constant review. i spoke to the independent‘s travel editor simon calder, and i asked him if it was now safe to visit. the foreign office reiterates exact what it was saying as of 1pm, that there is silly high threat of terrorism and of course dirty british holiday—makers died on the beach just over two years ago. the ban was put in place shortly after that and it has been constant pressure by the tunisian birdies to lift the ban, but the foreign office has said that we do not believe that
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the security measures are sufficiently in place. there are a lot of returning jihadis and a dispute with libya. they are satisfied that you and i could happily go on holiday bearing in mind it is on the high risk of terrorism list. pressure from tunisian is understandably given the amount of money that in. the tourist industry have been absolutely traumatised. tens of thousands of families whose lives depend on industry, have lost income. the germans, the french and the italians have been returning to tunisia, but there isn‘t going to be any kind of surge of british holiday—makers settling for the rest of the summer season up settling for the rest of the summer season up to october, and even the winter programmes that the tour operators would want to put in place, it is a little too late for that. it wouldn‘t be really until
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next spring package holidays are put on sale. meanwhile, anybody can fly there. the scheduled flight from gatwick this morning touched down a couple of minutes ago and there will be travellers returning there i imagine from as early as this weekend. and quite a future nasional delta will want to take advantage and give deals. yes, of course. at events like theirs, tragically liked in egypt, the best way to similar demand is to cut prices. there will be some bargains around. the problem for british holiday—makers is how safe is the place? it is still on the high risk of terrorism list and it seems it will be some time before a lot of people will feel reassured. the soundings i have been getting from people on social is that it is fine, but i will not be returning there are any time soon. the big question is how will be a holiday
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insurance companies react? will this change anything? putter yes. as with the government put the country on the government put the country on the no—go list, the travel insurance policies are invalidated. from 1pm this afternoon, tunisia is now back on the same coverage as other places. this would not cover you if you went to any of the areas should read the foreign office advises against travel. all the holiday resorts, the islamic shrine, very much there. 0pen resorts, the islamic shrine, very much there. open for business as of lunchtime today. still some way from making a full recovery. the european court ofjustice has ruled that a law requiring refugees to seek asylum in the first country they reach applies even in exceptional circumstances. during the migration crisis in 2015 and 2016 — when borders were opened — many people applied for asylum in other countries. today, the court accepted austria‘s and slovenia‘s argument that they had the right to return asylum seekers to their point of entry. we spoke earlier to our correspondent bethany bell from the austrian—slovenian border.
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i am on the austrian border was slovenia where some of those asylum seekers pass through trying to get into austria and file a claim for asylum. the court ruled today that austria and slovenia were right to send two afghan women and their children back to croatia and also to send a syrian man back from slovenia to croatia, because it said the eu rules on asylum apply even in very exceptional circumstances like the migrant crisis, when hundreds of people were passing through this border where i am every day. it is interesting though, because the court also reminded both austria and slovenia that they could show solidarity with eu border states like croatia which were facing the brunt of arrivals. in a moment a summary of the business news
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this hour, but first — the headlines on bbc news: ajudge will decide soon whether11—month—old charlie gard should be able to leave great ormond street hospital to die at home. a drive towards cleaner air — the sale of new petrol and diesel cars will be banned from 2040. the uk economy grew by 0.3% in the second quarter of the year, driven by retail and a booming film industry. president donald trump says the us government will not accept transgender individuals to serve in the us military — citing what he calls ‘tremendous medical costs and disruption.‘ in the business news: the uk economy grew by 0.3% in the three months from april to june. that‘s an initial estimate from the office for national statistics. it‘s up slightly on the previous three months, when it grew at 0.2%. the growth was driven
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by an expanding services sector — which includes banks, shops and leisure. retail showed the strongest growth along with film production. but the construction and manufacturing sectors shrank. the car industry has warned moves to ban diesel and petrol cars could cost jobs. the society of motor manufacturers and traders said that the sector supports 800,000 jobs and these could be at risk if enough time isn‘t given for the industry to adjust. environment campaigners said the ban — due by 2040 — does not come quickly enough. itv is feeling the love from love island — the programme‘s success helped the broadcaster attract more younger viewers. good growth at itv studios, which makes poldark and the voice, helped as well. it was enough to cheer investors — despite advertising revenue falling 8% in the first half of the year. do you want wifi when you‘re travelling by plane? well, a survey by sattelite company inmarasat says you do. in fact according to their survey 60% of you believe wifi
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is a necessity not a luxury. joining us now is victoria moores, european editor, air transport world. it's it‘s interesting, because the european carriers are very much lagging behind the us carriers. that is right. there have been a couple of things which have helped european airlines back from following other continents like america and one of thoseis continents like america and one of those is infrastructure and technology. america is far more unified on that front. in europe, things are a lot more fragmented. secondly, there is the issue of cost. airlines don‘t want to add cost. airlines don‘t want to add cost of the dome though they can get back from a passengers. the other day i was on the train and i wanted to use wi—fi, but i had a favourite and that put me off wanting to use it. how much do you think customers will be willing to pay for it? that‘s a good question. it‘s one of the questions thrown up by this research that has just come out. passengers say they are willing to
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pay for it. the difficulty is that if the difference between what passengers say and what their behaviour is. even if you are asked to pay of money, it tends to put two of signing up to it it all. if you‘re on a train, you mightjust use your data. it is a hurdle to add that. when airlines are incurring extra cost for this, they want to see it will be offset. 0ne extra cost for this, they want to see it will be offset. one of the big things that you have is with the current technology, you have to fit and and ten i to the aircraft which adds weight and increases the amount of fuel needed. the fuel is a huge cost. not keen to keen to add to those costs without it getting in with their revenue. what customers wa nt with their revenue. what customers want is low fares. european carriers are having a hard time at the moment. there is a lot of competition with the low—budget
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sector. how likely is it to be rolled out in the next few years or is ita rolled out in the next few years or is it a long—term goal? rolled out in the next few years or is it a long-term goal? if you speak to be low—cost airlines, easyjet, ryanair etc, if you speak to three out of the four of them, they all tend to agree that it is pretty much inevitable ba aircraft will be fitted that this technology, but that it has to come along a little bit first to bring down those costs and make it so that putting it on the aircraft will generate money. norwegian has already gone for wi—fi on their happened and it has been successful. give them a bit of a unique selling point. until we see those big players moving forwards and abandoning their resistance to it, seeing a real business model for it, seeing a real business model for it, it will be on pars for a while, but not that much longer i think. thank you very much forjoining us. in other business stories we‘ve been following: more bad news for car—makers. the supervisory boards at two big
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german car—makers are to hold emergency meetings later today, after they were accused of breaching eu cartel rules. volkswagen and daimler have declined to comment on the allegations that they and other german car giants colluded to fix the price of diesel emissions treatment systems. now if you like to convince yourself your sugary snacks are healthy, well, here‘s a story that might help — nestle is to open its first factory injapan in more than 25 years, that‘s because of demand for exotic flavours of kitkats. these exotic flavours include green tea and wasabi. as we know, kitkats are traditionally made with milk chocolate, but different flavours are proving popular in asia. flavours like wasabi and green tea are helping kitkat sales injapan grow by 50% since 2010. so, the factory will focus on the more expensive versions of the snack which have been a hit with tourists. if you like your gin and tonic in the summer, you might have helped the founder of fever tree drinks make £29 million. he‘s just sold 1.5 million shares to investors after it reported more than a 70% increase in sales.
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the company is benefiting from the continuing popularity of gin and tonic, which helped boost sales in continental europe by 64%. the uk remains its key gin drinking market, with revenues up 113% let‘s have a look at the markets before we go. a weaker pound has lifted the heavyweight defensive stocks on the ftse100, with british american tobacco, unilever and diageo all performing well in morning trade. broadcaster itv the top performer despite posting lower revenue from adverts. that is it from me. we will be back in one hour. from finding bombs to catching drug smugglers, a dog‘s sense of smell has long been used to help people do difficultjobs. now a trial has begun to see whether dogs could help doctors diagnose parkinson‘s disease earlier, by detecting subtle changes in a person‘s smell, triggered by the symptoms. parkinson‘s, a degenerative disease, affects more than ten million people worldwide, but is often only identified years after symptoms become apparent. tim muffett has been to see the dogs in action. kiwi is demonstrating a remarkable skill.
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the ability of dogs to sniff out cancer has been acknowledged for years. but now kiwi and other medical detection dogs are beginning a new challenge. what we‘re hoping to do is to train them to find the odour associated with parkinson‘s disease. if they can do this, they could revolutionise the way in which parkinson‘s is detected. parkinson‘s can cause body tremors and leave sufferers unable to speak or walk. but as there‘s no diagnostic test, in its early stages sufferers often miss out on medication that can help. we didn‘t understand what was happening. joy, however, has a highly developed sense of smell. she noticed something different about les ten years before doctors diagnosed parkinson‘s. i started complaining about his smell. so what was this smell like you could detect on your husband? it was, i describe it as a very strong musky smell. joy‘s sense of smell is so strong doctors say
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it is rarely seen in humans. for dogs, however, it‘s a different story. some breeds of dog have more than 200 million scent receptors in their nose, that‘s compared to around five million for a human. and many believe that by harnessing that incredible sense of smell, more medical conditions could be sniffed out earlier. these medical detection dogs live with families and come to the testing centre during the daytime. backed by the charity parkinson‘s uk, swabs from parkinson‘s sufferers will be introduced to see if the dogs can identify them. people might present at a neurological clinic or they might go to casualty because they have had a fall. 0r because they have had some other event not usual for them. and very rarely would they would they think they might have parkinson‘s. but if we could develop an early test, it really improves the patient‘s well—being if they know what‘s going on. the research and training
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will take six months. but 200 years after the condition was identified, it is hoped that dogs will soon help doctors diagnose parkinson‘s earlier. tim muffett, bbc news. a zoo in tokyo is seeking name ideas for a new giant panda cub born at its ueno zoo. the female cub was born injune to mother panda shin shin. her previous baby, born in 2012, survived only six days. the newcomer appears to be thriving, and the zoo is hoping she‘ll bring in huge crowds when she goes on display. panda gurgles. more panda stories throughout the
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year here on bbc news. time now for a look at the weather. afair bit a fair bit of rain today. pat has worked its way from west to east and tha nkfully worked its way from west to east and thankfully most of it is heading into the nazi orfurther thankfully most of it is heading into the nazi or further north into the northern isles. this is the cloud that has brought the rain. those are my picks of rain across more northern parts of scotland. it's more northern parts of scotland. it‘s moving its way over zero words. increasingly wet and windy for dinner at howells. showers are ready into the north and west. those will keep going tonight. temperatures will be getting down. the big picture for thursday sees a lot of pressure in charge our weather. that
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means it will be quite a breezy day. there were also be some showers coming in on that breeze from early on across the western side of scotland. the east german side of scotla nd scotland. the east german side of scotland should start on a breezy note. —— the eastern side of scotland. showers early on across the south—west and parts of wales. breezy here. throughout the day, you reasonable start for the east. the showers will cross all areas and some of those good time to be heavy with the odd rumble of thunder. spells of sunshine in between. 17 celsius in glasgow, up to the lower 20s in the south east. a promising start at the although for the third test, but showers moving through the breeze. interruptions certainly possible. through the evenings, though showers tend to fade away, so
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a bit more in the way of sunshine. wetter and windy weather getting back into the hill fog and western scotland. by dawn on friday, temperatures back to 12, 13, 14,000 is. friday itself, low pressure in the north west. windy again with showers again. low pressure heading for the southern half of the uk. turning increasingly windy. then wet in the south and west. wayne spreading its way across wales heading to the midlands. further north, breezy with a scattering of showers. as we get into the weekend, staying on the cool side. breezy, u nsettled. staying on the cool side. breezy, unsettled. showers around, but not all doom and gloom, because there will be a bit of content. more areas on the bbc website. this is bbc news. i am simon mccoy. the headlines. back in court, a judge will decide soon whether11—month—old charlie gard should be able to leave great ormond street hospital to die. the lawyer for parents of charlie say they have found a doctor
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who would be willing to look after him if his final days were spent away from hospital. a drive towards cleaner air, the sale of new petrol and diesel cars will be banned from 2040. we have to get rid of petrol and diesel to help health problems from emissions and meet our climate change targets. president donald trump says the us government will not accept transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the us military, citing what he calls tremendous medical costs and disruption. also in the next hour, huge wild fires in the south of france. thousands of people, including many british holiday—makers,
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