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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  July 31, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's monday, it's 9 o'clock. i'm chloe tilley, standing in for victoria. welcome to the programme. will government plans to recruit thousands more mental health workers in england over the next four years be enough to ensure patients get the help they need? i think the mistake that health secretary after health secretary from different parties and governments have made that if you want to solve a problem you only have to put the money in, but actually you've got to have the people as well. we'll discuss the plans with campaigners, medical professionals and patients — and we want to hear your stories. also this morning, ceremonies to mark the one—hundredth one of the bloodiest of the first world war. at this time 100 years ago today the battle of passchendaele had just begun. the offensive was under way,
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the first british and commonwealth troops had already fallen. today prince charles and the duke and duchess of cambridge will be at tyne cot cemetery, the biggest commonwealth cemetery in the world, most of the fallen foul at passchendaele. and pressure mounts on channel 4 to scrap a programme about princess diana featuring archive interviews in which she speaks frankly about her life. we'll have all the details. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. waiting for gcse or a level results is nerve—wracking enough, without the added worry that some of the grades might be wrong. the exams regulator 0fqual is tightening up the rules for appeals this summer, but are they also doing enough to check the results are right in the first place? if you're a student, a teacher or an exam marker then we'd love to hear from you this morning. do get in touch — use the hashtag victoria
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live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. thousands of extra mental health workers are to be recruited by the nhs in england. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, said the aim is to treat an extra one million people by 2021. the royal college of nursing has questioned how so many staff can be hired and trained, in such a short space of time. here's more from our health correspondent dominic hughes. ministers in england have already acknowledged the treatment offered to patients struggling with mental health problems suffers in comparison to those with physical ailments. an extra £1 billion in funding for mental health services in england was promised last year. now we know that some of that cash will be spent on recruiting thousands of extra nurses, doctors, psychologists and other clinicians. the plan includes recruiting 2,000 staff to work in child and adolescent mental health services, nearly 3,000 extra therapists working with adults,
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and an extra 4,800 staff, mostly nurses, working in crisis care. because mental health services have been underfunded for such a long time, this initiative, in and of itself, won't help us to achieve the parity of esteem that so many of us want. but what it will do is set the foundations to be able to look forward to a future where mental health is treated on an equal footing to physical health. but simply creating posts does not always mean you can always find the staff to fill them. these jobs are among the most challenging in the health service. data published last week showed that, even before this latest recruitment drive, many thousands of nursing posts across the wider nhs remain unfilled. dominic hughes, bbc news. the health secretaryjeremy hunt has been speaking about the reforms this morning. he told the bbc it was time to end the "historic imbalance" between mental and physical health services.
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we are confident we can get these numbers, there are people trained in mental health nursing, trained as psychiatrists who are not currently working in the nhs. we have a programme to attract them back into the nhs. we want to say to them that we probably have the biggest expansion in mental health in europe at the moment, we are proud of what we are doing but we want to do much more. will be talking more about this at 9:15am. julian worricker is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the united states says president putin's decision to order 755 of its diplomatic staff to leave russia is unjustified. they have been told to leave by the first of september. the move is in retaliation to new sanctions approved by the us congress for russia's alleged involvement in last year's presidential election and the annexation of crimea. the chancellor, philip hammond, appears to have stepped back from a suggestion that the uk could cut taxes and regulation
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in a bid to undercut eu countries after brexit. in an interview with the french newspaper, le monde, he says the government has no plans to make big changes to tax policy in order to attract global investment. his remarks are in sharp contrast with what he said earlier in the year. the editor of the sunday times has apologised for an article suggesting the bbc presenters claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz earned high salaries because they were jewish. the article, by the columnist kevin myers, was published in the newspaper's irish edition and online and has since been taken down. speaking on bbc radio london, ms feltz has expressed her hurt over the article. it is surprisingly hurtful. i would have thought that after all these years i would have been immune to it, and that is not at all how i felt. i felt extremely upset. also the layers of people at the newspaper who check copy before it goes into the paper, the subeditor, the legal team, not a single one of them spotted it
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and thought that is blatantly anti—semitic, vile and unsuitable, that cannot go in the paper. 0ne one in five mps continues to employ a member of their family using taxpayers‘s money, despite the practice being banned for new members of parliament. of the 589 returning mps, 120 do have declared the employment of a relative in the latest register of members financial interests. none of the 61 new mps elected on june eight interests. none of the 61 new mps elected onjune eight are allowed to do so. campaigners say there needs to bea do so. campaigners say there needs to be a clear end date for all mps. the high court will today decide whether tony blair, former foreign secretary jack straw and former attorney general lord goldsmith can be prosecuted over the 2003 iraq war. the attempt to bring them to court was launched by a former iraqi general, abdul—waheed al—rabbat, who calls the invasion a "crime of aggression". hiv testing should be offered to patients when they register
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with a new gp in areas where there are high rates of infection, according to new research. more than 13,000 people are unaware that they have the condition — researchers from two london universities say screening is affordable and could save lives. 0ur health correspondent, jane dreaper, reports. a simple finger prick test — that is all that is needed now to find out whether you have hiv. gps‘ surgeries in some parts of london are making this test more routine. this study says those efforts should be much more widespread. the researchers looked at surgeries where new patients are offered a hiv test when they register. this led to a much higher rate of diagnosing the virus. each test costs around £25. the authors say the benefits mean more screening is affordable. many patients are undiagnosed. that means they carry the virus without actually knowing it. so having an hiv test at your surgery will allow you to have access to excellent
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treatment, but then also prevent people — prevent you from passing on the virus to someone else. routine testing has previously been recommended by public health england for cities with high hiv rates. but investment in testing has fallen in some areas because of financial pressures on local authorities‘ public health budgets. the charity terrence higgins trust called on healthcare commissioners to act on these latest findings. jane dreaper, bbc news. cristiano ronaldo will appear in madrid today accused of tax fraud. he is the latest spanish spokesman to fall foul of this. if found guilty he could face a prison sentence. dozens of people were left suspended in mid—airaftera cable car came to a stop over the river rhine in germany.
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fire crews and rescue teams in cologne used a crane to reach the 75 trapped passengers, some of whom were left 130 feet in the air. a number of children were lowered to the ground. no injuries were reported. prince charles will attend the second day of commemorations to mark the 100th anniversary of the start of the battle of passchendaele. half a million allied and german soldiers were killed, wounded or went missing in action during the three months of fighting near the belgian town of ypres. the duke and duchess of cambridge attended a service with descendants of those who fought there. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. thank you. we will be speaking later about the growing pressure on channel 4 to scrap a programme which shows princess diana talking frankly about her personal life. mick on facebook says, she will always be alive in people's hearts, she is not
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here to defend herself from the rubbish people keep putting out to score points, let her rest in peace. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport with kat downes. kat, a great night for england's women. so england women are through to the final of the european championships in hungary — are they favourites now? no mean feat. they beat france for the first time in 43 years and manager mark sampson may be relieved because he said before the match that england could beat france even if they did not play at their best. i don't think that is what happened but it only took one goal from jody taylor and england won. they held on for the rest of the match, some goalmouth skirmishes as the french attacked in the final minutes but england held on. the result means
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that england are now the highest ranked team in the tournament after defending champions germany were knocked out. does that make them the favourites? this is what the manager said after the match. we always talked about the fact that you can't just turn up and click your fingers and hope it comes together, these are the results of sheer hard work, obsession with wanting to be the best supporting your mates through it for the two years. all that work has now come to fruition. i'm just so has now come to fruition. i'm just so proud of them because to reach that level of performance considering where we were four years ago is a huge achievement for them. but i know that they want more. england have been beaten by france at the last three major tournaments yet it is england who go through to face the netherlands, the host nation, in the semifinals. not only will they play a team in form, they'll be taking on the home crowd as well. let's not get carried away!
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let's talk about lewis hamilton. lewis hamilton let his teammate over take him in the closing stages of yesterday's grand prix, so some good sportsmanship there but did he do the right thing? is this about hamilton being a gentleman or team orders?” is this about hamilton being a gentleman or team orders? i think it was the right thing to do. i think lewis hamilton showed sportsmanship, following team orders, it has definitely sent the right message and is the right way of going about things. let me take you through the race. sebastian vettel was in front extending his championship lead over hamilton but was struggling with his steering. valtteri bottas, the team mate of lewis hamilton, was closing in on the leading ferraris, hamilton was closing in on him and hamilton said if you let me overtake my team mate i think i can close that gap at the top of the drivers championship. so valtteri bottas allows them to go past but it becomes clear that hamilton won't be able to chase down the ferraris so he keeps his word
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and says, i wasn't able to chase the ferraris stansell, and says, i wasn't able to chase the ferraris sta nsell, valtteri and says, i wasn't able to chase the ferraris stansell, valtteri bottas, you can go past me and take those points in the coming third at the hungarian grand prix. so now people are asking was that good sportsmanship from hamilton, was he just following team orders or in the cut—throat world of formula 1, where sebastian vettel is now 1a points clear at the top of the drivers's championship should hamilton have gone for it and closed the gap because he might regretted by the end of the season. he says, in my mind, iwant end of the season. he says, in my mind, i want to win the championship the right way. i don't know if that will come back to bite me in the backside or not. i want to win it the right way and i think today was the right way and i think today was the right way to do things. whether you agree or not is up to you. thank you, kat, we will find out at the end of the season if that was costly for lewis hamilton. now, tt‘s several years since the government pledged to put mental
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health provision on an equal footing with other health services, but many patients still struggle to access the services they need. it's a problem we've covered extensively on this programme. so will plans to recruit more than 20,000 extra mental health workers in england improve things? the plans involve increasing the number of trained nurses, therapists, psychiatrists and other mental health professionals by 2021. earlier, the health secretaryjeremy hunt explained the numbers to naga munchetty on bbc breakfast and said nurses have never worked harder. the 21,000 number is for posts overall. that isn't just nurses, that is psychiatrists, that is therapists who help people with conditions like depression and anxiety, and nurses, and people working in different parts of mental health provision. but nurses are a very, very important part of it, and we are confident that we can get these numbers. there are people who are trained in mental health nursing, people who are trained as psychiatrists who are not currently working in the nhs, and we have a programme to attract them back into the nhs. and what we want to say to them is that we probably have the biggest
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expansion in mental health provision in europe going on at the moment. we're proud of what we're doing, but we want to do a lot more. we still have too many people in this country who... where a young life is blighted because we're not getting them the mental health care that they need quickly enough. there are too many older people who are living in isolation and suffering and depression and they think it is automatic and we want to sort those problems out. this is a very important issue, i don't think anyone would deny that, and when it is such an important issue, i wonder how you think you're going to recruit nurses when there is a 1% pay cap, when it seems that all you're going to be doing is, what, placing advertisements for a job which many think is underpaid, low—paid, and your pay rise is going to be less than inflation, so you're actually earning less money each year doing a job that is frankly really hard? it is a very tough job, and i would say that nurses on the front line have never worked harder. but we are expanding the nursing workforce.
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we have nearly 6,000 more nurses on the front line than we had in 2010. we want to expand it further. one of the reasons that we have been able to expand the workforce to date is because with a limited budget and very difficult economic situation, we have shown pay discipline. but we have to balance that against the need for recruitment, the need to keep people in nursing. and that's why we have this independent process with the pay review body, and that's why we will listen carefully to what the pay review body says before we make our final decision. we can speak to diane hardiman is a psychotherapist who trains counsellors. mandy stevens has worked in mental health services for 30 years and recently found herself admitted to a mental health unit. paul farmerfrom the mental health charity, mind. stephanie aitken from the royal college of nursing. thank you for coming to speak to us.
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diane, you train counsellors, what do you make of whatjeremy hunt announced today? it sounds fantastic. it would be interesting to know exactly how many therapists and what he means by therapists being brought in. we have a lot of trainees, a lot of qualified counsellors who can't find paid work once they're trained. so, the idea of increasing the number available sounds fantastic, but whether it works or not and how we can actually get it happening, i don't know. but it sounds great. what do you think stephanie from the royal college of nursing prospective, do you think it is realistic? so we'd welcome it because anything that's addresses some of the issues that we have got around parity of he is seem rteem is really important, but we have concerns about the fact that in terms of recruit, retain and retrain that how is that actually going to happen? so we think they're laudable ambition, but there is very little
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detail in the plan about how that's going to be achieved. so to deliver the number of staff, thatjeremy hunt is talking about, when would the people need to start their training? how quickly would you need to get people? if you are looking into recruiting into post for 2020, they need to be recruited interest this september and with the changes in student funding at pre—registration level then there are real challenges around that. we know currently that it is less attractive and the numbers are down for recruitment for september. mandy, you have got a unique prospective, a truly unique prospective, a truly unique prospective to have worked so long in mental health services and then yourself having to access the services. so what are your thoughts asa services. so what are your thoughts as a professional and as patient?” worked for 15 years as a qualified nurse and when you are with people, what is so important is the communication and the relationship that you build up with the people that you build up with the people that you're looking after. 15 years working as a director and a leader so working as a director and a leader so you then have to manage the services, that's when you need to
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make sure that we've got enough staff, who are well trained, caring, compassionate and supportive. so, that the workforce are the people who deliver our service. so having then received services from mental health services myself, i benefited from outstanding care in the mental health trust that i was looked after. so, they care equality commission regulators, there is two mental health trusts in the country that are outstanding and i live in hackney so i received care from east london foundation trust which is an outstanding trust. so i was in hospital for three months and i received that fantastic care in my hour of need so the staff were cam passionate, kind, caring, consistent. there was always pempl na nt staff, people consistent. there was always pempl nant staff, people who knew me, and it helped building up the relationship. but i know that 98% of people who use services within our country don't receive that high level of care even at the moment.
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so, iwas level of care even at the moment. so, i was very lucky to receive such a unique high level of care. it was wonderful. paul, i can see you nodding away. mandy tells a great story about how important staff are. imean story about how important staff are. i mean the mental health services we don't have mri scanners, we have people. people who provide the care and support to people to really make and support to people to really make a big difference in their greatest hour of need. so i think the challenge is that the moment we have a huge amount of inconsistency in terms of what people experience locally on the grown and that's because of the very huge variety of staff availability and staff capability as well. so and we have never had a plan for mental health staff. this is the first time we are seeing those elements come into play, but it is a big challenge to get there over the next four to five yea rs. get there over the next four to five years. the thing about the area of mental health this. is one of the ha rd est mental health this. is one of the hardest jobs mental health this. is one of the hardestjobs in the nhs, isn't it? attracting staff is a problem and
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retaining them is a massive issue, isn't it? it's a passion. my colleagues, all of us who work in mental health services, it's about the relationship that you build up with our communities and our people. so nearly all of my colleagues who work in mental health services are all nurses, care. you know you really wa nt all nurses, care. you know you really want to do the best that you can, but it's very difficult when you've got high waiting lists and you've got high waiting lists and you have got high demand and if you're working with people who have got really challenging needs and people who are very high risk to themselves or other people, you need to be alert. you need to be very consistent and you need to be very, you need to be looked after yourself as an individual. so, i was really delighted that paul and mind have started doing work around the mental health of people who work in mental health of people who work in mental health services which is fantastic to see because you know, it has a lot of personal toll on people. what do you think needs to change in
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order to attract those members of staff that would be amazing and retain them? there is a lot of stigma around mental health. there is something about i would support any campaign that actually really makes clear what the value contribution people who work with those with mental health in a range of different roles, but particularly for us in nursing. actually add in terms of that. there is huge job satisfaction, butjob satisfaction isn't enough. people also need recognition and they need to be able to actually feel that they are able to actually feel that they are able to support themselves and their families and loved ones in the role that they are and actually, we have seen that they are and actually, we have seen that the pay has actually, the value of your pay has gone down for nurses over years and that's why we have launched our scrap the cut campaign. people need to have recognition both financially and in terms of the value that society offers. picking up on the stigma point. although there is a lot of stigma around mental health,
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probably this year, we have seen that eroding as we have seen the work of times change and the heads together campaign. prince harry talking about his own experiences? younger people changing mindset about mental health as an issue. the big opportunity here it is to attract that young group of people and for example, as we have heard earlier, there are thousands of people who do sky dolling degrees and we make it so difficult for them to come in and work in the nhs as therapists or in other mental health roles. so, there is a big opportunity here to kind of make the most of that huge awareness around mental health so that we can bring the next generation of staff into working in mental health. diane, what are your thoughts on that?” agree. from what i've heard from the previous three speakers i agree with what they are saying, but what i would personally and this is my experience in the past of working in
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the nhs, is to have a multidisciplinary team involving psychiatrists and nursing staff, counsellors and psychologists, everyone working together and supporting one another and supporting one another and supporting the patient ultimately, and that's fantastic. the idea talking about the nurses and their pay, for counsellors, itrain talking about the nurses and their pay, for counsellors, i train a lot of extremely talented and very gifted compassionate people, the same qualities that are needed to work as nurses, but to find work that's paid, because counselling isn't always acknowledged as having the value, we are seen as the tea and sympathy brigade as opposed to professionals in our own right. and there is a lot of volunteer positions even for qualified counsellors, but so little actually paid and recognised and again, recognition across—the—board in mental health for everybody, you know, all the away across to and create a unified multidisciplinary working team can only be good for
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the people working in the team, supporting each other and the patients. so do you think that this is going to put mental health services on a par with physical services on a par with physical services for example? well, we really welcome the plan and i think it is going to go a long way to support and engage a forward movement, but i think there is a long way to go. it's great in the document that they are talking about. i think its 5,000 staff coming into crisis services. so when people are desperate and really need urgent care, there is somebody avail cable. but... it doesn't happen now, does it? it does, but it's patchy across the country it is fair to say. my experience was great, but it is not everywhere and where you have long waiting lists and things, but the most important thing with all health care is to support people to stay well and safe at home in the community. so putting the resources into preventative mental health care and community services to keep people safe and well which will then
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prevent people getting more unwell and needing to come into hospital for example. i'm hopeful that through counselling they were, therapy, support services, community psychiatric nurses and liaising with the voluntary sector, we can support people to stay well at home. it is better for the people, better people to stay well at home. it is betterfor the people, betterfor the families and better for the communities and it is better than coming into hospital and using extensive coming into hospital and using exte ns ive resources coming into hospital and using extensive resources and it is just traumatic. i would agree. when we talk about mental health and physical health having parity of he is seem, it is important to think about the current workforce and how they are working. so we've always sort of divided the way that we see people either they have a physical or mental health and that's not how people are. people have a variety of complex needs. so we need to look at our health force and they need to be invested in in order to be able to ca re invested in in order to be able to care appropriately with the right skills in the right place at the right time to enable good care fob given. that's where this plan is
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great. it gets us to one particular place, but it's that wider story about having a multidisciplinary workforce , about having a multidisciplinary workforce, thinking about how you don'tjust train workforce, thinking about how you don't just train mental health nurses, but all nurses, all doctors, in really understanding mental health. how you recognise the vital role that peer support workers can play in terms of people bringing their own lived experience into supporting each other. i think that's the broader piece that we need to kind of move on to next to really get to that point where we can genuinely say that physical health and mental health are on a par. in that case, do you think the government truly understands what needs to be done in the nhs regarding mental health to create that parity? well, i think the plan is pretty good. it's based on what is pretty good. it's based on what is possible and achievable in the current time frame and it was co produced by lots of people who brought their own opinions together. i think what it does though is it recognises that there is such, we are trying to unpackage you know
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decades and decades, arguably ever, there has never been a time when mental health has been prioritised, we are trying to do something significant and we want to do it now, but we need to put in place the investment, the workforce, we need to have good quality information. so we're going to get to a certain point. it's not going to be enough for most people yet, but at least it will be a step in the right direction. lots of people getting in touch with their experiences. we have had an e—mailfrom a viewer touch with their experiences. we have had an e—mail from a viewer who says, "i'm schizophrenic and i must have fortnightly injections. my local clinishing only has one nurse giving out ingeneral elections. linda on facebook says, "people watch cas alt and think it's great. nursing is stressle. it is overrun by paperwork, policies and procedures. nursing is suffering from decades of constant under funding and political interference. hospitals need the nurses, but don't need the vast am of back room management that drains the money. they do not need to be put under
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pressure to meet deadlines or targets or to work stupid hours because when they are forced to that's when stupid mistakes are made. ali says, "i live in mid—devon with bipolar. no support only from my gp who saved my life." ken says, "why are mental health nurses and specialists expected to pay for their training or any other nurses in the mental health service? will peoplejoining the nurses in the mental health service? will people joining the police service or the fire service be expected to pay for their training? it not, why should nurses have to pay for their training? if the government is putting money into the nhs is it new money or will other parts of the nhs be cut to pay for that?" ceremonies to mark 100 years since the start of the battle of passchendaele are taking place. prince charles and the prime
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minister and 4,000 descendants will be in attendance. and research suggests new patients who sign up to gps surgeries in high risk areas should be tested for hiv. we'll speak to one of the researchers who says it could save money and lives. here'sjulian in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. thoughts of extra mental health nurses are to be recruited by the nhs in england. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, said the aim is to treat an extra one million people by 2021. the royal college of nursing questioned how so many staff can be hired and trained in such a short space of time. it's not long away, 20, 21, and those skilled nurses will need to be in training now. what we will need is lots of people coming in to train as mental health nurses this september when the programme is open, and that is
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not what we are seeing. the usa says president putin ‘s decision to order its diplomatic staff to leave russia is not justified. they have been told to leave by september one. this is in retaliation to new sanctions approved by the us congress relating to russia's alleged involvement in the last presidential election and its annexation of the crimea. the chancellor appears to have stepped back from a succession that the uk could cut tax regulation in a bid to undercut other countries. in an interview with a french newspaper he says the uk has no plans to change tax policy to encourage this. his remarks are in sharp contrast to what he told the german newspaper earlier this year. afghan police say there's been a suicide explosion outside the iraqi embassy in kabul. several explosions were heard and a gun battle is said to be under way.
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civilians are being moved from the area. the so—called islamic state group has claimed responsibility. the high court will today decide whether tony blair, former foreign secretary jack straw and former attorney general lord goldsmith can be prosecuted over the 2003 iraq war. the attempt to bring them to court was launched by a former iraqi general abdul—waheed al—rabbat, who calls the invasion a "crime of aggression". that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10am. thank you, let's get the sport now with kat. england are through to the semifinals of the women's euros, they beat france the first time in 43 gears thanks to one goal from jody taylor. they face the hosts, the netherlands, in the semifinal. sebastian vettel won the hungarian grand prix to extend his lead over lewis hamilton in the drivers
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championship after hamilton allowed tea m championship after hamilton allowed team mate valtteri bottas to overta ke team mate valtteri bottas to overtake him, keeping a promise he had made earlier in the race. england are closing in on a win over south africa in the third test, they need to take six more wickets today to lead 2—1 in the test series. in the world swimming championships the men's relay team got a silver, a third medal of the championships for adam peaty who already had two gold medals. back to you, chloe. thank you, kat. 100 years ago today one of the most deadly battles of the first world war began. over the 3 months that followed, half a million british, allied and german soldiers were killed or injured. it was fought in the trenches near the small village of passchendaele in belgium. many of the soldiers were drowned in thick mud that had been caused by weeks of relentless rain. events are now under way to commemorate the 100th anniversary — last night the duke and duchess of cambridge laid wreathes
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and listened to the last post be played out. this is a reminder of the battle which claimed so many lives. 0ur correspondent ben brown is tyne cot cemetery in belgium where many of the soldiers are buried. yes, at this time 100 years ago today the battle of passchendaele was well under way. the offensive had began at 358 and in the early hours of that morning. the first british and commonwealth troops had gone over the top and had fallen as well. today at tyne cot cemetery, the biggest commonwealth war cemetery in the world, prince charles and the duke and duchess of cambridge will be here for a commemorative service, 100 years on. iamjoined by commemorative service, 100 years on. i am joined by the eminent historian, glyn and also tim barrett
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whose grandfatherjack died 100 yea rs whose grandfatherjack died 100 years ago today at the battle of passchendaele. give us picture of what the men would have gone through a century ago. it is so beautiful today it is almost impossible to imagine the carnage. the bombardment had been intense, 4.5 million shells falling on german lines and at 3:50am the attack went on in gloomy weather, not at all like today. some of the soldiers were held back instantly, others advanced quite far but before long the german counter attack came in and many of the advances were last and on both sides it was the beginning of 3.5 months before but that has come to epitomise the horrors of the western front. half a million casualties, killed, wounded or missing on both sides. is important to reflect on the fact that both sides were traumatic, will remember the battle for the rain that fell on the
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afternoon of the 315t. it died and the were quite successful. but created a crisis in german morale. tim, your grandfather died at the beginning of the battle, 100 years ago today. jack barrett, 36, lieutenant. you have a picture of him. yes, i have. tell us what you know about how he served and how he died. he was commissioned into the rifle brigade is a signals officer but ended up outside kitchen's would, in charge of his men, tasked with capturing the machine—gun post. the objective was achieved but he was killed in the process along with another lieutenant. he was 36. he
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was quite old to be a lieutenant and his men caught father barrett! how important is it for you to come here one century on and remember? important is it for you to come here one century on and remember7m important is it for you to come here one century on and remember? it is very important that we all remember the futility of what went on. i know it sounds trite but perhaps the younger generation now might get the idea that war is a waste of time! you have a letter that your grandfather wrote before the battle of passchendaele. he wrote it to his wife. can you read some of it out?” will try. six months before he died. my dearest old girl. by the time you get this, i'm sorry, i can't do this! glyn prysor read about. my dearest old girl, by the time you read this i fear the germans will have said something over which has
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my name and address on it which will wipe me out and i want to say goodbye to you and leave it. i can never thank you enough for all you have given me. it is an awful wrench to leave you and the children because i had counted on doing with your help all i could do for them, they have been suspended and good and jolly from the first and by god 's grace they will continue as they have begun. now it must be left to you. i cannot give you any help. live your life, ev, as you think best. an incredibly emotional letter. a man who seemed almost certain that he was going to die here. absolutely. are so many people did feel that but to actually have a letter where he expresses the classic, there's a shell with my name on it, well, as you can see, it is very emotional. glyn, do you think most of the men
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who went into the batter would not have come out alive? it is very hard for us to imagine what they went through, men like jack, one of the inscriptions you will find in the cemeteries, families can choose a personal inscription, it says, to live in hearts we leave behind is not to die and the fact that we retain those memories is a very special thing. thank you very much, glyn prysor, tim barrett, an emotional moment. coverage of the ceremonies later today. and we'll have special live coverage of the remembrance ceremony at tyne cot cemetery in belgium with the bbc‘s ben brown from just before eleven o'clock this morning. coming up: the controversy surrounding a channel 4 programme due to be aired about princess diana. we find out why the corporation is under pressure to pull it. people who live in areas with high rates of hiv should be automatically tested for the virus
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when they register with a new gp. that's what a group of researchers are recommending after running a trial in east london. they had 80,000 people tested as part of the initial health check when theyjoined surgeries in the borough — and it quadrupled the number of hiv diagnoses. the research says not only would rolling this out save lives, but it would also save taxpayers money. we can speak to alex causton—ronaldson, who was diagnosed with hiv three years ago, when he was 24, and dr werner leber from queen mary university of london, who worked on this study. thank you both for coming in. alex, tell us how you were diagnosed.” started to get ill, lost a lot of weight rapidly. this i went to an a &e weight rapidly. this i went to an a & e department and they were too busy and i was asked to leave. i then went to a walk—in centre and they gave me penicillin because they did not know what was happening. it wasn't until i went to my gp on
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several occasions and we couldn't work out what was going on, eventually i said that i had had a partner with hiv. so i got referred to, i had to spend the whole day finding the clinic because it is outside the city where i was living, i had my test and three days later i found out i had hiv. did you have suspicions? it was one of those things where you think about it and obstruct yourself, you know it is there, but i live in london and i'd heard about it a lot but it was almost like this idea that it wouldn't happen to me. so i suppose, even though i wish... i was presenting a lot of the symptoms of hiv, i never thought it might be theirs. because originally i had tested negative in the january. that must have been inside the four week window where they can't pick it up on the initial test. window where they can't pick it up on the initialtest. is
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window where they can't pick it up on the initial test. is this why you carried out the study of the stories like this where it takes a long time and it can be difficult for people to get this diagnosis? that's absolutely right. i think our work and other studies have shown that testing, screening, a routine test, hiv screening can produce, help identify people in the early stage of the infection. what is the test, what does it entail? there are various ways of testing. the two main ones, offered to practices are a finger prick testing, a point of ca re a finger prick testing, a point of care test, as we call it, it is similarto care test, as we call it, it is similar to having your blood sugar taken for similar to having your blood sugar ta ken for instance similar to having your blood sugar taken for instance from a finger prick and it usually gives you an answer within minutes. an indicator of whether someone may have hiv or not. so that person would know
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within minutes. that would have really helped you, presumably, alex, because you had to wait a few days which must have been difficult. because you had to wait a few days which must have been difficultm was quite terrifying. in london they we re was quite terrifying. in london they were doing the rapid testing that i was living in norwich at the time, and they weren't doing it there. so i tested on a friday, then i moved back to london on the saturday, i came back and started a newjob there on the monday and i got a phone call at quarter past five that the test had come back positive. i suppose, had i been in the care of a local professional at the time, it was quite a scary moment, walking down the road in central london and suddenly being told... on your mobile? yes, unfortunately because i'd moved i couldn't go back to the clinic. it was an odd sensation, the nurse did not say, you have hiv, he said, your test is positive. i carried on walking for a couple of minutes and then thought, oh my god,
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what? then everything spins out of control, everything goes out of the window, all logic. it's quite a scary moment before you realise that you are going to be all right. i was on effective treatment within a couple of weeks. and i have lived long and healthy ever since, really. as well as alex saying it would have been easier if he was told by a health professional rather than walking down a street in london? our study is based on data which is where hiv is very common like in most parts of london, but it shows that it most parts of london, but it shows thatitis most parts of london, but it shows that it is cost effective. cost effective is different from cost saving. cost effective just means that the balance, the balance of doing a test, so the clinical benefits of doing a test will outweigh the costs at some point. now, we have shown that this will
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happen after about 33 years. that may sound very far away, but in fa ct, may sound very far away, but in fact, it's a public health measure which is accepted by the nhs. so, but however, i think the key here is that the offer, offering a hiv test is not or should not be based on financial considerations. it is a lwa ys financial considerations. it is always a clinical decision. so, implementing a screening service for insta nce implementing a screening service for instance in high prevalence areas is a clinical decision. offering a test to someone who is unwell as a result of their hiv infection is a clinical condition. now, what our study has shown if in addition to getting a cost benefit further
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financial... a cost benefit further down the - thank you for coming down the line. thank you for coming in to speak to us. some comments coming in to us about princess diana saying that from chris on facebook saying, "i think that channel 4 should be allowed to publish the documentary. diana maybe an icon and member of the royal family, but she is still a person. i'm sure many people would rather see herfor i'm sure many people would rather see her for who i'm sure many people would rather see herfor who she is rather than flawless icon. " tony see herfor who she is rather than flawless icon." tony says, "the diana tape should be broadcast. they we re diana tape should be broadcast. they were private recordings and could be hurtful to people who don't have an effective ability to respond. if they are allowed to be broadcast it shows that the callous nature of our nasty broadcasters. stop them from being broadcast." vladimir putin has announced that 755 staff must leave us diplomatic missions, in retaliation for new us sanctions against moscow. our correspondent sarah rainsford joins us now sarahjust explain.
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sarah just explain. this is a big response by russia to the us congress passing very tough sanctions against russia in response for russia's alleged meddling in the us elections and what russia has done is announced that some 755 staff at us diplomatic missions across russia, so that's notjust americans, we believe this is russian local hired staff will have to seize their activities as mr putin put it in an interview yesterday that he gave. so some of those will be americans who will be expeued those will be americans who will be expelled from the country. we don't know the exact numbers yet, but many of them are russian staff who will now lose their jobs of them are russian staff who will now lose theirjobs and this is an expression of the anger and the frustration that there is here in russia with the way that relations with america have gone under donald trump. i mean remember, of coffers,
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that russia was hoping for something ofa that russia was hoping for something of a reset in relations, hoping for things to improve with the united states when donald trump came to power, but what it has seen is actually relation plummet to the lowest that they have been since the cold war and this is the latest element of that. the removal from their posts of some 755 staff at us diplomatic missions here and people here don't think that's going to be the end of it. it is expected that there could be further measures to come. it is a fairly unpredictable situation now. thank you, sarah. a controversial documentary about the late diana, princess of wales is to be shown on channel 4 this weekend. it will show recordings that haven't been played in the uk before, in which she discusses her marriage, and relationship with a royal protection officer. here's a clip from the trailer for the documentary. diana said, "do you want a drink?" it was almost like being in a wine bar in kensington with a friend. she
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said, "do you know about camilla parker bowles?" said, "do you know about camilla parker bowles? " i said, "do you know about camilla parker bowles?" i couldn't deny that ididn't parker bowles?" i couldn't deny that i didn't know about it. there was a hesitation, she said, "well, she features most days, most hours and minutes of my life." i didn't really understand at that point exactly what she meant, but of course, the days that followed, the weeks that followed, the months that followed, i knew exactly what she meant by that. she sort of carried out her own research and found previous prince of wales' had their own mistresses. that's on channel 4 at 8pm on sunday. let's speak to matthew cole. let's talk about the controversy. just explain why so many people are
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unhappy? because of the content of these tapes and just how private they were meant to be some say. these were tapes recorded about three orfour these were tapes recorded about three or four years before princess diana died with her voice coach. this was her learning to speak and learning to deliver her own thoughts better ahead of some of the big interviews that she gave towards the end of her life, not least the famous one with martin basher, the panorama interview. she is very candid, speaking about her sex life with prince charles, speaking about her relations with a royal protection officer. deeply personal material which it seems was meant to be within the confines of those coaching sessions. these were tapes later, after her death, a legal battle was fought over. earl spencer, her brother, said she should belong to diana's, but they
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we re should belong to diana's, but they were returned to the voice coach and sold on, they have been shown in pa rt before sold on, they have been shown in part before in america, but never in this country. channel 4 now broadcasting ex—certs of the never seen or broadcasting ex—certs of the never seen or heard before in this country. they're seen or heard before in this country. they‘ re defending seen or heard before in this country. they're defending their right to do that. this is their head of factual. there were two, i would say, key factors in deciding to air the tape. one is we can argue about when things come history. 20 years have passed by. diana was very conscious about being filmed. she is sitting comfortably in front of the camera and was happy to be recorded by peterment when people see that, they will see a relaxed, informal diana, comfortable talking about her own story and they will see the process that she is going through is the one of bringing to light her story. it is not concealing her story, it is a process of about channelling her natural and her voice and using her personal experience to say inform that voice.
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i don't think people will find the experience of watching the tapes anything, but illuminating. any rid action from her children? not at this stage. but plenty from people who considered themselves close to diana. some of the words and expressions used are saying this is like blood money. it is very wrong that these were made public. these we re that these were made public. these were deeply personal tapes that should never have seen the light of day. they are critical and calling for channel 4 not to put it out there. matt cole, thank you. let's talk to the former royal press officer. also royal biographer, pennyjunior. we heard you are not happy about the documentary? i'm not happy about the documentary? i'm not happy and of course, channel 4 are going to defend themselves because they have got a lot of money invested in it and with the showing of the documentary, it will be a high rated programme, high ratings
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means high advertising, high advertising means a lot of revenue and channel 4 will laugh all the way to the bank. these tapes were recorded in private. they were part ofa training recorded in private. they were part of a training session and anybody would tell you who is involved in media training that anything done behind closed doors remains private. i'm surprised that they didn't have the decency to hand the tapes to diana. i have done media training time and time again, i hand the tapes to the client because it is their opportunity to watch back and listen back, to see whether they are doing right or doing wrong and to learn from it. penny, what do you think? i agree with everything dickie has said. it is obscene they are showing these and immoral. diana when she made them, the marriage had come to an end. they had just broken up. she looks delightful and she is, i think, a little flirtatious with
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her voice coach, but fundamentally, she was extremely hurt and she was bitter and she was, she was in pain. and she started, the bulimia had come flooding back, she was not in a good place, there she was talking privately, never ever intending these tapes to be heard by other living sole. i just these tapes to be heard by other living sole. ijust think it is so such exploitation and... we have heard from people getting in touch. penny, your line crackled up. people got in touch saying today, "we loved princess diana. we love the fact that she wasn't completely flawless. we loved all of the vulnerabilities that normal people have and we want to see those and that's why we want to see those and that's why we want to see those and that's why we want to see this documentary?" she had children and do her children, i don't care what age they are? do they really want to know how often
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their parents had sex? is it anybody's business? it is not our business. all we need to know about our royal family is that they do their job our royal family is that they do theirjob and that they are worth theirjob and that they are worth the money. we do not need to pry into their private lives. this may have historical interest, but 20 years on, when her sons are youngish and when her ex—husband is alive, when the royal family that welcomed her into theirfamily, when the royal family that welcomed her into their family, and when her sisters and brother are still alive, this is not the right time. let it wait until all these people are long gone and then let the historians perhaps pour over these tapes and make what they will of them. but this is not the right thing to be doing, for, serving up for public at this public information. do you think this she wanted it to be recorded and wanted people to know the truth? diana wasn't so much
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naive, she was incredibly vulnerable and she was prepared to talk to anybody who was prepared to listen to her. he has a knack about him to get somebody to relax and open up and this is what she did, she opened up and this is what she did, she opened up to him. she opened up on the basis that what she was doing was private and wasn't for public consumption. yes, by all means, release the tapes in 50, 60, 70, 100 yea rs' release the tapes in 50, 60, 70, 100 years' time when historians and researchers can pour over them, but certainly not while you have got william and harry alive, the royal family, the spencer family, william and harry alive, the royal family, the spencerfamily, it is just very hurtful and it seems to me, as! just very hurtful and it seems to me, as i said yesterday, it's grubby blood money. we know earl spencer is unhappy about the prospect of this documentary on sunday on channel 4. how do you think, william and harry, you mentioned them there, would respond to this? well, william and harry had it over the years, allegations about what their mother
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did, what their mother said, how their mother behaved and they have had to live with it and they toss it to one side, yes, whatever is coming out on channel 4 is hurtful and the spencerfamily will feel out on channel 4 is hurtful and the spencer family will feel the same. it is unfortunate that a lot of people will make, not a lot of people, but a few people will make a lot of money and what a private recording and should remain private and it's not going to enhance anything about diana. yes, we knew she was vulnerable, we knew she was suffering, but that was the lady of the day. she spoke to me many times about all sorts of things. i certainly wouldn't go and blab them, why settler is selling the tapes? only he can answer. now let's get the latest weather update with carol. we are looking at sunshine and showers. that's going to be the case
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today. some showers could have hail and thunder. further south, showers will be less intense and fewer and further between and the south east may escape them. between them all, there will be sunshine. through this evening and overnight many of the showers will fade. we will hang to a few in the west. temperature wise 11 to 14 will be the overnight lows. tomorrow morning, we start off with a lot of dry weather. however, it won't be long before the showers in the west develop further and again, some of those will be slow moving, heavy and thundery with hail, but not all of us will catch one. some of us will miss them altogether having a dry day with bright or sunny skies and in the sunshine, particularly in the south east, we could hit 22 to 24 celsius. it changes during wednesday. after a dry and a bright start, for many parts of the uk, we've got rain and stronger winds sweeping in from the south—west. hello it's monday, it's 10 o'clock,
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i'm chloe tilley, in for victoria. the health secretary has admitted plans to to recruit another 21,000 mental health nurses in the next four years is ambitious, and now the royal college of nursing is concerned. we do have concerns about the fact that, in terms of recruit, retain and retrain, how is that actually going to happen? we think these laudable ambitions but there is very little detail in the plan about how actually that be achieved. remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice. tributes will be paid later to those who lost their lives at the battle of passchendaele — as ceremonies are held to mark the 100 year anniversary of the start of the battle. at this time 100 years ago today the battle of passchendaele had already begun. the offensive was under way, the first british and commonwealth soldiers had attacked, many are
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fallen and are buried here at tyne cot cemetery, the biggest commonwealth war cemetery in the world. and from this summer it will be harderfor world. and from this summer it will be harder for schools to challenge exa m be harder for schools to challenge exam results so are calling upon all schools to appeal against every gcse and a—level results seems wrong. good morning, it's two minutes past ten. here'sjulian in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. our top story today. thousands of extra mental health workers are to be recruited by the nhs in england. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, said the aim is to treat an extra one million people by 2021. the royal college of nursing has questioned how so many staff can be hired and trained in such a short space of time. we are confident that we can get these numbers. there are people who are trained in mental health nursing, people trained as psychiatrists who are not currently working in the nhs. we have a programme to attract them back into
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the nhs. what we want to say to them is that we probably have the biggest expansion in mental health provision in europe going on at the moment, we are proud of what we are doing but we wa nt are proud of what we are doing but we want to do a lot more. the united states says president putin's decision to order 755 of its diplomatic staff to leave russia is unjustified. they have been told to leave by 1st september. the move is in retaliation to new sanctions approved by the us congress for russia's alleged involvement in last year's presidential election and the annexation of crimea. the chancellor, philip hammond, appears to have stepped back from a suggestion that the uk could cut taxes and regulation in a bid to undercut eu countries after brexit. in an interview with the french newspaper, le monde, he says the government has no plans to make big changes to tax policy in order to attract global investment. his remarks are in sharp contrast with what he said earlier in the year. afghan police say there's been a suicide explosion outside the iraqi embassy in kabul. several explosions were
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heard and a gun battle is said to be under way. civilians are being moved from the area. the so—called islamic state group has claimed responsibility. the editor of the sunday times has apologised for an article suggesting the bbc presenters claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz earned high salaries because they were jewish. the article, by the columnist kevin myers, was published in the newspaper's irish edition and online and has since been taken down. speaking on bbc radio london, ms feltz has expressed her hurt over the article. i could not believe that such a thing had been printed, it is gratuitous. not cleverly done. blatant racism, that's all, just racism. when you write something it is read by the subeditor, by the features editor, supposedly by the legal team and by the editor. i could not understand how all those layers of command had allowed
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something so blatantly racist to be put in the paper. one in five mps continues to employ a member of their family using taxpayers' money despite the practice being banned for new members of parliament. of the 589 returning mps, 122 have declared the employment of a relative in the latest register of members' financial interests. none of the 61 new mps who secured their seats at the general election onjune 8th are allowed to do so. campaigners say there needs to be a clear end date for all mps. the high court will today decide whether tony blair, former foreign secretary jack straw and former attorney general lord goldsmith can be prosecuted over the 2003 iraq war. the attempt to bring them to court was launched by a former iraqi general abdul—waheed al—rabbat, who calls the invasion a "crime of aggression". prince charles will attend the second day of commemorations to mark the 100th anniversary of the start of the battle of passchendaele.
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half a million allied and german soldiers were killed, wounded or went missing in action during the three months of fighting near the belgian town of ypres. yesterday the duke and duchess of cambridge attended a service with 200 descendents of those who fought there. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 10.30. thank you. a lot of people are getting in touch about the documentary going out at the weekend about princess diana. audrey says, princess diana is not owned by the people. it is and dignified to put these tapes in the public arena. her sons should take ownership of those tapes for her privacy. they don't own them, that is the problem. another text, of course diana talking about her private life should be shown, that was presumably the intention at the time that she participated in that film and conversation. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live
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and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here's some sport now with kat. the big news, england are through to the semifinals of the women's euros, they beat france the first time in 43 years thanks to one goal from jodie taylor. it was her fifth goal of the tournament. our correspondent katie gornall was that the game. there are a view england players training today at their base in utrecht but most have understandably been given time to rest and recover after that historic win over france last night. it may have taken 43 years but family england have beaten their rivals. they did so with another clinical performance in front of goal. mark sampson was full of praise for strikerjody taylor who's had a handful of chances but already has scored five goals. she is on course not only to win the last four on thursday.
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the team will no england very well and will be desperate to prove that they are better because england beat them last time. the capacity of the stadium is 30,000, after beating france england will fear no one and nothing at this tournament! katie gornall reporting. only an almighty south african defence can stop england taking a series lead on the final day of the third test. some big hitting from england meant they set south africa a world record chase of 490 to win. england's bowlers took four wickets before close of play, two by ben stokes, south africa resumed 375 runs
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behind, this morning. lewis hamilton sacrificed three vital points in the hungarian grand prix when he kept a promise to his team mate at mercedes, hamilton was given permission to overtake valtteri bottas because he thought he could catch the two leading ferraris. when he realised he couldn't, he allowed for teddy bottas to pass him again to ta ke for teddy bottas to pass him again to take third place. —— valtteri bottas. sebastian vettel added to his championship lead. it wasn't easy, i didn't do a favour for kimi ididn't easy, i didn't do a favour for kimi i didn't have the pace. i did come back a bit, a couple of laps when i could breathe a bit although i did have to stay focused the whole race. great britain have entered the world swimming championships in hungary with seven medals. after the relay tea m with seven medals. after the relay team four by 100 laps took silver, adam peaty dragged them into
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contention with a stunning lack, and they finished second to the usa. it's the third medal of the week adam peaty. —— he's won a stunning la ptop adam peaty. —— he's won a stunning laptop mac. now back to you, chloe. thank you, kat. it was one of the bloodiest battles of the second world war. conditions we re of the second world war. conditions were so appalling that many drowned to death in mud. before we go live to death in mud. before we go live to my colleague in belgium this is a short film about what happened. —— one of the bloodiest battles of the first world war. ben brown is live at tyne cot cemetery in belgium. 100 years ago today, the battle of passchendaele was raging. it had begun in the early hours of the morning. the
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first british and commonwealth troops had gone over the top. the first had fallen as well. many of those who would die in the coming three months of the battle of passchendaele are buried here at the tyne cot cemetery, the biggest commonwealth war cemetery in the world. later today prince charles and the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend a special commemorative service. it was, as you have seen, as you have seen, a as you have seen, a battle where british and allied troops face not only german machine guns but also mud, many drowning in the sea of mud that the battlefield became, and mustard gas as well. let's speak to the former england rugby captain lewis moody who has a special interest in the battle of passchendaele. tel us how you got interested. from my namesake, my great—grandfather's involvement coming over with the british
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expeditionary forces. i was here researching him and his regiment, the royal sussex when i got a text from my mother saying, we have a relative who is commemorative at tyne cot. i happened to be there at the time and could go and tracy ‘s footsteps. he died on november six, at the tail end of the battle, having been through the somme, almost making it through passchendaele. he is commemorated on the wall at men in gate. your mother's great uncle. when you come here what does it make you feel about the man who made such sacrifices 100 years ago. it's difficult to describe. when you come the doors, especially at tyne cot, the doors, especially at tyne cot, the brutality, the blood and sacrifice that happened is now replaced with bt, serenity and calm. it's very moving. i broke down in
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tea rs it's very moving. i broke down in tears one i found the place. it's so important to remember that not only our relatives but former rugby internationals who died there on this day, arthur wilson, edgar mobbs and other international players. it's important for me to be here and remember. can you imagine what it would have been like to fight? from all that you have researched about the battle, give a picture of what it would be like because these fields are now so beautiful, serene and green, it was a morass of mud, the worst rains the 30 years. when you see the old pictures and now you see the beautiful trees, it was a wasteland with mud everywhere, to see what they went through, and edgar mobbs, and northamptonshire man, and england international, he was refused entry into the army so he formed his own battalion with 240 men. they let him join and he died this year 100 years ago, as a
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lieutenant colonel because his battalion's advance was stored. he climbed out of the trench, his second lieutenant tried to pull him backin second lieutenant tried to pull him back in but he took it on single—handedly with a grenade and was sadly killed and his name is on the menin gate. the difficulties they had, the bunkers are still here, the german ones come across is placed on them as well, it shows you how difficult it must have been. we talk about the hell and the horror of passchendaele, some joined up horror of passchendaele, some joined up at the age of 15. theyjust wa nted up at the age of 15. theyjust wanted to be out here.” up at the age of 15. theyjust wanted to be out here. i don't think you can put it into words or comprehend it now. you think of your kids joining comprehend it now. you think of your kidsjoining up comprehend it now. you think of your kids joining up at 15 and being comprehend it now. you think of your kidsjoining up at 15 and being out here and some of those commemorated are 15, but how wide it was as well. from all corners of the earth people came and fought on this piece of land and died on this piece of land and the vast scale of the sacrifice
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when you walk through here is what really makes it important for me to try and pass it on to my children and the medals that i have from the various different sides of my family in the first world war and earnest‘s involvement at passchendaele, hopefully 80 or 90 years from now they are passing it on to their children as well. lewis moody there, former england rugby captain whose mother's great—uncle died in the battle of passchendaele. that's the latest from here. the high court will make a ruling today on whether a former chief—of—staff of the iraqi army can bring a private prosecution against tony blair over the iraq war. our legal correspondent clive coleman is at the high court for us now. tell us more about this case and who is bringing it and what it is about? he tried to bring it at westminster magistrates‘ court last year. he was u nsuccessful. magistrates‘ court last year. he was unsuccessful. the court ruled
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basically that tony blair, the former prime minister, the former foreign secretary, jack straw and lord goldsmith had implied immunity from prosecution because of their former government roles, but the court also ruled that the crime that the general, his name is abdul wahed shannan al rabbat. he is a former chief—of—staff of the iraqi army. but the crime he was trying to have them prosecuted for is the crime of aggression. in other words, waging an aggressive war in breach of the united nations charter, but the court back last year ruled that the crime of aggression was not a crime in our domestic english law. these proceedings at the high court are in an appeal against that decision. now, what was argued on the general‘s behalf was that the crime of aggression was wrapped and had beenin of aggression was wrapped and had been in our domestic law and when the former nazi leaders were
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prosecuted after the second world war, it was done on the basis that the crime of aggression was part of our uk law. however, critically, there was a ruling in 2006 that the fore runners of the spraol court, that crime, the crime of aggression does not apply in uk law. it didn‘t form part of uk law and parliament would have to pass an acof parliament to make it part of uk law. so, today we will get a ruling. if the general is successful, then the matter would go back to the supreme court and they would have to consider whether that decision back in 2006, which said that the crime of aggression doesn‘t apply in our law was correct or not. many commentators think it is a high bar for the general to pass. it is unlikely that the court will rule in his favour, but we‘ll find out whether they have done in a matter of minutes from now. so, i will come back on and tell you what happened. i want to ask you the implications of this. give us a wider sense of the significance of this kind of
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action? well, i mean, if it is established that a crime of aggression is a crime that can be prosecuted under our law it means that our political leaders, if they ta ke that our political leaders, if they take the country into the war and they do so unlawfully, and in breach of the united nations charter, it means that they can be held responsible and prosecuted in a british court for the crime of aggression. so, it is a very, very significant ruling. at the moment they have it this implied immunity from prosecution, but if the law changes on that, that‘s a very, very major step and huge ramifications for those critical and very important vital decisions for the nation where if the law changed our political leaders could be held responsible in the criminal courts. that would be a major change. clive, we will come back to you, as and when you have an update for us from the high court. it‘s several years since the government pledged to put mental health provision on an equal footing
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with other health services, but many patients still struggle to access the services they need. it‘s a problem we‘ve covered extensively on this programme. so will plans to recruit more than 20,000 extra mental health workers in england improve things? the plans involve increasing the number of trained nurses, therapists, psychiatrists and other mental health professionals by 2021. earlier, the health secretaryjeremy hunt explained the numbers to naga munchetty on bbc breakfast and said nurses have never worked harder. he said that nurses have never worked harder. the 21,000 number is for posts overall. that isn‘t just nurses, that is psychiatrists, that is therapists who help people with conditions like depression and anxiety, and nurses, and people working in different parts of mental health provision. but nurses are a very, very important part of it, and we are confident that we can get these numbers. there are people who are trained in mental health nursing, people who are trained as psychiatrists who are not currently working in the nhs, and we have a programme to attract them back into the nhs.
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and what we want to say to them is that we probably have the biggest expansion in mental health provision in europe going on at the moment. we‘re proud of what we‘re doing, but we want to do a lot more. we still have too many people in this country who, where a young life is blighted, because we‘re not getting them the mental health care that they need quickly enough. there are too many older people who are living in isolation and suffering and depression and they think it is automatic and we want to sort those problems out. this is a very important issue, i don‘t think anyone would deny that, and when it is such an important issue, i wonder how you think you‘re going to recruit nurses when there is a 1% pay cap, when it seems that all you‘re going to be doing is, what, placing advertisements for a job which many think is underpaid, low—paid, and your pay rise is going to be less than inflation, so you‘re actually earning less money each year doing a job that is frankly really hard? it is a very tough job, and i would say that nurses on the front—line have
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never worked harder. but we are expanding the nursing workforce. we have nearly 6,000 more nurses on the front line than we had in 2010. we want to expand it further. one of the reasons that we have been able to expand the workforce to date is because with a limited budget and very difficult economic situation, we have shown pay discipline. earlier we spoke to mandy stevens and paul farmer from
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earlier we spoke to mandy stevens and paul farmerfrom mind and stephanie from the royal college of nursing. we would welcome it. anything that addresses the issues that we have got around parity of he is seem around mental health is important. in terms of recruit, retain and retrain that how is that actually going to happen? so we think they‘re laudable ambition, but there is very little detail in the plan about how that‘s going to be achieved. so to deliver the number of staff, thatjeremy hunt is talking about, when would these people need to start their training? how quickly would you need to get people? if you're looking at recruiting into post for 2020, they need to be recruited interest this september. and with the changes in student funding at pre—registration level then there are real challenges around that. we know currently that it is less attractive and the numbers are down for recruitment for september. i think the challenge is at the moment we have a huge amount of inconsistency in terms of what people experience locally on the ground and often that's because of the very huge variety of staff
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availability and staff capability as well. so and we have never had a plan for mental health staff before. so this is the first time that we are seeing those kinds of elements coming into play. but it's a big challenge to get there over the next four to five years. what do you think needs to change and to retain them? there is a lot of stigma around mental health. there is something about, i would support any campaign that actually really makes clear what the value contribution people who work with those with mental health in a range of different roles, but particularly for us in nursing. actually add in terms of that. there is hugejob satisfaction. but job terms of that. there is hugejob satisfaction. butjob satisfaction isn‘t enough. people also need recognition and they need to be able to actually feel that they are able to actually feel that they are able to support themselves and their families and loved ones in the role that they are and actually, we have seen that they are and actually, we have seen that the pay has actually, the
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value of your pay has gone down for nurse over the years and that‘s why we have launched our scrap the cut campaign. people need recognition.” wonder do you think this is going to put mental health services on a par with physical services for example? well, we really welcome the plan and i think it is going to go a long way to support and engage a forward movement, but i think there is still a long way to go. it's great in the document they are talking about, i think it is 5,000 staff coming into crisis services. so when people are desperate and really need urgent care, there is somebody immediately available. it doesn't happen now, does it in into it does, but it‘s patchy across the country. so again my experience was great, but it is not everywhere. and where you have long waiting lists and things, but the most important thing with all health care is to support people to stay well and safe at home in the community. so putting all the
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resources into preventative mental health care and community services to keep people safe and well which will then prevent people getting more unwell and needing to come into hospitalfor example. more unwell and needing to come into hospital for example. so, i‘m hopeful that through counselling therapy, support services, community psychiatric nurses and in liaison with the voluntary sector we can support people to stay well at home because then it‘s better for the people, better for the families and better for our communities and it‘s also a lot cheaper than coming into hospital and using expensive resource and it‘s just very traumatic. let‘s speak to the shadow mental health minister barbara keeley. would you recognise what we heard from many people that this is a good start? well, of course, it is good to have an ambition to increase dramatically the number of staff working in mental health services and particularly in crisis services because the very recent report the ca re
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because the very recent report the care quality commission pointed out that staffing was the key issue causing a problem with patient safety a nd causing a problem with patient safety and we know that it‘s very difficult to get access to things like eating disorder services, it‘s very difficult for people with children and mental health for them to get access to the treatment they need. of course, it‘s welcome, but let‘s be realistic, that‘s what we are saying this morning, let‘s be realistic. it takes time to train a nurse and there is a big workforce recruitment crisis at the moment because of the pay and morale and conditions issue that you‘ve just heard about. but as we heard from the gentleman paul farmer from the charity mind there has never been a plan before and there is, he said, there has never been a plan so you have to start somewhere and at least now it is being recognised and there is an attempt to put mental health services on a par with physical health services? i always feel that we are a long way from that. so that‘s always a strange way to talk about it. i mean, clearly, you are not ina about it. i mean, clearly, you are not in a situation when i talked
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about children and young people, 23% of children and young people are referred by their gp for trelt get turned away. that doesn‘t happen with physical health and it is part of the problem that we‘ve got in the lack of parity between the two, but that‘s not the most important thing. the most important thing is we get the staffing levels up. that we get the staffing levels up. that we get the service levels up and we improve access and for that really the funding has to be sorted out and people have been questioning this morning whether this £1 billion part funding can go anywhere meeting the targets of thousands of staff? i don‘t argue with the numbers in any way, shape or form, don‘t argue with the numbers in any way, shape orform, apart from the fa ct way, shape orform, apart from the fact that the 4600 extra mental health nurses would not even take us back to where we were in 2010, but it takes 13 years to train a psychiatrist. so let‘s be realistic about where we can be by 2020 #2021. we heard there are maeb people who are trained to decided to leave the profession or haven‘t been
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able to get paid jobs. one lady said she trained many counsellors and they couldn‘t get paid jobs. if those people can be pooled together and you can bring in the people who have been trained, they would be ready to go now? yes, they would. the other thing i would like to see jeremy hunt announcing when he talks about funding, jeremy hunt announcing when he talks aboutfunding, any jeremy hunt announcing when he talks about funding, any extra funding for mental health he talks about ring—fencing because we have seen attem pts ring—fencing because we have seen atte m pts by ring—fencing because we have seen attempts by the government to put extra funding into mental health services and nhs bodies siphon the money off and use it for other things. we have had this loss of mental health nurses so we‘ve got crisis problems and problems on wards, we‘ve got problems with community resources. the very community resources. the very community resources. the very community resources which can be so valuable. so we‘re not into early intervention and prevention because those resources have been cut back and the voluntary sector has been cut back worse than any other part of this sector at the moment. so, those things need to be addressed. i would really like to see the
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government ring—fence funding for mental health. thank you very much for speaking to us. still to come. the change that‘s going to make it harder to appeal against gcse and a—level results. we ask the chief regulator of exams why the change is being made. and what it will mean for students. prince charles will attend a special ceremony being held later, to mark the 100—year anniversary of the start of the battle of passchendale, one of the bloodiest battles of the first world war. here‘sjulian in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today‘s news. thousands of extra mental health workers are to be recruited by the nhs in england. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, said the aim is to treat an extra one million people by 2021. the royal college of nursing has questioned how so many staff can be hired and trained in such a short space of time. the united states says president putin‘s decision to order 755 of its diplomatic staff to leave
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russia is unjustified. they have been told to leave by 1st september. the move is in retaliation to new sanctions approved by the us congress for russia‘s alleged involvement in last year‘s presidential election and the annexation of crimea. the chancellor, philip hammond, appears to have stepped back from a suggestion that the uk could cut taxes and regulation in a bid to undercut eu countries after brexit. in an interview with the french newspaper, le monde, he says the government has no plans to make big changes to tax policy in order to attract global investment. his remarks are in sharp contrast with what he said earlier in the year. afghan police say there‘s been a suicide explosion outside the iraqi embassy in kabul. several explosions were heard and a gun battle is said to be under way. civilians are being moved from the area. the so—called islamic state group has claimed responsibility. breaking news, the high court has
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blocked a bid to bring a private prosecution against tony blair, former foreign secretary jack straw and former attorney general lord goldsmith over the 2003 iraq war. the attempt to bring them to court was launched by a former iraqi general abdul—waheed al—rabbat, who calls the invasion a "crime of aggression". that‘s a summary of the latest news. here‘s some sport now with kat downes. england need six more wickets to ta ke england need six more wickets to take a lead in the test series against south africa, south africa are 375 runs behind. england are through to the semifinals of the women‘s euros, they beat france the first time in 43 years thanks to one goal from jodie taylor.
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they face a host nation the netherlands in the final. lewis hamilton sacrificed three vital points in the hungarian grand prix when he kept a promise to his team mate at mercedes, hamilton was given permission to overtake valtteri bottas because he thought he could catch the two leading ferraris. when he realised he couldn‘t, he allowed for teddy bottas to pass him again to take third place. great britain have entered the world swimming championships in hungary with seven medals. after the relay team four by 100 laps took silver, adam peaty dragged them into contention with a stunning lap and they finished second to the usa. adam peaty already had two gold medals to his name. one of the highest paid footballers in the world, cristiano ronaldo, is in court today accused of tax ford. he is accused of defrauding the authorities of the equivalent of £30 million. richard conway is there. what exactly is ronaldo accused of doing, richard? cristiano ronaldo,
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i‘m at the court has just north of madrid and he‘s inside giving evidence to a judge in a pre—trial hearing. he is accused of withholding information about his income, about keeping some of that income, about keeping some of that income offshore in a shell company outside spain and not declaring a large amount of money, several millions of pounds, relating to his image rights. he has said, my conscience is clear. it‘s very busy here. i‘m going to get the camera to move around to show you the level of interest. there are maybe 40 tv cameras here from all around the world, 120 journalists in all. ronaldo didn‘t arrive through the front entrance as we thought, he‘s gone into a side door but within the next hour or so he will appear on the courtroom steps behind me to address the world‘s media and we are expecting a defiant mood. he is clearly a ng ry expecting a defiant mood. he is clearly angry about this, at one
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stage he threatened to leave real madrid and spain and move overseas, such was his anger about these charges. perhaps we will cure more from him, protesting his innocence when he will appear shortly to address the media and explain how he feels about this case. thank you, richard. iam feels about this case. thank you, richard. i am sure we will head back when you have more news for us. now, waiting for gcse and a level results is bad enough without the worry that the marks might not be accurate. every year thousands of grades are challenged and many of them end up being changed. because you have to pay to lodge an appeal, it‘s generally private schools who are more likely to challenge results. from this summer the exams regulator 0fqual is tightening up the rules for appeals, partly to stop more wealthy pupils getting their grades improved, simply because their schools are prepared to pay for re—marking. but is the regulator doing enough to make sure the grades are right in the first place? let‘s talk now to michelle meadows, director for strategy, risk and research from the chief regulator of exams, 0fqual. jack lane had one of his a—level
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exam papers wrongly marked. if it hadn‘t been for the fact he had an unconditional offer from his university, it could have cost him his place. mike buchanan is headmaster at ashford school, which is a private school in kent. and kim knappett, teacher at a comprehensive in south london and a member of the atl union, that‘s the association of teachers and lecturers. thank you all for coming in. jack, what happened to you.” thank you all for coming in. jack, what happened to you. i had an english paper re—marked three years ago. luckily i‘ve been to university, i have done it all! started on a d, moved up to a b, a 21 points disparity. by wrote an open letter saying i think it was appalling that that‘s disparity could exist, —— wrote a letter. had i not been able to afford the re—marking i would have been this
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intensive dis— incentivised from getting the mark i deserved. you had to pay £50? may be about £40 at the time. how long did it take for the second mark to come through. just a couple of weeks although too late for a university place if that had not happened. i know some universities differ, when they take their offers but it‘s more about accommodation, how do you apply for everything surrounding the university when your place can be up north, down south, when it differs so north, down south, when it differs so much for each individual student. i think it affects you much more than just i think it affects you much more thanjust which i think it affects you much more than just which university you will go to. kim, how common is this kind of story? it comes and goes in waves. i am from a state school and we have to make a very difficult choice about whether we ask for any re—marking. many
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choice about whether we ask for any re— marking. many schools choice about whether we ask for any re—marking. many schools are in deficit, with their budget, and of course we have all the changes to the gcs e but with the new 1— man marking for english and maths so students are not confident about what they should be getting that 1-9. we what they should be getting that 1—9. we don't know if we should be asking for re—marks. 1—9. we don't know if we should be asking for re-marks. mike, do have this a lot at your private school. two put it in context almost 70,000 changes resulted in greater changes. 90 or 70,000 individuals or potential individuals who haven't got the right grades. that can't be a cce pta ble got the right grades. that can't be acceptable and i see it in my school every year. and across the schools that i represent as chair at a head teachers conference, youngsters are missing out on university places,
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jobs, sixth form places, because we don't have a system that does the job right. if any student at your school is not happy would you automatically go for a re—mark? school is not happy would you automatically go for a re-mark? we would not. we would look if it was a realistic disparity from our view and the evidence we have about their ability and the mark. and that is the case that was referred to in the sunday times article, where, you know, students were getting great way out off—line with what would be reasonable to expect of them and compared to their other subjects. it took nine months to resolve. that can't be acceptable. michelle, respond. 70,000 exam grades changing last summer, surely that can‘t be right. errors such as the one that jack experienced are clearly not a cce pta ble jack experienced are clearly not acceptable but we must put them in
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context. each year, around 8 million qualification grades are awarded. gcses and a—levels. we have safeguards in place that if teachers believe there to be an error in the marking, they can go for a review of that marking. and even then, if they are not happy following the review of the marking, there's an appeals process as well. at the end of all of those checks and balances, less than 1% of all grades actually change through the process. but this is such a critical time, if you are sitting gcses or a—levels this is your whole future ahead of you. i‘m fascinated. who mocks the paper committees and teachers? i don‘t think many people know. 34,000 examiners are involved and the vast
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majority of them are teachers. do they get paid by paper. varane four examples and they have different ways of pagan. sometimes it can be by entire paperand ways of pagan. sometimes it can be by entire paper and sometimes by individual questions. you would worry about that because if you are in front of a computer screen because i guess that is the way they market rather than a physical paper? the vast majority of marking is done in that way. if you know you are being paid per paper you are going to make mistakes. you will think, if i get this one i make more money. the systems have vastly improved partly because now there is an man marking. as tojust sign up to mark first they are trained in marking, before they are allowed to mark them as to doa
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before they are allowed to mark them as to do a test if you like of some scripts and marking to make sure they are applying the marks correctly. once they have done that they were be released on to live marking. this quality assurance is happening all the time so questions come up by senior examiners that have a definitive mark that we know the right mark for and if markers don't mark accurately according to that definitive mark and they are retrained. and yet nearly 2096 of those inquiries were changed, that's 70,000 changes a year, michelle is quite rightly talking about the robustness of the system, we are talking about two different things, a system and individuals. and i am interested in having reliable results for the individuals, and where there are mistakes, making sure they are put right quickly and
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without fuss and without cost. because not all my parents but some of them can afford to have those re—marks of them can afford to have those re— marks yet most of them can afford to have those re—marks yet most cannot. of them can afford to have those re-marks yet most cannot. if they can re-marks yet most cannot. if they ca n afford re-marks yet most cannot. if they can afford private school fees they can afford private school fees they can probably afford £40 for the future of their children. that's an assumption. but it is true, not like some parents who have to have free school meals, i have heard that some teachers mark one way and others not another and there is an area of the change, surely that cannot be right. surely if you are marking a paper thatis surely if you are marking a paper that is 68, or 81, a set mark that eve ryo ne that is 68, or 81, a set mark that everyone must get. the kind of marks we have in this country especially for english literature, that often essay responses and they will sometimes be differences of opinion
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between different teachers looking at the quality of the work. some of these differences of opinion are quite legitimate and some of them are errors. and it's incredibly important that the safeguard, if an error has been made and the review is done that errors are corrected no matter how small. but we don't want to see is one legitimate mark being changed for another legitimate mark. what we had under the old system of reviews... how can they be two legitimate marks are the same paper, i don‘t understand. surely if you are working hard you want to know there is one mark and you don‘t want one person who might give you 68 and another person might give you 73 for the same paper, that isn‘t fair. sorry. going to support michelle, in some subjects that are a range of marks which are quite legitimate. the difficulty is, the system has ha rd the difficulty is, the system has hard boundaries. and those hard
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boundaries are working with what i would describe as soggy marking. it doesn't mean it is incorrect marking, just that it is variable. in most other circumstances, if i am an engineer! in most other circumstances, if i am an engineer i work to a particular tolerance and it is way below 20%, it might be 1—5% tolerance and the syste m it might be 1—5% tolerance and the system doesn't suit that.” it might be 1—5% tolerance and the system doesn't suit that. i am a science teacher and a lot of the answers in science are right or wrong but we have encouraged and done lot more with longer answers and it is very easy for a long answer that is worth six marks to be given three marks or five marks. and that can so easily be the difference between a grade and where everything at gcse in particular is about the magic c or about the magic four or five that is what is difficult for the student dexter. it's not always about whether it is one or two marks, it is about the grade and
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what you will have fewer feature. lewis tweeted, "examineners do make mistakes." another viewer says, "on my brother‘s a—level exam, the examener missed out a 16 mark question. it took four weeks for the remark to come back meaning he lost his place at bristol university." another viewer said i had an a and it was markeds a b. i‘m sure it was meant to be a b. public schools do remarks on block because they can afford it. joshua says, "teachers are paid to mark papers and they should mark them correctly and accurately. results day is stressful enough." you are nodding. i'm sure the marking does differ, but i have had cases reported to me and my own
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personal experience was a 21 mark difference. luckily, it wasn‘t going to affect my place at university, but if we‘re going to continue to be classified as students in a system that‘s going to grade us from e to a star whatever body is responsible of giving us the marks needs to be held toa giving us the marks needs to be held to a higher standard because 21 marks to me, didn‘t make a difference. to my friend, 40 marks made a difference. other people reporting all over the country with these massive grade differences, two or three marks, four or five these massive grade differences, two or three marks, four orfive marks, i‘m sure we can understand and forgive when it comes back and you say oh, actually you did deserve the a, it was a higher a, say oh, actually you did deserve the a, it was a highera, but say oh, actually you did deserve the a, it was a higher a, but you still deserved the a, it impacts notjust people going to university, but people going to university, but people applying for apprentice shis and it is going to atected them for the rest of their lives. is the problem been that too many private schools have been going for the remark and if you look at the
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remarks, if you are within a boundary often those marks go up? so it means that people who can afford it, benefit by getting a second bite of the cherry if you likes?” it, benefit by getting a second bite of the cherry if you likes? i refute the idea that lots of schools who can the idea that lots of schools who ca n afford the idea that lots of schools who can afford it put in block remarks. they can‘t do that because they have to have the agreement of the individual candidates in any case and there are more strenuous tests for remarks. the issue is a financial one. in what other public service does it cost you to complain about something? i can‘t think of any. a brief response. it is important that teachers and students appreciate that if a grade changes through the remarking process they will not be charged. so, if they are certain there is a mistake, i would enkunlg them to go for a review of marking. they still have to pay upfront. where else and in what other public service do you have to pay upfront before you can even
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complain? this morning we‘ve been remembering the battle of passchendaele — one of the deadliest battles of the first world war. it began on this day 100 years ago and raged for three months on the western front in belgium. half a million soldiers lost their lives, but the gains were small. it moved the british front—line forward just five miles. it was trench warfare at its most brutal. in the next half an hour a commemorative service is being held in belgium, which the prime minister and the duke and dutchess of cambridge will attend. we can talk to lydia lobb whose great—grandfather john butcher fought in the battle. now, your great—grandfather was australian. he fought for the allied forces. did he ever talk much to you about passchendaele? well, he passed away in 1977 and i was born in the 80s so i didn‘t meet him. what i have heard, so he kept this detailed
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wardiary in the have heard, so he kept this detailed war diary in the form of three pocket books actually that was written in pencil and when he got back he wrote over it in pen and thenit back he wrote over it in pen and then it was later transcribed by his son. but what i‘ve heard is that my old est son. but what i‘ve heard is that my oldest auntie on my mum‘s side asked him when she was little, grandpa what the war like and he said, "love, you don‘t want to know." what the war like and he said, "love, you don't want to know." did he ever open up? i heard so many really harrowing tales of people who have almost taken it to the grave. they haven‘t wanted to impart the true horror on their loved ones and others who have been able to open up and they have almost felt a sense of relief? well, i guess, keeping this diary, i guess, relief? well, i guess, keeping this diary, iguess, must relief? well, i guess, keeping this diary, i guess, must have been somewhat car that is rightic. they weren‘t allowed to go into much detail in case it fell into the wrong hands, but through this diary we are lucky enough to get that first hand insight into just what it must have been like from, you know,
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a really top line point of view. and iam aware a really top line point of view. and i am aware that the family knew these diaries existed. i think that they had probably read some of it. so whilst maybe he didn‘t want to talk about it, you know, day—to—day, understandably, from what i‘ve heard, luckily for my family, it didn‘t change his character. he was a lovely gentle man through right until the end, but you hear so many stories of, you know, soldiers who come back hose characters were really badly affected so luckily for my family that didn‘t seem to be the case. you talk about his diary. i know it is on display in australia? that‘s right. know it is on display in australia? that's right. you have got ex-hearts that you have got with you? that's right. so he was actually in the war forjust over right. so he was actually in the war for just over two years. right. so he was actually in the war forjust over two years. and he was injured three times. during the
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battles. both of those times he was sent back to the uk to recover and sent back to the uk to recover and sent back to the uk to recover and sent back to the front. the third time he was injured severely at the battle of passchendaele and sent back to the uk and was discharged and went home, but i have a couple of exerts. the first is during the battle where he says this is 12th july 1916. "hope that rob will never be in the same tonight that i was." rob was his younger brother whose birthday actually fell on 12th july. colonel feathers tells us that we will soon be in it. for king and country, not so nice as it sounds. looks well on books and paper, honour rolls, should but should be tried first." prior to him being injured for the first time on 27th july. he says, "slept in shell hole. country ruined with shell holes. german dug—outs very deep and well made. dead bodies and piecing lying about. artillery around us, 18
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pounders. tommies, australians and germans lying dead all along the road. shall consider myself lucky if i get through." he talks the next few entries, it goes on in this fashion. that was one of the most detailed entries in fact, but then he says on 1st august. "had a good brea kfast he says on 1st august. "had a good breakfast and also some rum. on fatigue again at night, but got hit ona fatigue again at night, but got hit on a lay up, crawled into a station and waited for stretcher bearers." the second time he was injured was during a battle and on 1st august, he had gone back to the uk and was just about to be sent back to the front and says, "warned for draft proceed overseas, it is raining like the devil. read of another big battle on the western front. that‘s the battle of passchendaele. on 21st
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september, he says, "took over line from seventh brigade. wounded about midnight." then there were no real entries because after that apart from when he then made it to england, there were no proper entries because he suffered a head wound and he was on the on site hospital until then and was sent back to australia and suffered some level of paralysis for the rest of his life. lydia, it is really moving to hear some of what he has written and get some kind of sense of the horrors he went through. thank you for sharing that with us. many poems have been written to try and put into words the horrors of passchendale. one of the most famous is by the world war one poet siegfried sassoon. here to recite his work memorial tablet, written in 1918, is the poet gary dexter. why is it that war poetry resonates
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for us 100 years on? well, i think that people turn to poetry in times of loss and in times of bereavement, that‘s one reason. another reason is that‘s one reason. another reason is that the world war i poets were a unique generation. a certain historical circumstances came combined, i think, historical circumstances came combined, ithink, to historical circumstances came combined, i think, to create this remarkable rendgation. sassoon and thomas and it was the birth of modernism to a certain extent in poetry. so we still remember poems from the first world war where we wouldn‘t necessarily from the second orfrom subsequent wouldn‘t necessarily from the second or from subsequent wars. can you read it for us certainly. memorial tablet. squire nagged and bullied till i went to fight, under lord derby‘s scheme.
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i died in hell. they called it passchendaele. my wound was slight, and i was hobbling back and then a shell burst slick upon the duck—boards so i fell into the bottomless mud, and lost the light. at sermon—time, while squire is in his pew, he gives my gilded name a thoughtful stare. for, though low down upon the list, i‘m there. in proud and glorious memory. that‘s my due. two bleeding years i fought in france for squire. i suffered anguish that he‘s never guessed. once i came home on leave and then went west. what greater glory could a man desire?
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thank you so much for sharing that with us. explain briefly what‘s behind that and what we‘re trying to convey? yes. well, it makes reference to squire. so, in the period before conscription this would be about 1915, the parish squire, the county squire would be in charge of recruiting men between the age of 14 and 21, they were often badgered and brow beaten to go to war. later on, lord derby‘s scheme which was a reference in the poem was introduced in which men would be visited in their homes and encouraged to go and fight and then... forgive me forjumping in because we need to go over to bbc newsroom live which is coming up. i wa nt to newsroom live which is coming up. i want to thank you for your company today. thank you for watching and we will be back again tomorrow at the
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same time. a brand—new week. it‘s the same old weather story, that of sunshine and showers and the showers already getting going this morning. across parts of scotland we had a more persistent spell of rain earlier. that‘s starting to ease. some showers for scotland and northern ireland. if you catch the showers they are likely to be heavy. the showers not as frequent across wales and england as they were yesterday. more in the way of sunshine especially the further south and the east that you go, but nowhere immune from a shower. in the best of the sunshine, 22 or 23 celsius. now through this evening, some heavy and thundery showers for northern ireland and scotland. they will fade. much of the night becomes dry
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and clear spells a few coastal showers. lows ten ten and 14 celsius. for many, we get off to a dry, bright start with sunshine tomorrow, but showers never too far away and yet again they could be heavy and thundery, pushing eastwards during the day, but the further south and east you are, it should be dry and here, feeling warm in the sunshine. highs of 22 or 23 celsius. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11: the government announce plans to recruit thousands more mental health workers in england over the next four years. we are confident we can get these numbers, as there are people trained
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in mental health nurses and psychiatrists who are not currently working in the nhs and have a programme to attract them back. 100 yea rs on programme to attract them back. 100 years on from passchendaele. ceremonies are held. prince charles and the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend a ceremony here at tyne cot cemetery, where 12,000 servicemen are buried, many who fell during the battle passchendaele.
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