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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  August 1, 2017 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello — it's tuesday, it's nine o'clock. i'm tina daheley in for victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. our top story today, this programme has learned greater manchester police is facing new investigations by the police watchdog over three separate fatal firearms incidents. you've got quite a number of separate fails which then brings that big picture of an organisation that is questionable — it looks farfrom good. we'll bring you the full exclusive story shortly. also on the programme — a jury at the inquest of a mentally ill prisoner at hmp holloway who took her own life at the jail last year has identified serious shortcomings in her care. we'll bring you sarah reed's full story before ten. calls continue for channel 4 to cancel plans to broadcast private video tapes of princess diana. we speak to some of those who knew her. what we have to look at here is what's in the national
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interest and historically, twenty years after her death this is information we should know about. everyone who had close involvement — as indeed you did — mr burrell and others with great respect we should keep quiet now, let her rest in peace. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11. throughout the programme, we'll bring you the latest breaking news and developing stories and — as always — we are really keen to hear from you on all the stories we're talking about this morning. a little later in the programme we'll hear calls for the importance of breast—feeding to be taught in secondary schools. the uk has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe — so would this make a difference?
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get in touch — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... british gas has said it will increase the price of electricity for the first time in nearly four years. from september, the standard tariff will rise by 12.5%. the move is expected to affect more than three million customers. ian conn is the chief executive of british gas's parent company, centrica. he explained why the price rise was necessary despite a decrease in the wholesale cost of energy. first of all, the last time we moved electricity prices was injanuary 20 14. electricity prices was injanuary 20 1a. since then, they have been held flat. from that time, you are absolutely correct, wholesale prices have fallen. we estimate about £36 on the average bill. that is not what is driving this but what is driving it is the transport and distribution costs, the costs of getting electricity to your home and government, environmentaland getting electricity to your home and government, environmental and policy costs. when you add these together,
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it goes up by approaching £100 which is driving the increase. i should say that even after this increase, british gas's electricity prices will be cheaper than ten other suppliers by some distance. the government says it is concerned that this price rise will hit people already on poor value tariffs and shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell said it was unacceptable. our business editor simonjack is with us. 12.5% is a massive price rise? they are playing catch up with other energy suppliers who put up their price rises injanuary, they said they would freeze them back in december, but this is a big double—digit rise and will be a shock to many. in the clip from the boss of centrica, british gas's pa rent boss of centrica, british gas's parent company, they say that wholesale prices have gone up, usually, but this time wholesale costs have gone down but government policy and renewables have added to
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this. there is a big emphasis on generating more electricity through renewables, like wind and solar energy, a bit more expensive than traditional sources like gas—fired power stations. you have two connect those sources to the actual grid which costs money, those costs are coming through to the customer. and the other thing about government policy, in terms of feeding tariffs where you can sell money to the grid, where you have your own solar panels, they take administration and they are putting those three. the government hit back this morning and say that government policies do not account to this. there is a war of words about who is to blame for this but, 3.4 million people will see a big price rise. 0n a prepay meter, you are already protected if you are on this as there is an energy cup. this will dou btlessly there is an energy cup. this will doubtlessly reignite the debate as to whether we need price caps, more generally in the industry. it was a
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labour party policy, the tories had it in their manifesto but it was dropped in the queen's speech. while other companies follow suit? others went up injanuary this year, they may feel they have done their bit for this year but it is a bigger rise than we saw for many of the others, it's not impossible that we will see further rises, people say, isn't it typical that these price rises come in september with winter just around the corner? thank you. if you are a british gas customer, we are keen to hear your views on this story. julian is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. white house communications director anthony scaramucci has been fired after fewer than ten days in the post. mr scaramucci was dismissed last night — just hours after the appointment of generaljohn kelly — for what officials described as his "inappropriate" comments in a magazine interview. he's the third trump appointee to leave his role in recent days. despite his short tenure as white house media chief, anthony "the mooch" scaramucci made his mark. it was a most difficult
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situation to be in. what is the first thing you are going to change to right the ship and put it on course? again i take issue with that. this ship is going in the right direction. one of the things i cannot stand about this town is the backstabbing that goes on here. where i grew up, in the neighbourhood i am from, we are in front stabbers. what happens to leakers on your watch? they are going to get fired. why don't you guys get together and make a decision as a team that you are going to stop leaking.
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if you are going to keep leaking, i am going to fire everybody. it is just very binary. donald trump is not elitist then? very much so, he is both. he knows how to operate in an elitist world and he has unbelievable empathy for the common struggle that is going on with the middle—class people and the lower—middle—class people. tell me why donald trump is not elite? the business side or the politics side or the inheritance? what part of donald trump? many people in the uk don't understand that. there are so many things about the president... he's a celebrity, he's a billionaire. how about the pizza? everybody eats burgers and pizzas. what are you talking about? you see, you are coming across a little bit elitist. well, social media users have been having a lot of fun with mr scaramucci's swift departure. the kate hudson film ‘how to lose a guy in 10 days' wasjust one of the memes that appeared on twitter. the new york post updated
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its ‘survivor‘ front page, while other users played around with how the news was being received. there was even a suggestion that "scaramucci" could be added to the dictionary as a measure of time. greater manchester police is facing new investigations by the police watchdog over three separate fatal firearms incidents. this programme learned the independent police complaints commission is examining new evidence in the cases dating from 2008 to 2013. many of the officers involved are still serving in the force. and we'll have more on this story shortly. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him in london's knightsbridge. police say he was taken to hospital but has since been discharged. a spokesperson said it was not yet known if the liquid thrown was a corrosive substance. pupils should be taught about the
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importance of breast—feeding in schools according to the professional body representing paediatricians. the royal college of paediatrics and child health say that there should be legislation for best feeding breaks and facilities in all companies. the uk has one of the lowest breast—feeding rates and they blame social stigma for the trend. more needs to be done to stop women being forced to wear high heels at work, according to scientists at the university of aberdeen. academics looked at the the physical and social impact of wearing the shoes and say there's enough evidence to suggest they're bad for the health of wearers. earlier this year the government rejected calls for a ban on enforced high—heel wear. 0n on that story, an anonymous text has come in. as a previous work at an estate agent as an office receptionist, i was forced to wear high heels. it wasn't stated in the
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contract but doubly mentioned at every occasion, it was meant to make you look smarter but made it more difficult to move around the office ona difficult to move around the office on a daily basis and made me feel uncomfortable and a lot of the time. keep your messages coming in. it's time for a look at the sport now. los angeles will host the olympics in 2028? yes, a whole host of cities in the next to host this and we know that subject to ratification, essentially a formality, we know that paris in france will host the 2024 olympics. and, la, in 2028. this was the team celebrating in the la galaxy stadium where david beckham and steven gerard used to play. a victory for na, they brought the olympics back to the usa for the first time since 2002, salt lake city hosted in 1984, in los angeles famously. it's a centenary event for
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them, 100 years since they hosted it. a win—win situation. and it's a memorable day for england's cricketers, especially moeen ali? dramatic, brilliant from england's point of view, winning by 239 runs, taking a 2—1 series lead. 0ne test to play in manchester, starting on friday but three men we should mention. ben stokes was brilliant, man of the match. he took two important wickets, and toby roland—jones, on his debut, the middlesex all—rounder essentially taking eight wickets for 129 runs. moeen ali and what a way to finish the test match. the first wicket, taken by morris and caught by stokes. a replay of rabada's wicket. and finally... the drama. morne morkel, lbw, successfully reviewed. a test match fast—track —— the first test match hat—trick since 1939 for
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a spinner. there are questions about the inconsistency of the england team. they won nine matches, and every time they have done that, they have gone on to lose one directly afterwards. questions at old trafford after that decider. england could win 3—1. they could be levelled up too. it is incredible for moeen ali. staying with cricket, test match special‘s geoffrey boycott was on the receiving end of a wind—up? boycott was on the receiving end of a wind-up? he was, look at this. a very special moment for him, people may remember one of england's most famous batsmen, special because this century came at headingley... his home ground in yorkshire and this was his 100th first—class century. bat in the air, a big moment for him, celebrating with a glass of champagne and yesterday, jonathan agnew played a blinder in the test
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match special box. this was during the test match, when moeen ali took the test match, when moeen ali took the final three wickets to wrap it up. he started by reading a fake statement from the icc, suggesting one of these centuries would be taken away meaning the famous 100th century would not have come at headingley. look at this, it is brilliant. it should say no, we are not going to. that would become your 99100. not going to. that would become your 99 100. it is not going to. that would become your 99100. it is ridiculous. when was it? the 11th of august. if we were not doing anything special... we don't have anything planned, do we? 180 people at our house raising money for the yorkshire air ambulance. you will have two counts of it. we are not cancelling it, it's an absolute mess. and a complete wind—up, geoffrey boycott! complete wind—up, geoffreym it's an absolute mess. and a complete wind-up, geoffrey is that right? you muppet. i will get you
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for that! brilliant! he well and truly fell for it! an oscar forjonathan agnew, we cut that down, it is about three and a half minutes long, it's on the bbc sport website. he deserves that wind—up, he will have for dinner and it all goes ahead. i will watch a full version straight after the programme. thank you. this programme has discovered that greater manchester police — england's second biggest police force — is facing three new investigations into deaths involving firearms officers. the three cases are very different — they involve the shooting dead of an unarmed man, a police officer killed in a training exercise and a young man who was tasered and died after being restrained by armed officers. it raises questions about the conduct of gmps firearms unit at a time when manchester has recently been hit by a terror attack.. simon cox has this exclusive report for us? they are the second biggest police force in england and wales.
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it is very much a male dominated environment, lots of testosterone. but greater manchester police's firearms unit is facing intense criticism. my life is on hold. the police have determined what has happened with anthony's life and they‘ re dictating what is happening in my life. three very different cases have ended up with three people being killed and left three families grieving. i'm tempted to say you try and move on, but you don't move on. you really never can move on. we can now reveal that all of these cases are facing new investigations by the police watchdog. if you have got quite a number of separate fails then that brings out that the big picture of an organisation that is questionable, it looks far from good. we've spoken to more than a dozen former officers, some of whom are speaking out for the very first time.
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i thought we were getting a little bit too much into the aggressive tactics. the more aggressive you get, the more likely you are to have people shot. so what's going wrong inside greater manchester police? he was a beautiful person inside and out. just a kind heart. i'm not trying to say for one second that he was an angel. anthony granger was 36, he had two young children and worked as a car mechanic. he lived in manchester with his partner gail.
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i remember coming back and actually sitting there and thinking my life is perfect. i remember it. and then he nipped out and he didn't come home. this is bbc radio five live. a man was shot dead last night in cheshire after the car he was in was stopped by officers from greater manchester police in a preplanned operation. it happened in culcheth near warrington. two men were arrested at the scene. the victim was anthony granger. he had been found guilty of handling stolen cars but had no convictions for violence. the other men in the car were a different story. they did have convictions for violence and the police saw one as a very dangerous criminal. it was early saturday evening back in march 2012 when armed officers swooped into this car park in unmarked cars. they were aiming for the corner which is where anthony granger was sitting in the driver's seat.
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what happened next is disputed. the police say that when they got here anthony had raised and then lowered his arms. they were worried that he was going for a gun. one of the officers fired a shot and killed him. we've talked to one of the other passengers in the car and they said there was no warning, they did not know it was armed police, the first thing they knew a shot had come through the windscreen and had killed anthony. what is clear is that anthony granger didn't have a gun, neither did anyone else in the car. it was half past seven, eight o'clock in the morning and there was somebody knocking on the door so i opened the door and i thought he had forgotten his keys. it was one of his friends and his friend just stood there looking at me. he just went, "he's been shot." i thought, what do you mean? he's shot? we don't live in america.
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and then he said the police did it. and i just collapsed. but i didn't believe it even up until i seen in his body in the morgue. the sleepy village of culcheth is the last place where you would expect a shooting. it's somewherejohn buttress knows well. he's a former chief inspector with greater manchester police. he was sacked over a mortgage fraud case but later cleared by a jury. he claimed he was targeted after whistle—blowing about bullying. this was denied by greater manchester police and wasn't upheld by further investigations. thank you very much. my son went to scouts over there. his primary school is a few hundred yards down there, his secondary school just over there. the sweet shop a lot of the kids used to come to is just over there. so the idea of having armed police
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officers doing an operation here? it's utterly wrong. so why did the police shoot anthony granger? earlier this year a public inquiry was held into his death. it hasn't reported its findings yet but during the evidence we started to get some answers. officers had been trailing anthony granger and his friends for weeks, convinced they were planning an armed robbery. the top detective on the operation was this man, chief inspector robert carson, seen here in 2011. he admitted making a mistake on the intelligence about anthony granger and said it would not have made any difference, there were still known violent criminals in the car. john buttress says that is not good enough. i'm disgusted. igenuinely am. the person who put together the intelligence brief,
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that person didn't collect the intelligence from the existing police systems and that has ended up with a man shot dead in broad daylight. but intelligence is only one part of the picture for firearms officers. another one was a drugs raid on a flat about that high. tony long knows what it's like to pull the trigger. he shot and killed three people during his 30 year career with the metropolitan police. he says you cannotjust rely on someone's criminal record. by definition a good criminal is one that doesn't get caught. so if you look at the granger case, i understand that he had a criminal background, he hung around with criminals, certainly the vehicle that they were driving was a stolen car where the plates had been swapped. the intelligence suggested, as i understand it, that they were going to carry out a robbery.
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it looks now with the benefit of hindsight that they were probably just on another reconnaissance. during the public inquiry lawyers for anthony granger‘s family said the police had exaggerated his criminal record and the threat he posed. greater manchester police firmly denied this, but admitted mistakes had been made. 0n the night of the operation the firearms team had been on duty for 14 hours when they were told to move in. there were 16 firearms officers, all given codenames to protect their identities. several had failed training courses and it was argued during the public inquiry they shouldn't have been on the operation. greater manchester police disputed this. i cannot honestly see how that can happen. a force such as manchester has got resilience, so there shouldn't be a reason why somebody involved in a firearms job who wasn't trained to carry out their role.
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martin harding spent 14 years on the front line as a firearms officer with the greater manchester force and still works as a consultant for the police. it's very much a male dominated environment, lots of testosterone. it's very close—knit. the nature of the role means it has to be close—knit, you had to be able to trust your partners and team—mates 200%. but has this macho environment gone too far? it emerged during the public inquiry the shooter, the officer known as q9, had seriously injured a suspect during an arrest. it was also revealed he had been previously disciplined for assaulting two people. he was cleared of ten other separate assault allegations and remained as a firearms officer. to have that number of complaints would raise concerns. when you've got an officer who is in a role as a firearms officer with a significant number of complaints, somebody has got to look at that managerially and decide if that is the right place for you.
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ultimately q9 told the inquiry he fired the shot because he thought his life and those of his fellow officers were in danger. tony long has met q9, they're part of the tiny group of officers who have carried out fatal shootings. he seemed just like a really decent guy, just quiet, steady. if the perception by his body language, his movements is that he was going for a gun or he has got hold of a gun and you think that your colleagues or a member of the public‘s life is in danger, then you are duty bound to act on that decision and do what you have been trained to do. this wasn't the last serious case q9 was involved in. we've discovered there was another incident where his conduct
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was called into question after anthony granger‘s death. all of the firearms officers involved in the granger case were granted anonymity so we can't talk about this other case in detail. the questions for greater manchester police go to the top of the force. during the public inquiry an assistant chief constable apologised for changing his record of the operation, leading up to anthony granger‘s death. and a senior firearms officer had destroyed his notes when he retired a year after the shooting. it would be unusual. there's lots of stuff you get rid of, but there are things you don't get rid of and pocketbooks and notes of that nature are not one of the things that you would get rid of. anthony granger‘s partner, gail, is still grieving, waiting for the case to end. but we've discovered that the police
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watchdog has launched a new investigation into his killing. it's the second time the independent police complaints commission has looked into this case which is incredibly rare. they told us they are examining evidence given to the public inquiry. my life is on hold. it has been on hold and it is still on hold now. the police have determined what is happening with anthony's life and they're dictating what's happening in my life. i don't want anybody to have to go through the pain and the upset and the... just what we have been through as a family. but this isn't the first time questions have been raised about firearms officers and greater manchester police. we bought it for ian for his 18th
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birthday as a birthday present. he always wanted a yellow beetle. so when i am in it i feel quite close to being in the beetle, almost as if he is with us. we canjust picture him driving it and how pleased he was when he got it in the first place, when he got it as a birthday present. ian terry was devoted to his family and his job as a firearms officer with greater manchester police. he was full of fun. he was a caring person, but i think the thing that stands out most of all was his enthusiasm for life and everything he did. he absolutely adored his wife and children and he loved hisjob. behind me is the sharp project, this
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is home to lots of small businesses now, but in 2008 this was a disused factory. it was the ideal location for firearms officers to do a practice exercise. it was here that pc ian terry had volunteered to play the role of a baddy. but what was unusual on this day is they were going to use live rounds. it was a decision that would go horribly wrong. shot dead on duty, a policeman is killed during firearms training in manchester. we were told that he had been involved in an accident at work and that they couldn't save him. ian terry had been shot by an officer using a shotgun loaded with a so—called rip round cartridge at
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deadly close—range. he died within minutes. the police watchdog was scathing. it said the case was a shocking wa ke—up call for greater manchester police firearms unit. an inquestjury in 2010 ruled that ian terry had been unlawfully killed and that he would've been saved if the training had been properly prepared. the training exercise had been over engineered if you like. they'd made it rather too dangerous. and really certain elements in there should not have happened altogether. 0ne former officer agrees with this. i thought we were getting a little bit too much into the aggressive tactics. john foxcroft ran the firearms training unit
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at greater manchester but left over safety concerns in 2006. i thought they were exposing some possible dangers and they wouldn't listen to me. the more aggressive you get, the more likely you are to have people shot. two years afterjohn left the unit, ian terry was killed. i don't think you can underestimate it really. i have seen it a great deal in 30 years of policing and i have been involved with firearms a lot, but another situation where a police officer would end up shooting another police officer by accident, it shouldn't have happened. the crown prosecution service said there was not enough evidence to bring criminal charges against any officers. the greater manchester police was fines for health and safety offences. in 2014 one of the officers who organised the training was fired from the force. the man who shot ian terry was disciplined but still works for the police. we would have liked there to have been rather more disciplinary action against the officers who ran the exercise. he was a good friend of ian and hejust could not explain why he had gone
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with all that was happening. he had just gone into what he would have done in a live situation. we got the impression that the firearms officers were more or less allowed just to get on and do their own thing. john buttress has met the two police officers who organised the ill—fated training. they had borne some responsibility but everybody else involved needs to accept their portion of the blame and it simply has not happened. there were a number of officers who failed in their duty and a police officer, a very talented individual who i know personally, who is dead as a result. but ian terry's family think greater manchester police responded well. we have been treated as well as we could possibly have been by gmp. i think there were mistakes made byjust a small number of officers on the day.
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incredibly we have discovered there is another new investigation by the police watchdog, this time into the ian terry case nine years after he was killed. we understand it follows fresh complaints about what happened on the day of the shooting. and there is another controversial case where someone was killed, again involving armed officers from greater manchester, but in very different circumstances. jordan begley was 23, he worked in an ice cream factory near his home in gorton in manchester. a ha rd—working person, a family man, loved his mum and his little brother, he loved football and he loved manchester united and loved going to all the games. that was his passion, manchester united. but on the night of his death jordan begley had a drunken
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argument with his neighbours and was threatening to attack them with a knife, so his mum called the police. i need the police here as soon you can. jordan, just stay there, you are not going out! a patrol officer calmed him down, then other officers arrived, eleven in total. jordan begley was tasered and restrained by armed police. he was punched while he was on the ground and died from heart failure. it was a shock because they did not need that many officers for one person. he was harmless. he would not hurt a fly, so it is like why do you need all these officers when they could have been elsewhere helping other people? at his inquest, thejury found police failings played a part in his death and said he had been unlawfully killed. we were really close, he is a year older than me, so it was like the loss of a cousin and a friend as well. the police were initially
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cleared of any blame but after the inquest the police watchdog quashed their first report and started a new investigation which had never been done before. someone actually believes us and we can go somewhere now and do something about it. someone has got to say sorry, they have got to. that is what we want. this is not about the past. many of the officers in these cases are still serving and the new investigations are ongoing. these cases pose tough questions for greater manchester police and their firearms officers. at a time when they are needed more than ever — can we trust them to keep us safe? we asked greater manchester police to come on the programme. instead they sent us a brief statement. they told us, "firearms officers in gmp and around the country volunteer for the role and do a very difficultjob, quite rightly under the highest levels if scrutiny.
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however, as the public inquiry is still ongoing, it is not possible for us to comment more specifically at this time. we will await the findings and will consider any recommendations made." more on this story after 10am. still to come... sarah reed — a prisoner with mental health issues — took her own life at hmp holloway last year. now a jury at her inquest has identified serious shortcomings in her care. we'll speak to her mother shortly. hackers say they have stolen the script for an upcoming episode of game of thrones. we bring you the latest in just a moment. he is julian he isjulian in the bbc newsroom live a summary of the news today. british gas will increase its electricity prices by 12.5% from the 15th of september. its owner centrica said the price increase was its first
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since november 2013. the company's gas prices will be held at their current level. the government says it's concerned the price rise will hit many people already on poor value tariffs. and the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell said it was unacceptable. i think it is extortionate, at this point in time when people's wages are being cut orfrozen, and people are being cut orfrozen, and people are struggling at the moment. we said from the labour party that we would introduce a price cap and have alternative energy supplies. they cannot control energy prices and holders over a barrel future. the white house communications director anthony scaramucci has been fired less tha n anthony scaramucci has been fired less than two weeks after his appointment. after his departure from donald trump's top team, the new chief of staffjohn kelly asked him to step aside. the former banker
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made headlines when comments about his predecessor were made public. a canadian couple have been described as heros for using their speedboat to put out a wildfire. koyne watson was on the south thompson river with his fiance tasha hunt when they spotted smoke on the bank. tasha called the authorities but koyne had another idea. he repeatedly drove the speedboat close to shore spinning it so water doused the flames. firefighters were able to totally put out the fire when they finally arrived. that's a summary of the latest news, moore at ten o'clock. you have been reacting to our top stories this morning, british gas price rises. adel e—mailed to say that she is a single mum with two children and has two keeper has warm in winter. she is on two keeper has warm in winter. she isona two keeper has warm in winter. she is on a prepaid meter, her gas bill was £100 and £40 — £50 for her electric in january, was £100 and £40 — £50 for her electric injanuary, she can barely
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afford this, how can she cope with price rises? she pays enough. someone anonymously has said that they will change their tariff and now save £152 per year, no price rises for them. that was fast. time for a look at the sport with will perry. los angeles are set to host the 2028 olympic games, and paris will stage the 2024 competition. both had wanted the 2024 event — but la mayor eric garcetti says the deal they were offered "was too good to pass up". los angeles has staged the olympics twice — in 1932 and 1984. england's cricketers now lead the series against south africa 2—1 after winning the third test at the 0val by 239 runs, a win sealed by a dramatic moeen ali hat trick. it was brilliant yesterday afternoon, the first england spinner to get a hat—trick since 1939. the fourth and final test starts at old trafford on friday. manchester united manager jose mourinho has made his third big signing of the summer.
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he's gone back to former club chelsea and signed nemanja matic, a player he signed for the blues three years ago. he has moved to old trafford for a fee of £35m, that could rise to £40m. and the world athletics championships get underway at the weekend, but one of the star attractions on the track won't be there. david rudisha, the world and olympic 800m champion — and world record holder, is out with a thigh injury. the kenyan won the world title in beijing two years ago, and broke the world record in london in 2012. i'm tina did healy in for victoria. next this morning, this is 32—year—old sarah breed, described asa 32—year—old sarah breed, described as a woman in tournament. she was loved and adored by her family. as a woman in tournament. she was loved and adored by herfamily. she had been suffering from serious mental ill—health since the death of her six—month—old baby in 2003. in 2012 she was the victim of a brutal police assault where an officer was
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convicted. in 2014 she was co ntroversially convicted. in 2014 she was controversially charged with the assault of a psychiatric nurse. she was kept in holloway women's prison and it was there that she took her own life. serious shortcoming is in her care have been identified and herfamily say that she was let down by authorities at every opportunity. her mum marilyn reed joins us now along with lee jasper, a campaigner and spokesperson for the family. thank you so much for coming in to talk to us this morning. marilyn, can you tell us about sarah, and what she was like? she was an ordinary young woman. very much adored by her family. ordinary young woman. very much adored by herfamily. she experienced mental health issues after the death of her child. but, ona after the death of her child. but, on a whole, you know, she was still someone on a whole, you know, she was still someone that we still cherished and looked after. she was just a normal
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young woman. that had a fewer issues. how long ago did those mental health issues start? she became unwell within about six months. a couple of months after the death of her child. how much treatment was she receiving for that. who was supporting her during this time? she wasn't really being treated. as a family, we took her to our local health care professionals. when we identified that she was struggling, with the loss of her child, she became stuck in a mode where you would try and have a conversation with her about something basic. and, she would a lwa ys something basic. and, she would always bring you back to this deceased baby. she would walk around
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with a photo that was given to her at the hospice, with the deceased child. you could not get her away from the subject. she would present the photo to you and say, have you seen the photo to you and say, have you seen my baby? how much worse did her problems get? i would say her mental health got pretty bad around about two or three years after the death of the child. because, what happened with sarah, is that she would not engage with any of the mental health few workers that were given to her. —— key workers that were given to her. she had a mistrust. it did not help. she would respond to gps, and the level of care for sarah, in the
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early stages, i would say was pretty poon early stages, i would say was pretty poor. partly because she would not communicate what was going on with the mental health institutions, and partly because she did not trust anyone. that mistrust was down to another incident, the problem began when she lost her child, we saw disturbing footage of her being beaten by a police officer. what impact that have on her mental health? it affected her terribly. at a time where she experienced the physical, i would call it, beating from the police officer, she had been accused of shoplifting. it was proven that she had not shoplifted. but because of how she appeared at the time, she was taken into the back of the store and accused of
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shoplifting. you could clearly see in the video that she is opening her bag for him to look but overall, it affected her greatly. before what happened to her was made public, she asked the legal team looking after her then not to release that. due to concerns for herself and her welfare, and her living child because she still has a living daughter. it really impacted her. she said she remembered feeling very frightened of white males, that were quite big. this officer was quite a big officer. and she also felt humiliated and she felt there was a change after the incident in how she was being treated by health care professionals as well. sarah ended up professionals as well. sarah ended
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up in prison. how was she treated there? umm. .. there up in prison. how was she treated there? umm... there are other versions of how she was treated, and the version she communicated to us while she was in their hands. what is your version based on your communications with her last time you met her in prison? the true version was that she was placed in holloway for psychiatric reports to see if she was fit to play against an incident where she had been... another patient had tried to sexually assault her on a mixed ward in maudsley hospital, and that changed but throughout her being placed in holloway, i battled with a legal team, i tried to communicate to thejudge legal team, i tried to communicate to the judge and holloway to find
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out why they felt it was necessary where an incident in a hospital... you know someone has a history of mental health, that you have decided to imprison them for a psychiatric report? nobody could tell me why. throughout, being in holloway, sarah complained in writing over phone conversations and with the few visits she had, she had her medications taken away from her that she had been on for years, she was on one of her tablets that kept her stable, it was a medication called for typing, that was removed from her more or less within a couple of weeks. but placed her in crisis. who do you blame for sarah's death? i'd rather not answer that at this point because i think sarah, sarah's death, i still have questions about
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her death. i willjust read you a cull of messages that have come in on twitter. "heartbreaking listening to sarah reid's mother." kelly says "we need huge change too many lives lost. " how "we need huge change too many lives lost." how did you become involved? it was sarah's grandmother who rang me up desperate at 11 o'clock at night saying they were desperate to get this story out and that mainstream media had initially said yes, we're interested and then dropped the story and they couldn't really understand why. i then wrote something on my blog which then resulted in more mainstream press interest and that's howl resulted in more mainstream press interest and that's how i came associated with the family. what we re associated with the family. what were the failings as you saw them? failings in putting a an ill person in remand on prison. that's wrong. it should never happen to anybody
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with serious mental health. there was a misdiagnosis, a damning critic of the jury and brutality of a level and hellish nature that you can't believe unless you really read the tory in detail. she descended into a hell brought on by a psychosis which was left untreated by the prison. i blame holloway and the criminal justice system that seems to think it's ok to treat mentally ill people as if they're behaving badly. was this an isolated incident or a systematic failure? systematic because we're waiting for the home secretary's report into deaths in custody and there is a tragic his dre dan saunders who were subjected to similar treatments and misdiagnosis. sarah's mum was denied
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11 visits to a person on remand. her partner was refused visits. her solicitor was denied visits. all the time she is descending into this hellish torment that is brought on bya hellish torment that is brought on by a psychosis. for you this isn't just about the mental health issues, but it's to do with race, gender and class. tell me why? i think as a black woman, as a young black woman who is suffering mental health, made sarah particularly vulnerable and acute and the kind of beat that we saw from pc james acute and the kind of beat that we saw from pcjames kennedy aggravated that and we know about the disproportionate deaths of people within the criminaljustice system. the government announced more effort for mental health patients. surely we should be make ago law that nobody with mental health should be
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ina nobody with mental health should be in a prison. no, it's not the place. a ministry ofjustice spokesperson told us: "this is a tragic case and our thoughts are with sarah reed's family and friends. we await the full recommendations from hm coroner and these findings will be carefully considered by the departments and agencies involved." coming up: princess diana's former bodyguard and close friend tells this programme that a controversial documentary about her being shown on channel 4 this weekend should be broadcast. lots of you getting in touch with this. jess says, "diana tapes, no purpose of making public. those poor boys william and harry have enough stress in their lives. the decision should be with queen, prince charles and diana's children. the tapes are their prort. they have so little privacy. some things should be kept private." an e—mail from privacy. some things should be kept private." an e—mailfrom pixie. calling for the tapes not to be
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aired is ridiculous. people saying it will upset the boys is a lame excuse for it upsetting some of the establishment that are continually trying to remove princess diana's existence. william and harry are grown men. in the interview last week, william made it clear that he wa nted week, william made it clear that he wanted george and charlotte to know they had another grandmother and she existed. this is a clear message that people should acknowledge. history cannot and should not be rewritten. more on this at 10.30am. the royal national lifeboat institution or rnli, says last year saw a rise in the number of coastal deaths in august. they're warning of the shock that can come with falling into cold water as we enter the deadliest month for accidents in the sea. radio 1 newsbeat‘s rick kelsey has been in cornwall with the rnli as a new national campaign tells people how to deal with the shock of falling in cold water. tens of thousands of people will go into the water
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off the uk this month. one of the most popular places is here in newquay. so how would you describe today's conditions? a good day for surfing or not? yes, it's pretty good, it's pretty solid out there. it's nice and clean which makes a change. josie has the job of watching hundreds of surfers and swimmers here on fistral beach. i've lived pretty much on this beach all my life. i've done the surf life saving club since i was little. it's nice to keep the waters safe in somewhere you have always lived. it's nice to keep people safe. so on a day like this what are the trickiest things that could cause someone a problem? for holiday—makers they do not understand the water like we do. so theyjust think they can go wherever they want and sometimes when you tell them they don't like to be told what to do. right. although the beach has lots of flags flying it's clear some people don't know what they mean. the red and yellow flags there are for swimmers, bathers and body boarders, so any soft equipment.
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and then we've got the black and white chequered flag which are for surfers and kayakers and stand—up paddle boarders, anything with a hard bottom, a hard fin, anything like that. we like to keep them separate because obviously we don't want a surfer to bump into any of the swimmers. every yearjust under 200 people die on the uk's coastline while thousands more are injured. anthony miller was just 23 when he went into the water one night. they were drinking, partying and he basically said right, "i'm going skinny—dipping". he went into the sea and basically he disappeared. i really, really want people to be aware that when you are on holiday, or whether you live by the sea, and you are out drinking by all means have a good time, but do not go near the water, do not because you may not come back out alive. even in the summer months the temperatures in uk waters do not
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get much above 16 celsius which is about the same temperature that comes out of your cold water tap. and august is also the month that the guys who work in this lifeboat station are the busiest. volunteers like 18—year—old michaela can be in the water saving lives just ten minutes after serving customers in a pharmacy. i am actually the only girl in the crew and i'm the youngest so it can sometimes be a little bit challenging. so we're just off to a training exercise. my grandad was a coxsmith in a life—saving boat in the 19705 so it has always been in the family. it's just the adrenaline and knowing that you could potentially save someone's life just changes everything. if you can save someone's life, it is worth it. it is worth getting wet for? yes, definitely. and their families will always remember you for looking after them so well. so one of the big things the rnli are talking about this year
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is cold water shock. so what happens when you fall into really cold water and how not to panic when it happens to you. if you're out around the coastline, you could be fishing on rocks and slips, trips and falls around the coast, if you end up in the water, you will be in your clothes because you were not prepared. as he goes in now, it's cold, there is shock in his body, so the natural instinct is to fight against it. now his heart rate is running at an unusual rhythm and his lungs are struggling. trainer lewis wants people to go against their natural reactions if they fall in the water. so rick, do you want to have a go? yes, why not? i want you to go onto your back, arms out by your side and push your chin as high as you can towards the air and that will keep your airwaves away from the water. it's that initial part of giving yourself a minute, a minute and a half, to let your heart rate go back to a normal rhythm and get your breath back and try and compose yourself a little bit so you are not making rash decisions
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in these environments. how did you find that? slightly nippy! yes, slightly nippy. so i am obviously in a wet suit, but when anyone else falls in, it is the weight of your clothes that also drags you down. 0bviously that initial thrashing around, the air pockets come out of the clothes and they become very heavy. so the calmer you stay, the more effective that is going to be. shouting for help is the most important thing and obviously around the coastline if anybody sees anything, anybody in distress, dial 999 and ask for the coastguard. never attempt to rescue anybody yourself. you need the rescue equipment. you have a lot of trouble with people getting into trouble with their own bravery and the best thing to do is call 999 and ask for the coastguard. we need rescuing from the weather. i think we do. despite the warnings, the amount of injuries and deaths has remained steady over the last five years and the rnli hope with this new advice fewer people will get into trouble. more to come on that after 10am.
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the government say they are not ruling out the option of introducing legislation to impose an energy price cap. it is after the announcement by centrica of a 12.5% increase in electricity prices. our political guru norman smith can tell us more. political guru norman smith can tell us more. good morning, norman. we thought the government had booted this idea of a price cap into the long grass because in the queen's speech the policy was abandoned and the governmentjust said we're going to leave it to the regulator to think about what to do next. this morning, government sources saying no, they are ruling nothing out, including the option of legislation to impose a price cap. what does it tell us? i think it tells us that there is a likely public anger at this latest increase of 12.5%, well above the sort of pay rises people are getting at a time of rising inflation. it tells us too of the pressure they're under too from the
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labour party, which again, has committed to introduce a price cap. a word of caution though, we have been here so many times before. this argument about what to do about rising energy bills has been rumbling for years. we have had endless competition inquiries to establish whether there is some sort of cartel among the big six energy companies. nevertheless, the government this morning seeming to be leaving open the door of the possibility that they could legislate to impose a cap on the energy bills we pay. norman, thank you very much indeed. hackers claim to have stolen the script for an upcoming episode of the american television series game of thrones. the show‘s producers hbo have confirmed a "cyber incident". newsbeat‘s entertainment reporter sinead garvan can tell us more. what happened ? what happened? sunday night lots of americanjournalists what happened? sunday night lots of
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american journalists received in e—mailfrom someone american journalists received in e—mail from someone claiming american journalists received in e—mailfrom someone claiming to have 1.5 tera bytes e—mailfrom someone claiming to have 1.5 terabytes of data from hbo. he or she wrote, "hi to all mankind. the greatest leak of cyberspace is happening. you are lucky to be the first pioneers to witness and download the leak. enjoy it and spread the word. hbo is falling." they also claim to have more material that they will be releasing soon, but so far it is supposed to bea soon, but so far it is supposed to be a script of the next episode of game of thrones and unreleased episodes of bawlers. what have hbo had to say? they have confirmed the lea k had to say? they have confirmed the leak and not given any specifics. they haven't said what episodes it was. they say there was a cyber incident and they are investigating into it, but some of the people who work for them have been making comments to various american outlets saying when you have got a product, thatis saying when you have got a product, that is this popular and people want to know what's happening and there is lots of secrecy around it, people
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are going to try and get in and it is the world we live in that this sort of thing is happening. is the world we live in that this sort of thing is happeningm is the world we live in that this sort of thing is happening. it isn't the first time that hbo had this problem, is it? there is quite a few. you might remember sony in 2014, a load of their information was leaked, all the e—mails personal to high—profile actresses and actors, netflix more recently, someone was actors, netflix more recently, someone was asking for a ransom. they said they had ten episodes of 0range is the new black. screeners we re 0range is the new black. screeners were released to members of the press. they unfortunately got leaked. and that stopped any screeners of any game of thrones being sent out to any press since. are the lines circulating on social media as a massive game of thrones it is hard enough to avoid spoilers if you haven't watched an episode immediately? people trying to catch up immediately? people trying to catch up with because it is on america before over here and everyone writes it up. it is hard. you can't find
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much on the internet about the leak. don't worry if you are worried about spoiling it. thank you, sinead. now, it is time for the weather. u nsettled unsettled weather for the start of august, it's a day of sunshine and showers, many in the north and west, gradually moving eastwards through the day but in between the showers we had sunshine to look forward to. breezy with highs of 15—24d. shallow seas and clear. 0vernight, whether france pushing in, from the south—west. dry tomorrow morning, temperatures range between ten and 16 degrees. the rain band in the west will gradually track northwards and eastwards, strong winds with it as well. northern parts of scotland stay dry for match of the day, the odd isolated shower, temperatures ranging from 16—20d, the worst day
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of the week. sunshine and showers, by the time we get into thursday, but at least there is brightness in between to compensate. hello, it's tuesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm tina daheley in for victoria derbyshire... more on our top story — greater manchester police faces new investigations over three fatal firearms incidents. 0ne ex—officer criticises its "aggressive" tactics. i thought we were getting a little bit too much into the aggressive tactics. the more aggressive you get, the more likely you are to have people shot. we'll hear from current and former firearms officers in the next few minutes. princess diana's former bodyguard and close friend tells this programme it's important channel 4 broadcast the private recordings of her talking about her personal life. i think it's important that the public have this information, because diana was an iconic figure, an important person within the royal family that will go down in history.
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should channel 4 show the documentary? loads of you getting in touch. gary says in the name of decency and humanity, return the tapes to the family now. get in touch with your views whether you agree or disagree. should schools teach breast—feeding? we will bring you the details. good morning. here'sjulian in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. the government says it isn't ruling out the option of introducing legislation to impose an energy price cap after a decision by british gas to raise electricity prices. the government said the 12.5% increase, brought in next month, would hit many people already on poor value tariffs. the owner of british gas blamed the increase and distribution costs. the white house has insisted that
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president trump's new chief of staff will bring discipline to his administration, following the sacking of anthony scaramucci as director of communications after less than ten days in office. mr scaramucci was dismissed last night — just hours after the appointment of generaljohn kelly — for what officials described as his "inappropriate" comments in a magazine interview. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him in london's knightsbridge police say he was taken to hospital but has since been discharged. a spokesperson said it was not yet known if the liquid thrown was a corrosive substance. doctors have called for secondary schools to teach children about the importance of breast—feeding. the royal college of paediatrics and child and facilities in all workplaces. the college says britain has one of the lowest rates of breast—feeding in europe, blaming social stigma for the trend. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30.
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let's get a sport update. los angeles is set to host the 2028 olympic and paralympic games. la's bid team has reached an agreement with the international olympic committee, which is expected to be ratified by the los angeles city council later today. la had originally been bidding for the 2024 games, but that event is now set to take place in paris. we have an 0lympics ready city. what i would say is, unlike the old model where people try to fit the olympics to the city, this is a model where we fit the city to the olympics. we aren't building things for the 0lympics aren't building things for the olympics and hoping our people benefit but building for our people who will benefit and we know the 0lympics can take advantage of those. it's a different kind of model, not every city will be la but we hope that we can build the city
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by telling folks use what you have and use it well. england's cricketers will go into fridays fourth and final test against south africa with a 2—1 lead after an amazing finish to the third test at the oval yesterday. the tourists were trying to save a draw, but two wickets in two balls from debutant toby roland jones ended those hopes. the only resistance came from dean elgar, who went on to make 136. but it was moeen ali who finished south africa off, winning the match in the perfect fashion — with a hat—trick. england victorious by 239 runs. i think how we played was brilliant. we looked down the side and got a number of matchwinners throughout. if we can setup a game and get him into a position of strength, we can find ways of getting across the line. it's important we continue to do that but more importantly, we responded positively after last week. it was a tough week, but it shows the character of the guys in dressing room.
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the world athletics championships get underway at the weekend, but one of the star attractions on the track won't be there. david rudisha, the world and olympic 800m champion — and world record holder, is out with a thigh injury. the kenyan won the world title in beijing two years ago, and broke the world record in london in 2012. that's all of the sport for now. this programme has learned that greater manchester police is facing new investigations by the police watchdog over three separate fatal firearms incidents. it raises questions about the conduct of one of the uk's second biggest firearms unit at a time when manchester has recently been hit by a terror attack. we bought you simon cox's full exclusive report earlier in the programme — here's a short extract. my life is on hold. it's been on hold, and it's still on hold now. the police have determined what is happening with anthony's life and they are dictating what is happening in my life. anthony grainger was 36, a father of two young children.
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he was shot dead in the sleepy village of culcheth in march 2012. i didn't believe it, even... even up until i seen his body in the morgue. police believed he was planning an armed robbery. there were known violent criminals with him. but there was no gun in the car. there was a public inquiry into his death earlier this year. it was argued there were mistakes in the police intelligence, some of the armed officers had failed training courses and the most senior officer had changed his notes on the operation. you've got quite a number of separate fails which then brings is that big picture of an organisation that is questionable. it looks farfrom good. during the inquiry, greater manchester police said it was committed to learning lessons from the case and that no firearms officer goes to work wishing to injure or kill. the inquiry hasn't reported yet and will have to decide
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whether anthony grainger‘s death could have been avoided. this isn't the first time, though, questions have been asked about the force's armed police. ian terry was devoted to his family and his job as a firearms officer with greater manchester police. we were told that he'd been involved in an accident at work and that everyone had done all they could but they couldn't save him. ian terry was killed on a training exercise at this disused factory in 2008. an inquestjury ruled he would have been saved if the training had been properly prepared. john foxcroft ran the firearms training unit at greater manchester, but left over safety concerns in 2006. i thought we were getting a little bit too much into the aggressive tactics. the more aggressive you get, the more likely you are to have people shot.
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there were no criminal charges brought, but greater manchester police was fined for health and safety offences. and there's another controversial case, that ofjordan begley. i need the police here as quick as i can. well, i'll get an officer there as soon as we've got one. jordan, just stay there, you're not going out! this was the call his mum made to police after a drunken row with neighbours. he was tasered and punched while he was on the ground. he later died from heart failure. an inquestjury found that police failings played a part in his death and that he was unlawfully killed. someone actually believes us and someone will do something about it. we can go somewhere now, we can do something about it. someone's got to say sorry. they've got to. we've discovered that all of these cases are now facing new investigations from the police watchdog. with many of the officers still serving, it poses tough questions for greater manchester police. we asked greater manchester police to speak to us this morning —
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they said no — but told us "firearms officers in gmp and around the country volunteer for the role and do a very difficultjob, quite rightly under the highest levels if scrutiny." we can however speak to tony long — a former metropolitan police firearms officer — who shot dead three people during his career. he has met the officer who shot anthony grainger. that officer cannot be identified. shea donald joins us, a police federation spokesperson on firearms, and leroy logan, a former superintendent in the metropolitan police and the founder of national black police association. tell us your reaction to the film you have seen your reaction to the film you have seen and your your reaction to the film you have seen and your concerns your reaction to the film you have seen and your concerns about greater manchester police's firearms unit.|j do not have any concerns. there are three tragic incidents you have spoken of, in the space of three or
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four years between all of them. if we talk about them individually, one was an accident in training, we have strict health and safety now, and health and safety may have been breached in that instant, i don't know, i would breached in that instant, i don't know, iwould be breached in that instant, i don't know, i would be lying if i said i had not been in situations where we went, that was close, because something happened that we had not anticipated. somebody does something off the script, and causes a danger. as far as that anthony grainger incident is concerned, i have a great deal of sympathy for q9, i found myself in a near identical situation, shooting someone dead even though i did not see a gun but acting upon intelligence. they were sat ina acting upon intelligence. they were sat in a stolen car with swaps number plates. the intelligence was they were going to do a robbery. what is key for someone watching at home, they would be thinking, we
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know from the enquiry there was not a gun in the car, anthony grainger did not have a gun and nobody in the car had a gun but he was shot dead? ifa car had a gun but he was shot dead? if a police officer perceives there was a threat, three weapons were recovered inside of the car in my case but i made it clearfrom recovered inside of the car in my case but i made it clear from the outset that i made the decision to fire not having seen the guns but believing the intelligence i was given and acting on his body language. q9 gave evidence at the enquiry that they were acting on intelligence they were given, that they were armed and were going to conduct a robbery. the suspect put his hands up and put his arms down ina way his hands up and put his arms down in a way that led them to believe he was armed. if he was in a stolen car with stolen plates, they may have been carrying out reconnaissance that if they get involved in criminality of that nature, that when they are confronted by armed
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police, by the very nature of the intelligence they are acting on, the lives of the officers are going to ta ke lives of the officers are going to take priority over the lives of the suspects, unfortunately. and che, how often are police involved in shootings? it is extremely low, figures produced for the last 12 months show we have had 15,000 operations, over 15,000 operations, and we have had ten discharges within all of those operations. it has to pay credit to the training the officers receive, and the restraint they show in dealing with incidents that potentially have far reaching repercussions, not only to the public that the officers themselves. ten discharges in 15,000 operations over a space of 12 months is absolutely fantastic. i keep saying that our firearms officers
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are the best trained and most restrained in the whole of the uk. what impact does it have on officers involved in those incidents, like you? you've involved in those incidents, like you ? you've been involved in those incidents, like you? you've been in a position where you? you've been in a position where you have shot dead people in your career, what impact does it have? absolutely huge. it is bigger than only the officers but their families as well. they have husbands, wives and children, their lives are put on hold. as you mentioned earlier in your report, no officer comes to work in the firearms unit with the desire to shoot anyone. in fact, we try and resolve the situation at the lowest possible level, before we have to resort to the use of deadly force. that is only in the most extreme circumstances, where there is the immediate threat to life, perceived by the officer. but, their life is put on hold. the impact that they have ta ken life is put on hold. the impact that they have taken another life dwells on them as well. you know, where
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thoughts have previously been around a firearm shooting, everybody goes back and it is high—fiving and tea and medals for everyone, no, it is extremely solemn and there is a lot that takes its toll on the officers. your adrenaline may have been very high at the start of the instant but afterwards, the reality kicks in that a life has been taken and that life has a family of their own, there are victims with families. what do you think? i think, you know, there is a need for specialist firearms officers and to deal with the risk that they face, other firearms, other weapons to save lives, the public and even the suspects themselves, but like everything, it's how it's dealt with at the time and subsequently. i
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mean, just listening to the video just then and even martin harding who was on there, he is a manchester officer, retired superintendent from manchester. he thinks there is questions to be asked and again, it is around perceptions and if the fa ct is around perceptions and if the fact that police are seen to be not totally open and transparent even though there is some legal con sta i nts, though there is some legal con staints, but if they feel there isn't that transparency and accountability then it reinforces people's perceptions that officers are trying to hide something and invariably that's not the case, however, you know, it's trying to be, trying to get that balance and reassuring the community that those officers did the best they can in a professional manner. do you think more armed police make people feel safer or reduce trust and confidence in the police? well, it depends what sort of policing they have experienced. if the trust and
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confidence is low, is commence rate with heavy handed policing. to know officers are more armed can have more of a threat to them, more of a fear. whereas certain communities where trust and confidence is high and they see armed officers they are reassured. so it is different issues for different communities. tony, i will let you respond quickly. for different communities. tony, i will let you respond quicklylj acce pt will let you respond quickly.” accept what leroy is saying, but the reality is all of the incidents that we're talking today, one is a training accident. both are situations where the police are trying to deal with a violent situation. look at the so—called controversial shootings, so the one in london, mark duggan that caused the riots, my incident and granger we re the riots, my incident and granger were all intelligence led. if anthony granger had been sat at home watching tv with his kids instead of being ina watching tv with his kids instead of being in a stolen car. with duggan
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we re being in a stolen car. with duggan were questions around the intelligence and not only about him, but the person... was duggan in a car with a but the person... was duggan in a carwitha gun? but the person... was duggan in a car with a gun? we are out of time. thank you to all three of you for your contribution. still to come: calls continue for channel 4 to cancel plans to broadcast private video tapes of princess diana. but one close friend believes the documentary should be shown. we will hear if him in the next half an hour. a tweet from a viewer who says, "we should see the tapes. it is against freedom of speech." harry says, "it is time they let her lie in peace." an anonymous text, "the princess diana pictures, tapes or whatever, should not be shown on tv, whatever, should not be shown on tv, whatever will get shown in public about her or the royal family is private and should stay that way. why should the public see it only to
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passjudgment?" this why should the public see it only to pass judgment?" this programme won't hurt william and harry. they know everything. the tapes have been around for years."john everything. the tapes have been around for years." john says, "people should be ashamed of themselves. they are just trying to make money over diana's death. i don't know how they sleep at night." keep your messages coming in. doctors are calling for secondary schools to teach children about the importance of breast—feeding. the royal college of paediatrics and child health says the uk has one of the lowest rates of the practice in europe with just a third of babies receiving breast milk at the age of six months. would that change if pupils were taught about it at school? with me isjudith ellis, chief executive of the royal college of paediatrics and child health. in our cambridge studio is hollie mcnish. she's a mum and spoken word artist who writes about motherhood and having to breast—feed her daughter in a public toilet because of the stigma of doing so in public. welcome to the programme. why is
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this an issue of concern for you? paediatricians are convinced and the evidence shows us that breast milk is best for babies. and it's a very big push for us to try and increase these rates. so we know as you were saying that we have only got a third of mothers at six months breast—feeding. in norway they have 7196. breast—feeding. in norway they have 71%. so it's a real concern that our rates drop off. 75% of mothers start breast—feeding and by the end of six weeks you have got 40% and it has dropped again down to 35%. the nhs advises women to breast—feed exclusively for six months. 0nly1% manage to. why is it so low? 1% manage to. why is it so low? 1% manage to. why is it so low? 1% manage to breast—feed. it is 35% of mothers are breast—feeding. it is actually, you have still got some breast—feeding for six months, but that's the guidance. and what about
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the lessons in schools? why teach 11—year—olds about breast—feeding ?” think one of the things we were trying to look at is why is the drop off? there is a vast amount of work supporting mothers once they have had a baby and before they deliver. you need to change cultural attitude towards breast—feeding and you start with the children. and we have a really good network called and us where we have hundreds of children we consult with. 50%, fine. the other 50%, yuck. that was their over arching statement. they need to change that. these are the parents of the future and they need to accept the importance of breast—feeding. accept the importance of breast-feeding. what would you say to people who say it is not a school's place to teach children about breast—feeding ? school's place to teach children about breast-feeding? well, it is a school's place to teach them about how to have a healthy life for the future. it is notjust about passing
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exams. it will involve parents and we therefore it is important to get the health messages across. health education isjust being reviewed the health messages across. health education is just being reviewed as to what's going to be delivered in school. so they already have sessions delivered in school and we wa nt to sessions delivered in school and we want to include in the sessions breast—feeding because we see it as vital for the health of the babies. hold i i want to bring in holly. why is it something you care about so passionately? i think i is it something you care about so passionately? i thinki care is it something you care about so passionately? i think i care about it so passionately now because i guess after sharing, i wrote a poem andl guess after sharing, i wrote a poem and i wrote it while i was sitting ina public and i wrote it while i was sitting in a public toilet feeding my daughter because i was too embarrassed. i didn't have to go there, ijust felt too embarrassed to sit on a cafe on my own and it wasjust the reaction to sit on a cafe on my own and it was just the reaction from people that kind of shown me how important it is to people. has been shared by millions of women who said they also often go and sit—in public toilets to feed their babies. you think what
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sort of place do we live in? i had no physical problems doing it. it wasjust no physical problems doing it. it was just psychological. no physical problems doing it. it wasjust psychological. raising a kid is so hard and the idea that just to feed your baby that's such a big issue. can i get you to read a couple of lines to give us an idea of how you were feeling and what you we re of how you were feeling and what you were trying to articulate? all right, yeah. as the pyramid cells pictures and female breasts banned until they are out for show. the more i go out, the more i can't stand it. iwalk more i go out, the more i can't stand it. i walk into town and feel i'm surrounded by bandits because in this country of billboards covered in tits, wh smith top shelves out for men, why don't you complain about them then? thank you very much. can you talk to me more about the type of, when you say the reaction to you breast—feeding, what's the reaction? well, just the reaction, i didn't put that poem online at first
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because ijust put that poem online at first because i just didn't put that poem online at first because ijust didn't think anyone else would relate to it. i didn't think anyone else was embarrassed to do it when they were on their own. and just the fact that so many mums and dads too have said that they've kind of felt this way. they felt it was stigmatised. but also the kind of negative reaction as well. the weird comments i have had from a lot of people online comparing it to going to the toilet and comparing it to things you wouldn't do in public. a lot of people saying because it is natural doesn't mean you should be doing it in public like going to the toilet is natural and you don't do that ina toilet is natural and you don't do that in a restaurant. that's from lack of education, just not knowing that's something that's excreting fluids that are unhealthy, that you shouldn't be able to do this anywhere you want and that's because it is not normalised, it is not taught. i don't see why it is not taught. i don't see why it is not taught. we teach the digestive syste m taught. we teach the digestive system and we teach roe
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reproduction. new mums experience guilt for giving up or choosing not to breast—feed. will this had to pressure and expectation that women should? the thing we say about this, it is natural to breast—feed, but it doesn't come naturally. we accept it can be very difficult and there are certain mothers who will not be able to breast—feed for medical reasons too. and there are certain babies who can't breast—feed. as far as the paediatricians are concerned because that's our organisation, we have to encourage breast—feeding. breast milk is such a protector for babies. imean my milk is such a protector for babies. i mean my background, i'm a paediatric nurse and i was a paediatric nurse and i was a paediatric ward sister for eight yea rs on paediatric ward sister for eight years on the medical ward and we didn't get babies in with gastro entro isis and ear infections, the protection it gives these babies is vital. so as a college we have to say breast milk is the best thing, but we recognise that there are some
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mothers and some babies that it is not going to be right for. and that's where we'll leave it. thank you very much indeed. the royal national lifeboat institution or rnli says last year saw a rise in the number of coastal deaths in august. they are warning of the shock that can come with falling into cold water as we enter the deadliest month for accidents in the sea. radio 1 newsbeats rick kelsey has been in cornwall with the rnli, who are launching a new national campaign to tell people how to deal with the shock of falling into cold water. if you're out around the coastline, you could be fishing on rocks, you know, slips, trips orfalls around the coast, if you end up in the water, generally you're going to be in your clothes because you weren't prepared. so as he goes in now the cold is shocking his body, so the natural instinct is to fight against it. now, his heart rate is running at unusual rhythm, his lungs are struggling. trainer lewis wants people to go against their natural reactions if they fall in the water. so, rick, do you want to have a go? yeah, why not? i want you to go on your back, arms out by your side, and i want you to sort of push your chin as high
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as you can towards the air. that's going to keep your airway away from the water. it's that initial part of giving yourself a minute, minute and a half to just let your heart rate go back to a normal rhythm and obviously get your breath back and just try and compose yourself a little bit, so we're not making rash decisions in these environments. now, last year, camber sands in east sussex hit the headlines after seven people died after swimming in the sea. five died on the same day in august. that came after two men lost their lives there a month before. one of them was 36—year—old mohit dupar. he was trying to rescue a man who got into trouble when waves dragged him out to sea. mohit was swimming with his 17—year—old son ankush, who nearly died too. we can speak to ankush now and also simon crayfourd who is from the rnli. he was a lifeguard for more than a decade and is now an area lifesaving manager in devon and cornwall. you went to camber sands in east
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sussex lastjuly with your dad. it was a normal day out for you. when did you railise something was badly wrong? yes, it was a normal day. we a lwa ys wrong? yes, it was a normal day. we always went for a weekend once or twice in the month for the beach. we normally go to bournemouth, but dad decided to go to camber sands and it was a really nice day that day and it was crowded. but there wasn't any flags that something was going to happen. there was a white flag, how far you can go. so we went in the water and we took some pictures as well in the water and after that, when i came back to put my phone in the bag and when i went back in the water dad was a little bit far. i thought he's just going for the swimming and then i realised he's
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going too far. i wear glasses and at that time i wasn't wearing so i didn't know what was going on. i asked him, "why are you going far?" 7" he asked him, "why are you going far?" ?" he said somebody is drowning in the sea and needs help. you call for help. i called for the help and after that the tide came out and after that the tide came out and after that, i remember! after that the tide came out and after that, i remember ijust woke up after that, i remember ijust woke up in the hospital. it was a summers day injuly, what was the sea like, and the waves that day? the waves were normal, it was like normal day. there wasn't anything... any kind of... you could not see that there was any kind of... but anything could happen like this. you remember your dad shouting
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to you, what did he say? he said that somebody needed help, they were in trouble in the water, they needed help, he called for help and called for the coastguard. your dad was a hero, he was trying to save someone else when he got into trouble, does that give you some comfort? yes. simon, let me bring you in. what more would you like to see done to stop what seems to be happening every year when it comes to summer, a rise in the number of these kinds of incidents of people getting into trouble? it is a tragic case, events like this happen year after year and that's one of the reasons why the rnli have brought about the respect the water campaign to encourage people to get a better understanding of the environment they are going into, and to give them some basic
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skills to help themselves if they find themselves in difficulty. the first piece of advice is, if you do see somebody in difficulty in the water, call 999 and ask for the coastguard. it's100% water, call 999 and ask for the coastguard. it's 100% the right thing to do and if you find yourself in the water unexpectedly, as was just said in that piece before, laid—back and float, relax. keep yourself calm and that will let yourself calm and that will let yourself get into a state where you are ina yourself get into a state where you are in a position to make clear decisions and you can out of that situation you found yourself in. you cannot talk about the situation at camber sands, it is not your area but deaths there were put down to rip currents, can you explain what those are? that is water trying to find its own level again. when waves break on the shore, the water wants to find its way back out to its own level. it will find the path of
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least resistance, which forms a channel. there there is a stronger current. it pulls you out from the shore towards the deeper water, and that's when people start to panic and find themselves in difficulty. the best advice that we can give is to stay calm, do not swim against the current, actually float with it. that will eventually peter out, the current will weaken, and you will be able to find yourself in water where you can swim across the beach, and back into an area of safety without tiring yourself out and trying to fight that large body of water pushing against you in the rip current itself. thank you to both of you forjoining us this morning. now, should channel 4 broadcast private video tapes of princess diana? a new documentary is due to air next week, showing footage previously never shown in the uk where the princess of wales discusses her marriage.
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the bbc decided to pull its own programme containing the same tapes ten years ago — and there are now calls for channel four to do the same. earlier we spoke to ken wharfe, who was princess diana's close protection officer for six years. he was in charge of the princess's security at home and abroad, in public and in private, and became her close friend and confident. he features in the documentary. and dai davis, who is former head of royal protection for met, he also knew princess diana. diana said, what do you want a drink? it was like being in a wine bar in kensington with a friend. she said, do you know about camilla parker bowles? i could not deny that i knew about it, i said yes, of course. there was a hesitation and she said well, she features most days, most hours and minutes of my life. i did not really understand at that point exactly what she meant. of course, the days that followed, the weeks that followed, the months that followed, i knew exactly what she meant by that. she sort of carried out her in research, and found the previous prince of wales has had their own mistresses.
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earlier, we spoke to ken worf, princess diana's close protection officerfor six years. he princess diana's close protection officer for six years. he was in charge of her security at home and abroad, in public and in private and became a close friend and confidant. as we saw, he features in the documentary and the former head of royal protection for the mat, also new princess diana —— the metropolitan police. what is your role in this upcoming film about princess diana? my role in the process is to support the film, that is primarily my role because i was a participant in the film as i believed in its quality and structure, and why the film needs to be made. that is my role. i was her protection officer from 1986 to 1983. i was very much around at the time she made this broadcast with peter settler and in 1992 and
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1993. and dai davis, you don't believe that these tapes should be broadcast, can you tell ken why? we have had so much diana over the last 20 years, most people i think would wa nt 20 years, most people i think would want her to rest in peace and her children should be allowed to put this in the past. they did an documentary on their mother, i would like to remember her as she was rather than regurgitate continuously what we have been for a number of years. while i have great respect for ken wharfe, he was a great police and protection officer, i do not believe this is the time or place, especially 20 years before the anniversary of her tragic death. channel 4 tell us this is a important historical source and public record ? important historical source and public record? we should learn
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lessons of history as i say in the lectures i give. i lecture at cardiff university's business school on ethics and the moral factors involved in ethics. ethics is knowing what is right, and having the courage to do what is right. with great respect for ken wharfe and everyone else, i do not think this is right. ken, dai does not think this is right. he is entitled to his viewpoint, i would never deny that but what you need to look at here is a person. diana, during her short life in 1981 right through to her abandonment of royal duties in 1993, 1994, they had a significant impactand 1993, 1994, they had a significant impact and carved the path to the future and modernisation of the monarchy. whilst dai has a point, what we need to look at here is what
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was in the national interest. historically, 20 years after her death, this is information we should know about. can i respect to the -- respectfully say that a lot of people have cashed in on this. i only lecture in terms of what happened in paris. that's the only time you will ever hear me talk about diana because i've researched it over three or four years and i am passionately keen in protecting both her memory, as a decent person, and to regurgitate, as i say, some of the more fallacious factors involved m, the more fallacious factors involved in, as you know, she was going through a period of incredible hurt and mistrust. everyone who had close involvement, as you did, mr burrell and others, with great respect we should keep quiet now and let her re st should keep quiet now and let her rest in peace. that's what i say. the vast majority of the public wanted. channel 4 are doing this to make money, make no mistake.
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wanted. channel 4 are doing this to make money, make no mistakem wanted. channel 4 are doing this to make money, make no mistake. it is and people cashing in, people make programmes and these need to be financed. if you choose to see the programme next week, you will see the actual line, the continuity from diana's marriage in 1981 through to her death in 1997, you will see how professionally the programme has been put together. it has been slated as the sex tapes but there is no mention of these at all. these tapes had been in a public domain with an intelligent and educational approach to the documentary. i support channel 4 in this and in my view, once the programme has shown that people will generally realise how historical in context the programme is and, for that reason, i think things have to be said. there was a quote the other day saying, should it be another 30, 40 or 50 yea rs before should it be another 30, 40 or 50 years before this is shown? it's irrelevant, the point is this is
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historical in the sense that it happened 20 years ago, i do not share the view that princes william and harry will be upset by this. like all members of the royal family they read the newspapers and are aware of current affairs, they will see it for what it is and therefore i support the view and your idea of cashing in, you lecture, and i lecture internationally as well about it. spreading the message and telling people how important the roles diana had in the 20th century, thatis roles diana had in the 20th century, that is a continuation of it. it's important the public have this information as she was an iconic figure, important in the royal family and will go down in history. to allay fears of a royal... the documentary maker who made it. equally i would say her brother and
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her sisters through this, and others closely allied to her, i would say fine, but they are not. we should ta ke fine, but they are not. we should take this into account. i would say yes, i will watch the tapes. i read transcripts published in 2004. i am aware of a great deal of content and what is actually in the film? no, i have not seen. dai, will you watch the film on sunday? i will now, as i may be asked to comment on it. but at the moment i stand by what i am thinking and what i am saying. you both new princess diana personally, how would she have reacted to what is happening now? she did not give her permission, what would her reaction be? i new princess diana in
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a way that dai didn't, i remember 1992 when she used a very good friend of hers, who is in the documentary, he talks very openly about that period. diana desperately tried to resolve problems within her marriage. he was her biographer? the conduit between diana and andrew morton. diana tried desperately to resolve the complications and problems within her marriage. achieving little or no help. people, friends of the prince of wales, openly went on national television to say that diana was mad, and even friends of the queen said that she was damaged goods. in the end, diana had to resort to dealing with this herself. with morton, panorama and so herself. with morton, panorama and so forth. even now, with these tapes, she is telling somebody else the problems of her marriage. let's
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understand that there is no point in hiding what happened here. her sons know about this. i think for the first time ever, you know, we are having this documented in a format where i think people will realise and understand it. this has been in the public domain for so much time. there have been numerous documentaries. i myself have been on these documentaries, becoming a pop pundit. is the first documentary i've ever taken part in where there isa i've ever taken part in where there is a line earth continuity explaining everything from the day of their marriage in 1981 through to her death in 1997. we had to leave it there but thank you very much for taking part. loads of you getting in touch about some of these stories today. one text from gary, the paparazzi harmed diana's memory and even after her death, the trauma her son suffer continues. repugnant,
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shameless and disgraceful. loads of you getting in touch about breastfeeding following that discussion earlier about whether it should be taught in secondary schools. 0ne text saying their daughter is due to give birth and has made the decision not to breast—feed, she has had all their experiences with midwives making her breast—feed, she attended an event where mothers who choose to bottle feed web described as bad mothers. many women struggle, myself included, but i have been taught about the benefits and therefore i was determined to succeed. let's educate young people, the next generation and support women to persevere to give the best possible start in life for their children. keep your messages coming in and just to let you know, if you are watching us on three view all you view, some channel numbers are changing on wednesday afternoon. bbc
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news is moving to channel 231 while bbc hd remains at 107. some televisions update automatically but you may need to retune your televisions or boxes. for help on how to retune, just go to the free view channel 100 or visit the website. freeview. co. uk/retune. sky, freesat and virgin media viewers are unaffected. i'm tina daheley in for victoria derbyshire. the met police says stealing a moped and committing robbery has become the "crime of choice" among young people in london. last night, a man was left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw liquid at him in knightsbridge. today, a group of delivery riders will meet the deputy mayor of london to highlight the problem. veronika is going to that meeting. she's from the motorcycle crime prevention community which is a campaign group that's formed on facebook. she's asked us not to use her surname. also with us the labour mp
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steve mccabe says he was hit in the face with brick that had been thrown by one of two motorcyclists. steve, that looks like a very, very nasty bruise on your face. tell us what happened. well, i was out with a group of volunteers. we were door knocking. this issue of motorbike thuggery or menace is quite a big problem in the area and a couple of them came down the road at high—speed zigzagging, doing wheelies in the middle of the road, very threatening and i shouted at them to park it in. i shouted that a couple of times and then i said i would phone the police. they took off, but they came back a few moments later. 0ne off, but they came back a few moments later. one of them got off the bike and confronted me and while i was engaged with him, the other one threw a rock or a brick at the side of my head with some force. now, do you think there, is as the
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police describe it, a crime of choice? especially after the muslim brotherhood attack overnight? well, i think there is a real issues with mopeds and motorcyclists at the moment. i think basically the police are in danger of losing control of the streets. these people are threatening and intimidating hole neighbourhoods and unless we get more police on the streets and give them more resources, we're going to lose control of this situation. what are you hoping to achieve by taking this to the deputy mayor today? good morning, tina and thank you for the opportunity to speak to me on the behalf of our motorcycle prevention community. motorcycle theft has become a massive problem and especially in london. people are being threatened and this affected
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motorcyclists, but now it is spreading to the wider community. people are using acid and there is a distinction between criminals on mopeds and motorcyclists and i think it is an important distinction to make here because motorcyclists are under threat themselves. so what do you want to see happen? what solves this problem? how do you reduce this number of attacks? well, the first step i propose is currently the police's is unable to pursue the criminals and the first thing we need to do is find means of enabling them. so we are as suggested earlier as well, we are hoping to get more resources for the met police and both in terms of, you know financial resources, but also greater powers to pursue offenders, any kind of offenders including offenders on mopeds. this is... sorry, go on. one
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of the ends we are trying to accomplish, we would like to have more adequate and secure motorcycle and moped parking around london, london east, a hotspot for this problem, although other areas are affected for example bristol and birmingham are heavily affected as well. we would like some help from the courts as well which is just to essentially do theirjob to back up the police with real solutions in the police with real solutions in the form of punishments for the crimes that these people have committed. ok, thank you very much for joining committed. ok, thank you very much forjoining us this morning. less than half of young men say they'd contact police if they accidentally found images of child sex abuse online — that's according to a survey for an online watchdog. the internet watch foundation is encouraging people to report the material to its experts anonymously. they've been working with everton football club to teach young footballers about the importance of online behaviour safety. during the workshops, players admitted they'd received worrying messages on apps like snapchat from men claiming to be football agents and wanting to sign them.
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snapchat say the exploitation of children on its platform is "absolutely unacceptable and a complete misuse of our platform." let's talk now to andy wood who runs the safeguarding workshops for young footballers at everton fc. he was there when some players said they'd been targeted by people posing as football agents online. susie hargreaves is chief executive of internet watch foundation and andy woodward, a former crewe alexandra footballer who waived his anonymity to speak out about abuse in football on this programme. he says the governing bodies in football have a "moral responsibility" to do something about the abuse of young players online. suzy, why football clubs? well, the internet watch foundation is the uk hot light for reporting and removing online sexual abuse and to give you a sense of what that means in 2016,
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we removed 57,000 individual web pages of child sexual abuse and about 50% of the children were under ten and about 50% was rape and sexual torture. now, what we know from all the surveys we've done is that the most likely group to stumble on child sexual abuse are young men aged 16 to 24 and they are the least likely to report it to us. so we wanted to reach young men and one of the great ways to reach them was through the power of football. and we reached out to everton because everton have got this fantastic track record in terms of their safeguarding and are very active in uk safer internet day and we went to talk to them and asked if we went to talk to them and asked if we could run some workshops, not just looking at child sexual abuse, but looking at sexual behaviour because we want young men if they stumble across child sexual abuse, not to freeze or panic, and not to close the commuter down, but to report it from us so we can remove the images because they are real children who have really been
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sexually abused and we need to get them off the internet. you can understand why they might be fearful, scared, worried about doing so. fearful, scared, worried about doing so. how practically do they go about reporting any images they might stumble across? yes, i do understand why. and what people need to understand is that if you have accidentally stumbled, there is no danger of you reporting it to us. you can report anonymously. we are not interested in your details. we don't follow up with you. we don't send information to the police about who reports to us. you report online wa.org.co.uk. send us the web link. we will take a look at it. if it is child sexual abuse, we will work internationally to get it removed. andy, you were there when some of the boys you worked with told us they were targeted by fake football coaches. that was over a biggercution about people pretending to be someone else online. we tried to be someone else online. we tried to encourage the young men to make the right choices and to actually think more carefully about the
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people that are online, they are talking to, their contacts, their relationships, and the fact that maybe those people they're talking to don't have their best interests at heart. and snapchat is one platform. it could have been any platform. it could have been any platform. it could have been across any of the social media applications, the notion that we're trying to get no these young men to safeguard them is that they need to think carefully about the relationships that they develop. what, can you give me some of the example. what are the scenarios you go through with them? first of all, the first thing we say is how much we love the internet. i use the internet every day. that that's really important to get across that the internet is a good place for the most part. you start talking about introducing an idea of, you get a text, a message from a girl who says she is 16 for example. asking for an image. what do you do? how do you know the girl is 16? what sorts of issues? what sort of red flags does
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the fact that the girl is 16 raise in itself? it is illegal to produce images of children under the age of 18. so, it's a real understanding, it is an education of making sure these young men, these elite players are protecting themselves, their clu b are protecting themselves, their club and also this they are gaining skills to go forward as well. why aren't more clubs involved? well, this was a pilot. everton were really brave and they are real leaders in the field and they stepped up and took part and the project exceeded our expectation. 0ne project exceeded our expectation. one thing! project exceeded our expectation. one thing i would say the issues everton deals with are the same for every clu b, everton deals with are the same for every club, whether it is football, by, every club, whether it is football, rugby, anything, but the issue...m is for young people in general. all young people are in these situations and are vulnerable to those risks. we have run it for a year. we did a detailed analysis, evaluation, we had an advisory board. we really wa nt to had an advisory board. we really want to reach out to the premier
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league, the fa, the pfa and all the other football clubs and sports clu bs other football clubs and sports clubs and say this works. the young men got a lot from it. what we did find out was that young men will do the right thing if they have the education and support. and you have got to hand it to everton, they really, really, got behind this project and they're dealing with this ina project and they're dealing with this in a really, really fantastic way. i want to bring andy into the conversation too. good morning, andy. good morning. happened when you sat down with the fa a few months ago and talked to them about how to deal with the issues we are talking about? i met greg clarke in novemberand he talking about? i met greg clarke in november and he told me he would be supportive and on board with what my project is. i have met with the governing bodies at executive level just a couple of months ago with the holistic solution that would prove that there is a problem within all sports and that's physical, online abuse, you know, financial abuse,
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andl abuse, you know, financial abuse, and i gave it to them and i have yet to hear anything back, but it's clear to see that this is an issue for vulnerable players because footballers need trust and what we've come up with is an independent body that players can go to and i think what they were just saying before is so important because footballers a re before is so important because footballers are vulnerable and it's something that i'm passionate about and something that we need to move forward with it and it's so important. we need to save these players and be able to, for them, to become professional footballers that they want to be, but they need trust and trust is key. andy, what do you think needs to happen practically? well, i've given them a full package that will protect players in the future and it's an independent body and i'm still waiting to hear from them and it's so important that we do this now and all of us collectively can make that difference for our future.
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footballers are unique because when they go into that world, and if they are they go into that world, and if they a re successful, they go into that world, and if they are successful, they are earning lots of money and they get a lot of attention. so, how is your training specific, the workshops you do specific, the workshops you do specific to them? well, we do emphasise right at the start that they are not the normal child on the street. my son is 16. he would love to bea street. my son is 16. he would love to be a professional footballer. u nfortu nately, to be a professional footballer. unfortunately, he's not. these group of elite sportsmen are different. these are potential captains of national teams for example. so, we have to really emphasise to them that they are not the normal person. i have to say as well, the safeguarding arrangements put in place at these clubs does need to be spot on and everton seem to have a really good grasp on that. they do seem really good grasp on that. they do seem to be a unique set of circumstances. 0bviously many advantages becoming a footballer, but disadvantages and things they need to look out for as well. thank you very much indeed.
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thank you for your company today. 0n the programme tomorrow, we'll talk to the parents of a miracle baby who survived despite being told she'd stopped growing in the womb at 18 weeks. join us tomorrow for that. have a great day in the meantime. well, we have a bit of everything in the forecast today. it is a mixture of sunshine and showers and it will be breezy as well. if we take a look at the satellite and the radar, much of the showers across the north and the west and east anglia enjoying the west and east anglia enjoying the best of the dry weather, but we have the showers tracking eastwards through the day. at least there is sunshine in between if you're lucky, but it will be breezy, especially for exposed areas in the west. top temperatures today between 15 to 24 celsius. through tonight the showers will continue for a time, but
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gradually they will fade awe way thanks to high pressure. the winds will ease as well. 0vernight, we will ease as well. 0vernight, we will start to see this weather front coming into the south—west and the south and the west of wales as well. the temperatures getting down to about ten celsius, but i think in the countryside perhaps a little bit lower than that. through tomorrow, we have this band of wind and rain tracking its way north and eastwards. i think northern parts of scotla nd eastwards. i think northern parts of scotland staying dry and bright for much of daylight hours. the temperatures tomorrow getting up to 20 celsius. it will remain blustery throughout much of the day as well. as we head towards the end of the week, a mixture of sunshine and showers. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11.00.
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the government says it is concerned about a decision by british gas to raise electricity prices by 12.5%. following the sacking of anthony scaramucci after less than ten days in office, the white house insists that president trump's new chief of staff will bring discipline to the administration. the home secretary challenges technology companies like facebook, twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. pakistan's parliament is set to elect a new prime minister to replace nawaz sharif, who stepped down on friday. the police watchdog is investigating greater manchester police over three separate fatal firearms incidents. also, after a man who drifted a mile out to sea in a toy dinghy is rescued. the rnli launches a new water safety campaign as we enter the deadliest

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