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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 31, 2017 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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this was the view in kent from a weather watcher, patchy cloud in the distance. but this was the lovely double rain will captured in wales and you need rain to have a rain will. and we have showers and some sunshine. midweek, wetter weather spreading across the country. then it turns breezy as we return to sunshine and showers. low pressure to the north west of the uk. that is driving the weather. the closer you are 2% of the low pressure, that is where the showers will be at their heaviest, so wettest in scotland, northern ireland, some thunder and few showers in the south east. largely dry here. further north and west, ru m bles largely dry here. further north and west, rumbles of thunder and hale mixed in with showers, but further spells of sunshine and temperatures in the upper teens. similar in northern england. sunny spells, heavy showers. across wales and the scattered showers, like flea
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falling. few showers across the east and £5” "’"’ east ’” ’ " ttt’ and £7” r” east 53‘s. the w” 5:5 of f‘éésié‘lz: : a ’ jf , , te'zerze'atures. in. the late 9535 992 3 ~ ~ —~ — . — te'zerze'atures. in. the late 9535 945th. 3 ~ ~ —~ — . — of te'ztrte'3tt1re5 ih the tee; 9q5 tlt'ith 3 ~ ~ —~ — . — ofi breeze. - a te'ztrte'3tt1re5 ih the tee; 9q5 555th 3 ~ ~ —~ — . — ofi breeze. - a dry through the evening, afternoon. through the evening, showers around in the north and west, some heavy. but they fade away for many central and eastern areas. it will turn chilly in rural areas by the end of the night. major towns and cities around ten, 14 degrees. dipping into single figures in rural areas. a chilly start for some but a bright spot ——. for many. across the north and west, showers around and a chance of hale and thunder and a higher chance of showers in the south east. the far south east should stay dry with showers in london. 22, 20 three degrees.
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tuesday night and wednesday, into the atlantic, we have this weather system. this brings a breeze. you can see the isobars. and it will bring some rain. 0n can see the isobars. and it will bring some rain. on wednesday, the rain is on the south—west of england, wales and northern ireland, making steady progress north and east. the north east staying dry is to longest. the rain mostly out of the way on thursday and back into breezy conditions with a mixture of sunny spells and scattered showers, and temperatures similar to what they are at the moment. let's rejoin sophie in tyne cot cemetery. among the people present there today were former england
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by there today were former england rugby player lewis moody. you discovered that one of your a ncestors discovered that one of your ancestors fought and died here. discovered that one of your ancestors fought and died herelj was doing some work with the england by was doing some work with the england rugby union about the rugby players that have died. i was told by my mother that one of our relatives was buried here. iwas mother that one of our relatives was buried here. i was stood here when she told me. i had never heard his name mentioned before. i was able to go and find his name on the memorial at the back which is among the unknowns. it takes you by surprise emotionally when you come and see this place. it was your great great uncle. he fought at the battle of the somme and survived the whole battle of passchendaele almost. he went through all those battles. he got here and died on the 6th of
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novemberfour got here and died on the 6th of november four days before the battle finished. during the course of the war he also lost two brothers sidney and albert. 0ne war he also lost two brothers sidney and albert. one in the battlefield and albert. one in the battlefield and one on the ship on the way to malta. to come and pay respects was something i thought i had to do. 100 yea rs something i thought i had to do. 100 years doesn't feel that long ago when you can see the names and connected. what was it like at the ceremony today? it was incredibly peaceful. the sadness and sorrow creeps up on you without being prepared for it. all of a sudden, you are restraining tears. you weather stories from the various people, about the canadian infantrymen people, about the canadian infa ntrymen and the people, about the canadian infantrymen and the brutality that they had to go through. that they we re they had to go through. that they were all normal people from privates through to the lieutenant colonel
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and generals. they are all remembered with the same gravestone. so young. lewis moody thank you for joining us. in a moment, we will joining us. in a moment, we will join the news teams from where you are but first we will leave you with some moving images from the service to mark the centenary of the battle of passchendaele. can there be any more eloquent witnesses than this must rank of silent witnesses to the desolation of war? the latest from the bbc sports
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centre. its the final day of the third test — and england need to take six more south african wickets to win — and move to a 2—1 lead in the four match series — our correspondentjoe wilson is at the oval for us. just three more wickets. it all seems to be going england's way. just three more wickets. it all seems to be going england's waym does. and england came into this test match desperately seeking a nswe rs , test match desperately seeking answers, including three debutantes and one of them toby roland—jones, what a match he is having. south africa batted for 50 minutes without losing a wicket and then in came
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toby roland—jones. a very inspired review to get rid of bavuma. credit tojoe review to get rid of bavuma. credit to joe route. review to get rid of bavuma. credit tojoe route. the next one, not much doubt about that one. dean elgar has been resisting at the other end. in pain frequently especially with the ball at the bottom of his bat. he made 100. chris morris was with him until the very last all before lunch. a wicket for moeen ali. i think he'll bowl quite a lot after lunch as england tried to wrap up the last three wickets. we've seen some resistance from morne morkel. we know ra bada some resistance from morne morkel. we know rabada can bat. now, i think we are in the realms of when rather than if. my prediction was between five past three and quarter past three. i will stick to that. just a ten minute window! very precise. at a
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the re—introduction of safe—standing at premier league football grounds of safe—standing at premier league football grounds has come a step closer, after liverpool fans have voted overwhelmingly in favour of rail seating. grounds in the top two tiers of english football have been all—seater as a legacy of the hillsborough disaster in 1989 which left 96 liverpool fans dead. 0ur correspondent david 0rnstein joins me for more on this. what does this actually mean. the liverpool fans have voted and they say that safe standing is the way forward. does this mean we will see this across england 7 forward. does this mean we will see this across england? not necessarily but it could be a very influential day. calls have been coming for relaxation of the rules since so many people stand anyway and the real reasons of the hillsborough disaster came to us with an unlawful death ruling. we've got to this position where the likes of celtic held a successful trial last season. 0nly last month, the premier league as its clubs whether they would be interested in a pilot scheme.
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shrewsbury town have had an experiment with say standing. liverpool's biggest independent supporters group have voted in favour of safe standing. that could be very significant in terms of forming opinion and at some point the authorities going to the government to change legislation. we are not at that point just yet. it was back to training for some of the england squad today, starting to prepare for their semi—finals in the european championship. jodie taylor scored her fifth goal of the tournament as england beat france for the first time in 43 years. they play hosts the netherlands in the last four on thursday. they are good on the ball. they have shown that in this tournament. their wingers have been playing really well so that's something we've got to stop. there are places to exploit as well, especially with somebody likejodie up
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as well, especially with somebody like jodie up top as well, especially with somebody likejodie up top scoring goals. all oui’ likejodie up top scoring goals. all our strikers have scored in this tournament so it shows that they've got to be ready for hours. it will bea got to be ready for hours. it will be a different task for us but i'm sure we'll be ready. england play the netherlands and thursday. all the netherlands and thursday. all the support on the website. you can keep up—to—date with all the sports new including the third test at the 0val. more from me in the next hour. it was one of the most deadly battles of the first world war. half a million men on both sides of the conflict were killed, injured or listed as missing. the horror of the battle of passchaendale is hard to imagine — conditions were so appalling that many people drowned to death in mud. events have been underway to commemorate the 100th anniversary of this enormous loss of life. a short time ago prince charles and the prime minister theresa may were among those to pay tribute to those who died in the battle of passchendaele.
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100 years ago today, the third battle of ypres began. at ten to four in the morning, less than five miles from here, thousands of men, drawn from across britain, france and the commonwealth, attacked german lines. the battle we know today as passchendaele would last for over 100 days. we remember it not only for the rain that fell, the mud that weighed down the living and swallowed the dead, but also for the courage and bravery of the men who fought here. the advance was slow, and every inch was hard—fought. the land we stand upon was taken two months into the battle by the third australian division. it would change hands twice again before the end of the war. in 1922, my great—grandfather,
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king george vi came here as part of a pilgrimage to honour all those who died in the first world war. —— king george v. whilst visiting tyne cot, he stood before the pillbox that this cross of sacrifice has been built upon, a former german stronghold that had dominated the ridge. 0nce taken by the allies, the pillbox became a forward aid post to treat the wounded. those who could not be saved were buried by their brothers in arms in makeshift graves. these became the headstones that are before us today. all these were honoured in their
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generation and where the glory of their times. some were they which have their own memorial who perished as though they had never been and are become as though they had never been born and their children after them. but these were merciful men whose righteousness hath not been forgotten. with their seed shall continually remain a good inheritance and their children are within the covenant. their seed
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standard fast and their children for their sakes. their seed shall remain for ever and their sakes. their seed shall remain for everand their their sakes. their seed shall remain for ever and their glory shall not be blotted out. their bodies are buried in peace. but their name lives forever during the remembrance ceremony, members of the military and descendants read out letters
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and diaries from soldiers who fought at passchendaele. around 4, 000 relatives are attending the service at the tyne cot cemetery near ypres. my my great great—grandfather rifleman sta nley my great great—grandfather rifleman stanley durra nt of my great great—grandfather rifleman stanley durrant of the king's royal rifle corps, killed in action on the 24th of august 1917. his son mike great—grandfather was only three yea rs great—grandfather was only three years old. my great great uncle, private walter stevenson fourth italian grenadier guards, a coal minerand amateur italian grenadier guards, a coal miner and amateur footballer, killed in actionjuly 291916,
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miner and amateur footballer, killed in action july 291916, aged 20. private rfid griffith of the kings shropshire light infantry killed in action on the 26th september 19 17. his younger brother of those killed three months later. private james munro won south african infantry regiment, killed in
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action on the 20th of september 19 17. his commanding officer wrote home, your son was a general favourite and we shall all miss his cheerful personality. private edward michael batten, 13th platoon the company, 45th battalion australian imperial force. a crazier from new south wales. my my great uncle sergeantjohn kerwin, the duke of wellington ‘s west riding regiment. throughout my childhood i was intrigued by his portrait which hung in my grandparents home in durham. killed in action 10th of october 1917 grandparents home in durham. killed in action 10th of 0ctober1917 aged 22. the commemorations there at tyne
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cot ce m ete ry 22. the commemorations there at tyne cot cemetery in belgium. a little bit of breaking news to bring you. news you will know in the centre of glasgow. a power cut is affecting large parts of glasgow city centre and buchanan gallery shopping centre is evacuated. we will bring you news of why that has happened as soon is we know. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first — the headlines on bbc news: 100 years on from passchendaele — ceremonies are held to mark one of the bloodiest battles of the first world war. the government announces plans to recruit thousands more mental health workers in england over the next four years. the editor of the sunday times has apologised for an article suggesting the bbc presenters claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz earned high salaries because they were jewish. i'm egon cossou — in the business news. profits at hsbc have gone up by 5%
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in the first six months of the year. it's also buying back some of its shares. we'll have more on this injust a moment. fees for going over your overdraft limit could soon be a thing of the past. the financial conduct authority says these charges are too high and too complicated. it's thinking about a fundamental shakeup. the chancellor, philip hammond says he won't try to undercut rival eu countries by slashing taxes after brexit. this is being seen as a softer tone from him. injanuary he said the uk would do whatever it takes to stay competitive after brexit. back to news about hsbc. it made pre—tax profits of more than 5 billion dollars in the second quarter of the year — that's more than analysts were expecting. it's also spending 2 billion dollars on buying back its own shares. this could push up the value
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of the company by effectively restricting how many of its shares are on the market. the company's already had a good year, with its share price almost doubling in the last 12 months. analyst ken 0deluga says the share buy back is an important move. this is a third large buy—back over the last 18 months. for a bank, largely, particularly in the post—crisis world, if you've got a very strong capital position, if you've managed to put aside a great deal more cash than your rivals your shareholders are clamouring for you to return some of that cash for them, because we've had many lean yea rs them, because we've had many lean years where institutional shareholders, those stable, few of them have sold wholesale. it's a way to reward shareholders but it has another purpose. you mentioned the share rise over the last year. in
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real terms, your shares will rise if you remove some stocks from availability to buy. inflation has been rising this year, and it's having an impact on builders. the federation of master builders says higher costs for things like plasterboard, bricks and timber are squeezing margins and making life tough for a third of small building firms. sarah mcmonagle, from the federation of master buildersjoins me now. thanks very much. what are the materials that are really going up for builders in terms of cost? we asked our members at the beginning of this year if they had it experienced material price increases since the brexit referendum and many of them said that they had. the research released today looks at the issues in more detail. we ask them which products have increased the most in price since the referendum last year and timber tops the list
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followed by insulation, then bricks and blocks. anecdotally, we're hearing that price increases are right across—the—boa rd. hearing that price increases are right across-the-board. what impact is this having an building firms? the third of firms have reported squeezing in margins. 0ne the third of firms have reported squeezing in margins. one in ten builders is telling is that they've made losses on projects and that's really bad for growth in the construction sector. a quarter of building firms have told us that they've had to pass on price increases to consumers which may dampen demand in the sector. what can companies do to whether this particular storm? is there anything they can do? some builders are advising clients to choose alternative materials, once more likely to be made in the uk because they tend to be less affected by the depreciation in sterling that we've
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seen since last year. really, they are squeezed right across—the—board, also with wages and salary. there is also with wages and salary. there is a construction skills shortage so a typical bricklayer in london is now earning £60,000 per year. that's tough on employers who are having to cope with these price increases. tough on employers who are having to cope with these price increasesm is now the time to have a word with your builder? we are seeing lots of people. our advice would not be good and the rogue trader route to save money. commission a more modest project with a professional builder than a more ambitious project with a rogue trader who might charge less and be tempting to work with but it would be a sorry ending in most
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situations. sarah, thanks very much. eu countries have until today to submit their bids to host the european medicines agency and the european banking authority. both these bodies are currently based in london. but they're leaving because of brexit. there's been a fall in the number of mortgages being approved. more than 611,600 home loans got the go ahead last month — the lowest figure since september. apple has axed 60 virtual private networks from its app store in china. vpns allow users to hide their internet addresses and access blocked material. apple says the banned networks didn't comply with government regulations. good weather in europe has boosted sales for heineken. they were up by more than 4 per cent in the second quarter of the year. but the company has struck a sobering note — it's warning of volatile trading conditions ahead. let's have a look at the markets. a
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lot of green there. hsbc has been making healthy gains after it announced bigger than expected profits. water companies also doing well — with severn trent rising by more than 3% and similar gains for united utilities. the pound is holding steady against the euro and the dollar. that's all the business news. hiv testing should be offered to patients when they register with a new gp in areas where there are high rates of infection, according to new research. more than 13,000 people are unaware that they have the condition. researchers from two london universities say screening is affordable and could save lives. 0ur health correspondent, jane dreaper, reports. a simple finger prick test — that is all that is needed now to find out whether you have hiv. gps‘ surgeries in some parts of london are making this test more routine. this study says those efforts should be much more widespread. the researchers looked at surgeries where new patients are offered a hiv test when they register.
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this led to a much higher rate of diagnosing the virus. each test costs around £25. the authors say the benefits mean more screening is affordable. many patients are undiagnosed. that means they carry the virus without actually knowing it. so having an hiv test at your surgery will allow you to have access to excellent treatment, but then also prevent people — prevent you from passing on the virus to someone else. routine testing has previously been recommended by public health england for cities with high hiv rates. but investment in testing has fallen in some areas because of financial pressures on local authorities‘ public health budgets. the charity terrence higgins trust called on healthcare commissioners to act on these latest findings. jane dreaper, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. it may well be a new
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week but the weather remains the same with some fairly unsettled conditions but not for all. on the other side of the country, a lot more cloud around. to get a double rainbow, you need rain so it is a mixed bag this afternoon. sunshine and showers today, similar tomorrow. midweek, more persistent rainfall areas and by the end of the week back to sunshine and showers. low pressure is in charge of our weather at the moment. the closer you are too that is where the showers are more likely to be. here is the radar sequence from earlier today. most of the showers in the north and west and there have been a few heavy ones already. a little bit of hail mixed in with some of the showers. 17 or 18 degrees at the very best. northern england is a mixed bag of
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heavy showers and sunny spells. towards the south—west, some sunny spells with a shower or two moving across on the breeze. the south—east, many places try and bright and breezy with patchy cloud. it looks pretty good through the afternoon at the oval. the cloud may break to allow some sunshine through. presently warm with sunshine in the low 20s. there may bea sunshine in the low 20s. there may be a few rumbles of thunder around later. the showers coming few and further in between. for the major towns and cities, temperatures around 1a degrees but in more remote spots dropping down further. some showers across east anglia and the southeast but sussex and kent will get away with a mostly dry day.
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temperatures similar to today. tuesday evening, this front is heading our way. it is going to turn quite breezy. cloud and rain struggles in from the atlantic. fairly wet and windy towards the south—west of the uk. that rain moving steadily northwards and eastwards. you will see the regulator on. on thursday, the rain clearing away towards the north. it's a bright and breezy day and we are back where we started with some sunshine and showers. that's the weather for now. this is bbc news.
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the headlines at 2pm... remembering the fallen — 100 years after the start of the world war one battle of passchendaele, commemorations are taking place in belgium. members of the royal family and the prime minister visited for a special service to remember those who served and died here in one of the bloodiest battles ever fought. the battle we know today as passchendaele would last for over 100 days, we remember it not only for the rain that fell, the mud that weighed down the living and swallowed the dead, but also for the courage and bravery of the men who fought here. 4000 guests have been invited to attend — among them descendants of those who fought and died — here today to honour their sacrifice.
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