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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 1, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11.00. the government says it is concerned about a decision by british gas to raise electricity prices by 12.5%. following the sacking of anthony scaramucci after less than ten days in office, the white house insists that president trump's new chief of staff will bring discipline to the administration. the home secretary challenges technology companies like facebook, twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. pakistan's parliament is set to elect a new prime minister to replace nawaz sharif, who stepped down on friday. the police watchdog is investigating greater manchester police over three separate fatal firearms incidents. also, after a man who drifted a mile out to sea in a toy dinghy is rescued. the rnli launches a new water safety campaign as we enter the deadliest month for accidents in water. once the centre of the world's wall
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trade, britain's only surviving cloth hall opens after a multi—million pound renovation. good morning. it's tuesday 1st august. i'm julian worricker. welcome to bbc newsroom live. british gas has said it will increase the price of electricity for the first time in nearly four years. its owner centrica says electricity prices will increase by 12.5% from 15th september. 3.1 million customers will be affected. but the company's gas prices will be held at their current level. the average annual dual—fuel bill for households on a standard tariff will rise by £76, up by 7.3%. ian conn is the chief
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executive of british gas‘s parent company, centrica. he explained why the price rise was necessary despite a decrease in the wholesale cost of energy. first of all, the last time we moved our electricity prices was in january 2014 and since then they have been held flat. from that time, and you are correct, wholesale prices have fallen, we estimate about £36 on an average bill, that is not what is driving this. what is driving it is the transport and distribution costs, the costs of getting the electricity to your home and government environmental and policy costs. when you add those two together it has gone up by approaching £100 and that is what is driving the increase. i should finally say that even after these increases, british gas electricity prices will be 10% cheaper than other gas suppliers by some distance. our business presenter
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ben thompson is with me. variously centrica explanation but this already is controversial. yes, it's always controversial when prices go up for supplies particularly because this will affect people on the lowest incomes, the standard variable tariff, the bog—standard one, if you've not paid attention to fixing your tariff or choosing a better deal. it's the most one people will revert to and it will add £76 to an average bill. that means bills will be significantly higher, of course, as we approach winter. there's always questions over the timing of this because this price rise will come into force mid—september so with people approach winter they will turn on the heating and the electricity and that's when they made the most. of course other are 110w made the most. of course other are now calls for the government to get involved. we heard a lot of campaign pledges during the general election about whether politicians could
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enforce a cap on energy price rises. but did not happen. there's a concern it will not happen given the latest results of a general election, but many people are now calling for rapid progress for the regulator's plans for a reform of the market. how does this compare with what other companies have done 01’ with what other companies have done or might be about to do? british gas is the last one to raise prices. last year we saw the other big firms raise their prices significantly. british gas has try out for doing that as long as possible and normally when you talk about rises like there's been talk about the wholesale price, the price they buy gas and electricity on the open market to them provided to us. those prices are becoming down quite significantly, so this time british gas and you heard from the jib executive saying not to do with wholesale price but to do with the cost of getting electricity to houses, the pipes, pylons, that sort of thing and the cables, but also government regulation and there's been a lot of regulation issued by government on the energy firms for
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things like clean energy, renewable energy initiatives which makes up a proportion of our bill. we paid to the energy firms but they then pass it onto the government. they say thatis it onto the government. they say that is behind these increases, they are paying more and passing the cost onto us. the government says it's a small proportion of the bill and would account for a big like this. gas prices are staying the same. yes, this just gas prices are staying the same. yes, thisjust a gas prices are staying the same. yes, this just a fact an atrocity on the dualfuel yes, this just a fact an atrocity on the dual fuel tariffs. many people getting both gas and anna christie from a provider like british gas, so, yes, they will keep gas prices on hold. some welcome relief as bigoted towards winter, turning on boilers, that sort of thing, but nonetheless, a significant rise, 12.5% in electricity which will affect just over 3 12.5% in electricity which will affectjust over 3 million customers. the worst affected british gas says will get a small re bate british gas says will get a small rebate but nonetheless, politically contentious but also raising tariffs like this always of course an
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important issue and we should just say this announcement comes as british gas issued its results, the figures were pretty good but the crucial thing, 377,000 customer cou nts crucial thing, 377,000 customer counts people walked away. they lost 377,000 so people are getting better at moving around but it's the same message, move and then switch with a provide you do like. then, thank you very much. and what's the political reaction been? let's speak to our assistant political editor norman smith. what are politician saying all about this, norman? it's striking the government are saying they are not ruling out the option of legislation to impose an energy price cap. that will surprise many people because we know in the queen's speech when theresa may set out her legislative agenda, there was no mention of that price cap which she talked about before the election this morning, though, the government said it is still an option. it tells us that
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they know there is going to be public anger at the scale of these price increases at a time when people's wages are falling behind inflation, after years of austerity. they know they are under pressure from labour who have committed that if they were in government they would introduce a price cap and i suspect they know that theresa may made central to their whole strategy trying to help the just about managing, those struggling families for whom energy prices are a huge pa rt of for whom energy prices are a huge part of the costs they face. all of which said, i would because us about the government actually delivering ona the government actually delivering on a price cap. the reason for that is they want to do it, they could've announced it in the queen's speech and they chose not to, added to which, it's a very controversial move in tory circles. many conservative mps view the idea of a price cap as under tory. so for that
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reason, although the government is talking about it, i think a wider price cap is pretty remote albeit thatis price cap is pretty remote albeit that is whatjohn price cap is pretty remote albeit that is what john mcdonnell from labour confirmed labour are still committed to. i think this is extortionate at this point in time when people's wages are being cut orfrozen and people are struggling at the moment. we said from the labour party we would introduce a price cap initially, but also we'd develop alternative energy supplies so that this cartel that we have now can't control pricing levels and hold us over a barrel ever again in future. i think they're exploiting their customers. what we may still see is when ofgem, the regulator, reports. they could recommend a much more limited cap which could only extend to much poorer families. that might perhaps include an additional 2 million families, so it is still possible that some of the poorest families, in time, could get a cap on energy
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bills, but as far as the much broader cap which was first mooted by theresa may before the election, i think that is still pretty unlikely. 0k, norman, thank you very much at westminster. the white house communications director anthony scaramucci has been fired less than two weeks after his appointment. mr scaramucci was dismissed last night just hours after the appointment of generaljohn kelly for what officials described as his "inappropriate" comments in a magazine interview. he's the third trump appointee to leave his role in recent days. suzanne kianpour reports. tonight, breaking news: forced out afterjust 11 days on the job at the white house... game of thrones, house of cards — pick your political drama. washington thrown into a frenzy after the newly minted, smooth—talking communications director is sacked. anthony scaramucci took to the podium ten days ago for the first and last time. he came in guns blazing, promising to flip the script and shake up the white house. and he did.
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although his eye was on getting rid of then chief—of—staff reince priebus, it was press secretary sean spicer who was the first to go, resigning in protest at the man called "mooch". but then a bit of foreshadowing. you know, one of the things i can't stand about this town is the backstabbing. where i grew up, in the neighbourhood i was in, we were frontstabbers. the self—proclaimed outsider took it too far, launching into a tirade of obscenities to a journalist, accidentally on the record, forgetting the rules of reporting. scaramucci seemed to have won when reince priebus resigned, reporting directly to the president. but a new—new sheriff was in town, generaljohn kelly, the secretary of homeland security. his request, a source tells me, was that scaramucci had to go. kelly's wish, the president's command. after the swearing—in ceremony, the mooch was escorted off the premises.
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donald trump has been in office for nearly six months, but his presidency has been plagued by chaos and controversy. from multiple investigations into his campaign's contacts with russia, to constant staffing shake—ups at the white house. but, with a four—star general at the helm now, the administration is hoping that it will be smoother sailing going forward. suzanne kianpour, bbc news, washington. reports have emerged that president donald trump personally dictated the statement his son gave on his talks with a russian lawyer during the election campaign. the washington post says some of the president's advisers fear the extent of the president's intervention could place him and some of his inner circle in legaljeopardy. the former foreign secretary william hague has revealed that business leaders and politicians abroad asked him how the uk would get round the eu referendum result. writing in the daily telegraph, lord hague said he was asked for months whether the uk would lose heart about leaving.
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but he said that globally the message has now got through. lord hague, who campaigned for a remain vote, said he backed the chancellor philip hammond's call for a transitional withdrawal. the home secretary is challenging the likes of facebook, twitter and google to do more to remove extremist content online. amber rudd has been attending a technology summit in san francisco. she's told the firms they need to work together to protect the public by stopping the spread of terror related material. our north america technology reporter, dave lee reports. terror of the streets of the uk. organised police say with the help of social media. so companies here in silicon valley are being told they must do more to prevent the spread of extremist content online. what i need them to acknowledge is that the enemy, who is really trying to move swiftly online, to radicalise people in their own homes, are really stepping their game up
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and we need our response stepped up as well. and there is also a concern that new measures might mean a loss of privacy for all of us. it's not possible to say we're going to monitor all communications on our platforms, but still preserve users privacy. they may attempt to minimise the impact on users privacy. they have to face up, people who might oppose this, to what our enemy is trying to do. they're trying to weaponise people at home. when this material goes online, it is circulated really fast. when this material goes online, it is circulated really fast. another worry as security experts will tell you is that terrorists could simply move to harder to reach parts of the internet. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him
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in london's knightsbridge police say he was taken to hospital but has since been discharged. a spokesperson said it was not yet known if the liquid thrown was a corrosive substance. greater manchester police is facing new investigations by the police watchdog over three separate fatal firearms incidents. the victoria derbyshire programme has learned that the independent police complaints commission is examining new evidence in the cases, which date from 2008 to 2013. simon cox has this exclusive report. my life is on hold. it's been on hold, and it's still on hold now. the police have determined what is happening with anthony's life and they are dictating what is happening in my life. anthony grainger was 36, a father of two young children. he was shot dead in the sleepy village of culcheth in march 2012. i didn't believe it, even...
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even up until i seen his body in the morgue. police believed he was planning an armed robbery. there were known violent criminals with him. but there was no gun in the car. there was a public inquiry into his death earlier this year. it was argued there were mistakes in the police intelligence, some of the armed officers had failed training courses and the most senior officer had changed his notes on the operation. you've got quite a number of separate fails which then brings is that big picture of an organisation that is questionable. it looks farfrom good. during the inquiry, greater manchester police said it was committed to learning lessons from the case and that no firearms officer goes to work wishing to injure or kill. the inquiry hasn't reported yet and will have to decide whether anthony grainger‘s death could have been avoided. this isn't the first time, though, questions have been asked about the force's armed police.
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ian terry was devoted to his family and his job as a firearms officer with greater manchester police. we were told that he'd been involved in an accident at work and that everyone had done all they could but they couldn't save him. ian terry was killed on a training exercise at this disused factory in 2008. an inquestjury ruled he would have been saved if the training had been properly prepared. john foxcroft ran the firearms training unit at greater manchester, but left over safety concerns in 2006. i thought we were getting a little bit too much into the aggressive tactics. the more aggressive you get, the more likely you are to have people shot. there were no criminal charges brought, but greater manchester police was fined for health and safety offences. and there's another controversial case, that ofjordan begley. i need the police here
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as quick as i can. well, i'll get an officer there as soon as we've got one. jordan, just stay there, you're not going out! this was the call his mum made to police after a drunken row with neighbours. he was tasered and punched while he was on the ground. he later died from heart failure. an inquestjury found that police failings played a part in his death and that he was unlawfully killed. someone actually believes is and someone will do something about it. we can go somewhere now, we can do something about it. someone's got to say sorry. they've got to. we've discovered that all of these cases are now facing new investigations from the police watchdog. with many of the officers still serving, it poses tough questions for greater manchester police. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. the government indicated could still
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legislate to impose a cap on energy prices after british gas said it will put a little silly prices by 12.5%. following the sacking of anthony scaramucci after ten days in office, the white house says president trump's new chief of staff will bring discipline to the administration. the home secretary challenges the world's biggest technology companies to do more to remove extremist content online. and in sport, los angeles will host the 2028 olympic games in paris will stage the 2024 competition. both wa nted stage the 2024 competition. both wanted the event in seven years' time that the la mayor says the dealer they were offered was too good to pass up. hearts have sacked their head coach afterjust seven months in charge. the 31—year—old who was previously at newcastle appears to paid the price for a shock league cup exit against dunfermline last weekend. maria sharapova makes a winning return from injury. she beatjennifer brady
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in three sets at west classic. she returned in april after a 15 month doping ban. she's been out with problems with her fight since may. i will be back just problems with her fight since may. i will be backjust after 11:30am. see you then. thank you very much. patients with pancreatic cancer are being operated on in just two weeks, instead of two months after being diagnosed. research published in the medical journal, hpb, says early surgery increases patients' chances of having their tumours removed by 22%. doctors in birmingham hope their approach will be adopted nationally. mikalay paduano reports. kate rigby was amazed at how smoothly the nhs worked when she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. within seven days, she had had surgery at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. i feel quite emotional, actually. i feel privileged. i could have died. i can't control nhs budget, and all the other things for the poor people who aren't as lucky as me.
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but what i can do is spread the word. normally, people with jaundice like mrs rigby have a stent put in to relieve symptoms, which delays the main operation. but the hospital bypassed this step. a nurse was employed to speed up treatment from two months to 16 days, meaning a fifth more patients were able to complete surgery to remove their cancer. cutting out the stent also said the nhs £3,200 per patient. cutting out the stent also saved the nhs £3,200 per patient. we save the nhs potentially £200,000 per year, with the number of patients that have surgery within our team. and so that, then, is a reproducible model that other units up and down the country could use to go forward. pancreatic cancer has a very low survival rate. it will be two years before doctors can say whether treating patients more quickly actually means that they live longer. and, if they do, that will beg the question as to whether or not other aggressive cancers should be treated more quickly. for now, kate rigby knows she has been given the best chance possible
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to survive pancreatic cancer. michele paduano, bbc news. pakistan gets a new prime minster today to replace nawaz sharif, who was forced to stepped down on friday. he was disqualified from public office by the supreme court, which ruled that he had failed to disclose his family's financial assets. our south asia correspondentjustin rowlatt is in islamabad and hejoins us now. who is going to take on the top job, justin? well, today in just a few moments we are expecting a guy called shahid khaqan abbasi, the former natural resources minister, to ta ke former natural resources minister, to take on the top job, elected by the national assembly. he's been chosen by the ruling party to be the successor and he will be elected by the national assembly, that, and this is where it gets complicated, here's an interim leader. he will hold the fort while nawaz sharif,
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the guy who was kicked out for corruption last week, his brother, the chief minister of the punjab, the chief minister of the punjab, the most powerful state in pakistan, needs to get himself based seat in parliament and then take over. we think shahid khaqan abbasi will hold office for about eight weeks and then this guy, the brother of nawaz sharif, will take over and the idea the ruling party is then saying he will lead the party in the country through two general elections, which are due in summer next year. so basically, this is where the real quy basically, this is where the real guy will be elected in a couple of months. what do opposition politicians make of all of this? they say pakistan is a democracy, how can you pass power between brothers in this way? the ruling party says, nawaz sharif is a significant powerful politician in his own right and the natural successor to his brother, nawaz
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sharif and it's successor to his brother, nawaz sharif and its reasonable he should ta ke sharif and its reasonable he should take leadership of the party and the country. and they say, listen, people have a problem with it, we have general elections next summer and they can vote then and opposition parties are making hay with this and saying this is not bureaucratic. the public should be able to choose and how can you expect to pass through a family brother to brother the leadership of the party in the country but at the moment that is what's happening. the pakistan muslim league, the ruling party and a big majority in parliament so there is no reason to think that he won't be elected in just a few moments. now and in a couple of months' time. his brother will take his place. thank you. up to 500 people are going on trial in turkey, accused of taking part in last year's attempted military coup. the trial is the largest so far relating to the uprising. the group will be tried at a specially built courtroom
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in ankara on charges ranging from murder, violating the constitution and attempting to kill president erdogan. at least 40 face life imprisonment if found guilty. the labour mp steve mccabe has been left with facial injuries after being hit with a brick by an attacker on a motorcycle. the memberfor birmingham selly oak tweeted this picture of himself saying he was suffering from a "very sore and swollen face" following the incident in the yardley wood area last night. west midlands police said they are investigating and are appealing for witnesses. the trauma unit atjohn radcliffe hospital will close due to fire safety concerns about the cladding on the building. it follows an investigation in the wake of the g re nfall tower investigation in the wake of the grenfall tower fire. 52 investigation in the wake of the grenfall towerfire. 52 inpatient beds will be moved by the 4th of august and the work to remove the cladding could take a year. a horde of roman silver discovered by a teenage metal detector wrist in his first top find is to go on display
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in scotland. david hall, who is now 16, found the silver in fife two yea rs 16, found the silver in fife two years ago. it dates from the third century a.d. and find if being hailed as significant. it will go on an exhibition in october. a man who drifted a mile out to sea in a toy dinky has been rescued by a lifeboat crew. what are you doing out here? the alarm was raised at 7:30pm last night after he was spotted near wind farm off the coast of red far. the man who was just wearing a hooded in shorts was brought back to shore and given a good talking to about safety. the royal national lifeboat institution or rnli says last year saw a rise in the number of coastal deaths in august. they're warning of the shock that can come with falling into cold water as we enter the deadliest month for accidents in the sea. radio 1 newsbeats rick kelsey has been in cornwall with the rnli, as a new national campaign tells people how to deal with the shock of falling into cold water.
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tens of thousands of people will go into the water off the uk this month. one of the most popular places is here in newquay. so how would you describe today's conditions? a good day for surfing or not? yes, it's pretty good, it's pretty solid out there. it is nice and clean which makes a change. josie has the job of watching hundreds of surfers and swimmers here on fistral beach. i have lived pretty much on this beach all my life. i have done the surf life saving club since i was little. so on a day like this what are the trickiest things that could cause someone a problem? for holiday makers they do not understand the water like we do. so theyjust think they can go wherever they want and sometimes when you tell them they don't like to be told what to do. right. every yearjust under 200 people die on the uk's coastline while thousands more are injured. anthony miller was just 23 when he went into the water one night. they were drinking, partying and he basically said right, i am going skinny—dipping.
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he went into the sea and basically he disappeared. i really, really want people to be aware that when you are on holiday, or whether you live by the sea, and you are out drinking by all means have a good time, but do not go near the water, do not because you may not come back out alive. even in the summer months the temperatures in uk waters do not get much above 16 celsius which is about the same temperature that comes out of your cold water tap. and august is also the month that the guys who work in this lifeboat station are the busiest. if you are out around the coastline, you could be fishing on rocks and slips, trips and falls around the coast, if you end up in the water, you will be in your clothes because you were not prepared.
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i want you to go onto your back, arms out by your side and push your chin as high as you can towards the air and that will keep your airwaves away from the water. it is that initial part of giving yourself a minute, a minute and a half, to let your heart rate go back to a normal rhythm and get your breath back and try and compose yourself a little bit so you are not making rash decisions in these environments. despite the warnings, the amount of injuries and deaths has remained steady over the last five years and the rnli hope with this new advice fewer people will get into trouble. if you are watching a fun free view 01’ if you are watching a fun free view or you view, some channel numbers are changing. tomorrow afternoon. bbc news is moving to channel 231. bbc news is moving to channel 231. bbc news is moving to channel 231. bbc news hd will remain at 107. some televisions will update automatically, but you may need to
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retu ne automatically, but you may need to retune your free view or you view tv box. for help to do that, you can go to free view channel 100 or visit the website. sky, free sat and virgin media customers are not affected. there you go. i hope that is clear now. bbc‘s babies are offered babies are to be offered at new vaccine in addition to the regularjabs. new vaccine in addition to the regular jabs. that is new vaccine in addition to the regularjabs. that is to come after the weather forecast. the weather is looking pretty mixed across much of the british isles today. we have a mixture of sunshine and showers. much of them across parts of the north and west currently. east anglia in drawing the best of the dry weather but they are tracking their way eastwards through the rest of the day so most of us will need an umbrella as we are heading out. some showers could be heavy infantry but equally there will be some
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brightness in between those showers and it could be blustery in exposed areas in the west. 15—24dc. through tonight, the showers will ease and gradually clear. the wind will ease as well but overnight weather front pushing its way up from the south—west. a game, the wind is picking up but the majority of the country will be dry with lows of 10-15dc. country will be dry with lows of 10—15dc. tomorrow, as we head on into wednesday, that rain band will push its way north and eastwards. northern parts of scotland enjoying the best of the dry and brighter weather for much of the day and where we have the ring, rather miserable. 16—20dc. the weather turning more unsettled as we head towards the end of the week. this is bbc newsroom live with julian worricker. the headlines at 11.30. the government has said it is concerned about a decision
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by british gas to raise electricity prices by twelve and a half per cent. labour have called it a "whopping increase". when people's wages are being frozen or cut they should have more consideration for their customers. the white house has insisted that president trump's new chief of staff will bring order to his administration, following the sacking of anthony scaramucci as director of communications after less than ten days in office. the major technology companies must step up their fight against extremism orface new laws. amber rudd said technology companies were not doing enough to beat "the enemy" on the internet. time to bring you up—to—date with the morning's sports news. los angeles is set to host the 2028 olympic and paralympic games. la's bid team has reached
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an agreement with the international olympic committee, which is expected to be ratified by the los angeles city council later today. la had originally been bidding for the 2024 games, but that event is now set to take place in paris. we really have an olympics ready city. unlike the old model where people tried to fit the olympics to the city, this is a model where we are fitting the city to the olympics. we are building things for oui’ olympics. we are building things for our people who will benefit and the olympics can take advantage of those. not every city will be labelled we hope we can change the olympics model by telling people to use what they have and use it well. hearts have sacked head coach ian cathro afterjust seven months in charge. the 31—year—old, who was in his first managerial role, appears to have paid the price for a shock league cup exit against dunfermilne at he weekend. a hearts statement reads:
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"the board wishes it to be known that this was a very difficult decision, reluctantly made, as every member recognises ian is an extremely talented young coach with a very bright future." new manchester united signing nemanja matic says to to work withjose mourinho once again was an opportunity i couldn't turn down afterjoining from chelsea for a fee which could rise to 40 million pounds. the serbia midfielder becomes united's third summer signing after victor lindelof and romelu lukaku. it's the second time mourinho has bought him. i feel great. manchester is one of the biggest clubs in the world and i'm very happy because i'm now part of this great club, part of this great group. i'm looking forward to start to train with the team and to start to train with the team and to start to train with the team and to start to play the games. maria sharapova made her return to hard court tennis last night, with a three set victory over american jennifer brady. following her 15 month drugs ban, a hip injury also forced sharapova to withdraw from wimbledon qualifying in june.
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but the russian broke several times on her comeback in california, to take the first set 6—1. and while she lost the second, the former world number one was at her very best in the decider, winning it six games to love. sharapova hadn't played in the us for over two years until last night. the world athletics championships get underway at the weekend, but one of the star attractions on the track won't be there. david rudisha, the world and olympic 800m champion — and world record holder, is out with a thigh injury. the kenyan won the world title in beijing two years ago, and broke the world record in london in 2012. one of the heroes of 2012 not returning to london but one man who will be performing in his very last major championship is usain bolt. he defends his 100 metres title and also competes in the relay. lord coe
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admits his absence will be a hard one to fill. we won't find another usain bolt in the same way as boxing didn't find another muhammad ali. when he left the sport of boxing, the bloodline dry up, where they pound for pound just as good or some even better, yes, absolutely but we're not going to replace usain bolt. you're not going to have a trophy cabinet full of three back—to—back olympic doubles and relays and world championships. you're just not relays and world championships. you'rejust not going relays and world championships. you're just not going to replace him because his personality dominated not just our because his personality dominated notjust our sport because his personality dominated not just our sport and because his personality dominated notjust our sport and pretty much every sport out there. back to you. more in the next half an hour. two venezuelan opposition leaders have been rearrested just days
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after a controversial vote to change the constitution. the families of leopoldo lopez and antonio ledezma say they were taken away by security officials overnight. this video posted by the daughter of mr ledezma shows her father being taken away by officers of the venezuelan intelligence service. both men are former mayors of caracas and critics of president nicolas maduro. with me is juan with me isjuan carlos from bbc mundo. this is very significant. they are the most prominent opposition leaders in venezuela. both were on the house arrest. mr ledezma was arrested in 2015 on suspicion of an attempted coup. mr lopez was arrested in 2014 for
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supporting demonstrations. this was a bold move by the government and things are very fluid. we have had this vote, the opposition encourage people not to vote and president maduro says it gave him what he wanted. where do things go from here? we, the probably tomorrow or on thursday and the assembly has com plete on thursday and the assembly has complete powers. they are even above mr maduro as president. they are going to meet in the same building as the national assembly and they can dissolve the assembly and ta keover can dissolve the assembly and takeover for example the office of the attorney general. he is a former chavista but has become an opponent to mr maduro. these things are moving more quickly than ever right
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110w. moving more quickly than ever right now. x-ray much indeed. from today, babies born in england, wales and northern ireland are to be offered a new vaccine which protects against hepatitus b. the hexavalent vaccine will also immunise against five other diseases — including polio, tetanus and whooping cough. health protection scotland is set to adopt a similar policy from september. public health england says the new vaccine has been "extensively tested". let's speak to jackie fletcher, whose son received the mmr jab at 13 months old which she believes trigged severe epilepsy. she joins us now from warrington. what are your thoughts? very concerned about this because hepatitis b which is a severe liver
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infection and not a airborne virus, it is blood—borne. it can be contracted through promiscuous sexual contact, through being a drug user 01’ sexual contact, through being a drug user or being in a profession that is at risk, like prison officers, people who might come into contact with other people's blood products. the vaccine has been extensively tested and shown to be safe and is widely used internationally with millions of doses given around the world. on that basis, what's the problem? here, in britain, we've got a support group of 200 adults who been given hepatitis b vaccine and have been forced to have it through their profession and they say they have suffered severe harm. oh my goodness! phone rings... they say
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this is a very safe faxing and eight weeks old babies are given this and three other vaccines for other diseases and these not only contained bacteria but they contain antibiotics and animal protein and most worrisome is aluminium. the point i put to you, sorry to interrupt. i'm glad your phone has insisted. the point i put to you when i said i'm saying it is safe, it's not me who is saying it, it's public health england. it's the world health organisation. they are not going to put people at risk u nless not going to put people at risk unless they say they have extensively tested this potential vaccine. well, what i'd like to put
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to public health england and the who is aware of the safety studies for the aluminium content. what they say isa the aluminium content. what they say is a safe recommended daily dose of injected aluminium is 25 micrograms. what a baby will get at eight weeks of age with all these vaccines which cover nine different diseases will be nearly 1100, which is 44 times the daily recommended dose. as i say, i would reiterate, the daily recommended dose. as i say, iwould reiterate, the the daily recommended dose. as i say, i would reiterate, the who, public health england should actually specified where the safety studies are to show this is a safe thing to do. we must leave it there. you have put your point of view. thank you for coming on. public health england have said it is extensively tested and as far as they are concerned is safe. prison staff have regained control at a jail in hertfordshire, after reports of a riot breaking out across two wings.
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police armed with riot gear were sent to mount prison, near hemel hempstead. the ministry ofjustice says order has been restored without any injuries. keith doyle reports. prison staff known as the tornado squad, trained to deal with disturbances, entered hmp the mount yesterday evening. they could be seen carrying shields and batons. two wings of the prison were said to be no longer in control of guards. the wings housed 227 of the 1000 inmates. from outside the walls of the prison, shouting could be heard, along with what sounded like stun grenades. late last night, the ministry ofjustice said the trouble had ended, and no staff or prisoners were injured. a report by the prison‘s independent monitoring board, released yesterday morning, warned staff shortages were adding to problems and mounting violence in the jail, while the prison officers' association said staff
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shortages were an epidemic, partly due to poor salaries. ina in a moment, a summary of the business news but first the headlines. the government indicates it could still legislate to impose a cap on energy prices after british gas says it will put up electricity prices by 12.5%. following the sacking of anthony scaramucci after less tha n sacking of anthony scaramucci after less than ten days in office, the white house says that the new chief of staff will bring discipline to the administration. the home secretary challenges technology companies to remove extremist content online. in the business news... energy giant british gas is to raise electricity prices by 12.5% from mid—september — but gas prices will be kept on hold. it means the average annual bill
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for a typical household will go up by £76 to £1,120. airline engine maker rolls—royce says sales rose sharply, helping it report a pre—tax profit of £1.9 billion for the six months tojune. that's a reversal of the £2.2bn loss it reported in the same period last year. bp has reported a solid start to the year, much better than forecasted. they have invested heavily in new technology to improve performance. the company which owns british gas has announced its half yearly results. three million people will face higher electricity bills
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from september as british gas are putting up their standard tariff by 12.5 per cent. a typical duel fuel bill will rise — the company says — by £76. the chief exec of centrica, ian conn explained why. first of all, the last time we moved our electricity prices was in january 2014 and since then they have been held flat. we have seen for reductions in gas prices in the period since 2013 as well as a small electricity for at the end of 2013. this is the first time we've put our prices up in that period. we are leaving gas prices flat. the reason for this is the transmission and distribution costs have been going up as well as the
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environmental and social policy costs a nd environmental and social policy costs and recently we've been selling electricity at a loss. those are the reasons we've had to put prices up, beginning in the middle of september. the overall impact for the average dualfuel of september. the overall impact for the average dual fuel bill is £76 and this will affect 3.1 million of oui’ and this will affect 3.1 million of our customers out of a total of 8.4. when you put this reason at the end of last year, wholesale electricity costs have actually come down. if you could afford to freeze then people will say nothing has really changed in the landscape and why can't you afford to freeze now. the reason is that applied then have still applied now. in fact, costs have fallen. since we dropped electricity prices last time, wholesale costs have indeed fallen by about £36 on the typical bill but
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we have seen these other factors on distribution and energy policy costs increased by nearly £100. that is the main driver. you have to look at where we started from. we had the cheapest electricity tariff of all the larger suppliers and we will still be materially below the average. ian can't talking to business editor. workers at the bank of england have gone on strike. some of them gathering at the bank today wearing masks depicting the bank of england governor mark carney. sony is on course for its highest
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annual positive profit in nearly 20 yea rs. annual positive profit in nearly 20 years. we've spoken about how companies have struggled to adapt to new arrivals but it has announced that its playstation console and image sensor technology has increased profits. a good year for greggs whose profits have risen. they have opened a lot of new shops. 61 of them in the first half of the year. and another update on house prices. average prices went up 2.9% last month, down slightly on the 3.1% rise injune. nationwide says those numbers are at odds with reports that the housing market is actually cooling. a lot of moving on
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the market today. you can see rolls—royce shares up nearly 9.5%. the parent company of british gas who announced that 12.5% rise, investors like what they see. of 2.596. investors like what they see. of 2.5%. it's going to be a pretty busy week. it's super thursday when we get the inflation forecast. we also get the inflation forecast. we also get the inflation forecast. we also get the new business rate. markets keeping a close eye on that. i'm off to greggs! seared on. britain's only surviving cloth hall reopens today after a multi—million pound renovation. the piece hall in halifax, west yorkshire, was once the centre of the world's wool trade and since then it has been through a number of different incarnations. we can get more now from our correspondent fiona lamdin for the last two and a half
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centuries the piece hall has stood at the heart of halifax, where in 1779 people came to trade from which clothiers would have sold the wool to merchants. merchants would have come from quite far afield, including on occasion from europe, and the trade from the piece hall went back into europe and also over to the americas. all the wool came from local sheep woven by local families on theirfarms. this is an example of the cloth most commonly sold in the piece hall and as you can feel, it's pretty hard wearing, isn't it? pretty rough. this was largely used by the military so it would have been used to make uniforms. this is the country's only surviving in fact cloth hall with 315 individual yet identical trading rooms. it seems such a waste this beautiful
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building was only open back then in the 18th century for trading for two hours every week. but after the industrial revolution the cloth was mainly made and sold from the mills. in its place the piece hall was filled with fruit and veg sellers. but a century on, in the 1970s, this is how the piece hall looked, a blot on the landscape, threatened to be flattened to make way for a car park. one of those who fought to save it back then was mary crossley. she had a shop on the second floor. she hasn't been inside for decades. we took her back. wow! isn't that lovely? when i first came in it was all black, there were sheds around the edge and warehouses in the middle and vehicles. when i came up onto the balcony i remember there were holes
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in the floor and it smells of cats. but you still fell in love with it? i still fell in love with it. to start with there were only three of us for quite a long time and there wasn't much trade to start with but it developed gradually. it's hoped this historical hall will place halifax back on the map. 238 years on as the shelves fill up, this is a new chapter for this town, but nothing is new for these old stones who have witnessed it all before. from today, people studying to be nurses or midwives will no longer receive nhs bursaries, instead, they will have to apply for student loans.
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applications for courses are down by more than 20%. the government says it is providing funding for an extra 10—thousand university places for students on nursing, midwifery and other health degrees in england. john maguire reports. these second—year nursing students are getting their first look at the anatomage table using the latest technology to take a 3—d trip through a virtual human body. their degree course at the university of central lancashire is funded by nhs bursaries and grants, but as of today applicants wanting to study nursing, midwifery and other medical courses will need a student loan in line with other undergraduates. so would it have deterred these students? i don't think it would have made a difference to myself because i really wanted to become a nurse and although the financial implications of not having a bursary would have impacted on me quite heavily, but i could have managed and my desire to become a nurse has overridden those. but applications for these courses have fallen by around 20%. theories include doubts
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from european students about brexit, a birthrate decline in the number of 18—year—olds as well as concerns about the change in financing. the universities, though, are determined to see the numbers recover and here there's cautious optimism. we have seen a decline in the number of applications coming through, but they're good quality and so the key thing is that they convert into the numbers that we have. so i'm very positive at this moment in time that we will recruit to target. one of the main areas of concern is the impact on mature students. nursing and midwifery attract a much higher percentage of older applicants than other degree courses and their life experience is seen as a vital part of the mix on a ward. sarah cordey says a loan instead of a bursary would have stopped her changing career to become a midwife. to saddle students with a huge
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amount of debt when they are only ever able to earn what the government dictates they can earn, it doesn't seem to make sense to me and had i been making this decision now knowing that i would have to take on the debt, i couldn't have done it, no. the government argues that the cap on student places had previously restricted numbers and that changing the funding will lead to an increase in around 10,000 applicants. but les green says he now can't afford to pursue his dream job. i'm 41 so i would be paying that... £30,000, i'd be paying back until i finish probably my... until i'm earning my pension. i don't think i'd ever play that off, i'd pay it until the rest of my career and beyond. all signs agree that the nhs is in dire need of more clinical staff but the debate centres on how to pay for them. california is famous
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for it's surfers — but this week it's the dogs that are hoping to catch the waves. canines of all sizes and breeds have been entering the annual surf—dog competition which is now in its 12th year. they'rejudged on how long they ride for, the height of the wave and showmanship — it gets a little....ruff! and outfits, quite possibly. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. for now, the weather. threatening clouds like this one across much of the british isles. the next moment, some sunshine like this. their are showers lurking around as well. some of the showers
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could be heavy. much of them across the north and west but tracking their way eastwards. grab an umbrella if you are heading out because there is the risk of a shower even if it looks sunny. blustery conditions for exposed areas in the west. in between the showers, some sunshine to look forward to. across scotland and northern ireland, a few scattered showers for later on. some of them heavy and maybe even thundery. perhaps a bit drier for northern parts of england. a few showers across northern england. fewer compared with this morning but still a few lurking around. for the south, brisk winds taking the edge off temperatures. a few showers for the rush hour across east anglia. the showers will ease and clear tonight.
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it will become dry. overnight, a weather front coming into the south—west. temperatures should remain in double figures in the towns and cities but perhaps down to single figures in the countryside. tomorrow, another unsettled day. low pressure bringing another weather front with it. stronger winds. much of it across the south and west, gradually tracking north—east. the brighter weather across northern parts of scotland. probably remaining dry for daylight hours. a pretty blustery day to come for much of england and wales. that low will stay with is as we head into thursday and friday keeping things u nsettled. thursday and friday keeping things unsettled. it will be blustery as well. thursday and friday, sunshine and showers. some showers heavy and thundery. perhaps settling down
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again just thundery. perhaps settling down againjust in time thundery. perhaps settling down again just in time for the weekend. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 12.00. british gas says it will put up electricity prices by 12.5% from next month. the government indicates it could still legislate to impose a cap on energy prices, as labour condemns the increase as extortionate. anthony scaramucci is sacked after less than ten days in office, as the white house insists that president trump's new chief of staff will bring discipline to the administration. pakistan's parliament is set to elect a new prime minister to replace nawaz sharif, who stepped down on friday. two key venezuelan opposition leaders are seized by security forces, days after a controversial vote to change the constitution. a man who drifted a mile out to sea in a toy dinghy is rescued by a rnli crew. what are you doing out here? the
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charity launches a water safety campaignfor charity launches a water safety campaign for august, the busiest month for its life—saving. and once the centre of the world's wool trade, britain's only surviving cloth hall reopens after a multi—million pound renovation. after a multi—million good afternoon. it's tuesday 1st august. i'm julian worricker. welcome to bbc newsroom live. british gas has said it will increase the price of electricity for the first time in nearly four years. its owner centrica says electricity prices will increase by 12.5% from 15th september. 3.1 million customers will be affected. but the company's gas prices will be held at their current level. the average annual dual—fuel bill for households on a standard
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tariff will rise by £76, up by 7.3%. ian conn is the chief executive of british gas's parent company, centrica. he said the company has held electricity prices flat since 2014. we have been seeing four reductions in gas prices over the period since the end of 2013, as well as a small electricity fall at the end of 2013, the first time we have put electricity prices up in that period and relieving gas prices flat. the reason for this is the transmission and distribution costs going up, as one of the environmental and social policy costs and, recently, we have been selling electricity at a loss. our business presenter ben thompson explained who would be most affected by the price rise. particularly because this will
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affect people on the lowest incomes, the standard variable tariff, the bog—standard one, if you've not paid attention to fixing your tariff or choosing a better deal. it's the most one people will revert to and it will add £76 to an average bill. that means bills will be significantly higher, of course, as we approach winter. there's always questions over the timing of this because this price rise will come into force mid—september so with people approaching winter they will turn on the heating and the electricity and that's when they made the most. of course there are now calls for the government to get involved. we heard a lot of campaign pledges during the general election about whether politicians could enforce a cap on energy price rises. but did not happen. there's a concern it will not happen given the latest results of the general election, but many people are now calling for rapid progress for the regulator's plans for a reform of the market.
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how does this compare with what other companies have done or might be about to do? british gas is the last of the big six to raise prices. last year we saw the other big firms raise their prices significantly. british gas has held out from doing that as long as possible and normally when you talk about rises like this, there's been talk about the wholesale price, the price they buy gas and electricity on the open market to then provide it to us. those prices are becoming down quite significantly, so this time british gas, and you heard from the chief executive saying it's not to do with wholesale price but to do with the cost of getting electricity to houses, the pipes, pylons, that sort of thing and the cables, but also government regulation, and there's been a lot of regulation issued by government on the energy firms for things like clean energy, renewable energy initiatives which makes up a proportion of our bill. we paid to the energy firms but they then pass it onto the government. they say that is behind these increases, they are paying more and passing the cost onto us. the government says it's a small proportion of the bill and would account for this.
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gas prices are staying the same? yes, this is just a fact that most of us are on the dual fuel tariffs. many people getting both gas and electricity from a provider like british gas, so, yes, they will keep gas prices on hold. some welcome relief as we go towards winter, turning on boilers, that sort of thing, but nonetheless, a significant rise, 12.5% in electricity which will affect just over three million customers. the worst affected british gas says will get a small rebate but nonetheless, politically contentious but also raising tariffs like this always of course an important issue and we should just say this announcement comes as british gas issued its results. the figures were pretty good but the crucial thing, 377,000 customers, people walked away. they lost 377,000, so people are getting better at moving around but it's the same message, if you don't like it then switch
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with a provide you do like. and what's the political reaction been? let's speak to our assistant political editor norman smith. what are politicians saying all about this, norman? the government have reiterated their threat to impose an energy price cap to put a lid on the bills that customers face. they have also expressed concern at this latest rise by centrica and say it will hit many families on poor value variable tariffs and have rejected the suggestion that it is government costs and charges for renewable energy that is driving up the bills. i have to say i wouldn't hold your breath in terms of an energy icecap being delivered and the reason for that, quite simply, is the government's focus is on brexit.
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there's an awful lot of brexit legislation to get through parliament and there probably isn't the time and space to push through such a huge and controversial piece of legislation. many tory mps are opposed to it on the grounds that they think a price cap is not a tory thing to do. and, bear in mind, ministers have the option of introducing a price cap in the re ce nt introducing a price cap in the recent queen's speech, and chose not to do it. nevertheless, they have to be seen to be taking the side of customers which is why i think they have come out with this suggestion today it is not off the table. added today it is not off the table. added to which, they are under pressure from labour who this morning, reiterated their commitment to introducing an immediate cap. this was the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell. i think this is extortionate at this point in time when people's wages are being cut orfrozen and people are struggling at the moment. we said from the labour party we would introduce a price cap initially, but also we'd develop alternative energy supplies so that this cartel that we have now
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can't control pricing levels and hold us over a barrel ever again in future. i think they're exploiting their customers. while i would because it's about expecting some sort of cap to protect all 17 million customers, there is still a possibility of a more limited cap because we are expecting the regulator ofgem to report after the summer with a series of proposals and one of the ideas they appear to be looking at is protection for the most disadvantaged customers. those perhaps on the warm homes allowance which could protect an additional 2 million people. there is a possibility of a more limited cap being introduced. norman smith, thank you very much at westminster. joining me now is the conservative mpjohn penrose, who has led calls for a cap on energy prices.
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good afternoon. good afternoon. what should happen as a result of this price rise from british gas?” should happen as a result of this price rise from british gas? i think norman smith is exactly right. we need to go ahead with a price cap which was promised in notjust the conservative party's manifesto but also the labour party and the snp's ma nifesto. also the labour party and the snp's manifesto. the board is now firmly in the court of ofgem who have the necessary powers to introduce this cap but the trouble is, at the moment, they are talking about a narrow thing which only covers 2 million people. there are 17 million households on these rip—off standard variable tariffs. they will be hit ha rd est variable tariffs. they will be hit hardest at the cap needs to protect them in the short term so we don't all suffer and get ripped off. why wasn't this in the queen's speech? it doesn't have to be in the queen's speech. you don't need more legislation. ofgem already have the powers to do this, it's tricky for
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them to do it, but they have the necessary powers so you don't need to legislate again to give the more powers. they have got the power was already. the question is making sure they have the courage and the backbone to applied properly to all 17 million of us who need protection, not just 2 17 million of us who need protection, notjust 2 million and leaving 50 million others to swing in the wind. that will puzzle people who watch the campaign, watching your party and other saying let's introduce a price cap to suggest legislation would be required, that was the implication out there, but you are suddenly saying no, we don't need to do it that way. what has happened since the general election ofgem have confirmed they have got the necessary powers to do this, so, since everyone's manifestos were written, if ofgem are worried about their being political backing for them, there is cross—party agreement for them. everybody wants this to happen. we can argue about how it should be happening, we could disagree about the kind of cap but
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fundamentally don't think there's any excuse, given what's happened, all of the big six are saying they wa nt to all of the big six are saying they want to raise prices and, interestingly, the one small they have sunshine, the chairman of centrica today was saying that he thinks that the market is not serving consumers properly and he was saying we should get rid of the standard variable tariffs, the ones which are harming many of your listeners. he thinks they should be gotten rid of entirely. if some of them are winning to do that, that is very, very welcome news and something which we could build on on a cross—party basis. something which we could build on on a cross-party basis. you talk about cross— party a cross-party basis. you talk about cross—party support but you acknowledge within the ranks of your own party there are some people, norman smith mentioned it, who think this is not a tory measure. it depends on the kind of cap you are talking about. the kind of cap a cce pta ble talking about. the kind of cap acceptable to most conservatives is acceptable to most conservatives is a relative cap, which means it caps the maximum mark—up so when you're
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fixed term deal comes to an end and you get put on the standard variable ta riffs you get put on the standard variable tariffs and your prices suddenly go up, it would cap the amount which could be applied to you which keeps lots of customer choice, and encourages people to switch and means we do better if we do switch thanif means we do better if we do switch than if we stay on the standard variable tariffs and that means most competition still works and you have a chance to allow the big six to compete against each other and the 50 new entrant into the market to compete as well and that means you then have a market which works properly and make the customer king, soi properly and make the customer king, so i think that would be more a cce pta ble so i think that would be more acceptable to most conservative mps but then we're arguing about the kind of cap about whether or not there should be one or not. thank you very much for coming on. joining me now is alex neill, managing director of home products and services at the consumer advice service which? where do we go from here? this is a big price rise for 3 million people, so that's a lot of people, and people are already paying over the
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odds for their energy so there will bea odds for their energy so there will be a sense of anger and disappointment for consumers. we would say to people, don't stand for this and switch supplier today. more people are doing that but you would say not enough? yes, there's still some perceptions it's difficult to do, but we urge more people to do it. a standard variable tariffs is the most expensive on the market, generally, and people can save around £300, so that's a of money to be saved by switching suppliers. british gas are saying there are transmission, distribution costs, government regulations they have to abide by which cost money and they haven't put this particular bill up for three years. how would you respond to that? it hasn't gone up but i would say this is still a very expensive tariff. there are cheaper ones on the market and, frankly, for the customers of british gas, they won't really care about any of this squabbling about who is to blame for the costs and the price rises. these
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people are now paying another £76 on top of what was already more than £1000 a yearfor a bill. and they are not seeing the difference in value they are getting from british gas, so i think the main point would be the service and the levels of information from these companies need to be better, otherwise customers should walk away. what about a customers should walk away. what abouta cap? customers should walk away. what about a cap? a good move or not? there's a lot of debate about this and had interestingly been passed to the regulator to try to sort this one out but i think the main point coming from consumers would be just do something. just do something. there's been so much debate, so much talk and yet we are still in the same situation two years on after a big major competition enquiry but what we agree is a market is not working but we can't agree on the solution but people need to see definitive action. 0k, thank you very much indeed for coming in. the white house communications director anthony scaramucci has been fired less than two weeks after his appointment.
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mr scaramucci was dismissed last night just hours after the appointment of generaljohn kelly for what officials described as his "inappropriate" comments in a magazine interview. he's the third trump appointee to leave his role in recent days. suzanne kianpour reports. tonight, breaking news: forced out afterjust 11 days on the job at the white house... game of thrones, house of cards — pick your political drama. washington thrown into a frenzy after the newly minted, smooth—talking communications director is sacked. anthony scaramucci took to the podium ten days ago for the first and last time. he came in guns blazing, promising to flip the script and shake up the white house. and he did. although his eye was on getting rid of then chief—of—staff reince priebus, it was press secretary sean spicer who was the first to go, resigning in protest at the man called "mooch". but then a bit of foreshadowing. you know, one of the things i can't stand about this town is the backstabbing.
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where i grew up, in the neighbourhood i was in, we were frontstabbers. the self—proclaimed outsider took it too far, launching into a tirade of obscenities to a journalist, accidentally on the record, forgetting the rules of reporting. scaramucci seemed to have won when reince priebus resigned, reporting directly to the president. but a new—new sheriff was in town, generaljohn kelly, the secretary of homeland security. his request, a source tells me, was that scaramucci had to go. kelly's wish, the president's command. after the swearing—in ceremony, the mooch was escorted off the premises. donald trump has been in office for nearly six months, but his presidency has been plagued by chaos and controversy. from multiple investigations into his campaign's contacts with russia, to constant staffing shake—ups at the white house. but, with a four—star general at the helm now,
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the administration is hoping that it will be smoother sailing going forward. suzanne kianpour, bbc news, washington. welcome to you, what you make of the demise of anthony scaramucci? it's another chaotic day in the white house and one that we are told by the white house is the beginning of a move away from chaos, but one that we have no reason to believe is not the next in an ongoing stage of chaos that we have just seen at the white house since january the 20th. unless, of course, generaljohn kelly has come in, he's going to crack the whip, he's going to be given the powers he's hinting at and will restore order? that's right. john kelly is a decorated general, a marine, someone who was known for
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being on top of things and being very strict on order. this could be the beginning of his new aero, cleaning out what was there from the days that preceded him, all the drama, melodrama which was part of the trump white has so far. the question is, so much of that drama and melodrama flows from the president himself and from the way of being he seems to enjoy that it's ha rd to of being he seems to enjoy that it's hard to believe at this point that we're going to see a major change from the white house, because every white house tends to say, it is this person or that person, but it always flows from the president and that was true of george bush, braque obama, bill clinton. how do think this place to trump supporters because he said it's time to drain the swamp. this is what he's doing, isn't it? a lot of people miss how
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many donald trump voters were eager to support him because they wanted to support him because they wanted to shake things up in washington and when they see the discomfort that it's caused by people in congress or by the lobbying world, special interests, people in the media about all of the chaos that is going on, in the white house, that, for them is often taken as a sign that this is often taken as a sign that this is working. people should be co mforta ble is working. people should be comfortable in the minds of trump voters and that is what is happening. it's not clear to me that we are going to see any major loss of support because anthony scaramucci was in the white house.|j suppose what i'm getting at is that the huge contrast between what the garden of the washington bubble and the rest of the united states of america. that's right, and it's not just the congress, but the people who are outside the washington bubble who don't want trump to be president, and don't support him, but amongst those who did support,
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they want that bubble to be squeezed, that pain and discomfort to be part of life for all of these people in washington, in the particular establishment, who feel like this is not the way you do things. i don't like the way things are being done by donald trump. anybody feeling bad about what's going on, it's a victory, not only for donald trump himself. thank you for donald trump himself. thank you for your thoughts. time to catch up with a sports news this lunchtime. good afternoon. elli downey will start with that news, she will miss october ‘s world championships in canada after surgery. she injured her left ankle in the british championships in march but went on to win four medals in the european championships. she plans to return to the commonwealth games in australia and has said, minor setback is a pathway for a major comeback. on to football and hearts of sacks of their head coach ian
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castro after just seven months of sacks of their head coach ian castro afterjust seven months in charge. 31—year—old who was in his first managerial role, former newcastle assistant, has paid the price for that shock league cup exit dunfermline at the weekend. the board wishes to make it known that a difficult decision. ian is an extremely talented young coach with a very bright future. maria sharapova made a return to hard court tennis last night with a 3—set victory over the american jennifer brady following her 15 months ban, and a hip injury forced her to withdraw from wimbledon qualifying injune withdraw from wimbledon qualifying in june that she withdraw from wimbledon qualifying injune that she broke several times last night in her comeback in california taking the first set 6—1, lost the second budget was at her best in the decider, winning it 6—0. she had not played in the usa for over two years. she had not played in the usa for over two yea rs. los she had not played in the usa for over two years. los angeles are set to host the 2028 olympic and paralympic games. their bid team had reached an agreement with the
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international olympic committee, which is expected to be ratified by the los angeles city council later today. la had originally been bidding for the 2024 games, but that's now set to be taking place in paris. we rarely have an olympics ready city and one thing i will say is, unlike the old model, where people try to fit the olympics to the city, this is a model where we are fitting the city to the olympics. we are not building things for the olympics and hoping our people will benefit. we are building things for other people who will benefit and we know the olympics can ta ke benefit and we know the olympics can take advantage of those, so it's a different model we hope not every city will be la, but we hope we can change the olympic model by telling folks, use what you have and use it well. that is all the sport for you now. thank you very much. pakistan gets a new prime minster today to replace nawaz sharif, who was forced to stepped down on friday. he was disqualified from public office by the supreme court, which ruled that he had failed to disclose his family's
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financial assets. our south asia correspondentjustin rowlatt is in islamabad and hejoins us now. what is in store in the coming hours? the coming hours, coming minutes, the national assembly, the accession has already begun. the bmps now are required to vote on the new prime minister aerial candidate. he is called shahid khaqan abbasi, the former natural resources minister. he should be elected, we think, within the next hour, so pakistan will have a new prime minister within the hour but before you get too excited about that you should know he's only going to hold office for eight weeks. after which, the former prime minister's brother is expected to take over. so nawaz sharif was disqualified by the supreme court from holding office
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after it was found he had not accounted properly for his families vast wealth. as leader of the leading ruling party has handed over power to his brother but because his brother isn't actually a sitting mp, he needs to get himself a seat before he can become prime minister. he will give up his currentjob as chief minister of punjab, get himself his brother ‘s seat, be voted in, and in two months' time he will, a similar process to what we are seeing now, the mps will vote again and he will be elected prime minister so what you are seeing is, yes, new prime ministerfor pakistan, but one which will only last a couple of weeks before the longer term replacement takes his seat. sorry about this. just omitted more complicated, in ten months there will be a general election at which the people of pakistan will be able to decide what they make of this transition of power. it's all very neatly choreographed by the ruling party but i wonder how it
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looks beyond the corridors of power? it's pretty tough explaining it so i don't know how neat it is. be on the corridors of power, people recognise that the pakistan muslim league, the ruling party has a big majority, and although their leader has been disqualified by the supreme court for corruption, as the sitting ruling party, they do have the right to nominate a successor, the same thing which happened for example in great britain when david cameron stood down, theresa may replaced him without an election. in the same way, he has chosen his own replacement. a difference if he has chosen his brother to replace him and, obviously, in pakistan, as elsewhere in the world, there have been eyebrows raised about that but of course the party would say, listen, this guy is a senior experienced politician in his own right, running the biggest state in pakistan, the punjab, and is the most appropriate person says nawaz
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sharif, the former prime minister, to carry on my legacy and therefore he gets thejob. to carry on my legacy and therefore he gets the job. because there was a general election, there is the opportunity in ten months' time for the people of pakistan to make a decision for themselves about whether they think handing over power between brothers is the best way to do things. mac quite good stuff, justin. thank you very much. relatives of venezuelan opposition leaders leopoldo lopez and antonio ledezma say the two men have been re—arrested. it comes just two days after a controversial vote to change the constitution. the daughter of mr ledezma posted this video on social media, showing her father being taken away by officers of the venezuelan intelligence service. the wife of mr lopez said that if anything happened to him, she would hold president nicolas maduro responsible. our correspondent will grant is in the capital caracas. how significant are these arrests,
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do you think? very significant, givenjust do you think? very significant, given just how key the opposition leaders are, both of those men very influential here in venezuela. leopoldo lopez was party leader and an extremely important figure tipped to one day perhaps challenge for the presidency. and antonio ledezma was the mayor of this city, caracas, so the mayor of this city, caracas, so the two of them have a lot of sway over a lot of supporters and they we re over a lot of supporters and they were taken in the dead of night by armed security forces. it doesn't really help the government argument that they are not descending into a dictatorship. leopoldo lopez's wife said that she held president nicolas maduro personally responsible should anything happen to her husband. maduro personally responsible should anything happen to her husbandm
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which case, you are hinting at further divisions further demonstrations on the streets? well i think you did not hear that. are we talking about further disturbances on the streets? i think we may have lost the line between london and caracas, so we might try to resume that conversation at some point but will ground there in caracas with the latest as far as he could bring us. i want to give you some view information. if you are watching us on freeview or you view, some channel numbers are changing. tomorrow afternoon, bbc news is moving to channel 231. bbc news hd will remain at 107. some televisions will update automatically, but you may need to retune your free view or you view tv box. for help to do that,
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you can go to freeview channel 100 or visit their website. sky, freesat and virgin media customers are not affected. time now for a look at the weather. let's put across to the balcony for the weather forecast. i let's put across to the balcony for the weatherforecast. i can let's put across to the balcony for the weather forecast. i can see some sunshine that it's not the case for all parts of the united kingdom. there's been some lovely sunny weather across the southeast part out towards the north—west, showers moving eastwards. we are likely to see some showers in east anglia and not far away from london. temperatures up to 23 degrees in
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london in glasgow about 18. the front moving in is going to bring some wind and rain into the south—west. northern scotland tomorrow is the place to be for sunny weather. elsewhere, wind and rain spreading across southern counties. it should dry up in northern ireland. temperatures in the low 20s. thursday sees persistent rain moving out and back to where we started. some blustery showers, most of them in the north—west. this is bbc newsroom live with mejulian worricker. the headlines at 12.30. the government has said it is concerned about a decision by british gas to raise electricity prices by twelve and a half per cent. labour have called it a "whopping increase".
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when people's wages are being frozen or cut they should have more consideration for their customers. following the sacking of anthony scaramucci as director of communications after less than ten days in office, the white house has insists that president trump's new chief of staff will bring order to his administration. pakistan's parliament is set to elect a new prime minister to replace nawaz sharif, who stepped down on friday. more now on british gas increasing the price of electricity for the first time in several years. joining me now is archna luthra, head of energy at the consumer finance website moneysavingexpert.com good afternoon. your reaction to
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this announcement given that bear has been this four—year period with no increase. no surprise that they are increasing prices, after a bit ofa are increasing prices, after a bit of a blunder on their website yesterday. british gas said they we re yesterday. british gas said they were freezing prices but they have just put it off a bit longer. this is an eye watering increase and it's just going to hit before winter which is the highest usage time. your website offers advice to people who want to find a way around the system. what should people be doing? they should be urgently checking whether they can save. the british british gas user on a standard tariff will be paying £1200, which is massive. the cheapest deals in the market are around 830. the perception is it is difficult to
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switch but really it isn't. just go toa switch but really it isn't. just go to a comparison price site and put in some details and it will tell you the cheapest price. your pipes and meter don't change, really only the company billing you changes. people see it as complex and there is that sense that you have got the big six operating as you do that no sooner you have switched, the one you switch to doesn't turn out to be as good as the others. possibly true but there is such a big difference between the standard prices and the cheaper deals on the market that really it is still worth it. there are other options. you can go for a longer fixed are other options. you can go for a longerfixed deal of are other options. you can go for a longer fixed deal of two or three yea rs longer fixed deal of two or three years which might not be the very cheapest which will save you from having to keep switching. there is now talk of a cap which was widely
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discussed in the general election campaign. where do you stand on the merits of that kind of measure? i'm not convinced a price cap will do what the government wants it to do. potentially, it's going to make people rest on their laurels even more because they will feel they are protected by this when they can actually get bigger savings. the government needs to make a decision on whether it wants a regulated or competent market and not go for options in the middle. thanks very much for coming in. following the grenfell tower
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disaster in london injune the hospital trust in oxford carried out assessments across four sites and an independent report found that the trauma unit here at thejohn radcliffe hospital failed a trauma unit here at thejohn radcliffe hospitalfailed a number of safety standards. they found a number of things, first they found that the cladding was flammable. second, they found that the measures in place to stop fire from spreading from floor to floor were not as good as they should be. we have good measures to stop fire from spreading within a single floor but we don't have measures it turns out in that building to stop spread from floor to floor as reliable as we want. the trust held an emergency meeting last thursday and took the decision to evacuate the 52 bed inpatient unit by friday this week. in the meantime, fire wardens are carrying out regular patrols and there is an agreement with fire and rescue that if the fire alarm goes off, the
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service will deploy a number of cruise. the hospital now needs to work out how much it will cost to carry out the necessary improvement work but it's carry out the necessary improvement work but its expected that the trauma unit will remain closed for the next 12 months. a man has been left with facial injuries after two people on a moped threw an unknown liquid at him in london's knightsbridge police say he was taken to hospital but has since been discharged. a spokesperson said it was not yet known if the liquid thrown was a corrosive substance. police have confirmed that a 43—year—old mother and her teenage daughter and son
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from the milton keynes area died as a result of a collision yesterday morning on the north devon link road near landkeyjunction near barnstaple. the crash was between a white kia sportage travelling towards barnstaple and a lorry travelling in the opposite direction. the road was closed for nine hours for a police investigation. officers have appealed for witnesses. the labour mp steve mccabe has been left with facial injuries after being hit with a brick by an attacker on a motorcycle. the memberfor birmingham selly oak tweeted this picture of himself — saying he was suffering from a "very sore & swollen face" following the incident in the yardley wood area last night. west midlands police said they are investigating and are appealing for witnesses. up to 500 people are going on trial in turkey, accused of taking part in last year's attempted military coup. the trial is the largest so far relating to the uprising. the group will be tried at a specially built court—room in ankara on charges ranging from murder to violating patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in the birmingham area are being operated on injust two weeks, instead of two months after being diagnosed. research published in the medical journal, hpb, says early surgery increases patients' chances of having their tumours removed by 22 per cent. doctors in birmingham hope their approach will be adopted nationally.
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michele paduano reports. kate rigby was amazed at how smoothly the nhs worked when she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. within seven days, she had had surgery at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham. i feel quite emotional, actually. i feel privileged. i could have died. i can't control nhs budget, and all the other things for the poor people who aren't as lucky as me. but what i can do is spread the word. normally, people with jaundice like mrs rigby have a stent put in to relieve symptoms, which delays the main operation. but the hospital bypassed this step. a nurse was employed to speed up treatment from two months to 16 days, meaning a fifth more patients were able to complete surgery to remove their cancer. cutting out the stent also said the nhs £3,200 per patient. we save the nhs potentially £200,000 per year, with the number of patients that have surgery within our team. and so that, then, is a reproducible model that other units up and down the country could use to go forward.
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pancreatic cancer has a very low survival rate. it will be two years before doctors can say whether treating patients more quickly actually means that they live longer. and, if they do, that will beg the question as to whether or not other aggressive cancers should be treated more quickly. for now, kate rigby knows she has been given the best chance possible to survive pancreatic cancer. michele paduano, bbc news. it's no secret that this year's general election threw up a tighter than expected result. but why was this? for the past three years the british election study has followed a panel of the same 30,000 voters — asking them hundreds of questions about their political views and choices. we can now see what they said about the 2017 election. as we can see from this graph, by far and away the most significant issue in voters minds was brexit —
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over one in three chose this as their top issue. it changed the way people voted. the majority of leave voters opted for the conservatives, while labour picked up lots of remain voters. this might seem strange, given that labour were also committed to leaving the eu, but this next graph explains what happened. by the time the election was fought the brexit debate was not so much about leave or remain but about how to leave. the survey asked whether it was more important for the government to "protect britain's access to the single market, or to gain full control of immigration". there's a striking correlation between wanting to control immigration and voting tory, and wanting access to the single market and voting labour or lib dem. of course there was more to the election than brexit. this graph shows how the leader's likeability ratings converged as the campaign wore on — mr corbyn picking up more support, while mrs may lost hers, despite starting very strongly. this helps explain the unexpectedly tight result.
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to get more on this i'm joined from our westminster studio by our political correspondent emma vardy. does this confirm what we already expected to an extent? on the one hand, yes but this is the most detailed look we've had so far add what is going on. a sample of 30,000 voters over three years. it gives a much better indication of where people were switching allegiances and how in some cases it managed to outfox the pollsters. one significant thing this picks up is the amount of churn that was happening throughout the campaign. the amount of people who changed the party they intended to vote for and who they actually voted for on election day. some 19% of voters switched the way they were going to vote during his time. the flow of
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those votes were overwhelmingly in one direction. labour picked up 54% of those who switched compared to just 19% of the conservatives. a sign that labour was able to broaden its appeal during the campaign, it didn't win of course but these numbers are showing as what the surprise surge was towards labour that we saw. what does it say about the brexit factor? when voters were asked what was the most important issue in this issue brexit was out and out the number one issue for people, way ahead of the traditional issues like the economy or the nhs. this study shows is that the conservatives picked up votes from those wanting to control immigration whereas labour and the lib dems picked up votes from those who wa nted picked up votes from those who wanted closer ties to europe. in effect, labour picked up a number of remain votes from the conservatives and benefit there. this survey
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interprets it as labour being the party who wanted a softer brexit and the tories being the party for a harder brexit. a lot of the questions were about what sort of brexit people wanted. a word finally about the party leaders theresa may and jeremy corbyn, what does it say about attitudes to them? the graph is really striking. at the beginning, jeremy corbyn's likeability factor was so far behind theresa may's. that graph narrows towards polling day and by polling day they were very much neck and neck. this study has interpreted it to say thatjeremy corbyn had a much more successful campaign and theresa may suffered because of what was perceived to be a weak campaign by the conservatives. labour really benefited becausejeremy corbyn was able to broaden his appeal and he
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attracted people towards him who we re attracted people towards him who were initially lukewarm about him at the beginning of the general election campaign. it appears that the conservative strategy to pin so much on that strong and stable leadership campaign was rather a mistake. of course, this is all in hindsight and about looking at the numbers after the result. but it really tells you overall is this was a story of two leaders and a very important campaign that really mattered and the pads overriding story of brexit. emma, thank you very much. emma vardy at westminster. the government indicates it could still legislate to impose a cap on energy prices, after british gas says it will put up electricity prices by 12.5%. following the sacking of anthony scaramucci after less than ten days in office, the white house insists that president trump's new chief of staff will bring discipline to the administration. pakistan's parliament is set to elect a new prime minister
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to replace nawaz sharif, who stepped down on friday. a man who drifted out to see in a dinky has been rescued by lifeboat crews. the alarm was raised at 7.30 last night after he was spotted near a wind farm off the coast of redcar. the man, who was just wearing a hoodie and shorts, was brought back to shore and given a good talking to about safety. the royal national lifeboat institution — or rnli — says last year saw a rise in the number of coastal deaths in august. they're warning of the shock that can come with falling into cold water as we enter the deadliest month for accidents in the sea. radio 1 newsbeats rick kelsey has been in cornwall with the rnli, as a new national campaign tells people how to deal with the shock of falling into cold water.
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tens of thousands of people will go into the water off the uk this month. one of the most popular places is here in newquay. so how would you describe today's conditions? a good day for surfing or not? yes, it's pretty good, it's pretty solid out there. it is nice and clean which makes a change. josie has the job of watching hundreds of surfers and swimmers here on fistral beach. so on a day like this what are the trickiest things that could cause someone a problem? for holiday makers they do not understand the water like we do. so theyjust think they can go wherever they want and sometimes when you tell them they don't like to be told what to do. right. every yearjust under 200 people die on the uk's coastline while thousands more are injured. anthony miller was just 23 when he went into the water one night. they were drinking, partying and he basically said right, i am going skinny—dipping. he went into the sea and basically he disappeared. i really, really want people to be
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aware that when you are on holiday, or whether you live by the sea, and you are out drinking by all means have a good time, but do not go near the water, do not because you may not come back out alive. even in the summer months the temperatures in uk waters do not get much above 16 celsius which is about the same temperature that comes out of your cold water tap. and august is also the month that the guys who work in this lifeboat station are the busiest. if you are out around the coastline, you could be fishing on rocks and slips, trips and falls around the coast, if you end up in the water, you will be in your clothes because you were not prepared. go on to your back and push your chin out towards the air. it's that
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initial part of giving yourself that minute and a half to let your heart rate come back to the normal rhythm. compose yourself a bit. trainer lewis wants people to go against their natural reactions if they fall in the water. despite the warnings, the amount of injuries and deaths has remained steady over the last five years and the rnli hope with this new advice fewer people will get into trouble. a line about flight delays that you might have experienced in and out of the since april. the eu commission has defended changes to eu security procedures that have caused delays. more checks can lead to more delays, they have said, all eu citizens crossing external borders must be checked against european wide
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databases. it checked against european wide data bases. it previously checked against european wide databases. it previously applied to only non—eu members. the eu says it is up to individual countries to implement the changes effectively. two robots speaking in their own language sounds like a scene from the film the terminator. well, that fantasy has now become a reality. facebook were forced to pull the plug when chat bots alice and bob modified english to create a language only they understood. bob started off by saying... alice responded with. .. bob then went to say... alice then replied...
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makes perfect sense. last week facebook boss mark zuckerberg and elon musk the creator of tesla clashed over the future development of artifical intelligence. mr zuckerberg accused mr musk of "trying to drum up doomsday scenarios." calum chace is the author of surviving ai. hejoins me now via webcam from steyning in sussex. good afternoon. what do you make of this ability, apparently, of robots to communicate in a language we don't understand. it's really important to say that this is not skynet, the defence system in the terminator movies that became self—aware and decided to kill us all. these are chat bots. they are
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natural language processing systems that take in information in ordinary spoken language, process it, do something useful with it and give us back information in natural language. very useful, very primitive, not conscious, definitely not super intelligent, consciences that are going to destroy is all. no need to worry about that. some decades away, elon musk is right to say that there is a risk of super intelligence but there are quite a lot of people working on that problem and by the time it arrives there is a good chance we will have solved it. facebook worth forced to fall the plug on this particular element. they weren't forced to. they did because the bots weren't doing anything useful. they invented a new language that was convenient for them but the whole point was to use natural language, taking it in and giving it back. they weren't
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doing that after a while. facebook stopped the experiment when it stopped the experiment when it stopped being successful. this is extraordinary progress and a lot of others struggle to get our heads around it. how closely do we need to watch the people who are experts in this field to make sure nothing slightly sinister is going on here? we need to pay attention to artificial intelligence, it's our most powerful technology and will give is wonderful benefits over the coming decades and create great risks. there is the super intelligence one which is several decades away if it ever happens. probably will. nearer term, there's risk of manyjobs are being destroyed and what we're going to do about that. all of us from government on down need to pay attention to disown we need to avoid this so we can get only the benefits from artificial intelligence. good
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to get your reassurance on this. thank you very much indeed. britain's only surviving cloth hall reopens today after a multi—million pound renovation. the piece hall in halifax, west yorkshire, was once the centre of the world's wool trade and since then it has been through a number of different incarnations. fiona lamdin reports. for the last two and a half centuries the piece hall has stood at the heart of halifax, where in 1779 people came to trade pieces of cloth. there were at least 315 individual rooms built for the sale of cloth, from which clothiers would have sold the wool to merchants. merchants would have come from quite far afield, including on occasion from europe, and the trade from the piece hall went back into europe and also over to the americas. all the wool came from local sheep woven by local families on theirfarms. this is an example of the cloth most commonly sold in the piece hall and as you can feel, it's pretty hard wearing, isn't it? pretty rough.
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this was largely used by the military so it would have been used to make uniforms. this is the country's only surviving intact cloth hall with 315 individual yet identical trading rooms. it seems such a waste this beautiful building was only open back then in the 18th century for trading for two hours every week. but after the industrial revolution the cloth was mainly made and sold from the mills. in its place the piece hall was filled with fruit and veg sellers. but a century on, in the 1970s, this is how the piece hall looked, a blot on the landscape, threatened to be flattened to make way for a car park. one of those who fought to save it back then was mary crossley. she had a shop on the second floor. she hasn't been inside for decades. we took her back. wow!
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isn't that lovely? when i first came in it was all black, there were sheds around the edge and warehouses in the middle and vehicles. when i came up onto the balcony i remember there were holes in the floor and it smelled of cats. but you still fell in love with it? i still fell in love with it. to start with there were only three of us for quite a long time and there wasn't much trade to start with but it developed gradually. it's hoped this historical hall will place halifax back on the map. 238 years on as the shelves fill up, this is a new chapter for this town, but nothing is new for these old stones who have witnessed it all before. california is famous for its surfers, but this week it's the dogs that are hoping to catch the waves. canines of all sizes and breeds have
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been entering the annual surf—dog competition which is now in its 12th year. they'rejudged on how long they ride for, the height of the wave and showmanship. some of them, as you can see, are really quite good at it. in a moment, the news at one with jane hill. first the weather with jay wynne. sta rt start with a quick look into the atla ntic start with a quick look into the atlantic where our weather is coming from. an area of low pressure with associated weather fronts heading our way for tomorrow. expect wind and rain to spread in from the south—west. for the rest of today, a mix of sunshine and showers coming down. sunshine and showers for the rest of the day. in the north and
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west some of the show is quite slow moving with some hail and thunder. a little bit of sunshine in between. into northern england, the same mix in wales and towards the south—west. right along the south coast, staying dry for the most part with some sunshine. there is a higher chance of some showers across east anglia, the east midlands and the south—east. touching gale force winds by the end of the night. temperatures 15 degrees in the south, 10 degrees in the north. in some parts of rural scotland it will turn quite chilly. the touch of gale force winds in the south—west tomorrow first thing in the morning. it's all moving steadily northwards and eastwards. northern scotland
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should fare quite well. it should dry out in northern ireland through the afternoon. some parts of the south—west wet and windy. the rain moves northwards and eastwards, eventually into northern scotland. and east across england. most of it clears into the north sea in the small hours and low pressure takes over with a whole rash of showers for the north and west. so, back to where we started on thursday. some of the showers quite heavy in the north and west. further south and east you go, the higher temperatures. a similar sort of day on friday. low 20s to lure teens with some sunshine in the south—east corner and showers in the northwest. british gas is to increase its electricity prices by more than 12%, affecting three million customers. the company says it's because of rising costs, and government environmental
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policies. we'll ask whether the government might introduce an energy price cap. also this lunchtime: anthony scaramucci is fired as white house communications director before he's even started the job — the third official to go in ten days. a new treatment for pancreatic cancer increases the number of patients whose surgery is successful by nearly a third — a charity says the findings are exciting. what are you doing out here? the rnli rescues a man a mile out to sea in a toy dingy — and warns about the risks of taking to the water unprepared.
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