Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 1, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. ‘you're fired' — more upheaval at the white house, as yet another senior official is sacked. outspoken communications chief anthony scaramucci gets the axe, just 11 days after being appointed, after a foul—mouthed rant to reporters. good morning, it is tuesday one august. also this morning: tackling terror online. the home secretary tells the world's biggest internet companies they must do more to fight the spread of extremism. we are asking them to work harder on this, to put more effort, more resources into it, and to work together to deliver it. a new approach to speed up surgery for pancreatic cancer raises hopes of improving poor survival rates.
6:01 am
good morning. car hire customers are being driven mad by problems with vehicle damage and excess insurance. complaints are on the rise. i will be taking a look at why. in sport: it is as easy one, two, three for england's cricketers. moeen ali takes a hat—trick to win the third test against south africa at the oval. england now lead the series 2—1 going into the final test in manchester. and carol has popped outside to bring us the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london, where we have got some blue sky. the forecast, though, for today, is for some showers, some of them heavy and slow—moving but in between there could be sunshine. it could stay dry in the south—east. i will have more in15 in the south—east. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: the white house communications director, anthony scaramucci, has been fired less than two weeks after his appointment, in the latest high—profile departure from donald trump's top team.
6:02 am
his sacking was the first decision to be taken by new chief of staff, generaljohn kelly, and it is seen as an attempt to bring stability to mr. trump's presidency. suzanne kianpour reports. tonight, breaking news: forced out afterjust 11 days at the white house... game of thrones, house of cards — pick your drama. washington thrown into a frenzy after the newly minted communications director is sacked. anthony scaramucci took to the podium ten days ago for the first and last time. he came in guns blazing, promising to flip the script and shake up the white house. and he did. although his eye was on getting rid of then—chief of staff reince priebus, it was sean spicer who was the first to go, resigning in protest at the man called ‘mooch.’ but then a bit of foreshadowing.
6:03 am
you know, one of the things i can't stand about this town is the backstabbing. where i grew up, in the neighbourhood i grow up, we were frontstabbers. the self—proclaimed outsider took it too far, launching into a tirade of obscenities to a journalist, accidentally on the record, forgetting the rules of reporting. scaramucci seemed to have won when reince priebus resigned. but a new—new sheriff was in town, generaljohn kelly, the secretary of homeland security. his request was that scaramucci had to go. kelly's wish, the president's command. after the swearing—in ceremony, the mooch was escorted off the premises. donald trump has been in office for nearly six months, but his presidency has been plagued by chaos and controversy. from multiple investigations into his campaign's connections with russia, to constant staffing
6:04 am
shake—ups at the white house. but, with a four—star general at the helm, the administration is hoping that it will be smoother sailing going forward. suzanne kianpour, for bbc news. internet giants such as google, facebook, twitter and microsoft have been told they must do more to tackle online extremism. following a meeting with the companies, the home secretary, amber rudd, said they needed to invest more and work together in order to stop the spread of terror—related material. but there are worries the privacy of ordinary users could be compromised. our north america technology reporter dave lee reports. terror on the streets of the uk. organised, police say, with the help of social media. so companies here in silicon valley are being told they must do more to prevent the spread of extremist content online. what i need them to acknowledge is that the enemy, who is really trying to move swiftly online, to radicalise people in their own homes, are really stepping their game up, and we need our response stepped up as well. and there is
6:05 am
also concerned the new measures might meana also concerned the new measures might mean a loss of privacy for all of us. it is not possible to say we are going to monitor all communications on our platforms, but still preserve users' privacy. we might attempt to minimise the impact on users' by the sea, but you are certainly going to be... it is not going to be as private as it was before. they have to face up, people who might oppose this, to what our enemy is trying to do. they are trying to weaponise people at home. vulnerable people, trying to turn them into terrorists. and what happens is, when this material goes online, it is circulated really fast. another worry, as security experts will tell you, is that terrorists could simply move to harder to reach parts of the internet. patients with pancreatic cancer are being operated on injust two weeks, instead of two months, after being diagnosed. research published in the medical journal hpb says early surgery increases patients' chances of having their tumours removed by 22%. doctors in birmingham hope their approach will be adopted nationally. michele paduano reports.
6:06 am
kate rigby was amazed at how smoothly the nhs worked when she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. within seven days, she had had surgery at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. i feel quite emotional, actually. i feel privileged. i could have died. i can't control nhs budget, and all the other things for the poor people who aren't as lucky as me. but i can spread the word. normally, people with jaundice like mrs rigby have a stent put in to relieve symptoms, which delays the main operation. but the hospital bypassed this step. a nurse was employed to speed up treatment from two months to 16 days, meaning a fifth more patients were able to have their cancer removed. cutting out the step also said the nhs £3,200 per patient. we save the nhs potentially £200,000
6:07 am
per year, with the number of patients that have surgery in ourteam. and so that, then, is a reproducible model, that other units up and down the country could use to go forward. pancreatic cancer has a very low survival rate. it will be two years before doctors can say whether treating patients more quickly actually means that they live longer. and, if they do, that will beg the question as to whether or not other aggressive cancers should be treated more quickly. for now, kate rigby knows that she has been given the best chance possible to survive pancreatic cancer. michele paduano, bbc news. from today, babies born in england, wales and northern ireland are to be offered a new vaccine which protects against hepatitis b. the hexavalent vaccine will also immunise against five other diseases including polio, tetanus and whooping cough. health protection scotland is set to adopt a similar policy from september. public health england says the new vaccine has been extensively tested. prison staff have regained control at a jail in hertfordshire,
6:08 am
after reports of a riot breaking out across two wings. police armed with riot gear were sent to mount prison, near hemel hempstead. the ministry ofjustice says order has been restored without any injuries. keith doyle reports. prison staff, known as the tornado squad, trained to deal with disturbances, entered hmp the mount prison yesterday morning. they could be seen carrying shields and batons. two wings of the prison were said to be no longer in control of guards. from outside the walls of the prison, shouting could be heard, along with what sounded like stun grenades. late last night, the ministry ofjustice said the trouble had ended, and no staff or prisoners we re had ended, and no staff or prisoners were injured. a report by the
6:09 am
prison‘s independent monitoring board, released yesterday morning, warned staff shortages were adding to problems and mounting violence in the jail. while the prison officers' association said staff shortages we re association said staff shortages were a neck and epidemic, partly due to poor salaries —— were an academic. workers at the bank of england will today hold their first strike in more than 50 years, as part of a campaign for higher wages. members of the unite union will walk out for three days, after talks at the conciliation service, acas, broke up without agreement. unite wants the bank to scrap its 1% cap on pay rises, arguing that a third of staff will get no increase this year. the bank says essential business will continue as normal during the industrial action. pupils should be taught about the importance of breast—feeding in schools, according to the professional body which represents paediatricians. the royal college of paediatrics and child health is also calling on ministers to legislate for breast—feeding breaks and facilities in all workplaces. the college says britain has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe, blaming social stigma for the trend. more needs to be done to stop women
6:10 am
being forced to wear high heels at work, according to scientists at the university of aberdeen. academics looked at the physical and social impact of wearing the shoes, and say there is enough evidence to suggest they are bad for the health of wearers. earlier this year, the government rejected calls for a ban on enforced high—heel wear. the saying goes that a dog is a man's best friend, so when petey the pooch‘s owner became stuck in his car during a flash—flood, there was no way he was going to leave his pet in danger. the car was submerged after a dry creek bed was engulfed by a flash—flood in colorado. rescuers had to use a crane to get to the car, before petey was handed over by his owner, who then climbed out. the pair could then walk across the crane to safety and dry land. the love of a dog. all safe and
6:11 am
well. i assume the dog's name is not petey the pooch. should we doublecheck? why are you asking me? you just read it out. surely your script is right. but i think it is petey, ,, the pooch. script is right. but i think it is petey, , , the pooch. i script is right. but i think it is petey,,, the pooch. i cannot wait to tell you about a story we have coming up in a little while about barry the shetland pony. we have petey the pooch and barry the shetland pony. more on that in a moment. we will start with a great day for moeen ali, who was recently described as a batsman who can bowl a bit. not the biggest complement in the world, and they proved him wrong
6:12 am
yesterday. england's cricketers have gone 2—1 up in the test series against south africa, after a dramatic final day at the oval. with the hosts needing six wickets, toby roland—jones took two in two balls before lunch, while moeen ali went one better, his hat—trick sealing a 239—run victory. david rudisha, the world and olympic 800m champion, will miss this month's world athletics championships. rudisha won the world title in beijing two years ago, and broke the world record in london in 2012. and jose mourinho has made his third big summer signing at manchester united. nemanja matic, a player he signed for chelsea three years ago, has moved to old trafford for a fee of around £40 million. ronaldo has appeared in court in spain, facing allegations of tax evasion. he is accused of evading just over £30 million. he said he never had any intentions of evading paying his taxes. the deal is done for los angeles
6:13 am
to host the olympics in the summer of 2028. it means the games will be staged in paris in seven years' time. the two cities had been competing to host the event in 2024, but la has agreed to wait. the international olympics committee have welcomed the move, and have pledged {1.4 billion to la's organising committee. the olympic games are going back to hollywood. when is barry coming? barry is coming during the papers in a few minutes' time. first we must get the weather. there could be some thunderstorms around today. you are outside on the roof of new broadcasting house. that's right. it is lovely out here this morning, as well. it is not too cold, there is a gentle breeze. the sun is out, we have blue skies but the weather forecast for many is one of sunshine, but they will also be some heavy showers in there and as you rightly said, some of those will be
6:14 am
thundery with some hail mixed in. not all of us will see them. we take a look around the country at our charts and we have some showers already this morning. if we start at 9am in scotland we have some showers, some heavy, just north of the central belt at the moment. there are one or two across southern scotla nd there are one or two across southern scotland as well, but equally a lot of dry weather with temperatures at 9am around 13 degrees in edinburgh. for north—east england we have some heavy showers, of those merging. some quite large totals in the next six hours or so, north—east england off toa six hours or so, north—east england off to a drier and brighter start. as we move into east anglia, essex, kent, all the way down into the isle of wight, a bright start some sunny skies. that continues as we head towards dorset, gloucestershire, and into the south—east of england we are looking at one or two showers. but most of us starting on a dry note. for wales, you have more showers, some of them merging in the same way they are across north—west
6:15 am
england. so we could see some large rainfall totals and as we look across the irish sea into northern ireland, it is the west which will see some showers. ireland, it is the west which will see some showers. the east mostly dry and bright. as we go through the course of the day, you will find a lot of further showers will develop. some of them, as you rightly said, will be heavy and thundery with some hail. especially as we take a line from south wales towards the wash northwards. parts of the south—east could mist them all together and stay dry and in the sunshine it could feel quite pleasant. hiser to 23 here. as we head into the evening and overnight, many of the showers will die away. there will be a few left, but through the night we will see the cloud built across south—west england and south wales, and some showers arrive. and then later we will have some rain coming in. it will be a chilly night across the northern half of scotland in rural areas, with single figure temperatures, we are looking at. so tomorrow we start off on a dry note in central and eastern areas, with
6:16 am
some sunshine, but the cloud will encroach with some showers ahead of that band of rain, spreading out across the south coast, the south—west and wales. it will be heavy and persistent and will move north eastwards through the course of the day, the company by windy conditions across south—west, england, and south wales. overnight that clears away so by the time we get to thursday there will be a curl of rain coming in across northern and western scotland, and parts of northern england as well. away from that we are looking at a fair bit of dry weather and breezy conditions, and also some sunshine. temperatures again up to the low 20s at best. so, although there is some rain and also some showers in the forecast, there is also going to be affected of dry weather and some sunshine. but, as weather and some sunshine. but, as we head towards the end of the week we head towards the end of the week we are back into the showers, so changeable. at least it's lovely where you are, you don't want a shower today, do you? absolutely, not like this.
6:17 am
thanks, kate. let's look through some of the papers. sally is here. the front page of the guardian, a lot of interest, we will talk about this through the morning, you may have heard of anthony scaramucci and in the short time he was white house communications director it would be fairto communications director it would be fair to say he made quite a stir but he's gone already. i don't even think he officially had his job. nine orten think he officially had his job. nine or ten days he has been addressing the press, now he's gone and question marks over what's going on with the trump administration and we will talk about that more later. that's on the front page of the daily telegraph as well. its lead story is statins are needlessly being doled out to millions, it's due to people's age, the royal couege due to people's age, the royal college of gps has called. the couege college of gps has called. the college has called to an end of the blanket doling out of statins. the
6:18 am
trump story on the front page of the times. passengers enjoying waits of up times. passengers enjoying waits of up to four hours on arrival at european airports —— injuring. sean, you have a story that ties into some of the trauma 7 you have a story that ties into some of the trauma? we talked about it a few weeks ago. on the front page of the papers yesterday as well we saw it. car hire. generally it's been making headlines lately. the daily mail is continuing their investigation by saying car hire sharks have been caught red—handed. a few issues people might be familiar with, paying the excess waiver at the desk. you arrive and they say you can't take the car until you have paid extra. they say you can't take the car untilyou have paid extra. you they say you can't take the car until you have paid extra. you don't have to do that but people feel pressured to do that a. fuel options as well, do you have to pay to leave it filled up or bring it back half empty? on this investigation the companies say they dealt with the individual issues. we will talk
6:19 am
about this more in half an hour so if anyone has had any issues then let us know. lot of headlines over the last few days. in the daily mail we have this story about rory mcilroy, this came out yesterday but it hasn't quite been confirmed that he is parting ways with his caddie of many years, jp fitzgerald, they have done a list of the highs and lows of rory and jp and it's only a couple of weeks ago at the open that he credited jp with having a word with him and saying remember who you are, you are rory mcilroy. if that is official today that will be interesting. there's been a lot of speculation about whether he would stay on the bag because rory hasn't been performing well. and who he would go for instead ? well. and who he would go for instead? may be someone from a different stable in terms of how they look at caddying. different stable in terms of how they look at caddyinglj different stable in terms of how they look at caddying. i promised you barry, barry the shetland pony. it's not a story about barry but it's about this young man here,
6:20 am
rocco dettori, i2, it's about this young man here, rocco dettori, 12, who raced yesterday at ascot on barry the shetland pony, he won, he is frankie's son, frankie said he didn't want him to be a jockey but this child is throwing such promise and determination, frankie dettori saying he only has to ride for four yea rs saying he only has to ride for four years and then they can race against each other —— showing. years and then they can race against each other —— showinglj years and then they can race against each other -- showing. i didn't know that they did shetland pony racing? you have seen the shetland pony grand national? we have read that script on the programme. i don't remember that at all. the shetland p°ny remember that at all. the shetland pony grand national. one of the highlights of my year. did mike busheu highlights of my year. did mike bushell compete in it? no, i don't thing he would be allowed. they don't have his size horse, it would be more like the shetland pony. he is scared with horses, he has had a few dodgy experiences with horses. the usain bolt documentary was on last night and as the excitement
6:21 am
builds, is he already here, is here in the uk? you reminded me of something i have in the guardian and here's a man who wants to spoil his party, he is hoping to race in the 100th is and he is saying, ujah, he is saying the world athletics championships won't be a retirement party for him, he wants to spoil his fun. does he have the numbers to back that up? nearly! apparently when usain bolt raced in monaco the last time they got all the athletes out half an hour before they needed to to whip up the crowd because he makes the atmosphere change in a stadium. it will be his last appearance in london as well! thanks very much. from today's people studying to be in as is and midwives will no longer get bursaries. the promise comes at a time when applications for these
6:22 am
courses are falling. from today, some degrees will no longer receive nhs bursaries. instead, they will have to apply for student loans. breakfast‘s john maguire has discovered there is concern that the move will stop mature students from retraining. we get rid of that and you've now got what? these second year nursing stu d e nts got what? these second year nursing students are getting their first look at the a knack to marsh table using the latest technology to take a 3—d trip through a virtual human body. the degree course at the university of central lancashire is funded by nhs bursaries and grants, but as of today applicants wanting to study nursing, midwifery and other medical courses will need a student loan in line with other undergraduates. so would it have deterred these students?” undergraduates. so would it have deterred these students? i don't think it would have made a difference to myself because i really wa nted difference to myself because i really wanted to become a nurse and although the financial implications of not having a bursary would have
6:23 am
impacted on me quite heavily, but i could have managed and my desire to become a nurse has overridden those. but applications for these courses have fallen by around 20%. theories include doubts from european stu d e nts include doubts from european students about brexit. a birthrate decline in the number of 18 —year—olds as well as concerns about the change in financing. the universities, though, are determined to see the numbers recover and here there's cautious optimism. we have seen there's cautious optimism. we have seen a there's cautious optimism. we have seen a decline in the number of applications coming through, but they're good quality and so the key thing is that they convert into the numbers that we have. so i'm very positive at this moment in time that we will recruit to target. one of the main areas of concern is the impact on mature students. nursing and midwifery attract a much higher percentage of older applicants than
6:24 am
other degree courses and their life experience is seen as a vital part of the mix on a ward. sarah cordy says a loan instead of a bursary would have stopped her changing career to become a midwife. to saddle students with a huge amount of debt when they are only ever able to earn what the government dictates they can earn, it doesn't seem to make sense to me and had! it doesn't seem to make sense to me and had i been making this decision 110w and had i been making this decision now knowing that i would have to ta ke now knowing that i would have to take on the debt, i couldn't have done it, no. the government argues that the cap on student places had previously restricted numbers and that changing the funding will lead to an increase in around 10,000 applicants. but les green says he 110w applicants. but les green says he now can't afford to pursue his dream job. i'm 41 so i would be paying that... £30,000, i'll be paying back until i finish probably my... until i'm
6:25 am
burning my pension. i don't think i'd ever play that off, i'd play it until the rest of my career and beyond. all signs agree that the nhs is in dire need of more clinical staff but the debate centres on how to pay for them. john maguire, bbc news, lancashire. still to come this morning: once a blot on the landscape and under threat from demolition, we're in halifax looking at the remarkable transformation of the country's only surviving cloth hall. you saw the pictures of the fire and 110w you saw the pictures of the fire and now it's in great condition! more from their macro later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him in knightsbridge, thought to be acid. police say the 47—year—old was attacked in walton street at about 8:30pm yesterday evening.
6:26 am
officially, police say they don't know if the liquid is a corrosive substance. the victim is currently in hospital and no arrests have been made. the bank of england is facing its first strike in over 50 years after a breakdown in talks over pay. europe's largest trainer festival is taking place in east london and its attracting thousands of people of all ages, notjust there to buy their next pair but also to make money. some trainers quickly become collectors items and sell for hundreds of pounds. and it's one of the reasons for the festival's rapid success. just word of mouth, social media
6:27 am
helped massively and it grew from being 200 people to 500,000 people in less than ten years. yeah, it's crazy. technology is being used by an nhs trust to allow new mothers separated from their baby after birth to stay in touch, thereby reducing anxiety. the new video link helps connect mothers in the delivery suites at west hertfordshire hospitals to the neonatal unit. the trust also believes it improves bonding between mother and baby. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning on the roads, there's no access from kennington park road to kennington road northbound. that's for gas works but there's still access for bikes. and in camberwell, there are temporary traffic lights to be aware of on camberwell new road for water works. let's have a check on the weather with kate. good morning, a lovely bright start
6:28 am
this morning, a bit of patchy cloud but plenty of sunshine. dry as well and it's not until later that we see one 01’ and it's not until later that we see one or two and it's not until later that we see one 01’ two showers and it's not until later that we see one or two showers developing but in the meantime it's really quite a pleasa nt the meantime it's really quite a pleasant morning. a little bit of patchy cloud but lots of sun. high uv levels today. pollen count moderate. not until later this afternoon will we seek showers developing. may be to the west or north—west of london tracking east. the maximum 23 and it looks like it will stay dry to the south and south—east of london. overnight tonight those showers will fizzle out. a dry night, the wind is like as well. cloud perhaps starting to move in as we head to dawn but the minimum temperature in towns and cities between 14 and 16. that cloud tomorrow morning is the precursor to the rain. it arrives from the west so we the rain. it arrives from the west so we could have some quite heavy bursts of rain through wednesday, feeling cooler and staying quite breezy as we head through the rest of the week and things startling to
6:29 am
settle down towards the weekend. va nessa vanessa feltz is on the boc radio and on —— bbc radio london in the next hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it is 6:30am on tuesday! august. we will have the latest news and sport injust a moment, and coming up on breakfast today: there has been a big increase in complaints against hire car companies. we will tell you how to avoid the pitfalls of renting a vehicle before you hit the road. # i #iwas # i was busy thinking about boys... it is the music video that has racked up millions of views on youtube, challenging gender stereotypes. singer—songwriter—turned—director charli xcx will be on the sofa after 8:30am. anxiety and depression made author matt haig obsessed with time. he will tell us how his mental health has inspired him to write about a 400—year—old history teacher. all that still to come.
6:30 am
but now, a summary of this morning's main news. the white house communications director, anthony scaramucci, has been fired, less than two weeks after his appointment. in the latest high—profile departure from donald trump's top team, the new chief of staff, john kelly, asked mr scaramucci to step aside. the former banker made headlines when derogatory comments he made about general kelly's predecessor were made public. the president certainly felt that anthony's comments were inappropriate for a person in that position, and he didn't want to burden general kelly, also, with that line of succession. as i think we have made clear a few times over the course of the last couple of days to several of you individually, but general kelly has the full authority to operate in the white house, and all staff will report to him. and, in just over half an hour's time, we will discuss in more detail
6:31 am
the turbulence at the white house. that is at 7:10am. internet giants such as google, facebook, twitter and microsoft have been told they must do more to tackle online extremism. following a meeting with the companies, the home secretary, amber rudd, said they needed to invest more and work together in order to stop the spread of terror—related material. but there are worries the privacy of ordinary users could be compromised. patients with pancreatic cancer are being operated on injust two weeks, instead of two months, after being diagnosed. research published in the medical journal hpb says early surgery increases patients' chances of having their tumours removed by 22%. doctors in birmingham hope their approach will be adopted nationally. pupils should be taught about the importance of breast—feeding in schools, according to the professional body which represents paediatricians. the royal college of paediatrics and child health is also calling on ministers to legislate for breast—feeding breaks and facilities in all workplaces. the college says britain has
6:32 am
one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe, blaming social stigma for the trend. more needs to be done to stop women being forced to wear high heels at work, according to scientists at the university of aberdeen. academics looked at the physical and social impact of wearing the shoes, and say there is enough evidence to suggest they are bad for the health of wearers. earlier this year, the government rejected calls for a ban on enforced high—heel wear. california is famous for its surfers, but this week it is the dogs that are hoping to catch the waves. canines of all sizes and breeds have been entering the annual surf dog competition, which is now in its 12th year. they arejudged on how long they ride for, the height of the wave, and showmanship. it gets a little...ruff.
6:33 am
i was literally looking at it and i didn't quite get it. now i have rather spoil the moment, because the pictures have gone. that is the right face 2—ball, isn't it? it was there in the script. —— to pull.|j like the way you thought you would get away with not saying that gag. and a fantastic hat—trick from moeen ali. the gorgeous picture of him celebrating with his team—mates, and he has been up and down the order. where should they be putting him? he showed the sort of form yesterday which suggests he should be higher up which suggests he should be higher up the order all the time. he is a spin bowler, and his bowling yesterday was just incredible. trevor bayliss, the england coach,
6:34 am
called him a batter who bowls a bit. england's cricketers went 2—1 up in the test series against south africa yesterday, after an amazing final day at the oval. the tourists were trying to save a draw, but two wickets in two balls from debutant toby roland—jones ended those hopes. the only resistance came from dean elgar, who went on to make 136. but it was moeen ali who finished south africa off, winning the match in the perfect fashion, with a hat—trick. england victorious by 239 runs, a vast improvement upon their disastrous trent bridge performance, which saw the team come under intense criticism two weeks ago. you are going to be upset, because you don't want to hear it, but we all know that wasn't a good enough performance for an england team, and it would have been very easy to sulk and moan about it. the guys stepped up and moan about it. the guys stepped up and made sure they put in a really good performance here. and i think now it is all about trying to go on further than we have done this week, and make sure that we finish
6:35 am
the series strong in manchester. the deal is done for los angeles to host the 2028 olympic and paralympic games. la's bid team has reached an agreement with the international olympic committee, which is expected to be ratified by the los angeles city council later today. la had originally been bidding for the 2024 games, but that event is now set to take place in paris. the world athletics championships get under way at the weekend, but one of the star attractions on the track won't be there. david rudisha, the world and olympic 800m champion and world record holder, is out with a thigh injury. the kenyan won the world title in beijing two years ago, and broke the world record in london in 2012. meanwhile, the sport's governing body, the iaaf, says russia remains banned from international competition, because they haven't made sufficient progress in anti—doping. russia was barred from last year's olympics for state—sponsored doping. 19 russians will compete as independently at the world championships. we've seen progress, and yes, some of that —
6:36 am
on some occasions, some of that progress has been quicker than on other occasions. and it tended to speed up a little bit when there's been a focus normally around the major championships. so it's not that there isn't any progress, but the progress we want has to culminate in a meeting of those criteria, and it's clear that it's unambiguous. manchester united manager jose mourinho has made his third big signing of the summer. he has gone back to former club chelsea and signed nemanja matic, a player he signed for the blues three years ago. he has moved to old trafford for a fee of £35 million. that could rise to £40 million. cristiano ronaldo has appeared in court in spain, where he is facing allegation of tax evasion. the real madrid star is accused of evading just over £13 million. he has said he has never had any intentions to evade paying taxes. liverpool's biggest independent supporters group has voted
6:37 am
overwhelmingly in favour of the safe standing at premier league grounds. the premier league wrote to its 20 clubs last month to assess whether they would be interested in staging trials. it follows celtic‘s decision to introduce around 3,000 rail seats last season. the question of safe standing at stadiums has been on the agenda after lord justice taylor's inquiry into the 1989 hillsborough disaster, in which 96 liverpool fans were killed. four—time major champion rory mcilroy has split from long—term caddyjp fitzgerald. the pair have worked together for the past nine years, and for each of mcilroy‘s major successes. last month, mcilroy gave fitzgerald credit for geeing him up after a poor start to the open. mcilroy is expected to confirm the news tomorrow ahead of this week's world golf championship event in ohio. now, finally, being a football manager is a precarious occupation. if you don't get the results, more often than not,
6:38 am
you get fired. obviously most top managers get a big pay—off if they get sacked. but, if ever liverpool boss jurgen klopp falls on hard times, we reckon he could make a living as a sound engineer. he came to atletico madrid manager diego simeone's rescue in a press conference in munich, fixing his microphone. and, when it comes to audio, we thought klopp was just good at soundbites. what you can't see, everybody at home, is behind us when we are all plugged in, sometimes there is a sound man or woman who comes along and fiddles with a wire, and winds us and fiddles with a wire, and winds us up. and jurgen has thejob. and fiddles with a wire, and winds us up. and jurgen has the job.|j think we wind each other up. never! some of the biggest websites on the internet have been told they must play a bigger part in tackling online extremism. home secretary amber rudd is in san francisco to meet the bosses of online giants including google, microsoft and facebook. she says they need to do more to clamp down on those using the sites to share extreme material and radicalise vulnerable people.
6:39 am
our north america technology reporter dave lee joins us now. he has been taking a look at what exactly amber road wants these companies to do. taking a look at the technology which is behind all the technology which is behind all the websites, and how easily they can be accessed —— amber rudd. in terms of hacking, and what is easiest for hackers to access and what is easiest for us to access. in a few minutes we will speak to our technology correspondent to take us through what amber rudd is saying, to what are the real powerbrokers in silicon valley, in charge of those internet companies. donald trump has sacked his communications director, just days after appointing him. as you are
6:40 am
just hearing, the home secretary is in america challenging the likes of facebook my twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. let's talk to carol and find out what is happening with the weather. it seems as if there will be some storms kicking off in the skies. well, there will be some heavy showers. in morcombe there has been 12 millimetres of rainfall. if you are thinking is this ever going to stop? intensity should ease off in the next or so. wales seems heavy downpours, but here on the broadcasting house in london it is pleasant. we have a son, blue skies and it feels quite pleasant the warm as well. through the day to day, the forecast for us all is one of heavy showers and also some sunny spells. perhaps the exception to that will be in the south—east of england, where we may well stay dry. in between the showers there will be bright and sunny spells. taking a
6:41 am
look around the country at 9am, there is some rain particularly across scotland north of the central belt. but even southern scotland seeing some showers. in between, a lot of dry and bright weather. for north—west england we will have some heavy showers around as we go through the morning. some of us will have between ten and 20 millimetres of rainfall. but north—east england dry and bright. dry as we move southwards across the midlands, east anglia, down into essex and kent, through hampshire, dorset on the isle of wight, some sunny skies. south—west england seeing a few showers and then back into wales, where we have got more showers, and they are heavy ones. forming lines overnight. for northern ireland you have some showers as well. more especially in the north and the west. the east seeing something drier and brighter. as we go through the course of the day, where it is currently dry, we will see further showers develop. but as is the way with showers, not all of us will
6:42 am
catch one. some of us will stay dry, at times it will be cloudy and at times we will see some sunny skies. if we were to draw a line from south wales towards the wash and points north of that, you are prone to seeing some thunder and lightning and some hail. further south some showers but the south—east could stay dry and invite rhesus temperatures up to 23 will feel quite pleasant. as we go through the evening and overnight most of the showers will tend to fade. however, we will see cloud increase, and then some rain is coming in, accompanied by strengthening winds. temperatures generally tend to about 15 overnight temperatures in rural parts of scotla nd temperatures in rural parts of scotland will be lower. it will feel chilly for you. tomorrow we start off with a lot of dry weather, some sunny spells as well across central and eastern parts of the uk. but the rain already across the south—west is going to spread. the rain will be heavy and persistent across the
6:43 am
southern parts of wales, south—west england and southern counties and will advance north eastwards through the course of the day. always with cloud building ahead of it and a few showers. windy across the south—western parts of wales, with coastal hail. it clears overnight and we are looking at some sunny skies as we head on into thursday. but still, across western and northern areas, we are not going to be immune to some showers. and then, as we head into the latter part of the week, again we continue with sunshine and showers. something drier in the south on saturday and drier in the south on saturday and drierfor many drier in the south on saturday and drier for many of us on sunday. thank you very much. getting a bit windy up on that route. a bit blustery. we started talking yesterday about holiday car rentals. you get to the airport and they ask for extra money, and then they say afterwards there is some damage. it isa afterwards there is some damage. it is a bit ofa afterwards there is some damage. it is a bit of a pickle, isn't it? and if it doesn't go smoothly, you are just about to go on your holiday and it can feel like the worst thing that can happen. car companies have come under a bit of pressure lately. they have been grabbing some
6:44 am
headlines in the last few days and weeks. europcar may have to pay out £30 million for overcharging on car repairs. today we can see that complaints from customers are on the rise. if you are not able to sort it out with the car companies and their complaint service you can go to the european consumer centre. in the last year they had seen almost 30% increase in the number of complaints they are getting on this. since last summer they are getting on this. since last summer they have had to deal with about 600 odd complaints about car hire. they have told us it is one of the biggest issues they have had to deal with and the commonest complaints, which some people might be familiar with, were about being charged for damage the driver had not done and being misled over excess insurance. that is the protection you can get encased the car gets damaged, and being overcharged for fuel. so car gets damaged, and being overcharged forfuel. so how car gets damaged, and being overcharged for fuel. so how can you avoid these sorts of problems, when you are going away for a nice holiday? martyn james is a consumer expert from resolver, which helps people with complaints against big companies.
6:45 am
is against big companies. this an area that's growing‘ is is this an area that's growing?m is and it's an area that gets under people's skin, asking around and speaking to people about this, there are so many speaking to people about this, there are so many people who are upset or who have been stitched up by car hire charges and full disclosure, this happen to me and my partner ten yea rs this happen to me and my partner ten years ago but we ended up paying £500 excess for a tiny scratch on a bumper. it makes sense to keep an eye out for some of the common ways they can squeeze more cash out of you. laura has got in touch saying she hired a van for a couple of hours and ended up with a prank when she was taking it back but they insisted they take £1000 of her credit card for repairs and she wasn't given any option but to pay up, she was totally unaware about how much the van cost to fix. this is becoming an issue, europcar having to deal with that, what can you do to make sure you don't end up ina you do to make sure you don't end up in a pickle you don't want to be in?
6:46 am
a good question. there's a couple of simple things you can do in advance to avoid the common problems and i should say not all car hire companies are out to get you but they will try to squeeze you. if you arrive at the check—in desk and they are trying to flog you and the kids are trying to flog you and the kids are screaming that's when they will try get you. preparation is wonderful. pic the best of not the cheapest because the cheapest offer will have the highest excess the. if you a ccess will have the highest excess the. if you access fee is £1000 then that is the amount of money you will play if they claim they need to make repairs — — a ccess they claim they need to make repairs —— access fee. they claim they need to make repairs -- access fee. dave said they hired a car in alicante and they had to wait six months for the £1000 deposit to come back. there's lots of things that you are asked at the desk, do you have to do any of it? not necessarily will. the credit ca rd not necessarily will. the credit card one is interesting because they will freeze the deposit or they will
6:47 am
provisionally take it is the official term and refund it as soon as. let's be clear, there's never an excuse for it to take six months for your own money to be returned. if your own money to be returned. if you have a uk card you have more rights and you can complain through us or the financial ombudsman so it doesn't have to end in tears. when you hire a car and the damage issue, should you be walking around filming it and getting the evidence you can beforehand? it sounds awful but yes is the simple answer. you don't have to go mad because we want people to enjoy their holidays but most people have a tablet or smart phone, when you get in the car they will give you get in the car they will give you a paper and they will draw on the marks were things need to change so the marks were things need to change so go around and photograph it from all angles and point out any scratches because they can come back and haunt you when you hire the car back. factory much. jed has got in touch with another tip, always
6:48 am
booked in advance, i imagine it could be worse if you turned up not having a car ready and you have all those problems. good tips all—round! thanks very much, sean. the home secretary amber rudd is in san francisco where she is meeting big internet companies to urge them to do more to tackle online extremism. we can talk to our north american technology reporter dave lee. good to see you. what is she going to try to persuade them to do? this is in terms of tackling the way hackers have access to our accounts? it's more to do with the amount of extremist material appearing on social networks, facebook, twitter, microsoft and google, they are all getting together tomorrow here, still monday evening where i am, and they're going to talk about what more can be done and the crucial thing is what does that mean? in the home secretary's case, shebelieves cup these companies should use some
6:49 am
of their intelligence algorithms they used to block certain things —— she believes these. they want to use that intelligence to block known extremist material from ever being uploaded to facebook. it won'tjust appearand be uploaded to facebook. it won'tjust appear and be taken down, it will be blocked before it's even put on the site and that's a big step and something these companies think they may be able to do. but they are relu cta nt, may be able to do. but they are reluctant, the reason being they are obviously concerned with freedom of expression and privacy. i raised this with the home secretary —— home secretary earlier and this is what she said. they have to face up to what our enemy is trying to do, they are trying to weaponised people at home, vulnerable people and trying to turn them into terrorists and what happens is when this material goes online it's circulated really fast. what our company is saying in response to what amber rudd is
6:50 am
saying? -- what are the companies. they have put out a joint statement, and none of them would do an interview with us about it, but together they acknowledged this was a big problem and a big challenge and something they wanted to tackle and something they wanted to tackle and they agree more can be done and again the disagreement is what the moore is. but privately from the experts i have spoken to and some of the people at this set of companies on the record, they feel hard done by because they feel they have done a lot already to stop the spread of this material and sometimes they are used as a scapegoat for what might be considered as a failure of policing or following leads when be considered as a failure of policing orfollowing leads when it comes to terrorism in particular. there will be give and take and in this meeting happening on tuesday here, we will see lots of progress and discussion about what can be done, but i don't think tech companies will want to do too much to upset their users and how they feel about using those services. dave, thanks bromance forjoining
6:51 am
us. dave lee from san francisco. britain's only surviving cloth hall reopens today after a multi—million pound renovation. the piece hall in halifax, west yorkshire was once the centre of the world's wool trade and since then it has been through a number of different incarnations. fiona lamdin is there for us this morning. fiona, i think you're going to reveal it for us in just a minute but this is an extraordinary building, isn't it? well, just take a look. it really does look like we could be in italy this morning but we are in halifax. as you say, we're in the country's last remaining intact cloth hall. this is the piece hall. it's been here for over 200 yea rs hall. it's been here for over 200 years and i've been taking a look back at its history. fiona, i'm sorry that we don't have that report right now but can you give us more of a look around and tell us more about that place because as you said a moment ago,
6:52 am
lots of people are thinking what an extraordinary building architecturally and the scale of it? yes, as you can see, if you can have a look there is over 300 identical doors, each have a little trading unitand a doors, each have a little trading unit and a window and a door and back then over 200 years ago this is where people came to trade their cloth. in a minute we will introduce you to the counsellor who is delighted to be opening this. if you come down here i'm going to take you ona come down here i'm going to take you on a little tour and we're going to go and see... if you come down these stairs... we are going to find out what's going to be going on. coming onto nicky, we've been hearing a bit about the past and how it used to be
6:53 am
about the past and how it used to be a trading place and how they're used to be loads of wall and cotton sold here, tell us about what the future will be? the future will be another bustling town square where we will have trade, heritage and culture again in the square and what we want people to do is come here, meet each other and visit the wonderful shops that have come on board. they are absolutely beautiful. if we look behind there will be restaurants here, do you hope to have music and theatre? there will be open air theatre, music events. in the summer we will do screenings like somerset house in london so the idea is to make this a vibrant international destination. people in halifax have known about this place for a long time, just coming to you, tim swift, you are hoping to pull people from right across the world? you've seen this morning that macro 81 is really this morning that macro 81 is really this most extraordinary georgian building. —— piece hall. the only surviving cloth hall in western
6:54 am
europe. people in halifax and west yorkshire have always known about it but we think it has potential national and international appeal as a place to visit and keep coming back to. yellow what's happening today? at 10am the bell is going to go and the shots are going to open and trading will start again? that's right, when it opened as piece hall it opened from just 10am to 2pm for two hours and the bell marked the start of trading. we have a host of events to date to show you what the piece hall will have going forward, local people who haven't got in for the last three years will come in and enjoy it —— today. people can also come and see what a wonderful building it is. we will be here through the morning. can you see all those identical doors? if you pan around there's over 300 and we will be here through the morning showing
6:55 am
you what's going on inside those doors. fiona, thanks very much. wonderful images. congratulations to whoever is on the camera for making it down the stairs earlier on without mishap. always great when it doesn't go wrong! you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: student loans are replacing nhs bursaries that funded some degrees and with a fall in nursing and midwifery applications we'll ask if the new system will deter mature students from retraining. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him in knightsbridge, thought to be acid. police say the 47—year—old was attacked in walton street at about 8:30pm yesterday evening. officially, police say they don't know if the liquid is a corrosive substance. the victim is currently in hospital
6:56 am
and no arrests have been made. the bank of england has been asked to provide details of the city of london's readiness in being able to cope with a hard brexit. the request comes from nicky morgan, who's been newly elected as head of one of parliament's most influential committees. the treasury select committee also wants to know the bank's view on what a brexit transition deal should look like to minimise damage to the city. technology is being used by an nhs trust to allow new mothers separated from their baby after birth to stay in touch, thereby reducing anxiety. the new video link helps connect mothers in the delivery suites at west hertfordshire hospitals to the neonatal unit. the trust also believes it improves bonding between mother and baby. europe's largest trainer festival is taking place in east london and it's attracting thousands of people of all ages, notjust there to buy their next pair but also to make money. some trainers quickly become collectors items and sell for hundreds of pounds. and it's one of the reasons for the festival's rapid success. it grew from there, just word
6:57 am
of mouth, social media helped helped massively and it grew from being 200 people to 5,000 people in less than ten years. yeah, it's crazy. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. on the roads, there's no access from kennington park road to kennington road northbound. that's for gas works but there's still access for bikes. and in camberwell, there are temporary traffic lights to be aware of on camberwell new road for water works. let's have a check on the weather with kate. good morning. a lovely, bright start this morning, a bit of patchy cloud but plenty of sunshine. dry as well and it's not until later that we see one or two showers developing but in the meantime, it's really quite a pleasant morning.
6:58 am
a little bit of patchy cloud but lots of sun. we're looking at high uv levels today. pollen count moderate. not until later this afternoon will we see showers developing. maybe to the west or north—west of london tracking their way east. the maximum, 23, and it looks like it will stay dry to the south and south—east of london. overnight tonight those showers will fizzle out. it's a dry night, the wind is light as well. cloud perhaps starting to move in as we head to dawn but the minimum temperature in towns and cities between 14 and 16. that cloud tomorrow morning is the precursor to the rain. it arrives from the west, so we could have some quite heavy bursts of rain through the course of wednesday, feeling cooler and staying quite breezy as we head through the rest of the week and things startling to settle down towards the weekend. should breast—feeding be taught in schools? that's what vanessa feltz is looking at on bbc radio london in a few minutes time. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga
6:59 am
munchetty. ‘you're fired' — more upheaval at the white house, as yet another senior official is sacked. outspoken communications chief anthony scaramucci gets the axe, just 11 days after being appointed, following a foul—mouthed rant to reporters. good morning, it is tuesday one august. also this morning: tackling terror online. the home secretary tells the world's biggest internet companies they must do more to fight the spread of extremism. we're asking them to work harder on this, to put more effort, more resources into it, and to work together to deliver it. a new approach to speed up surgery for pancreatic cancer raises hopes of improving poor survival rates. good morning. we are about to find out how
7:00 am
british gas has been performing, when it comes to profits, customer numbers, and maybe something about energy prices. i will have more very shortly. in sport: it is as easy as one, two, three for england's cricketers. moeen ali takes a hat—trick to win the third test against south africa at the oval. england now lead the series 2—1 going into the final test in manchester. and carol has popped outside to bring us the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london, where it is sunny. there is a gentle trees but it feels quite pleasant. the forecast for the uk as a whole, though, is one of sunshine and showers. some of the showers will be heavy, and the best chance of staying dry in south—east england. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: the white house communications director, anthony scaramucci, has been fired less than two weeks after his appointment, in the latest high—profile departure from donald trump's top team. his sacking was the first decision to be taken by new chief of staff,
7:01 am
generaljohn kelly, and it is seen as an attempt to bring stability to mr trump's presidency. suzanne kianpour reports. tonight, breaking news: forced out afterjust 11 days on the job at the white house... game of thrones, house of cards — pick your drama. washington thrown into a frenzy after the newly minted, smooth—talking white house communications director is sacked. anthony scaramucci took to the podium ten days ago for the first and last time. he came in guns blazing, promising to flip the script and shake up the white house. and he did. although his eye was on getting rid of then—white house chief of staff reince priebus, it was beleaguered press secretary sean spicer who was the first to go, resigning in protest at the man called ‘mooch.’ but then a bit of foreshadowing.
7:02 am
you know, one of the things i can't stand about this town is the backstabbing. where i grew up, in the neighbourhood i grew up, we're frontstabbers. the self—proclaimed outsider took it too far, launching into a tirade of obscenities to a journalist, accidentally on the record, forgetting the rules of reporting. reince resigned, scaramucci seemed to have won, reporting directly to the president. but a new—new sheriff was in town, generaljohn kelly, the secretary of homeland security. his request was that scaramucci had to go. kelly's wish, the president's command. after attending the swearing—in ceremony, the mooch was escorted off the premises. donald trump has been in office for nearly six months, but his presidency has been plagued by chaos and controversy. from multiple investigations into his campaign's connections with russia, to constant staffing shake—ups at the white house. but, with a four—star general at the helm now, the administration is hoping that there will be smoother
7:03 am
sailing going forward. suzanne kianpour, for bbc news. the home secretary is challenging the likes of facebook, twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. amber rudd has been attending a technology summit in san francisco. she has told the firms they need to work together to protect the public by stopping the spread of terror—related material. our north america technology reporter dave lee reports. what i need them to acknowledge is that the enemy, who is really trying to move swiftly online, to radicalise people in their own homes, are really stepping their game up, and we need our response stepped up as well. they need to be the ones to own that. we're asking them to work harder on this, to put more effort, more resources into it, and to work together to deliver it. and in these meetings, actually, i have had a very strong response from all of them. they say they will do just that. none of them want to be the
7:04 am
platform on which terrorists to operate, and it is that imperative which is driving this forward. you spoke about making these places on the internet hostile to terrorists. what do you mean by that, exactly? how do you make something like that hostile to terras? well, they have to make sure that the material that ca re rs to make sure that the material that carers wa nt to make sure that the material that carers want to put up gets taken down, or even better, doesn't go up in the first place. that is what we are in the first place. that is what we a re really in the first place. that is what we are really trying to achieve. i mean, in the uk we take down through our internet referral unit about 2000 hostile pieces a week. and that is continuing to rise. we need to make sure that they take action to do this. users are going to hear this, regular users are going to hear this, and think what you are trying to do is decide before
7:05 am
someone trying to do is decide before someone posts something whether that is allowed. i mean, that is censorship and the concerns about that, i really... you are deciding before it even goes online whether it is allowed. well, i would ask users to decide very carefully the consequences of what is going online. this is material that is designed to encourage violence, it is designed to encourage terrorists. nobody wants that online. and there are ways that we can make sure that the sort of people who they can track of who might be putting that online, i stopped track of who might be putting that online, istopped before track of who might be putting that online, i stopped before it goes up, or indeed, as they put it up, it stops actually going up, because they have managed to track it, and they have managed to track it, and they can identify it before it actually goes live. they have to face up, people who might oppose this, to what our enemy is trying to do. they are trying to weaponise people at home, vulnerable people, trying to turn them into terrorists. and what happens is, when this material goes online, it is circulated really fast. patients with pancreatic cancer are being operated on injust two weeks, instead of two months, after being diagnosed. research published in the medical journal hpb says early surgery increases patients' chances of having their tumours removed by 22%. doctors in birmingham hope their approach will be adopted nationally.
7:06 am
michele paduano reports. kate rigby was amazed at how smoothly the nhs worked when she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. within seven days, she had had surgery at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. i feel quite emotional, actually. i feel privileged. i could have died. i can't control nhs budget, and all the other things for the poor people who aren't as lucky as me. but what i can do is spread the word. normally, people with jaundice like mrs rigby have a stent put in to relieve symptoms, which delays the main operation. but the hospital bypassed this step. a nurse was employed to speed up treatment from two months to 16 days, meaning a fifth more patients were able to complete surgery to remove their cancer. cutting out the step also said the nhs £3,200 per patient. we save the nhs potentially £200,000 per year, with the number of patients that have surgery within our team. and so that, then, is a reproducible model, that other units up and down the country could use to go forward. pancreatic cancer has
7:07 am
a very low survival rate. it will be two years before doctors can say whether treating patients more quickly actually means that they live longer. and, if they do, that will beg the question as to whether or not other aggressive cancers should be treated more quickly. for now, kate rigby knows that she has been given the best chance possible to survive pancreatic cancer. michele paduano, bbc news. british gas has just announced its latest profits. sean is here with the details. yes, we have profits from british gas and the parent company that own it, and generally for the british gas part of the business their budgets are down. the biggest thing from the results statement this morning is what they will do with energy prices. they are announcing that from 15 september electricity prices will be going up a 12.5%. british gas had had a freeze longer
7:08 am
than the other suppliers had had for several months, but that has come through now. 12.5% on electricity. gas prices will be frozen, they say. that means it will be about £76 on average for everybody with a dual fuel bill with british gas. do we know roughly how this compares to the other electricity companies?‘ lot of the other suppliers have put up lot of the other suppliers have put up prices by a similar amount a little earlier in the year. they had announced that. at wholesale prices, so announced that. at wholesale prices, so how much these big suppliers get paid to get energy into them, have actually been falling this year. we are talking to the boss of british gas in about 20 minutes or so. it will be interesting to see why he says prices are going up so much, because we talk about inflation going up between 2% and 3%, electricity bills going up by 2.5% isa electricity bills going up by 2.5% is a large amount. they say that for those who get the warm home discount, the 200,000 most
7:09 am
vulnerable customers, they will be covering that cost. so effectively a re bate covering that cost. so effectively a rebate you will be getting if you are already getting the warm home discount. but around 3 million customers will see a big price rise on their electricity bill. when are you talking to the boss? in about 20 minutes or so. if you have a specific question you would like sean to ask, 12% is a big increase. e—mail as those questions. you can get in touch on twitter as well. pupils should be taught about the importance of breast—feeding in schools, according to the professional body which represents paediatricians. the royal college of paediatrics and child health is also calling on ministers to legislate for breast—feeding breaks and facilities in all workplaces. the college says britain has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe, blaming social stigma for the trend. more needs to be done to stop women being forced to wear high heels at work, according to scientists at the university of aberdeen.
7:10 am
academics looked at the physical and social impact of wearing the shoes, and say there is enough evidence to suggest they are bad for the health of wearers. earlier this year, the government rejected calls for a ban on enforced high—heel wear. when the owner of petey the dog became stuck in his car during a flash—flood, he decided there was no way he was going to leave his pet in danger. the car was submerged after a dry creek bed was engulfed by a flash—flood in colorado. rescuers had to use a crane to get to the car, before petey was handed over by his owner, who then climbed out. the pair could then walk across the crane to safety and dry land. and petey is all well, that is good. sally will have the sport for us in about half an hour. carol will have
7:11 am
the weather. he is no stranger to delivering the words "you're fired", but even for the reality tv star—turned—president, the past 11 days have seen a staggering number of departures from the west wing of donald trump's white house. former communications director anthony scaramucci is the latest to go, before he officially began. let's try and make sense of the latest developments with the american political analyst eric ham, who is in our washington studio for us. lovely to speak to you again. so when anthony scaramucci was first at the podium, the first thing he said isiam the podium, the first thing he said is i am going to be very brief. he certainly was. he meant that literally, yes. this is a record departure in the white house, and it actually looks more like a trump's own reality show, the apprentice, because we are seeing so many people depart from this white house, it is getting difficult to keep up —— the
7:12 am
apprentice. this is the third high—profile departure from this white house in just high—profile departure from this white house injust to make weeks, so white house injust to make weeks, so it does look like the white house in chaos and there are many in the republican establishment that are actually breathing a sigh of relief, hoping that general kelly can actually bring normalcy to the white house. now, what is ironic about this new addition to the white house, general kelly, is that he is actually the first military man to serve as white house chief of staff since alexander haig, who was the white house chief of staff for richard nixon. and there have been many who have actually compared donald trump's administration thus far to the eventual downfall of richard nixon. so this could get really interesting going forward. talk us through a little bit more about anthony scaramucci himself. when he was appointed and spoke himself he talked aboutjust how close he was to donald trump, kind of personally, but also in terms of their style. he is quite rash,
7:13 am
someone their style. he is quite rash, someone who on the face of it you would think donald trump would like to have in his team. but he is gone and partly because he was so outspoken —— quite brash. do you think his departure means we are heading towards a new style of white house administration? actually, i think we are heading into a new style in the short term. i do believe that donald trump made some concessions tojohn kelly in order forjohn kelly to take this position andi forjohn kelly to take this position and i do believe that one of those concessions was that anthony scaramucci needed to move on from this position. i believe that kelly wa nted this position. i believe that kelly wanted somebody who was more disciplined in that role, and so i believe that in the short term what donald trump did is something that he failed to do with his previous white house chief of staff, and that is to empower him to actually run the operation and manage the white house as it should be, and make the white house chief of staff the last
7:14 am
voice that many people in that white house here. now, ithink voice that many people in that white house here. now, i think what will be interesting going forward is many people typically see the white house chief of staff as an administrative or maybe a management position, but actually, in washington, this is actually, in washington, this is actually considered the top political job actually considered the top politicaljob in washington. and so we don't typically see or think of general kelly as a political person. soi general kelly as a political person. so i think this will be interesting if he can actually develop, or if he has, political antenna. because if he can actually develop, or if he has, politicalantenna. because that is something he is going to moving forward. i'm going to play a clip of anthony scaramucci when he spoke to one of our colleagues emily maitlis and it gives you a glimpse of why he has now gone. one of the things i cannot stand about this town is the backstabbing that goes on here. ok? where i grew up that goes on here. ok? where i grew up in the neighbourhood i'm from we're front stabbers, we like to tell you where we're from and what we're doing. he was talking about
7:15 am
backstabbing, the ironies are so rich in this but if you were looking for a positive spin about this and the white house is all about spin, it's the positive that they think they are heading to a calmer spot. it has been pretty hectic. it has been. i do believe that many people will look at this move and think that this can be a turning point for this administration. but again, i do believe that scaramucci was acting in the interests of donald trump and ido in the interests of donald trump and i do believe that president trump and chile was pleased with the work that he had witnessed thus far from scaramucci —— actually. but i believe he recognised he needed a strong white house chief of staff. if there's one thing we know about donald trump, he has a great and high respect for military personnel. i believe in the short—term, and i do believe this is a short—term fix,
7:16 am
he was willing to hand over the rains tojohn kelly to move him into this position. i believe we will see a more disciplined white house but will we see a more disciplined president trump? that's the big question going forward. the departure of scaramucci is perhaps the easiest thing john kelly will be able to get done in this white house. now the real difficult work of running the white house and managing relationships both with congress and other republican stakeholders, i think that becomes the very heavylift that john kelly is going to have to wrap his hands around going forward. eric, thanks for staying up late for us, never a dull day in the white house! you could stay up and just be entertained at all hours watching
7:17 am
the white house! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: donald trump has sacked his communications director, anthony scaramucci, just days after appointing him. the home secretary is in america challenging the likes of facebook, twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. this is the scene at the refurbished piece mill which reopens in halifax this morning. it's to help celebrate yorkshire date. you can see the blue skies peeking through the clouds. —— date. is that going to be the picture across the country? —— date. you're on the top of new broadcasting house in london? good morning. it won't be the case everywhere and even in yorkshire it won't stay dry all day because what we have today is a forecast of heavy showers, some will have hail and thunder embedded in
7:18 am
them, and bright spells or indeed sunny intervals. if we start by looking at the country at 9am. in scotla nd looking at the country at 9am. in scotland we will have some heavy showers, particularly north of the central belt. where we don't have the showers it's a bright start with southern scotland seeing some showers this morning, easing off through the morning, though. some heavy showers at the moment in parts of north—west england. currently north—east england is dry, as we've just seen in halifax, and as we come further south across the peak district into the midlands, east anglia, essex and kent all the way to the home counties and the isle of wight, similar skies to london, blue skies with some cloud here and there. drifting east woods, and westwards, against some sunshine but a few showers in south—west england —— eastwards. in wales, some heavy showers and forming lines through the night, that's why they are heavy, they are merging. as we push into northern ireland, the north and west of northern ireland is seeing
7:19 am
the showers this morning with the east attending to be dry. through the day further showers will develop and some will push east. not all of us will see them but there's the potential for some to be heavy and thundery with some hail, especially if we draw a line from said the south wales to the wash northwards, that's where you're likely to see that's where you're likely to see that combination. further south, south—east england could stay dry and in light winds, temperatures up to 23 feeling quite pleasant but generally we're looking at a temperature range of 17 to 20. as we had through the evening and overnight, many the showers will tend to fade but through the latter pa rt tend to fade but through the latter part of the night you'll notice the cloud encroaching into south—west england and south wales. the showers will start to arrive and the wind will start to arrive and the wind will increase and the whole lot will be followed by rain. temperatures roughly ten to 15 overnight but lower than that in sheltered glens in scotland. for tomorrow for many we start off on a drier and brighter
7:20 am
note even with some sunshine but all the cloud and rain in the south—west will move north—east and spread out across the south coast. that's where it's going to be heavy and persistent and it will drift north—east of through the day. coastal gales in south—west england and south—west wales and eventually the rain pushes far north, not into the rain pushes far north, not into the far north of scotland, which will hang on to the driest conditions but tomorrow as a result will be cooler. most of that clears overnight and by thursday we have a curl of rain coming into the north and west of the uk. that will bring showery outbreaks of rain but for many it will be dry, a breezy day and temperatures getting up into the low 20s. that leads us into friday, which is going to be a day of sunshine and showers but at the moment it looks like we are going to see hunting dry in the south on saturday and for many on sunday. but that's an if because there are tropical storms in the atlantic and that could have a bearing on our weather, so i'll keep you posted on that in the next couple of days.
7:21 am
keep us posted. thanks bromance, see you later on. let's look at the morning papers, shall we? —— thanks very much. the daily telegraph looking at statins, lots of discussion about how useful they are and who should be receiving them but now the royal college of gps is warning they are being prescribed to people because of their age and not their condition. the other story is mr scaramucci, anthony scaramucci, has been removed as donald trump's communications director after 11 days. that's on the front page of the mail as well, the picture is scaramucci and donald trump, the thumbs up shot clearly before this recent sacking and the main story pupils as young as 11 could have lessons in breast—feeding to make it better better known. sam shepard, the american actor and playwright has died at 73 after suffering with motor neurone disease. on the front
7:22 am
page of the sun, quite of the few —— quite a few of the papers focusing on the diana tapes featuring in a television documentary. this page on the front of the sun, very controversial story often, according to this story facebook shut down artificial intelligence experiments after two robots began talking in a language only they understood. they we re language only they understood. they were set up to start having this discussion. it was a kind of negotiation and watching the dialogue and eventually it made no sense to anyone and the assumption was they understood each other but we didn't understand them. the rise of the machines, sounds familiar! from today, people studying to be nurses or midwives will no longer receive nhs bursaries, instead they will have to apply for student loans. applications for courses are down by more than 20%. the government says it is providing funding for an extra 10,000 university places for students on nursing, midwifery and other health degrees in england. we get rid of that and
7:23 am
you've now got what? these second—year nursing students are getting their first look at the anatomage table using the latest technology to take a 3—d trip through a virtual human body. their degree course at the university of central lancashire is funded by nhs bursaries and grants, but as of today applicants wanting to study nursing, midwifery and other medical courses will need a student loan in line with other undergraduates. so would it have deterred these students? i don't think it would have made a difference to myself because i really wanted to become a nurse and although the financial implications of not having a bursary would have impacted on me quite heavily, but i could have managed and my desire to become a nurse has overridden those. but applications for these courses
7:24 am
have fallen by around 20%. theories include doubts from european students about brexit. a birthrate decline in the number of 18—year—olds as well as concerns about the change in financing. the universities, though, are determined to see the numbers recover and here there's cautious optimism. we have seen a decline in the number of applications coming through, but they're good quality and so the key thing is that they convert into the numbers that we have. so i'm very positive at this moment in time that we will recruit to target. one of the main areas of concern is the impact on mature students. nursing and midwifery attract a much higher percentage of older applicants than other degree courses and their life experience is seen as a vital part of the mix on a ward. sarah cordy says a loan instead of a bursary would have stopped her changing career
7:25 am
to become a midwife. to saddle students with a huge amount of debt when they are only ever able to earn what the government dictates they can earn, it doesn't seem to make sense to me and had i been making this decision now knowing that i would have to take on the debt, i couldn't have done it, no. the government argues that the cap on student places had previously restricted numbers and that changing the funding will lead to an increase in around 10,000 applicants. but les green says he now can't afford to pursue his dream job. i'm 41 so i would be paying that... £30,000, i'd be paying back until i finish probably my... until i'm earning my pension. i don't think i'd ever play that off, i'd pay it until the rest of my career and beyond.
7:26 am
all signs agree that the nhs is in dire need of more clinical staff but the debate centres on how to pay for them. john maguire, bbc news, lancashire. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: we're talking high heels later on. researchers say wearing them raises the risk of injury and they also want action to stop women being forced to wear them, despite the government already rejecting calls for a ban on compulsory high heels. do they cause you pain, do you wear them because your boss says its the dress code? get in contact and let us know your thoughts. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him in knightsbridge, thought to be acid. police say the 47—year—old was attacked in walton street at about 8:30pm yesterday evening. this latest attack happened here on
7:27 am
all the place at around 8:30pm last night. police say a 47—year—old man was walking past harrods here when he had liquid thrown in this base by men on a moped. police tell us this morning that man has been discharged from hospital no arrests have been made. the bank of england has been asked to provide details of the city of london's readiness in being able to cope with a hard brexit. the request comes from nicky morgan, who's been newly elected as head of one of parliament's most influential committees. the treasury select committee also wants to know the bank's view on what a brexit transition deal should look like to minimise damage to the city. europe's largest trainer festival is taking place in east london and it's attracting thousands of people of all ages, notjust there to buy their next pair but also to make money. some trainers quickly become collectors items and sell for hundreds of pounds. and it's one of the reasons for the festival's rapid success. itjust grew from then, just word of mouth, social media helped massively and it grew from being 200 people to 5,000 people in less than ten years. yeah, it's crazy.
7:28 am
let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. on the roads, there's no access from kennington park road to kennington road northbound. that's for gas works but there's still access for bikes. and in camberwell, there are temporary traffic lights to be aware of on camberwell new road for water works. and in islington, essex road is closed north from upper street for water works. let's have a check on the weather with kate. good morning. a lovely, bright start this morning, a bit of patchy cloud but plenty of sunshine. dry as well and it's not until later that we could see one or two showers developing but in the meantime, it's really quite a pleasant morning. a little bit of patchy cloud but lots of sun. we're looking at high uv levels today. pollen count moderate.
7:29 am
not until later this afternoon will we see showers developing. maybe to the west or north—west of london tracking their way east. the maximum, 23, and it looks like it will stay dry to the south and south—east of london. overnight tonight those showers will fizzle out. it's a dry night, the wind is light as well. cloud perhaps starting to move in as we head to dawn but the minimum temperature in towns and cities between 14 and 16. that cloud tomorrow morning is the precursor to the rain. it arrives from the west, so we could have some quite heavy bursts of rain through the course of wednesday. feeling cooler and staying quite breezy as we head through the rest of the week and things startling to settle down towards the weekend. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london and in a few minutes she'll have more on the government scrapping bursaries for nursing and midwifery courses from today, which you may have seen on breakfast a few minutes ago. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga
7:30 am
munchetty. our main story this morning, british gas has announced it is increasing its electricity charges by 12%. those figures just out this morning. we will bring you more details shortly, but british gas announcing that it shortly, but british gas announcing thatitis shortly, but british gas announcing that it is increasing those electricity prices by 12.5%. that will be from mid—september and will affect around 3 million customers in all, who are all on standard tariffs. it will add around £76 a year to dualfuel bills tariffs. it will add around £76 a year to dual fuel bills for the average household. it is the energy firm's first price rise since 2013, and we will have more on that story throughout the programme this morning. the white house communications director, anthony scaramucci, has been fired, less than two weeks after his appointment. in the latest high—profile departure from donald trump's top team, the new chief of staff, john kelly,
7:31 am
asked mr scaramucci to step aside. the former banker made headlines when derogatory comments he made about general kelly's predecessor were made public. the president certainly felt that anthony's comments were inappropriate for a person in that position, and he didn't want to burden general kelly, also, with that line of succession. as i think we have made clear a few times over the course of the last couple of days, to several of you individually, but general kelly has the full authority to operate in the white house, and all staff will report to him. the home secretary is challenging the likes of facebook, twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. amber rudd has been attending a technology summit set up by the internet giants in san francisco, and has told the firms they need to do more to protect the public by stopping the spread of terror—related material. but there is concern that the privacy of ordinary users could be compromised. what i need them to acknowledges
7:32 am
that the enemy, who is really trying to move swiftly online, to radicalise people in their own homes, are really stepping their game up. and we need our response stepped up as well. medical researchers have revealed details of a new approach to treating people with pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest of all cancers. a pilot by the university hospitals birmingham found that early surgery increases patients' chances of having their tumours removed by a fifth. the charity, pancreatic cancer uk, says the findings are incredibly exciting. from today, babies born in england, wales and northern ireland are to be
7:33 am
offered a new vaccine which protects against hepatitis b. the hexavalent vaccine will also immunise against five other diseases, including polio, tetanus and whooping cough. health protection scotland is set to adopt a similar policy from september. public health england says the new vaccine has been extensively tested. workers at the bank of england will today hold their first strike in more than 50 years, as part of a campaign for higher wages. members of the unite union will walk out for three days, after talks at the conciliation service, acas, broke up without agreement. unite wants the bank to scrap its 1% cap on pay rises, arguing that a third of staff will get no increase this year. the bank says essential business will continue as normal during the industrial action. pupils should be taught about the importance of breast—feeding in schools, according to the professional body which represents paediatricians. the royal college of paediatrics and child health is also calling on ministers to legislate for breast—feeding breaks and facilities in all workplaces. the college says britain has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe, blaming social stigma for the trend. more needs to be done to stop women being forced to wear high heels at work, according to scientists at the university of aberdeen.
7:34 am
academics looked at the physical and social impact of wearing the shoes, and say there is enough evidence to suggest they are bad for the health of wearers. earlier this year, the government rejected calls for a ban on enforced high—heel wear. a canadian couple have been described as heroes for using their speedboat to put out a wildfire. they were on a river when they spotted smoke on the bank. natasha called the authorities but her partner had another idea and repeatedly drove the speedboat close to shore, spinning it so that the water douse the flames. —— doused the flames. the firefighters eventually arrived and managed to put out the fire. carol will be here with the weather in ten minutes. it is looking quite nice, we are
7:35 am
seeing a bit of blue sky. later, later. i was just seeing a bit of blue sky. later, later. i wasjust thinking there is a new james bond later. i wasjust thinking there is a newjames bond film next year, that chap should be auditioning. he probably does that anyway, a bit of spinning around. do you think? are you not impressed? well, why not? and talking of spinning... get it?|j see where you are going there. england's cricketers went 2—1 up in the test series against south africa yesterday, after an amazing final day at the oval. the tourists were trying to save a draw, but two wickets in two balls from debutant toby roland—jones ended those hopes. the only resistance came from dean elgar, who went on to make 136. but it was moeen ali who finished south africa off, winning the match in the perfect fashion, with a hat—trick. england victorious by 239 runs, a vast improvement upon their disastrous trent bridge performance, which saw the team come under intense criticism two weeks ago.
7:36 am
i think the way we played was brilliant. i looked down the side and we had a number of matchwinners throughout. if we can get in a position of strength early we can generally find ways to get across the line. so i think it is really important that we continue to look to do that. but the most important thing to me was that we responded positively after last week. it was obviously very tough week for us but it shows the character of the guys in the dressing room. the world athletics championships get under way at the weekend, but one of the star attractions on the track won't be there. david rudisha, the world and olympic 800m champion and world record holder, is out with a thigh injury. the kenyan won the world title in beijing two years ago, and broke the world record in london in 2012. meanwhile, the sport's governing body, the iaaf, says russia remains banned from international competition, because they haven't made sufficient progress in anti—doping. russia was barred from last year's olympics for state—sponsored doping. 19 russians will compete as independently at the world championships.
7:37 am
we've seen progress, and yes, some of that — on some occasions, some of that progress has been quicker than on other occasions. and it tended to speed up a little bit when there's been a focus normally around the major championships. so it's not that there isn't any progress, but the progress we want has to culminate in a meeting of those criteria, and it's clear that it's unambiguous. manchester united manager jose mourinho has made his third big signing of the summer. he has gone back to former club chelsea and signed nemanja matic, a player he signed for the blues three years ago. he has moved to old trafford for a fee of £35 million. that could rise to £40 million. cristiano ronaldo has appeared in court in spain, where he is facing allegation of tax evasion. the real madrid star is accused of evading just over £13 million. he has said he has never had any
7:38 am
intentions to evade paying taxes. liverpool's biggest independent supporters group has voted overwhelmingly in favour of the safe standing at premier league grounds. the premier league wrote to its 20 clubs last month to assess whether they would be interested in staging trials. it follows celtic‘s decision to introduce around 3,000 rail seats last season. the question of safe standing at stadiums has been on the agenda after lord justice taylor's inquiry into the 1989 hillsborough disaster, in which 96 liverpool fans were killed. four—time major champion rory mcilroy has split from long—term caddyjp fitzgerald. the pair have worked together for the past nine years, and for each of mcilroy‘s major successes. last month, mcilroy gave fitzgerald credit for geeing him up after a poor start to the open. mcilroy is expected to confirm the news tomorrow, ahead of this week's world golf championship event in ohio. what are your earliest memories of
7:39 am
an olympics? what is the first big olympics you remember? one really sticks in my mind. my earliest proper memory i think would be david thompson. i wonder whether it might have been... it might have been los angeles, 1984? that is actually quite late, but if i am honest that is the first one. what about some of the swimmers, david wilkie and some of those swimmers elli on... who was the ethiopian runner, the woman? —— earlier on. interestingly, you are going back to 1984. the deal is done for los angeles to host the 2028 olympic and paralympic games. la's bid team has reached an agreement with the international olympic committee,
7:40 am
which is expected to be ratified by the los angeles city council later today. la had originally been bidding for the 2024 games, but that event is now set to take place in paris. when i said to you at the start of this, what is your most striking olympic memory, do you know what mine is? the man with thejet pack arriving into the stadium in los angeles. it was just like something from another world. it very much may be olympics much bigger, there was a sense of occasion to it. and in 1984 no one really wanted that olympics. los angeles to get and it did them a world of good. it was a fantastic to be kept games, so the olympics definitely going back to hollywood. —— fantastic games. british gas have just announced they are putting their prices up for the first time in four years. sean has the details. sometimes it feels like it doesn't have much direct impact on people's pockets, but this announcement
7:41 am
really does. yes, it is notjust about profits but about energy prices. yes, britain's largest energy supplier has just said that its electricity prices will go up by 12.5% from september. gas prices will be frozen, but it means around £76 will be added to average annual household duel fuel bills. iain conn is the chief executive of centrica. hejoins me now. good morning. good morning. the wholesale cost of energy, what you pay for it, has been going down. so why is it going up customers? so first of all, the last time we moved our electricity prices was in january 2014, and since then they have been held flat. from that time, and you are absolutely correct, wholesale prices have fallen. we estimate about £36 on the average bill. that is not what is driving
7:42 am
this. what is driving it is the transport and distribution costs. the cost of getting the electricity to your home, and government, environmental and policy costs. and when you add those two together, that has gone up i approaching £100. that is what is driving the increase. i should finally say that, even after this increase, british gas's increase is lower than our competitors. we have heard that when energy prices are going up or you thatis energy prices are going up or you that is often passed on. if when they are falling at does not fall for the customer, does that mean the energy market is not working for these customers? actually, as the energy prices have been falling, we have reduced gas prices four times over the last few years. and the only reason electricity prices are not falling, and are now rising, is because of these other costs. the
7:43 am
electricity costs are being affected either change in the electricity system, as more renewables are coming on the big red —— by the change. —— onto the grid. coming on the big red —— by the change. -- onto the grid. so if customers want to see electricity prices falling, who do they look to to get that to fall? is it the government? is that people providing you with energy? so first of all, one has to remember that all energy costs have actually fallen, on average, significantly over the last few years. electricity by less, as i have explained, gas prices by more, and we have been able to pass it onto our customers. and this price in september is for electricity only. our gas prices are being held flat. it is a big figure, isn't it? ofgem are the regulator for the
7:44 am
industry. they have said that ta riffs industry. they have said that tariffs are lower. why can't you switch people to a fixed—rate deal? you know it is better for your customers. festival, ofgem have published also that the average cost per hour supplier has gone up by about 15% in the kostya —— first of all. on standard variable tariffs. our standard tariff is a standard retail tariff. but standard variable ta riffs retail tariff. but standard variable tariffs are not good value for a lot of customers, yet you still provide it. so the standard variable tariff is part of our licence conditions. and one of the things we are proposing is, instead of the government capping the standard variable tariff, which we think would not be good for competition or choice, we are actually advocating that the standard variable tariff should be phased out completely. we
7:45 am
think that these tariffs that have no end to that term do not encourage customers to shop around, and we are advocating ending it. what do you say to customers where they have seen supermarkets say there are prices rising, and british gas have put up prices 12.5%, that will squeeze their pockets more when wages are going up at the same rate. what do you say to those people? it's very regrettable we have had to put prices up. this is the first time for electricity in four years andi time for electricity in four years and i remind you we have also reduced prices of gas a number of times over the last few years so we are responsive. the average increase will be 7.3% on a dual fuel bill and the final point i will make is we are very concerned about some customers who have difficulty paying and the warm home discount provided
7:46 am
to some customers we consider vulnerable, some of them are not protected by the prepayment cap that came in at the beginning of this year and we voluntarily decided we going to protect another 200,000 of those customers from this increase. we are very conscious of people's pockets and the fact that energy is a big part of the bill. that is why we implemented a price freeze and kept it open for as long as we could. hyeon, thanks very much, the chief executive of centrica, which owns british gas. —— ian. prices going up not because of energy prices for them going up but they say it is government costs and transmission costs have gone up so much that it has had to go on to the customers. sean, thanks very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: donald trump has sacked his communications director, anthony scaramucci, just days after appointing him. the home secretary is in america challenging the likes of facebook, twitter and google to do more
7:47 am
to remove extremist content online. let's have a look at the weather this morning and have a chat with carol. good morning. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london. good morning to you too. a fine start to the morning, breezy but we are a few levels up. blue skies and feeling pleasant but the forecast for the uk is one of sunshine and heavy showers. some of the showers could have hail and thunder embedded in them but as is the way with showers, not everyone will see one. if we take a tour around the country at 9am, there is some rain in parts of scotland, particularly north of the central belt. showers through the south of the central belt but in between a lot of dry weather. some heavy showers and still some to come in north—west england this morning but
7:48 am
in north—east england at this stage it is dry with sunshine and that continues as we go southwards in through the peak district, the midlands, east anglia, essex, kent, down to the isle of wight with variable amounts of cloud and in amongst that sunshine we will seek cloudy conditions. further west, sunshine in dorset and gloucestershire and in the south—west we could see some showers but most will miss them but wales is a different story, heavy showers this morning on and off and with you much of the day but in between some brighter skies. much of the day but in between some brighterskies. northern much of the day but in between some brighter skies. northern ireland, eastis brighter skies. northern ireland, east is best, west with showers in the north and west. through the course of the day, showers in the west will move a bit further eastwards, fragmenting. further showers will develop. we're not all going to catch one but if we were to draw a line from south wales to the wash, points north of that are more prone to slow moving heavy showers with hail and thunder. further south the showers will be further and farther between. with highs of 23 it
7:49 am
will be pleasant in light breezes. through the evening and overnight the showers will fade but we have cloud building in south—west england and south wales and then some showers and then rain and the wind strengthening. temperature wise we are looking at ten to 15 as the overnight lows, lower in rural scotland, though. tomorrow we start with a lot of drier and brighter weather in northern, eastern and central parts but the cloud will continue to drift north—east ahead of the band of rain doing the same thing. you can see how it forks out. the heaviest rain will be in wales, south—west england and southern counties and here it will also be persistent and we will see coastal gales across the approaches of south—west england and southern wales. northern scotland staying dry. through the course of the evening and overnight, that rain pushes across and we have a curl of showery outbreaks in the north and west but for many on thursday it will be dry and breezy with highs up to the low 20s.
7:50 am
thanks, carol. we will talk later. thanks, carol. we will talk later. thanks very much. britain's only surviving cloth hall reopens today after a multi—million pound renovation. the piece hall in halifax, west yorkshire was once the centre of the world's wool trade and since then it has been through a number of different incarnations. fiona lamdin is there for us this morning. it's an amazing building, fiona, isn't it? good morning. good morning. i'm in the middle of the piece hall, it feels like we could be in italy but this is halifax. it's over 200 years old. it has an extraordinary history but today at 10am it opens its doors to training again but i've been looking back at the extraordinary history. —— trading. for the last 2.5 centuries the piece hall has stood at the heart of halifax, where in 1779 people came to trade pieces of cloth. there were
7:51 am
at least 315 individual rooms built for the sale of cloth, from which clothiers would have sold the will to merchants. merchants would have come from quite far afield, including on occasion from europe, and the trade from the piece hall went back into europe and also over to the americas. all the wall came from local sheep woven by local families on their farms. this from local sheep woven by local families on theirfarms. this is an example of the cloth most commonly sold in the piece hall and as you can feel, it's pretty hard wearing, isn't it? pretty rough. this was largely used by the military so it would have been used to make uniforms. this is the country's only surviving in fact cloth hall. with 315 individual yet identical trading rooms. it seems such a waste this beautiful building was only open back then in the 18th century for trading for two hours every week.
7:52 am
but after the industrial revolution the cloth was mainly made and sold from the mills. in its place the piece hall was filled with fruit and veg sellers. but a century on, in the 19705, this veg 5ellers. but a century on, in the 19705, this is how the piece hall looked, a blot on the landscape, threatened to be flattened to make way for a car park. one of those who fought to 5aveit park. one of those who fought to save it back then was mary crosby. she had a shop on the second floor. she had a shop on the second floor. she hasn't been inside for decades. we took her back. wow! wow! isn't that lovely? when i first came in it was all black, there were sheds around the edge and warehouses in the middle and vehicles. when i came up onto the balcony i remember there were hole5 the balcony i remember there were holes in the floor and it smells of cats. but you still fell in love with it? i still fell in love with it. to start with there were only
7:53 am
three of us for quite a long time and there wasn't much prey to start with but it developed gradually. it's hoped this historical hall will place halifax back on the map. 238 years on as the shelves fill up, this is a new chapter for this town, but nothing is new for these old 5tone5 who have witnessed it all before. we are very excited this morning to bejoined by david hole5 we are very excited this morning to be joined by david hole5 worth. we are very excited this morning to bejoined by david hole5 worth. good morning. good morning. you are eighth generation here which actually means back then all those years ago your family had three or four units we think around about here. yourfamily four units we think around about here. your family were trailing behind us in these units? that's right, in the days of the cottage industry we were what you might call traders, we were 5upplying industry we were what you might call traders, we were supplying the cottage weaver5 with the yarn and they made fabrics to certain patterns that were then brought to my forebear5 and they sold the
7:54 am
fabrics here in the rooms in the piece hall back in 1779 through to around 1820. they were here on the first day when it opened? correct, obviously they contributed to the building of this magnificent building. you are still in the textile world, you have kept the tradition going? myself i have textile world, you have kept the tradition going? myselfl have been in manufacturing all my life with manufacturing bus fabrics and now i supply fabrics to large organisations, some of which are manufactured locally. is it amazing to see this building, to think those hundreds of years ago your family we re hundreds of years ago your family were here, what's it like seeing it open were here, what's it like seeing it o e ' were here, what's it like seeing it open again? magnificent. we used to come here when we were younger when it was a market but it was pretty the credit but to have it restored to this level is magnificent and it i5 to this level is magnificent and it is super to have a large piazza where we can have 5uper events and theatrical5 and artists and music.
7:55 am
david, thanks for joining theatrical5 and artists and music. david, thanks forjoining u5. theatrical5 and artists and music. david, thanks forjoining us. we are going to take you to meet one more person. as david said, a fantastic piazza. lisa is opening her restau ra nt piazza. lisa is opening her restaurant for the first time today. very quickly, li5a, this will be your first restaurant? that's correct. we have been running different catering events since 2011 starting in our living room, a p°p‘up starting in our living room, a pop—up 5erie5 starting in our living room, a pop—up series of restaurants and now we are opening in halifax. how does it feel to think this is your first restau ra nt it feel to think this is your first restaurant and you are opening today? it feels fantastic, obviously 5lightly nervou5 today? it feels fantastic, obviously 5lightly nervous but looking forward to welcoming people in as part of wider celebrations. leezer was telling me earlier her vision very much... you will come out and see why, look at this space, on a sunny evening they wouldn't want to be out here having a coffee? —— li5a. it really feels like we are in europe. a coffee and a slice of cake, fiona,
7:56 am
and take in the view. and just a tiny bit warmer! hey, it's not too bad, carol will give us the latest later on. look5 beautiful. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him in knightsbridge, which is thought to be acid. from the scene, ja5on ro5um sent this update. this latest attack happened here walton place at around 8:30pm last night. police say a 47—year—old man was walking past harrods here when he had liquid thrown in this base by men on a moped. police tell us this morning that man has been discharged from hospital no arre5ts have been made. prison staff have regained control atajail in
7:57 am
prison staff have regained control at a jail in hertfordshire after reports of a riot breaking out across two wings. police armed with riot gear were sent to mount prison, near hemel hempstead. the ministry ofjustice says order has been restored without any injuries. a report into the jail published earlier this year highlighted staffing problems and said violence was an issue. europe's largest trainer festival is taking place in east london and it's attracting thousands of people of all ages, notjust there to buy their next pair but also to make money. some trainers quickly become collectors items and sell for hundreds of pounds. and it's one of the reasons for the festival's rapid success. itjust grew from then, just word of mouth, social media helped massively and it grew from being 200 people to 5,000 people in less than ten years. yeah, it's crazy. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. on the roads, there's no access from kennington park road to kennington road northbound. that's for gas works but there's still access for bikes.
7:58 am
and in camberwell, there are temporary traffic lights to be aware of on camberwell new road for water works. and in islington, essex road is closed north from upper street for water works. let's have a check on the weather with kate. good morning. a lovely, bright start this morning, a bit of patchy cloud but plenty of sunshine. dry as well and it's not until later that we could see one or two showers developing but in the meantime, it's really quite a pleasant morning. a little bit of patchy cloud but lots of sun. we're looking at high uv levels today. pollen count moderate. not until later this afternoon will we see showers developing. maybe to the west or north—west of london tracking their way east. the maximum, 23, and it looks like it will stay dry to the south and south—east of london. overnight tonight those
7:59 am
showers will fizzle out. it's a dry night, the wind is light as well. cloud perhaps starting to move in as we head to dawn but the minimum temperature in towns and cities between 14 and 16. that cloud tomorrow morning is the precursor to the rain. it arrives from the west, so we could have some quite heavy bursts of rain through the course of wednesday. feeling a bit cooler and staying quite breezy as we head through the rest of the week and things startling to settle down towards the weekend. should breast—feeding be taught in schools? that's what vanessa feltz is looking at on bbc radio london before 8:30am. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. fuel bills on the rise — british gas hikes electricity bills by 12.5%. it'll hit more than three million people, but the company says it's giving greater protection to vulnerable customers. and the boss of centrica has just told me that prices are going up for customers despite the price of
8:00 am
energy falling for suppliers. good morning, it's tuesday the 1st of august. also this morning... ‘you're fired' — more upheaval at the white house as yet another senior official is sacked. communications chief anthony scaramucci gets the axe after just 11 days. tackling terror online — the home secretary tells the world's biggest internet companies they must do more to fight the spread of extremism. we are asking them to work harder on this, to put more effort and resources into it, and to work together to deliver it. in sport — it's as easy one, two, three... for england's cricketers. moeen ali takes a hattrick to win the third test against south africa at the oval. england now lead the series 2—1 going into the final test in manchester. he turned his battle with depression into a best—selling memoir — now author matt haig will tell us
8:01 am
how it's inspired him to write a fictional tale about a man who's 400 years old. # i #iwas # i was busy thinking about boys... # challenging the image of women in music videos — we'll find out how singer charli xcx is turning the tables on some well—worn cliches. and carol has the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london, the sun is beating down but the forecast todayis sun is beating down but the forecast today is one of sunshine and showers. some thundery with hail, some miss them all together, especially in south—east england. we have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. british gas says that its electricity prices will go up by from september. it'll affect just over three million customers who are
8:02 am
on the standard variable tariff. let's get more detail from sean who joins us now. sean, you interviewed the boss of centrica, the owner of british gas. challenging him quite a bit on why we see this price rise now? quite often we hear energy prices, when they go up for suppliers, where they get their energy from in pipes around the world, when they go up it is often passed on to customers but in recent months, energy prices for them have been falling and so when you put that to ian connor, the boss of centrica, the owner of british gas, they say they have been falling but other costs are going up like transmission costs, moving energy around the uk, investment into the grid, as he put it, and general government policy, passed on through suppliers and on to customers meaning that has put up costs. when i put that to him he acknowledged that there were rises but he said they had to be made. we are very conscious of people's pockets and the fact that people and energy is a
8:03 am
big part of the bill so we implemented a price freeze and kept it open for as long as we could. remind us, that was the boss talking about some of the reasoning, can you ta ke about some of the reasoning, can you take us through the numbers, what are the rises? with gas there is no rise but with electricity a rise of 12.5% for 3 million odd customers at british gas. on a dualfuel bill, that's about £76 on top of what they've paid previously, coming to an average about £1120 for a dual fuel bill, they say. for the 200,000 customers they have on the discount, their most vulnerable customers, they will effectively get a rebate for the costs of £76 bid for the other £2.8 —— 2.8 million customers, they will take that on the chin. he said it was regrettable they had to
8:04 am
put up the prices but the standard tariff needs to be put out by energy suppliers and he called for an end to it so it was not a default option. you can be switched to lower tariffs, fixed payment plans? exactly, the regulator say that there is a lot of cheaper deals are benn, but not enough are switching so we can benn, but not enough are switching so we can get the best deal —— are out there. we will get more later, thank you.. the white house communications director anthony scaramucci has been fired less than two weeks after his appointment, in the latest high—profile departure from donald trump's top team. his sacking was the first decision to be taken by new chief of staff, generaljohn kelly, and it's seen as an attempt to bring stability to mr trump's presidency. suzanne kianpour reports. tonight, breaking news: forced out afterjust 11 days on the job at the white house... game of thrones, house of cards — pick your drama. washington thrown into a frenzy after the newly minted communications director is sacked. anthony scaramucci took
8:05 am
to the podium ten days ago for the first and last time. he came in guns blazing, promising to flip the script and shake up the white house. and he did. although his eye was on getting rid of then chief—of—staff reince priebus, it was press secretary sean spicer who was the first to go, resigning in protest at the man called "mooch". but then a bit of foreshadowing. you know, one of the things i can't stand about this town is the backstabbing. where i grew up, in the neighbourhood i was in, we were frontstabbers. the self—proclaimed outsider took it too far, launching into a tirade of obscenities to a journalist, accidentally on the record, forgetting the rules of reporting. scaramucci seemed to have won when reince priebus resigned,
8:06 am
reporting directly to the president. but a new—new sheriff was in town, generaljohn kelly, the secretary of homeland security. his request, a source tells me, was that scaramucci had to go. kelly's wish, the president's command. after the swearing—in ceremony, the mooch was escorted off the premises. donald trump has been in office for nearly six months, but his presidency has been plagued by chaos and controversy. from multiple investigations into his campaign's contacts with russia, to constant staffing shake—ups at the white house. but, with a four—star general at the helm now, the administration is hoping that it will be smoother sailing going forward. suzanne kianpour, bbc news, washington. the home secretary is challenging the likes of facebook, twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. amber rudd has been attending a technology summit in san francisco — she spoke earlier with our north america technology reporter, dave lee who began by asking her what she felt needed to be done.
8:07 am
what i need them to acknowledge is that the enemy, who is really trying to move swiftly online, to radicalise people in their own homes, are really stepping their game up, and we need our response stepped up as well. they need to be the ones to own that. we're asking them to work harder on this, to put more effort, more resources into it, and to work together to deliver it. and in these meetings, actually, i have had a very strong response from all of them. they say they will do just that. none of them want to be the platform on which terrorists do operate, and it is that imperative which is driving this forward. you spoke about making these places on the internet hostile to terrorists. what do you mean by that, exactly? how do you make something like that hostile to terrorists? well, they have to make sure that the material that terrorists want to put up gets taken down, or even better, doesn't go up in the first place. that is what we are really trying to achieve. i mean, in the uk we take down, through our internet referral unit, about 2,000 hostile pieces a week, and that is continuing to rise.
8:08 am
we need to make sure that they take action to do this. users are going to hear this, regular users are going to hear this, and think what you are trying to do is decide, before someone posts something, whether that is allowed. i mean, that is censorship, and the concerns about that are really... you are deciding before it even goes online whether it is allowed. well, i would ask users to decide very carefully the consequences of what is going online. this is material that is designed to encourage violence, it is designed to encourage terrorists. nobody wants that online. and there are ways that we can make sure that the sort of people who they can track who might be putting that online are stopped before it goes up, or indeed, as they put it up, it stops actually going up. because they have managed to track it, and they can identify it before it actually goes live. they have to face up, people who might oppose this, to what our enemy is trying to do.
8:09 am
they are trying to weaponise people at home, vulnerable people, trying to turn them into terrorists. and what happens is, when this material goes online, it is circulated really fast. amber rudd speaking to our reporter in san francisco. patients with pancreatic cancer are being operated on in just two weeks, instead of two months after being diagnosed. research published in the medical journal, hpb, says early surgery increases patients' chances of having their tumours removed by 22%. doctors in birmingham hope their approach will be adopted nationally. michele paduano reports. kate rigby was amazed at how smoothly the nhs worked when she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. within seven days, she had had surgery at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. i feel quite emotional, actually. i feel privileged. i could have died. i can't control nhs budget, and all the other things for the poor people who aren't as lucky as me. but what i can do is spread the word. normally, people with jaundice like mrs rigby have a stent put
8:10 am
in to relieve symptoms, which delays the main operation. but the hospital bypassed this step. a nurse was employed to speed up treatment from two months to 16 days, meaning a fifth more patients were able to complete surgery to remove their cancer. cutting out the stent also said the nhs £3,200 per patient. we save the nhs potentially £200,000 per year, with the number of patients that have surgery within our team. and so that, then, is a reproducible model that other units up and down the country could use to go forward. pancreatic cancer has a very low survival rate. it will be two years before doctors can say whether treating patients more quickly actually means that they live longer. and, if they do, that will beg the question as to whether or not other aggressive cancers should be treated more quickly. for now, kate rigby knows she has been given the best chance possible to survive pancreatic cancer. michele paduano, bbc news. pupils should be taught about the importance
8:11 am
of breast—feeding in schools — that's the advice of the professional body which represents paediatricians. the royal college of paediatrics and child health is also calling on ministers to legislate for breast—feeding breaks and facilities in all workplaces. the college says britain has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe, blaming social stigma for the trend. more needs to be done to stop women being forced to wear high heels at work, according to scientists at the university of aberdeen. academics looked at the physical and social impact of wearing the shoes and say there's enough evidence to suggest they're bad for the health of wearers. earlier this year, the government rejected calls for a ban on enforced high—heel wear. when the owner of petey the dog became stuck in his car during a flash flood, he decided there was no way he was going to leave his pet in danger. have a look at the pictures here, this is the scale of the problem
8:12 am
they were facing. the car was submerged after a dry creek bed was engulfed by a flash flood in colorado. rescuers had to use a crane to get to the car before petey was handed over by his owner who then climbed out. dog first, owner second. the pair could then walk across the crane to safety and dry land. hgppy happy for both of them. from today, babies born in england, wales and northern ireland will be offered a new vaccine which protects against hepatitis b. the hexavalent vaccine will also immunise against five other diseases including diphtheria, polio, tetanus and whooping cough and replaces the current "five in one" injection. health protection scotland is set to adopt a similar policy from september. let's get more detail from joanne yarwood, head of programmes for immunisation at public health england and gp barbara murray. good morning, lovely to see you both. barbara, can i start with you
8:13 am
in terms of the detail of the new vaccinations? you will know full well that a lot of parents worry quite a bit about vaccinations anyway. you are adding one more. 5-6. anyway. you are adding one more. 5—6. joanne, take us through, if you would come exactly what this would comprise of and allay any fears about another vaccine being included? yes, we completely understand parents have concerns about the safety of their children and protecting them. but, this vaccine, as you have already described, adds another element of protection to their children, to protection to their children, to protect them against some really serious and nasty infectious diseases. we are delighted that we can add and introduce this vaccine to babies born today, and add the extra protection into the programme. barbara, is good to have you on the sofa with us, how will parents react to this? it is quite a worry, it's a
8:14 am
stressful time when you take your baby for a vaccine, you are tense and you are waiting for the baby to be heard, and you worry about the consequences of the vaccine? hearing there are six strains of immunisation, six diseases to immunise against seems a lot for a little one to take? when baby is born they're exposed to millions of diseases and viruses, changing a nappy, sitting in a waiting room, somebody coughing on you, far, far more than in a properly prepared vaccine. one of the examples given, on that first vaccination they get protection from nine different diseases. notjust the six, but another three on top. but if you were to give them 11 that would still only use up 0.1% of the ba by‘s would still only use up 0.1% of the baby's immune system. they are so well prepared. can ijust ask baby's immune system. they are so well prepared. can i just ask you about take up? in a gp's surgery,
8:15 am
what's your practical knowledge of how many people take up? it's clearly volu nta ry, how many people take up? it's clearly voluntary, what's the take 7 clearly voluntary, what's the take up? well, we aim because we have targets in general practice, we aim more about 90%. do you reach that? not always. in some areas it can be as low as 80% and then there is a big drive to get the parents to understand how important it is. often what we do is we combine the vaccination day with having the developmental check. joanne, why now? why are we seeing hepatitis b being added to the vaccine now? where will we see a difference? well, what we haven't discussed really is we have an expert committee that advises us on the additional vaccines that we maybe able to offer in our national programme. so they've considered all the evidence. they've looked at it and they advised that we should
8:16 am
introduce this vaccine and babies born today, all babies born from today, will be able to have this vaccine so their first vaccine will be at eight weeks and we're really pleased, we worked really hard to ensure that our national programme, which really is amongst one of the best in the world, is able to offer protection to as many infants as we can. is hepatitis b a problem at the moment in the uk? well, the prevalence of hepatitis b is low in england, in the uk, but we are part ofa england, in the uk, but we are part of a global community and the world health organization has a commitment to protecting infants across the whole world with this vaccine and there are at the moment 97 countries that are already offering this vaccine and we know that more than 150 million doses has been given. so this is part of the really hard work
8:17 am
that everybody is doing to ensure that everybody is doing to ensure that we can offer the best protection available to our children. thank you. and barbara murray, dr barbara murray, thank you for your time as well. it's 8.18am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: british gas says that its electricity prices will go up by 12.5%. it'll affect just over three million customers on the standard variable tariff. donald trump has sacked his communications director, anthony scaramucci, just days after appointing him. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. started off early this morning a little bit blustery where you are this morning on your little balcony overlooking london. yes it was a bit breezy up here, but
8:18 am
we are quite a few levels up. it feels pleasantly warm and we have got blue skies. this isn't the case everywhere, it is across some parts of the uk. the forecast for us today is one of heavy showers and bright or sunny is one of heavy showers and bright or sunny spells. we have seen heavy showers already this morning especially across north—west england and wales, but across scotland, there are also some heavy showers coming in from the south, we have got them across the highlands as well, the outer hebrides, but there is dry weather around. still some heavy showers moving from north—west england heading across the pennines through the day, but north—east england is dry and then as we come further south, across the peak district and essex, kent and towards the isle of wight, a lot of dry weather, sunny skies, pleasantly warm and gentle breezes. further west, we a re warm and gentle breezes. further west, we are looking at sunshine across gloucestershire, dorset, and south—west england seeing sunshine and just a few showers, but wales, you've got a few showers. they have
8:19 am
been lining up as we have gone through the course of the night. some are heavy. for northern ireland, here too, we've got showers particularly in the north and the west. further east, it is drier and brighter with sunshine. now through the course of the day, further showers will develop. some of them will be heavy. some of them will be thundery. some will have hail in. that combination is likely to be anywhere, from south wales to the wash, north of that line, but they are showers. so not all of us will see them. further south, the showers will be less intense. fewer and further between. and south—east england could escape them altogether, but we will see some in east anglia. through the evening and overnight, well, we are looking at a lot of the showers fading. it will bea lot of the showers fading. it will be a chilly night in sheltered glens, but the cloud will build. we will see showers and some rain coming in. and that will be accompanied by strengthening winds. so tomorrow, we start off with a lot of dry weather, but watch how the rain spreads out as it moves
8:20 am
north—east wards. that's going to be heavy and persistent across wales and south—west england and southern counties and the wind will pick up touching gale force around some of the coasts and that rain will advance northwards through the courts day, but north—east scotland should stay dry. so as a result of this rain and the wind, it will feel cooler than it's going to do today where it's going to feel warm. into thursday, we lose the rain. overnight, it will clear off into the north sea, but we will have a curl of showery rain coming in across parts of the north and the west, but many of us will have a dry day with highs once again back up into the low 205, but it will be noticeably breezy. on friday naga and charlie, it will be sunshine and showers again. but you're making sure you're hogging the sunshine. 0h, sure you're hogging the sunshine. oh, it's lovely. i know how carlol feels. i love it. enjoy it. style bible british vogue makes history today when edward enninful
8:21 am
becomes its first male editor. to bring in the changes he's recruited the film—maker steve mcqueen and the model, naomi campbell, but in the digital age when runway shows are live streamed is there still a demand for glossy fashion magazines? let's discuss this now with the fashion blogger, maria joynson and from new york. bronwyn cosgrave who was a features editor at british vogue. good morning. thank you for staying up good morning. thank you for staying up late for us. we've got a female dr scop who and now a male editor of vogue. the times are changing. it's about time. i mean and i actually think this isn't about gender. there has been a lot in the press about edward's appointment. i really feel that they picked the best person for thejob. he has a track that they picked the best person for the job. he has a track record that goes back decades. he started out on
8:22 am
i-d goes back decades. he started out on i—d magazine which is the great british style bible. he has worked inw british style bible. he has worked in w magazine in new york and for american vogue. he is not an outsider. it's edward enninful obe. he is great friends, the second son ofjonathan he is great friends, the second son of jonathan newhouse who he is great friends, the second son ofjonathan newhouse who made the appointment, not the second son, the adopted son and close to the newhouse family. he is a wonderful quy- newhouse family. he is a wonderful guy. very imaginative. his great contribution so far was the black issue which was published in 2008 at vogue italia which was the first all black issue of vogue. also vogue has had a man at the helm in the 19305, he was the editor of paris vogue and continued into the 19505 and was a legendary character and men have
8:23 am
co nsta ntly legendary character and men have constantly worked behind the scenes at british vogue so now it's time for somebody to take up the reigns. that's the issue when it comes to what a man can do at the helm of such an iconic magazine, it is interesting maria about blogging and the place of vogue now. the place of a glossy magazine in our world and i noticed that last year, some us vogue writers were openly critical of fashion bloggers, just basically saying, no to bloggers who change head to toe and paid to change, there is this competition to say well, who says what goes? and you are not the one to say it. why should there be a competition. i feel you could include bloggers a lot more. it's not about a competition, it's about emgracing the fact that the fashion industry is changing. the people are embracing people like you who blog, isn't it? yes. it is instant access.
8:24 am
so by the time you get a magazine and we will get your view on this bronwyn, by the time you get a magazine, it is out of date almost. i feel like the instant access is there, if you open a copy of a magazine, if you're going to find someone magazine, if you're going to find someone who you magazine, if you're going to find someone who you can magazine, if you're going to find someone who you can relate to, it's difficult. if you have a disability, if you open a copy of vogue, you are not likely going to see yourself represented in the pages, but you can go online and within seconds search and a hashtag find hundreds of people who are exactly like you. maria, for your generation, is it still a big deal, what's on the cover of british vogue? is that still a big deal? it is personal to me because i have been a subscriber since 2011 and i recently cancelled my subscription. the current issue is on my desk in the packaging. what do you think of that?” is on my desk in the packaging. what do you think of that? i actually, i don't think a mag dean is out of date. i think a weekly publication
8:25 am
is out of date, but i think what a reader is looking at, looking to when one buys vogue is analysis and expertise. you know, it's not easy to get a job at british vogue, nor is it easy keeping a job at british vogue. they demand the absolute best. a lot of research and a lot of intelligence and background goes into that magazine and you know blogging, fantastic, but it's more off—the—cuff, you know, over the last five years, yeah, i'd love to see british vogue edited by a guest blogger. that didn't happen. i think there is a slight insecurity within there is a slight insecurity within the magazine establishment, about the magazine establishment, about the whole social media landscape and ido the whole social media landscape and i do think, you know, i do think
8:26 am
that castigating bloggers was a misstep. edward has over 5,000 instagram followers and he appointed steve mcqueen and naomi campbell, all these independent professionals who to a certain extent rely on social media to keep building their brands and today, vogue is no longer just a magazine, it is a brand and it has to compete with the best brands out there. thank you very much for your time. brands out there. thank you very much foryourtime. lovely brands out there. thank you very much for your time. lovely to speak to you and maria, thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, today, essentially, is one of sunshine and showers, some heavy and thundery. persistent rain in the forecast tomorrow, this brings with it showers initially into northern and western parts, gradually tracking eastwards through
8:27 am
the day. do grab your umbrella as you head out this morning. breezy among coastal areas, showers in northern ireland, wales and northern england, gradually moving eastwards and between, we can look forward to sunshine as well. temperatures are nothing to write home about, 16—23d. as we head into the evening, these showers continue for some time. they will clear way. then all eyes to the west. this weather front approaches, bringing rain into the south—west of england and wales. the rest of the country is dry tonight, temperatures don't drop too much but in the countryside is on the chilly side, especially in scotland. tomorrow, thanks to this weather front, we have wind and rain gradually tracking northwards and eastwards through the day. northern parts of england and scotland enjoy the best of dry and bride whether the longest. western parts are wet from the word go, strong winds and heavy rain are likely in the south coast
8:28 am
tomorrow. temperatures aren't too impressive, 16—18 degrees, sunshine is pretty ha rd impressive, 16—18 degrees, sunshine is pretty hard to find. on thursday, a day of sunshine and blustery showers. they could be heavy and thundery, temperatures range from 15 to 23 degrees, remaining blustery through much of the day. as we head towards the end of the week, it is cool and breezy, sunny spells to look forward to. a risk of showers and hopefully settling down in time for the weekend. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. adapating to the new normal. the energy giant bp delivers another strong profit despite lower oil prices. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 1st of august. with bp's focus moving
8:29 am
from old projects to new ones and a massive writedown in angola profits still came in at almost $700m. also in the programme... sony takes it to another level as it look at its biggest profit in nearly 20 years. the electronics giant has been selling lots of playstations and image sensors.
8:30 am

78 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on