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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  July 27, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at 5. .. a promise there'll be no cliff—edge on immigration, after brexit. the home secretary says there will be in implementation phase and she is asked a group of experts to report on the impact. we are leaving the eu, we will have a new policy but part of what i am announcing todayis but part of what i am announcing today is to show we will make sure it has evidence —based and make sure it has evidence —based and make sure it works for the whole country. six month before brexit will not be enough time to structure a new migration system, particularly if they want to completely alter the current system of users. we'll have the latest. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... the parents of charlie gard failed to getan
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the parents of charlie gard failed to get an agreement to spend up to a month with him in a hospice. wildfires continuing to burn in the south of france. at least 6000 firefighters and troops are now battling the flames. the un says a catastrophe is unfolding in yemen as the country struggles with the world's worst cholera epidemic, and the looming threat of famine. when‘s best to stop? a group of scientists say that we shouldn't always have to finish a course of antibiotics, for them to be effective. and up, up and away, prince william works his last shift as an air ambulance pilot. it‘s five 0'clock — our top story— the home secretary, amber rudd, says there will be no immigration "cliff—edge" when the uk leaves the eu. speaking in scotland, she said she wanted to reassure businesses that they would still be
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able to employ eu staff after march 2019, possibly using a registration scheme for foreign workers. the government announced this morning that free movement will end they announced they have asked a group of experts to and lies the cost... but some have accused the government of waiting too long to consider the impact of brexit on immigration from the european union.0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. getting tough on immigration, the home secretaryjoined a coastal patrol in scotland today. but simultaneously, she signalled the government wanted to take a flexible approach to legal migration after brexit. she made it clear the new immigration policy would not be implemented immediately and the independent migration advisory committee, or mac, would examine how many eu migrants might be needed. we want a new informed evidence—based eu migration policy. we have commissioned the mac to commission on that, they will be consulting business.
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in the meantime, there will be an implementation phase where new eu workers will need to register their details, but the full new eu immigration policy will be after the mac has reported in the final phase of leaving the eu. the government says it wants the economy to flourish after brexit, so a new study from the migration advisory committee will examine what businesses are most reliant on eu labour, the costs and benefits of eu migration, and the potential impact of a reduction in the number of eu citizens working here. questions are being raised not just about the substance of the new eu migration study, but about the timing. mps are not at westminster in the summer, to examine the terms of reference. but there is another issue because the government's critics are saying, why on earth are they commissioning it now and not a year agojust after the referendum 7 we have been talking to different sectors across government since the referendum.
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this is just part of the process. the foreign secretary had not even heard of the new immigration study. you bring me news of this report today. i am sorry, i do not... i cannot comment. it sounds like an interesting report. there is another issue of timing. the government will set out its broad approach to immigration after brexit later this year and ministers will introduce legislation for a new immigration system early next year. the new study on eu migration will not report until much later in 2018. six months before brexit, will not be enough time for structure a new migration system, particularly if they want to completely alter the current system. but if businesses are to be reassured, government ministers it is welcome that there now seems
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to be broad consensus that time limited transition is essential. we i'iow limited transition is essential. we now need to work on the detail, what model will it adopt? we have suggested a common—sense approach, that we stay in the single market and custom deal. to reassure businesses ministers are sending more flexible over how long it will ta ke to more flexible over how long it will take to reduce the numbers. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. our home editor mark easton is here. crucially, let's start with the numbers. we know that for many years now the british economy has come to rely on large numbers of trained and educated, international migrant workers and the net migration figure for eu migration, the number of war who arrived in leith, the latest
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figure on that is 130 3000. actually, that's down a quarter from a year before, i actually think that figure will fall further because the uk is not particularly attractive to eu migrant workers right now because the pound is low, and because of the uncertainties of brexit. if we see how that fits into the overall net migration figure that is now 240,000, that is still well above the government's target of getting down to the tens of thousands, less than 100,000. we down to the tens of thousands, less than100,000. we are down to the tens of thousands, less than 100,000. we are talking about how britain can adapt to become a low migration economy, seeing it reduced very substantially will present some real challenges to the british economy, and what companies are saying is that we need to work out, you can't just are saying is that we need to work out, you can'tjust hand the tap off because if you do that you will have significant gaps with real problems. it isa significant gaps with real problems. it is a question of where we apply oui’ it is a question of where we apply
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our thinking it is a question of where we apply ourthinking cap, as it is a question of where we apply our thinking cap, as it were, to different sectors. let's look at the different sectors. let's look at the different sectors. let's look at the different sectors starting with hospitality. now, if you have bought yourself a copy copy in london this morning it's likely that an eu migrant will have given it to. —— if you bought yourself a cup of copy three macro copy in london. three quarters of all waiters and waitresses are eu migrant workers. huge percent is. a quarter of chefs. it shows how much we have come to rely on eu workers in the system, farming and fishing, 35 thousands, thatis farming and fishing, 35 thousands, that is just full—time workers on top of that you have tens of thousands of temporary workers but we will have to think about how we train at british people to take those places, so with manufacturing where that it were lies on 325,000 eu nationals. every part of the british economy has come to rely, to
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an extent, but its growth on bringing in eu nationals. health and social care, another huge area, 209,000 eu citizens there. social ca re 209,000 eu citizens there. social care in london and the south—east, 60% of carers are foreigners and increasingly they are from the eu. real challenge. 0ne increasingly they are from the eu. real challenge. one area i would like to pick an, is the creative industries, there were reports to the government from the creative industries federation, urging the government to reflect on the fact that the profits of creative industries are very often on collaboration and bringing in foreign workers. if you take one area, a eu workers in the creative industry sections, visually affects, hugely profitable britain leave the wealth in it. architects, quarter of all the architects working in britain are eu nationals. this is
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the scale of the challenge, the complexity, you can get there but to unravel all that and get the right people in the right place will be the real problem. what sort of system in that case the government starting to think about? personally i think it is unlikely we will end up i think it is unlikely we will end up in i think it is unlikely we will end upina i think it is unlikely we will end up in a visa system, we would not wa nt to up in a visa system, we would not want to get to the situation where eve ryo ne want to get to the situation where everyone who comes to the eu requires a visa... it probably will be looking at work, at some system around work, it could be an australian point style system, although that is quite bureaucratic and expensive. i think it will be based on the advice from the migration advisory committee, here is this sector which needs these people and we will provide some kind of work permit to ensure they can get, perhaps time—limited or cap, the detail is unclear. 0ne interesting idea is that you would
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make regional, so that you might have a particular problem in london 01’ have a particular problem in london or in the north—east, or wherever and you could actually have regional cups and agreements on things. they do something not that dissimilar in australia. all to be worked out. but, in quite a short space of time. ido but, in quite a short space of time. i do think it is odd that we are only now saying, you know what we ought to find out what those eu migrants do. what is even more surprising is that the government is thinking about introducing its white paper on immigration system before they get the ball will put from the migration advisory committee telling them how the system works now and them how the system works now and the pressures, and so on. there will be interim reports from the migration advisory committee, i think those will feed into that debate. but, yes, just as the clock is ticking on the brexit
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negotiations so it is also ticking on trying to find a system that will make sense, from march 2019 we will clearly have some sort of implementation phase. some people took about two years, could be a lot longer. actually, as i've been saying, we have just longer. actually, as i've been saying, we havejust become longer. actually, as i've been saying, we have just become an economy that has used eu migration from many, many years as a way of growing many industries and many rely on that international collaboration. very interesting. thank you enough. just to tell you we will be talking a lot more about that story after 5:30pm as well. wildfires continue to burn in parts of southern france for a fourth day, but officials say they are now under control. at least 6000 firefighters and troops have been battling the flames. there are concerns that flesh praises could start quickly. —— rush
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blazes. thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes and campsites around the town of bormes—les—mimosas, with many spending the night on beaches, or in sports halls and other public buildings. wyre davies reports. huge... difficult to reach by road or foot. throughout the huge... difficult to reach by road orfoot. throughout the night more than 6000 firefighters had fought to push back the flames but —— that have caused so much havoc and damaged in the hills. thousands of tourists and local residents who have been evacuated from the hillside homes and campsites also spent another night camped out in the beaches below, uncomfortable and inconvenienced but glad to have escaped with their lives. among the
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hundreds of british tourists forced to flee, but unsure what happens now, is this month am sorry. we work on up about half past 12 by the emergency services shouting fire in french. some people run to the beach and putting life jackets on the children but we decided to try and drive out. we were directed by the police and eventually reached a save point. the blaze destroyed some 10,000 hectares of mediterranean scrub and forest and local officials say was almost certainly deliberately started. it has also been called a disaster for the local economy and environment. 250 ca rava ns we re economy and environment. 250 caravans were here and not a single one has survived. the people that own the company, it is all gone and it isa own the company, it is all gone and it is a sad sight to see this place is used to some of these buyers but this is an magnitude that has not been seen for quite some time...
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emergency officials are reluctant to stu n emergency officials are reluctant to stun firefighters down the people back to their homes and campsites because of the very real possibility that the dry winds will fan the fla mes that the dry winds will fan the flames once more and the threat will the town. indeed, weather conditions across the southern mediterranean are still precarious, hundreds of homes have been evacuated on the island of corsica and from portugal to the italian riviera firefighting teams have been trying to contain several smaller fires before they as well get out of control. later i will talk to the travel editor of the sun editor who was on a camping holiday in that region and of course was forced to move. we will hear more about her experiences a bit later. latest figures show that a record 71 prisoners were released from prisons in england and wales last year by mistake. 0ther statistics from the ministry ofjustice suggest violence in prisons in england and wales is increasing. there were more than 26 and in the
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year to march and a record number of self harm incidents with the figure standing at more than 40,000. with me is our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. let's start with accidental releases, people watching might be astonished that happens told the clearly doors. it does and you have to put into context and said there we re to put into context and said there were 71 releases in error but over 70,000 prisoners released so small proportion but it does happen and happens when mistakes are made on computer systems. someone put in the wrong figures the sentences or sometimes someone wrong figures the sentences or sometimes someone is found not guilty at court, they are released and then later emerges that they wa nted and then later emerges that they wanted the something else they should not been released. these m ista kes should not been released. these mistakes can in prisons, at court or in transit. there was one example earlier this month a prisoner was serving a nine—year sentence for grievous bodily harm with intent, a
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dangerous prisoner, but it had been recorded as nine months and he was released in error and spent a week on the run before being recaptured all stop one example of what can happen. in terms of the broader picture of what is going on in our prisons, there are some worrying figures coming out of there. yes, levels of assault at a record high, over 26,000 up 20% year—on—year and the number of prison staff who are assaulted is at record level over 7000 sivebak means that every day 20 prison officers are being assaulted in jails. levels of self harm are also all over 40,000 there are some signs that self harm rates are beginning to come down and the number of self—inflicted deaths, very high but indications that they are beginning to come down. possibly staff are beginning to quip that problem. the other good news is that they are beginning to get more
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prison officers in the post. the government says they are now having the highest rate of newjoiners the seven yea rs. the highest rate of newjoiners the seven years. hopefully that will get them to the 2/2 thousand figure by them to the 2/2 thousand figure by the end of next year. more prisons then we had last year giving cause serious concern, ten in that category and 40 are rated as of concern, so still some serious problems. danny, thank you very much for now. this is bbc news at 5, the headlines... the government has asked independent experts to produce a report if assessing eu migration but critics argue it should have been the parents of charlie gard have failed to get an agreement to spend up to a week with their son in a hospice. wildfires are continuing to burn in southern france for the fourth day. thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes and campsites. and in the sport england wickets
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continued to fall at the full, a test debutant is the latest man out. the hosts have been reduced to a four. they will resume after rain. england save the momentum with them... at the women's euros a draw will see them win the group. the bbc have secured the right across all the platforms the next month's us pga championship. all the details at half past 5pm. traditional medical advice says that we should always finish a course of antibiotics, even if we feel better, in order for them to be effective, but now a group of scientists has cast doubt on that recommendation. an article in the british medical journal argues that taking antibiotics for longer than necessary can increase the risk of developing a resistance to them. however england's chief medical officer says more research is needed before any change in policy.
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here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. # antibiotics, we're wonderful pills...#. v0|ceover: all sorts of ways ways are being used to spread the word that antibiotics need to be used sparingly. that message is becoming ever more urgent, as fears grow over the dangers posed by microbes which are resistant to the drugs. traditionally, we've always been told to finish a course of antibiotics, but some believe that might actually be making the situation worse. what we worry about now is that many patients are already colonised with resistant bacteria, and they might not be part of the infection, they might be sitting in your gut, or on your skin, or up your nose, and if we use antibiotics for longer than required, what we're doing is enhancing the chances that those resistant bacteria will take over and colonise us more. the world—famous discovery of penicillin... following alexander fleming's discovery of penicillin in the
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late 19205, the belief was that not taking enough could lead to bacteria developing resistance. the modern day official advice is still to complete the course you have been prescribed. but now questions are being raised about whether that advice is correct, some doctors are concerned patients will be confused. i'm very fearful that people will hear the headlines today without seeing the truth of the story behind the headlines and will decide on their own accord to take antibiotics for a shorter amount of time than prescribed, and that is potentially unsafe. just because you are starting to feel better does not mean the infection is completely gone. today's report acknowledges more research is needed before the "finish the course" advice is changed to something like "stop when you feel better." serious concerns about drug resistant bugs means long—established practice is now being questioned. dominic hughes, bbc news. for charlie gard's parents have come
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painful private medical team to care for their son said they could spend up for their son said they could spend up to for their son said they could spend uptoa for their son said they could spend up to a week with him but great 0rmond to the said that was not in the 11—month—old's best interest. let's hear more from mr lister... —— let's hear more from david lister what is our understanding? his pa rents what is our understanding? his parents said that reluctantly except that the decision he should be transferred to a hospice to spend the last days of his life. they wa nted the last days of his life. they wanted to go to the family home and buy bad but the court ruled that that was not in his best interest because of the amount of medical attention that he would need in a setting that was outside of a hospital, a specialist facility. they said that if he cannot be transferred home, if you have to go toa
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transferred home, if you have to go to a hospice we would at least like to a hospice we would at least like to spend more time with him there, to spend more time with him there, to extend the life support services that have. great 0rmond to said they could not find a hospice that was willing to let him do that but if they could find a medical team that would allow that to happen it would let that go ahead, the judge gave them until noon today to come up with that team, they were unable to find such a team and now the judge's order has come into effect and mr justice francis has said he will continue to be a great 0rmond for a period of time, will there be moved toa period of time, will there be moved to a hospice and shortly after that his life support will be withdrawn. the timetable for that and exactly where the hospice is has not been released, the judge has where the hospice is has not been released, thejudge has ordered those details to be kept secret for obvious reasons. that does seem to be the last very sad chapter in this case. richard, thank you. some of the other stories making bbc news at 5. police and authorities have been criticised for failing to protect 18—year old abdullah deghayes and his younger brotherjaffar, after they were killed
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in syria after travelling to fight with jihadists. a review found their radicalisation came as a ‘total shock‘ to the authorities, despite a number of warning signs. scotland's top police officer has been urged to step aside while he's being investigated over allegations of bullying. phil gormley says he's fully cooperating with the inquiry but remains focused on hisjob. the lloyds banking group has set aside a further billion pounds, to cover the cost of mis—sold insurance and overcharged mortgage customers. the additional money brings the total now set aside by the bank if to compensate for mis—sold insurance to £18 billion. the duke of cambridge has arrived ahead of his final shift as an air ambulance pilot, before he takes up royal duties full—time. prince william has spent the past two years working for the east anglian air ambulance service,
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based in cambridge. the duke said the role had given him a ‘profound respect‘ for those who serve in the emergency services. let's find out more about those wildfires still burning in parts of southern france. 6000 firefighters and troops have battled the flames let's talk to the travel editor of the sun. you were on holiday, camping what impact this had on your family and holiday? it has been horrifying, we had good news in the last ten minutes we all allowed back on the campsite for the first time and we've just got back to the caravan, hence the very low battery on my phone and a rather hurried response to you, but we're just
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really believed to be back. they have been fighting the fires all day today, as little as an hour ago we could still see the flames in the hills the campsite. they are now convinced it is safest to come back and we are hopefully going to get to enjoy the rest of our holiday. yes, and whether fires close enough that it was frightening or has itjust been the case... no, it was also a terrifying, the first day tuesday night we had a lovely evening and about one o'clock in the evening we we re about one o'clock in the evening we were leaving our friends about one o'clock in the evening we were leaving ourfriend's pitch about one o'clock in the evening we were leaving our friends pitch and were leaving our friends pitch and we noticed an orange glow on the horizon behind the campsite, within an hour it had taken over the entire horizon and they had evacuated the campsite. we spent the entire night on the beach. we were told at about ten o'clock the next morning that the would be told if we could go back to the campsite to collect our
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things. it took only another hour before we had to evacuate completely and we have been away from the campsite until now and they are now convinced it is safe enough to come back but we could see vast plumes of black smoke and from our perspective it looked like it was literally two minutes away from where we were. where you tempted, did you talk as a family about just leaving altogether? 0r family about just leaving altogether? or did you want to stay? no, i'm deterrent to stay out stayed in this campsite every year... wire that might be it slightly, she did say -- bat might be it she said her battery was low i wonder whether we have lost lisa ? battery was low i wonder whether we have lost lisa? no, i think she is still talking. i am still here. you
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we re still talking. i am still here. you were saying you are determined to stay? yes, i really want to make sure we support of the people down here, it is not a long season and the is devastating, the campsite is beautiful and the minute we could get back here we wanted to be here. lisa, we hope that everyone is safe and happy in that you can enjoy what remains of your holiday. good of you to speak to us. she just happens to be on holiday in that area, the travel editor of the sun. time for a look at the weather... i would like some of that cool wet weather that we are having here in france but none of that in the forecast, there, here we are staying quite cool, quite unsettled there are some heavy downpours and they are some heavy downpours and they are still out there this evening, so we are dodging those. there are some sunny spells in between, a lot will
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fade out as we go deeper into the evening and into the night. across southern and eastern parts at least. you may hear the rain on the window overnight in northern ireland, and other places. ten — 15 degrees the overnight temperature. the north—west of the uk is sharing the line is part of the showers. the rest of england and wales, something quieter on the way at a time but you can see cloud increasing and some men coming back to south—west england and wales, going through the afternoon and into the afternoon. extending to many of england and wales tomorrow evening. heavy bursts as well by that amount if you head out and about. some of that they may threaten parts of the south and south—east england. elsewhere, it is looking drier on saturday. showers widespread, again on sunday. this is bbc news at 5:30 — the headlines: the secretary and brandt has
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promised there will be an implementation phase after brexit as changes are made to the immigration system. the parents of charlie gard have failed to get an agreement to spend up to a week with their son in a hospice. wildfires are continuing to burn in southern france for the fourth day. thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes and campsites. the number of assaults in prison is at a record high, and the performance of ten jails in england and wales is causing "serious concern" according to new figures. the duke of cambridge is on his final shift as an air ambulance pilot, before he takes up royal duties full—time. time for the latest sports news now. mike bushell is in the bbc sports centre.
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hello good evening. england first may have won the toss on the opening day of this third test against south africa, taking place at the oval, but batting first hasn't gone to plan. they have lost four wickets and only their former captain plan. they have lost four wickets and only theirformer captain ed alastair cook has worked out how to play and tame the attack. they have just come out after a rain delay. that is why they went off around an hour ago. they have just restarted in the last few minutes. two wickets. cook is going strong on 72. england's women play their third group match tonight, at euro 2017, against portugal. a win would mean they will win their group, but would have to face their nemesis france in the quaretr—finals.they haven't beaten france since 1974. but england have been the form team so far. if they win and keep a clean sheet, they'll become the first england side — male orfemale — to progress at a major tournament, with a 100 % record without conceding
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a goal. we want to improve, we want to get better. we have said before we want to be the best team in the world. and so far we have had a good performance against scotland, in other areas, a good performance against spain. it is about bringing those areas together, and improving, and keeping that snowball rolling, because we want to go into the knockout stages feeling confident, feeling we are the team with momentum. and not only will we feel that, but the other teams will feel it as well. scotland coach anna signeul says her side need to believe in themselves as they face an uphill task to reach the last eight. they need to beat spain by two goals and hope that england defeat portugal. everton fans should be out in force tonight, to welcome home, wayne rooney, as he makes his first competitive start, since rejoining the club from manchester united. they face slovakian side ruzom—berok, in the first leg of the third qualifying round, in the europa league. the manager's already noticed the impact rooney, has made at the club. what i like is his ambition in
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training, showing it to the young people, the young lads in the team. experience, explaining things, discussions about football, about positions. i think it is really what i expected. great britain swimmer has just missed out on a medal at the world swimming championships in budapest. litchfield set a new british record on the way to qualifying for the final of the 200 metre individual medley but fell short on the final lap. he is third from top of the screen lap. he is third from top of the screen there, finishing fourth. but he goes in the 400 individual medley on sunday. the bbc has secured the live tv, radio and digital rights, to broadcast the final golf major of the year, the us pga championship at quail hollow next month. so you can see ifjordan spieth camp
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com plete so you can see ifjordan spieth camp complete his grand slam. so highlights and live coverage on bbc two, the red button, online and five live, from the 10th to the 13th of august. if you are shopping in a welsh high street you might stumble across some pretty valua ble street you might stumble across some pretty valuable sporting memorabilia. that is because the lions captain sam warburton has donated his kit from the tour of new zealand to his local charity shop in the high street. he tweeted this picture today outside the shop in the town. unsurprisingly, the shop has been inundated with questions from fans eager to get their hands on the kit. england are now 150—4 they have resumed a couple of overs ago in the last few minutes after the rain brute. a to regroup. that's bbc.co.uk/sport and i'll have more in sportsday at 6:30pm. before we move onto our promise to
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discussion about migration, let's bring you a little more information coming through from great 0rmond street hospital, because it has just released a statement of the last few moments. they say it deeply regrets the profound and heartfelt differences between charlie gard's doctors and his parents have had to be played out in court over such a protracted period. just that brief statement from the hospital, and it has decided to release this statement in the last few moments. this is because a high courtjudge approved that plan which will see the 11—month—old boy moved to a hospice before having life—support treatment withdrawn. so the little boy will be moved to a hospice and because of that, because he will ultimately be leaving the hospital's cowie he has been looked after so
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long, the hospital has decided to release a statement. they are saying they deeply regret that the profound differences between the little boy's medical team and his parents have had to be played out in court over such a protracted period. that statement was just through from the hospital. let's get more now on our main story — a new report has been ordered by the government to look at the role eu nationals play in the economy as it attempts to draw up a post—brexit immigration policy. the home secretary, amber rudd, said the report she has commissioned from the migration advisory committee would help the government decide what kind of immigration policy was needed after brexit. freedom of movement is the phrase people use about being part of the eu from what we have at the moment. what we have said is we want a new informed evidence—based eu migration policy. we commissioned the mac to deliver on that, an independent group and they will be consulting
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with business and in the meantime here will need to register their details, but the full new eu immigration policy will be after the mac has reported in the final phase of leaving the eu. you say you want businesses to be sure there won't be a cliff edge and there will be flexibility, what does that look like? is it work permits? we have all those possibilities in the sort of thing we might discuss after the mac has concluded the review, but let me be very clear, what they are doing is gathering the evidence. it will be for the government to set the policy. but we want to hear from businesses and what their views are as we look at this during the next year. on that evidence clearly different industries and different parts of the country want different things. how will you satisfy them all? we will have to look at the evidence to make sure we try and do that. we are leaving the eu and we will be having a new policy but part of what i am announcing today
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is show that we will make sure it is evidence—based and that we are going to make sure that it works for the whole country. i am here in scotland today to celebrate the launch of a new type of boat that will help to keep our borders secure. this is going to be a really national consultation so that we look at the different regions and make sure the policy we finally arrive with does support the whole country. on that, the groups of peers and mps in the scottish government has said the possibility of a different arrangement for scotland should be left on the table. is it on the table or something you should be considering? we haven't seen evidence for that working in any way but we have absolutely asked the mac to make sure they look at the whole of the country, the whole of the union to see what would work best. does that mean the possibility of a different deal is on the table or has it been ruled out? it hasn't been specifically set out by the mac. but we asked them to look at the different areas of the country. the move by the government is designed to restore public
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confidence and to help bring reassurance to businesses in the uk. the deputy director general of the confederation some people have accused the government of waiting too long to consider the impact. the deputy director general of the confederation of british industry, josh hardie, said that this was a "sensible first step". we've always said that it's really important that we have an honest conversation about immigration. you've got businesses who are genuinely concerned about whether they'll be able to access the skills, the labour that the uk needs to build our roads, our rail, to grow our industries, to staff our hospitals. at the same time, you've got genuine public concern about the social impact of immigration. we've got to have an honest conversation to find the middle ground, to find a consensus so we can build a model that works for business and society. but make no mistake, this is urgent. this is affecting individuals right now who, despite good initial offers from the government, still aren't sure whether to take up a job, whether to stay, whether to put their children into schools.
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it's affecting businesses who may get planning permission on a plant but who aren't sure whether to take that planning permission because they don't know whether they'll have the labour to staff it in the future. so we've got to move quickly. with me to discuss migration policy is gerard lyons, chief economic strategist at netwealth investments, and formerly an economic advisor to borisjohnson when he was mayor of london; and tim thomas — director of employment and skills policy at the manufacturers organisation, the eef. gentlemen, welcome. you heard it loud and clear there, saying time is not on our side. are you surprised, gerald, that this is happening now, because we are meant to be leaving soon? it is welcome news but the reality is that we have discussed migration in some detail. there is already a lot of information so i
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surprised this process is going to ta ke surprised this process is going to take a year. any further information is good news, the reality of the situation is the uk needs to have a sensible migration policy. the last two decades it has gone up sevenfold. the number of people on national insurance papers doubles it again. it's not that we don't want migration, wejust need a again. it's not that we don't want migration, we just need a sensible policy. anything that helps the debate is good. this report from the nac could have been commissioned a year ago. of course, in fact there area year ago. of course, in fact there are a lot of things that could have happened quicker. but we should still be positive about what is going to happen. a lot of things are going to happen. a lot of things are going behind—the—scenes and in terms of migration a lot has happened behind—the—scenes. this is making it more public. but it is a surprise that this has been announced today. tim, it is meant to reassure businesses, business owners, is it reassuring? it is helpful that it has happened, we would like to see
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it happen some time ago. and time is short. they are not going to report until late next year. we need to see information and evidence from them a lot sooner. we hope there will be interim reports to allow government to consult with business and form a sensible policy. but i think the point is we need to know sooner rather than later what the new arrangements are going to be. it is all very well to say they will report any year's time but we can't wait a year to see what the government will do after we leave the eu. and your focus is particularly manufacturing, what are you hearing from that sector? what reassurance to people want? what kind of freedoms do they want, given the percentages of eu workers that they currently use in that sector? there are about 300,000 eu workers in manufacturing at the moment and they are needed. we actually need more, not less, there is a skills shortage. but we want to things, the certainty on the rights of eu nationals already in the uk, what
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will their status be, can be made certain as soon will their status be, can be made certain as soon as will their status be, can be made certain as soon as possible? and we need to know what the new arrangements will be after we leave the eu, and we want to see a phase transition from free movement to whatever the new arrangement will be. that needs to be over a period of years, not months. do you agree? there are two key issues. first, one is never discussed is a uk—based company is the last 20 years have underinvested in their staff. in skills and training. hence there is every incentive for them to fill posts with overseas workers. we need to fill skilled post here in the uk and uk companies should be forced to invest more. the second issue is that no one is against skilled migration. the issue here, and one that came out centrefold in the referendum campaign, was the need to have the migration policy where we let ina have the migration policy where we let in a number of people that we need. unlimited migration as to problems of suppressing wages,
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pressure on housing, pressure on public services. we need more skills and training from uk companies and secondly we need to accept that we should have migration but it should be limited and it should be the migration the economy needs. so you can adapt its sector by sector, can you? hospitality can adapt its sector by sector, can you ? hospitality bc can adapt its sector by sector, can you? hospitality bc has a high percentage of people from the eu countries, they are going to say to you... i need these people. that is the important thing. we decide what the important thing. we decide what the economy needs. clearly there will be issues in the near—term. hospitality, also the city, these need skilled workers, ideally from the uk, but we fill them from overseas. from government ‘s perspective you can either have a points—based system, a work permit system, or in terms of one of your earlier parts on the tv, whether we
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divide this across the country, whether to scotland, london, and do it on whether to scotland, london, and do itona whether to scotland, london, and do it on a regional basis. there are a lot of options and hopefully this report will add value towards those options. do you feel that is fair, that there are some sectors that have not invested in skills training and how potentially in two years' time, that could prove problematic? take our sector as an example. only 1596 take our sector as an example. only 15% of employers have apprentices. we have more. we are investing, we are training, and yet we are still short of people. it is not the case that manufacturers do not train, it'sjust that our that manufacturers do not train, it's just that our needs outstrip what the market can provide. i'm sure there is an argument that but it is not an easy argument to say that manufacturers just and training. as the second point, i think the home secretary said we will look at economic the impact on society but clearly what we need to
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do is have a sensible transition period. we've broadly had free movement since about 1972 and we can't turn the tap off immediately and expects to employers and the economy to suddenly react to a new system. we would like to see a phase transition, maybe over to or three or four years... but that transition should be limited otherwise it will drag on. very interesting. some agreement there. thank you, both, very much. the united nations says a catastrophe is unfolding in yemen as the country struggles with the world's worst cholera epidemic, and the looming threat of famine. un officials say the country has been brought to its knees by more than two years of war between houthi rebels and a saudi—led coalition. orla guerin has gained rare access, to the southern port city of aden and sent this report. well, the humanitarian needs in yemen are staggering and they
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are increasing. this is an aid distribution by the un's royal food programme. the families here are getting a month's rations — they are getting wheat, oil, sugar and flour. but officials here tell us they can only help those in the most serious need. theyjust don't have resources to deal with everyone. and they are ringing an alarm bell about the danger of famine. they say 7 million people in this country are just one step away from famine. with me now is a representative from the world food programme. how critical is the situation now? well, we are in a very difficult situation. the latest assessment indicates about 17 million people, over 17 million people who are really in need of food assistance. but unfortunately the situation is that our resource allocation and resource availability can reach only about 6.1—7 million people.
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and we have to really prioritise the most vulnerable and the most needy people. and add to that cholera situation, the epidemic in yemen — it further deteriorates the food security situation of the people in yemen. we are trying our level best to get more resources and reach as many people as possible. we are also doing some nutrition intervention to arrest the malnutrition levels of the women and children in yemen. how urgent is this? it is very urgent. just the fact that we are only able to reach about 30% who are really in need. if you don't provide assistance they could you really have another famine epidemic, so it is very urgent that we get more resources, and right now all the resources are even going into the cholera so food security is also getting into a difficult situation. so you are robbing peter to pay paul? yes. but we need to see which is more required and do it accordingly. thank you forjoining us. and the warning coming from senior aid officials is that this
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is the world's biggest humanitarian crisis. nowhere in the world are more lives at risk than here in yemen. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: the government has asked independent experts to produce a report assessing eu migration — but critics argue it should have been commissioned a year ago. great ormond street hospital has said it deeply regrets the profound and heartfelt differences between charlie gard's doctors and his pa rents were charlie gard's doctors and his parents were played out in court over such a protracted period. wildfires are continuing to burn in southern france for a fourth day. thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes and campsites. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day.
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and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. action aid has launched a campaign to end child marriage in ghana. the charity say underage marriage cuts short the childhood of one in five girls there. the singer and britain's got talent judge, alesha dixon, has teamed up with action aid to highlight the plight of girls who are at risk of rape and abuse. i'll speak to her in a moment, but first, let's just take a look at alesha on a recent visit in ghana, meeting teenage girls who'd been rescued after being abducted, and forced into marriage. i met felicia. she is just 18 years old. she was promised a better life by a man who then left her pregnant and alone.
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were you afraid when you found out that you were having a baby? yes. yes, because you were so young. one of the biggest threats of violence facing teenage girls in this region is abduction for child marriage. these common kidnappings target young girls, remove them from their villages and families, leaving them isolated and their futures at risk. this is cynthia. she told me when she was 15 she was abducted on christmas day, held hostage in a room and told to prepare for marriage. when you were locked in the room, how did that make you feel? translation: with actionaid's support, cynthia was rescued and returned safely home to her family, and was able to go back to school. and i'm pleased to say alesha dixon is here with me in the studio.
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you're is here with me in the studio. only back for a few d hear you're only back for a few days. you hear of girls being abducted, that girl cynthia was abducted when she was 15, and it is something we in this country don't know much about. exactly, so when action aid contacted me it really struck a chord. obviously we hear about arranged marriages and we know abduction happens but i was not aware how big the problem was, particularly in northern ghana, so i wa nted particularly in northern ghana, so i wanted to go out and meet the girls and hear their stories and see the work that is being done there. it is really heartbreaking and sad that this is happening everyday. you must have heard upsetting stories from some girls. really upsetting. cynthia, she was abducted on christmas day, and she was put in a room alone and told to prepare the marriage. could you imagine being a 15—year—old girl and that being done
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to you? this is happening to so many girls and they have this fear, they are very vulnerable, they could be walking for miles on end to school alone and they can be taken and their choices in life are taken away. and that is the end of their education, the end of everything they have known. exactly. so in terms of what actionaid does, it can help rescue the girls in the first instance, that is that first practical step. i'm interested in whether they go out and feel more can be done on the ground with local communities to change attitudes as well, so that this stops happening. actionaid work with the community, they work with strong women in the community and the local chief who is a supporter of their work, the local authorities, and they put together a combat squad, and that squad is not only educate the parents, families, work with the authorities, they intervene and get involved in helping to rescue the girls,
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returning them to their families and hopefully getting them back into education, which is the most important thing. it is about changing the mindset. there is the presumption that the girls of the family are not as worthy as the boys and girls are almost treated as second—class citizens, so it is really about educating them to see the value in girls having an education, and also the girls clubs that actionaid have helped to put into the schools, help teach girls about rights, choices, education, the dangers of child marriage, the signs, what to look out for. there is lots of work done to protect the girls and make the message clear that this is wrong on all levels. and is it treated as a crime? absolutely. the combat squad with the local authorities and the chief will make sure the perpetrators are held accountable. it is 100% and illegal crime. they need to be protected, they deserve education, they have a right to a choice and thatis they have a right to a choice and that is taken away from them, they do not deserve to live in fear.
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there is so much poverty in ghana. felicia, who you saw in the film, she had her one—month—old baby sleep ona hard she had her one—month—old baby sleep on a hard floor, no running water, no toilet, so when a man comes along and offers them a bit of money or more stability, you can see how they might be pressure for the family for them to get married, or they might be tempted, and then the man leaves and they are alone and out of school. but the good news is actionaid are doing brilliant work and were able to rescue cynthia. she is now back in school and this is the work they are doing. these girls wa nt to the work they are doing. these girls want to go on to become teachers and nurses, they want to contribute to the community, and it is about empowering the girls so they know they have the right to say no. that they have the right to say no. that they have the right, that they are valued, they are as important as the boys. that is right. i am really interested , boys. that is right. i am really interested, charities must come to
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you all the time asking you to support them. how do you decide what it was about this project is that you thought of all the requests you have had this is something that interests you ? have had this is something that interests you? for me, if something moves me, if it speaks to my heart, then i act on to it. and it spoke to me. i believe all girls deserve to have a choice, freedom, and an education. and i believe in female empowerment as well. they are young girls and they need our help. lovely to meet you, thank you for coming in. good to hear about your work. thank you for being with us. and much more on all of today's stories coming up in the six o'clock news. this forecast will take us through the weekend and we'll find out what is in store. a lot has happened today with heavy downpours, some thunder, some hail. there is still a fair few out there at the moment.
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this is the past few hours. there has been some sunshine around but it may not be too long before you see the dark clouds approaching. the sauers themselves don't last too long before heading through and the sun appears again later. as we go through the evening the showers become fewer but overnight they are still there. and accompanied by a gusty wind. elsewhere it is quieter, ,, gusty wind. elsewhere it is quieter,,, ten to 15 quieter, ,, ten to 15 degrees overnight. friday, north—western parts of the showers. you may see some wet weather, occasionally some pushing across scotland and northern england, but they are most frequent in the west. still quite breezy and windy. coming south, it is a quieter picture. very little blue. most of us picture. very little blue. most of us will be starting the day drive. still breezy and not particularly warm, around 50 degrees. through the
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day, the showers capon peppering north—western parts. the rest of england and wales are a little quieterfor england and wales are a little quieter for a england and wales are a little quieterfor a time but england and wales are a little quieter for a time but thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain begin to push into the south west and in two parts of wales as the afternoon goes on. north and east england may get above 20 celsius, most will not. and it is still quite breezy. we have had interruptions from showers today for the cricket, there may be another soon. the cricket, there may be another soon. there is a chance of rain late in the day tomorrow but until then it looks mainly dry if raza cloudy. the chance of rain later comes as this weather system spreads rain further north and east across england and wales across friday evening. still some showers in northern scotland and northern ireland. still there on saturday. this weather front is still close on saturday as well. whilst many places on saturday are looking dry, there will be some sun around, showers in northern ireland and north and scotland and further south in england you are cloud and outbreaks
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of rain. still uncertainty about the positioning. we will keep you updated. on sunday, baxtersunshine and showers. showers could be heavy and showers. showers could be heavy and thundery, with a risk of hail. temperatures still around 18 to 21 celsius. harrowing scenes from inside yemen, a country brought to its knees by disease and war. parents carry in famished children — many now defenceless against a major outbreak of cholera. this hospital alone receives about 100 new cholera cases every day. those who get help recover quickly, within hours. but many in yemen are dying needlessly, because they can't get the most basic treatment. an international bbc team has gained rare access to yemen and witnessed the harrowing struggle of people to survive. also tonight: do you see anybody english to work
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here? what will happen to eu migrant workers after brexit? the government moves to reassures business there'll be no "cliff edge". thousands of firefighters in the air and on land continue to battle forest fires in southern france.
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