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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  August 4, 2017 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's friday, it's 9am — i'm tina daheley, in for victoria, welcome to the programme. the first step to possible criminal charges as a grand jury is assembled in washington to investigate the claims of russian meddling in the american election. president trump has rubbished the allegations. the russia story is a totalfabrication. it's just an excuse for the greatest loss in the history of american politics, that's all it is. cheering this the latest in yet another week of intrigue at the white house. we'll be taking an in—depth look at what's happening in the next hour. the deadline for people wanting to have their say on what the grenfell fire inquiry should cover expires later today. 80 people died in the tragedy in june. as survivors struggle to come to terms with the horror of what happened to them, one woman tells us of the online abuse people are experiencing. it's people thinking we're having a free ride.
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we're not having a free ride. it's people thinking we're taking advantage. we're not taking advantage. what are we taking advantage of? and it's the start of the world athletics championships in london this evening — two of the sport's best known stars mo farah and usain bolt are competing at the event for the final time. hello, welcome to the programme — we're live until ”am this morning. lots to talk about. have you been caught in the massive queues for passport control at airports in parts of europe? people have been missing flights and struggling in the heat. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... in the united states,
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the investigation into russian attempts to interfere in last year's presidential election is picking up speed. it's emerged that special counsel robert mueller has convened a grand jury in washington — which is the first step towards possible criminal charges. but president trump — as he has done many times before — ridiculed any suggestion that his campaign team colluded with russia to beat hillary clinton. earlier, he addressed a rally of supporters in west virginia. have you seen any russians in west virginia, or ohio, or pennsylvania? are there any russians here tonight? any russians? they can't beat us at the voting booth, so they're trying to cheat you out of the future, and the future that you want. they're trying to cheat you out of the leadership you want, with a fake story that is demeaning to all of us and, most importantly, demeaning to our country
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and demeaning to our constitution. cheering our correspondent peter bowes explained how significant this is. well, this shows, it really confirms, that this is a very serious criminal investigation. and a lot of people are saying that it was only a matter of time before we discovered that a grand jury had been brought into this. of course, it is not a grand jury's role to determine guilt or innocence, but it is crucial as far as gathering the information, and the evidence is concerned. they have the power to issue subpoenas. there could be subpoenas to banks or telephone companies to try and piece together this story, and of course more individuals — perhaps people that we haven't even heard of, connected to this story — could be brought into this.
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so, it is a very wide ranging investigation. it is about president trump's inner circle, it's about his son, donald trumer, and of course we heard about donald trump, the president, having a role in writing a statement for his son, about that meeting with the russian lawyer that was supposedly to get some negative information about hillary clinton. so the president does seem to be being drawn closer and closer to the centre of this. martine croxall is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. thank you, good morning. the deadline for submissions on what the g re nfell tower deadline for submissions on what the grenfell tower fire inquiry should cover will expire later today. hundreds of suggestions have been received with the total expected to exceed 300 by the 5pm cooktop. ahead of the inquiry promised to consider a broad range of evidence when he launched a public consultation into the terms of injuly. four teenagers have been arrested in north london on suspicion of being involved in acid attacks. they were tracked by a police
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helicopter in the early hours of this morning dumping a stolen moped, before being detained on an estate in islington. a british computer expert who helped stop the cyber attack that crippled the nhs has appeared before a judge in the us over alleged links with other malicious software. marcus hutchins, aged 23 and from devon, appeared in a las vegas court charged with creating a programme designed to steal bank and credit card details. 0ur north america correspondent james cook has more. marcus hutchins was hailed as a hero for stopping an attack which crippled the nhs and spread to tens of thousands of computers in 150 countries. his arrest is not related to his role in neutralising the so—called wannacry ra nsomwa re, which he discussed in this recent bbc interview. i checked the message board, there were maybe 16 or 17 reports of different nhs organisations being hit. that was the point where i decided my holiday‘s over,
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i've got to look into this. in the past week, mr hutchins had been in las vegas for the def con cyber security conference. he was apparently arrested at the airport minutes before he was due to fly home. we've now obtained a copy of the indictment against marcus hutchins, and another unnamed defendant. it reveals they're facing charges in the us state of wisconsin. they're accused of creating and selling a programme to harvest online banking data and credit card details. prosecutors say the arrest here in las vegas came at the end of a two—year long investigation. cyber security remains a top priority for the fbi, says the special agent in charge. marcus hutchins may now face his biggest challenge yet in an american court room. james cook, bbc news. police in australia say two men charged with plotting to bring down a plane were taking directions from a senior commander from the so—called islamic state group in syria. investigators believe they made a bomb using military—grade explosives. hywel griffith reports from sydney. described as one of the most
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sophisticated terror plots ever on australian soil, officers say they have ended a plan which could have caused catastrophic loss of life. they believe khaled khayat and his son, mahmoud khayat, were sent high—grade military explosives by the so—called islamic state through air cargo, and say they then put together a bomb packed into a meat grinder. 0njuly 15th, it's alleged the men planned to take the improvised explosive device, or ied, on to an etihad airways flight out of sydney, but officers say it was never checked in. we will be alleging in court that a fully—functioning ied was to be placed on that plane on 15thjuly. one thing that is important to state, though, is it did not get through security. having aborted the first attack,
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it's alleged the men took parts of the bomb to create a chemical device instead, which would emit poisonous hydrogen sulphide. officers say the men were arrested before that plot became advanced. detailed forensic searches are continuing. a third man is being questioned by police. airport security routines have now returned to normal. passengers are being assured the threat has been disrupted, but new questions have been raised over how explosives could be sent into australia by the islamic state, and how the terror threat is evolving. hywel griffith, bbc news, sydney. oxford university has urged one of its employees, who's suspected of murdering a man in chicago, to hand himself into the us authorities. andrew warren, who's 56, is wanted alongside an american professor, in connection with the death of a man found with multiple stab wounds. one of the world's tallest
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residential buildings, the torch tower in dubai, has been engulfed in flames for the second time in two years. as the fire spread rapidly, debris fell into the streets from the 350m—high building. the blaze has now been brought under control. harvey biggs reports. fire engulfs one of the world's tallest residential buildings. floor by floor, flames spread up the side of the torch tower in dubai's upscale marina district, as residents flee to the streets. all they can do is watch as firefighters work to bring the blaze under control. witnesses, many of whom filmed the blaze and uploaded images on social media, describe seeing burning debris fall from the building. originally the top of the building was out of control, and they had that dealt with, and then the centre of the building absolutely caught fire, and you can still see the remnants of that now. dubai authorities say crews successfully managed to evacuate the building,
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with no injuries reported. it's the second time the six—year—old 79—storey skyscraper has been hit by fire. in 2015, 100 apartments were severely damaged when a massive blaze swept through the tower. and it's the latest in a series of high—rise fires in dubai in recent years, including this inferno at the address downtown hotel that broke out on new year's eve in 2015. at the time, onlookers said the blaze tore up the side of the building in a matter of seconds. luckily, no—one was killed. many of dubai's tower fires have been blamed on the aluminium composite cladding on the outside of the building, a material that was only outlawed in the country in 2013. what started this latest blaze is yet to be determined, but once again it will bring the spotlight back on the safety. royal bank of scotland has reported its first half—year
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profit in three years. the bank, which is still predominantly owned by the taxpayer, made almost £940 million in the six months to the end ofjune, compared with a loss of £2 billion in the same period last year. the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, will address the issue of brexit and the border with northern ireland this morning, when he makes his first official visit to the province. in the past he's said the roads should remain open, but has cast doubt on the british government's suggestion that technology could be used to monitor trade. unionists have described some of his comments as "unhelpful". hmrc has pledged to make ‘significant improvements‘ to it's new child benefit website after complaints from thousands of parents. the treasury select committee has demanded the change. the site is meant to help parents access the tax—free childcare scheme and free childcare for all three and four—year—olds. parts of europe are experiencing their warmest sustained heatwave in more a decade. temperatures peaked at more than a0 degrees in parts of italy, spain and the balkans.
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several countries have issued health warnings as temperatures continue to soar, while some regions are also contending with drought and forest fires. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. let's get some sport now with leah. it's the start of a big ten days of athletics in london, isn't it? big names in action today? yes, more than 2000 athletes from over 200 teams will compete, and for british athletes it feels extra special because it is back on home ground where we have fond memories of london 2012. but two of the sport's biggest names, usain bolt and mo farah, will say goodbye to the track at the end of the season. the pair have 28 world and olympic titles between them. that is just amazing. for usain bolt, it is the
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final championships, he is competing in the 100 metres and ax100m relay. he has talked about wanting to play either cricket or play for manchester united after this, so this is probably not the last we will hear from this is probably not the last we will hearfrom usain bolt! and britain's main gold medal hope today is mo farah, who competes in the 10,000 metres vinyljust after 9pm tonight, and after this he is preparing to focus on the marathon, so preparing to focus on the marathon, so it is not the end for him and if he wins tonight it will be six world championship golds for thermo. disappointment for england's women last night. was their semi—final defeat something of a shock? they were the highest ranked team left in the competition but they we re left in the competition but they were knocked out 3—0 by hosts the netherlands. they had a really strong record, four wins out of four
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opened last night and were beaten by a technically superior dutch team in front of record crowds, about 20 7000. lots of disappointed england faces at the end of the match, perhaps too soon for the team to ta ke perhaps too soon for the team to take away any good they achieved from numbers watching women's football around the world and inspiring a whole new generation of goals, but no final for mark sampson's side. the netherlands play denmark in the final. and just very quickly for you, we knew it would happen but brazilian star neymar has officially become a paris st germain player at about £200 million tra nsfer player at about £200 million transfer from barcelona. i want sums of money involved in that one. it is the start of the cricket for the test today and an unusual honour for one of the england players? yes, i love this story. as england face south africa in the fourth test at old trafford today, they lead the series 2—1, james anderson will be bowling from the james anderson end.
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the pavilion has been named after him this morning, which usually only happens when a cricketer stops playing so it is pretty surreal for cricketer stops playing so it is pretty surrealfor him cricketer stops playing so it is pretty surreal for him and a huge honour. this is the last chance for residents of the grenfell tower to have their say on the inquiry into the fire that changed their lives. the public consultation closes this evening into what the inquiry should look into. it'll then be up to the prime minister theresa may to decide. there's already been so much anger and distrust about the inquiry — before it's even underway, and we'll be talking about this in a moment, but first michael cowan has been hearing from one survivor about her journey over the past 7 weeks. we first met you the day after the fire. we then met you a week after the fire. yeah. how far do you think you have
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moved on from that now? umm... i'm still not in a good place. i wouldn't call it a good place. i'm on medication. i've gotten help through counselling. so, that is good. one thing you've told me that has been worrying you is the abuse that grenfell survivors are getting, from certain members of the public? what sort of abuse are we talking about? it's, umm, internetabuse. very nasty comments, some of them i wouldn't even repeat. very nasty comments. and it's people thinking we are having a free ride. but we are not having a free ride. it's people thinking we are taking advantage. we aren't taking advantage. what are we taking advantage of? it's people thinking this person doesn't deserve to speak up, just because you are from grenfell.
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you said you have seen incredibly racist comments made. when you have been through what you have been through, how does it feel to see reactions like that from the public? it's scary. it is scary. for me, it is scary. umm... it'sjust scary, because i feel scared to tell anybody now that i am from the tower, because you don't know what their reaction will be. we didn't want to be in the fire, we didn't burn the tower by ourselves. no, it'sjust something that happened. we didn't ask for it. so, we are now living in hotels. nobody wants to live in a hotel for a month or more. how hurtful is it, when you have been through what you have been through, and people are saying vicious, racist things about the survivors? umm, the only thing that i can say is... i wouldn't wish it on anybody,
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even my worst enemy. i wouldn't. and, it could happen to you tomorrow and i would be the one holding... trying to hold you up. you know, lift you up. out of your tragedy. so please, stop. whoever they are, stop. just stop. just stop, please. and you can watch that full report from michael cowan just after 10. we can speak now to christos fairbairn who was on the 15th floor of grenfell where he'd lived for two years. he remained in the tower for almost three hours before escaping. he thinks he may be the last person to escape the building alive. the account of his escape is very distressing. he is speaking on tv for the first time.
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eve allison is a conservative councillor on kensington and chelsea council. she's also a local resident. and louise christian, the solicitor who represented all of the bereaved families in the lakanalfire inquest. i heard a knock on the door. i don't usually answer the door if i don't know who it is. i left it. about five or ten minutes later, i heard noises outside and the fire alarm ringing andi noises outside and the fire alarm ringing and i realised something was happening. i looked outside the window and i saw a commotion, i saw police downstairs on fire people downstairs. i realised there was
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something happening, so i went to my front door and opened the door and it was full up with smoke. i close the door. what was going through your mind at that point?” the door. what was going through your mind at that point? i did know what was happening. personally, you would never think that a whole building like that would go up on fire so i thought it was a little fire so i thought it was a little fire happening somewhere and the smoke was coming up and it would go away. i didn't understand the extent of it until further along the line, for me personally. europe and the door, all you can see it smoke, what did you do next? the smoke was so potent, i had to open the door. i made a few phone calls to people to let them know what was happening, i rang the ambulance as well and they put me on to a lady. i got in
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contact with her, she got in contact with me and found me. so that is nice. she was basically saying, you have to leave the building. i would advise you to leave the building. i tried on four occasions. the first occasion, i tried, tried on four occasions. the first occasion, itried, i opened tried on four occasions. the first occasion, i tried, i opened the door andi occasion, i tried, i opened the door and i couldn't see. i tried to find my way to the fire exit and i couldn't find it. i came back. but luckily, the door opened. 90% of the time, when the door closes, you have to open it with a key, but that time the door open. correct me if i am wrong, you first realised it was a fire just before 1am but you didn't manage to escape untiljust after four a:m., manage to escape untiljust after foura:m., was happening in manage to escape untiljust after four a:m., was happening in those four a:m., was happening in those four hours? i was speaking to friends, i spoke to the fire people a lot of the time, i was running about. it was hectic because i was
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basically, i was powerless. because what you have to understand, i lived on the 15th floor, i go to the gym. 0nafew on the 15th floor, i go to the gym. on a few occasions, the lift hasn't worked so i have ran down the stairs before and it is breathtaking. running down there in that smoke, not trying to take it in, it is difficult to do so. as i have said, within that time i tried four times andi within that time i tried four times and i couldn't. .. within that time i tried four times and i couldn't... the smoke was, the smoke itself was too powerful. there was so smoke itself was too powerful. there was so much concoction is in it, it was so much concoction is in it, it was so was so much concoction is in it, it was so strong and powerful. so i was stuck in the room going backwards and forwards, opening the windows, shouting. i got cladding all over my hands, as you can see. my head as well. i was trapped for about three and a half hours, i couldn't get out. but you did manage to escape? i managed to escape, i had no choice.
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at one stage, the whole of the house was filled with smoke the ventilator everything. i was in the corner. i was in the corner and i was at the stage now, i am going to die now. i was saying to myself, if i am going to die, i might as well die trying. i wear the t—shirt, put it in my mouth and i just went for it and ran. what do you remember from your escape? just trying to breathe in it, finding the exit. bouncing down the stairs. but i thought it was... i thought it was holes in the flaws, from the fire people, but it was bodies i was stepping on until i got further down, i tripped over. bodies i was stepping on until i got further down, itripped over. i bodies i was stepping on until i got further down, i tripped over. i will never forget this man's further down, i tripped over. i will neverforget this man's phase, lying on the floor it was an iraqi man. i tripped over him and it was bodies. astaire full of bodies that was on
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the stairs. ijust carried on. i made it to the third floor, i couldn't get to the bottom because of the smoke. so i collapsed on the third floor and thank you to the fire people, they actually got me down from the third floor, got me out and started to get the things out and started to get the things out of me. how have you been coping since it happened, where are you living now? i am living in a hotel. quite frankly, it is difficult, seeing dead bodies and being in that situation. people have died in there, people i know, whole families have died. it is difficult to come to terms with the fight you live in a block, you meet people every day and you say hello to them and they have died. it is their whole families. notjust one or two, a generation of families and their
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families as well because it was ramadan. it was a substantial amount of people that died in there. i will be honest with you, it is difficult to come to terms with. i cannot sleep at night, i have nightmares. i have snippets, certain snippets of what happened, seeing the man's face and it is difficult. i am tired, it is difficult to deal with. it is difficult. we will come back to you. louise, we are here today because this is the deadline for submissions to the grenfell public enquiry, what do you think needs to be included in the remit for this enquiry? the public enquiry needs to start very, very quickly. cannot wait for a criminal prosecution. there is a precedent for that, the ladbroke grove train crash enquiry happened within two months of the crash happening and the criminal investigation was afterwards. it is important that people in tower
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blocks throughout the country are reassured that steps have been taken to ensure they are stage of —— say. the la ka nal to ensure they are stage of —— say. the lakanal house, the lessons should have been learned. a lot of the same issues, as are the lakanal house. we had an inquest but it was downgraded to a public enquiry because of the criminal investigation that lasted for three and a half years. the interest wasn't until a long time afterwards and the media and people lost attention. i don't want this to happen with grenfell. is a public enquiry rather than an inquest the best way to get to the truth? i know you wanted in a timely manner, but is this the best way? a public enquiry hasa is this the best way? a public enquiry has a wider scope and is better than an inquest. it can get wider issues than an inquest. at the lakanal house inquest, the tenants
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association wouldn't allow it to represented. there is no doubt, the community issues and the whole issue of why complaints from residents we re of why complaints from residents were not heeded and what exactly this tenant management group was doing, needs to be looked at. a public enquiry is much, much better. can you briefly explain what it is? a public enquiry is now set up since an act of parliament in 2005 by the government. that might be one of the problems, there is too much involvement from the government. before 2005, public enquiries were more independent. but the terms of reference have to be agreed with the government nowadays, rather than being fixed by the enquiry chair. what do you want from this enquiry? i want legal action taken against the individuals responsible. a lot
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of people lost their family, i want them to have justice, of people lost their family, i want them to havejustice, lawful action to happen and for them to be settled. it is traumatising. i don't wa nt settled. it is traumatising. i don't want this to continue and... and the situation of grenfell tower happening again because it seems like it will be because there is still cladding in places, all over england. they could start all over again. if you could not repeat this again. if you could not repeat this again and do something about it, then that will lower the... there is a lot of people out there who are mentally u nsta ble a lot of people out there who are mentally unstable because could it happen here, we have cladding here. a lot of people unhappy, at the end of the day. as you can see, grenfell tower, within seconds, within 15 minutes, it was on fire. there is a
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huge problem with trust out when it comes to kensington and chelsea council, how can people trust you going forward? i run about three wards, lowland, nottingham barnes and saint helens ward, which is my ward. isee and saint helens ward, which is my ward. i see and talk to the average person the rest of my colleagues would ordinarily not talk to. when you see posters up that say, corporate massacre , you see posters up that say, corporate massacre, and the people deserve and want justice, corporate massacre, and the people deserve and wantjustice, then corporate massacre, and the people deserve and want justice, then you have to have some sort of feeling and some sort of depth to understand, why should somebody want to put that up. i go about and i speak to people that man gazebos late at night close to grenfell
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tower with provisions, water and food. these are the kind of people that this enquiry, public enquiry needs to reach. it is to reach the people that don't have a voice, the people that don't have a voice, the people that don't have a voice, the people that cannot come on your lovely tv set and dress up nicely, as we are. it is to the lady that comes from windsor who served me tv other day at the assistance centre thatis other day at the assistance centre that is now in baard road. it is samir, the orthodox muslim lady i was talking to who is traumatised herself but has to get up each and every day and go and help traumatised families. it is to all the silent muslim women's network cannot come forward for their cultural and societal reasons. they can tell me they cannot come on your tv set and tell you why. people need answers and whether that means kensington and chelsea falls on
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their own sword, so be it, we need to be open and transparent and we need to be honest and that is the only way we are going to get the truth. yes, we are making great strides now in our packages of care with what we are offering residents, but ordinarily, when i hear stories of people that have been in hotels for so long, cramped with their kids and theirchildren, for so long, cramped with their kids and their children, they need to be put into permanent housing as soon as possible. you can only live out of, you can only live with a suitcase for so long. you need to be properly settled. can the inquiry be trusted to get to the truth? we have reached this point now and we have to have some degree of trust in the judge and go from there, because this is a democracy, it is not about who shout the loudest, so we have to give some sort of respect to that and go from there, but where are lots of people
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who feel they are not going to get proper justice. who feel they are not going to get properjustice. it doesn't matter what kensington and chelsea does because trust has already been broken, grunfeld should not have happened, but it did. —— grenfell. there was criticism of the judge, sirmartin there was criticism of the judge, sir martin moore—bick, when he was appointed, if he does not have the respect of survivors, families and residents, is that not worrying? he's a very experienced seniorjudge andi he's a very experienced seniorjudge and i would trust him to carry out the role he has been given. however, ido the role he has been given. however, i do think maybe the inquiry should consider appointing a couple of other experts who would reflect the diversity of the community. they should be independent people, i think, not from the community, but that was done in the lawrence inquiry and was very effective, and in my response to the consultation i
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have recommended that to the inquiry asa have recommended that to the inquiry as a possible way forward. have recommended that to the inquiry as a possible way forwardlj have recommended that to the inquiry as a possible way forward. i saw you we re as a possible way forward. i saw you were nodding, you agree?m as a possible way forward. i saw you were nodding, you agree? it need someone were nodding, you agree? it need someone who is there, part of it, at the end of the day, someone from the community to speak, or someone who has been there before because it has more of an effect, because when people are in an inquiry, it isjust business, it isjust them doing the job they are doing, but someone from the community who have actually been there or donate or was actually involved in it, it is more personal, and for me, personally, a lot of people died and a lot of people are still missing, and it is very sad andl still missing, and it is very sad and ijust still missing, and it is very sad and i just hope still missing, and it is very sad and ijust hope that it does get sorted out and it doesn't repeat itself, and the people that suffered and lost family, that they can get on with their life in time to come because it is, for me personally, i'm still trying to cope with what
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happened and other people in their lost their family, the homes, generations of families, and for me, personally, ijust hope it doesn't repeat itself and the people who have been affected by it get help mentally, physically, and can carry on with their lives. thank you so much for coming in to share your story. still to come: if you are going on holiday to europe, you may face long queues as airports have increased security measures and passport checks. we speak to two british tourists we speak to who missed their flights as a result. and can mo farah and usain bolt go out with a bang? they will both retire from the sport after the world championships, which begin with the opening ceremony tonight in the london stadium. here's martine in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the investigation into russian
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attem pts the investigation into russian atte m pts to the investigation into russian attempts to interfere in last year's us presidential election is gathering pace. it has emerged special counsel robert mueller has convened a grand jury in washington, the first step towards possible criminal charges. president trump poured scorn on the inquiry, saying it was a total fabrication. the deadline for submissions on what the grenfell tower fire inquiry should cover will expire later today. hundreds of suggestions have been received. inquiry head sir martin moore—bick promised to consider a broad range of evidence when he launched a public consultation into the terms of reference injuly. four teenagers have been arrested in north london on suspicion of being involved in acid attacks. they were tracked by a police helicopter in the early hours of this morning dumping a stolen moped, before being detained on an estate in islington. a british computer expert who helped stop the wannacry cyber attack that crippled the nhs has appeared before a judge in the us over alleged links with other malicious software.
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marcus hutchins, who's 23 and from devon, was arrested in las vegas on suspicion of distributing malware designed to steal bank and credit card details. oxford university has urged one of its employees, who's suspected of murdering a man in chicago, to hand himself into the us authorities. andrew warren, who's 56, is wanted alongside an american professor, in connection with the death of a man found with multiple stab wounds. one of the world's tallest residential buildings, the torch tower in dubai, has caught fire for the second time in two years. firefighters say the 79—storey building was evacuated without any injuries and the blaze is now under control. a previous fire in 2015 was blamed, in part, on flammable cladding. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10am. let's just read out one of your messages. julie on twitter, this young man is amazing, a true representative of grenfell, calm and
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reasoned and very brave. talking about our interview with christios, which you should be able to see online. if you're jetting off to europe in the next few weeks, you could end up missing precious sunshine hours because of delays at passport control. tighter security checks have been brought in for those entering and leaving countries outside the special schengen area of the eu, and that includes the uk. the new measures are in response to the recent terror attacks, but many european airports are unprepared and understaffed to cope. border staff in the affected countries have to swipe each passport through a reader, rather than waving brits through. the european commission says the delays are "the price of security". but what does it mean for your summer holiday? let's talk now to sean tipton, from the association of british travel agents, about how passengers can prepare for the delays. thomas reynaert is from airlines for europe, a lobby group setup by the airlines.
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daniel miller was stranded with his partner in barcelona after huge delays in the airport. thank you forjoining us today. how bad is the situation, given that this is one of the busiest weekends for travel in the country? august is a lwa ys for travel in the country? august is always the busiest month for holidays, obviously families jetting off, we did research at the start of the school holidays and found 2.4 million people were heading off on one weekend, a record number so we are already busy. the second thing is these new security measures that come into place, you would expect to see longer queues, but what is most important about all of this is that some of the reports come out saying people have been stuck for four housing queues, that has not been our experience, it has been the case ina limited our experience, it has been the case in a limited number of examples but in most places people are getting through passport control pretty swiftly. there might be an issue in certain airports where they have not
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considered how to deal with the fact that record numbers of august plus these new requirements, they may be understaffed. the frustrating thing for holiday—makers is when you turn up for holiday—makers is when you turn up on holiday and there is a big queue and you see just one person on border control with two empty boots, thatis border control with two empty boots, that is not good enough, so i think there is a bit of a learning curve, certain airports did not expect to be this busy and they have not resourced it properly but i think that will change. we spoke to our members in the last few days and said, are you finding problems? most of them came back and said people are having to queue for a bit longer but they have had very few delayed aircraft because of it. i am not saying it is not happening but it is not as bad as people think, i would say four ours is excessive. kate meeks was one of 22 passengers that missed her flight from barcelona because of delays. what happened ? what happened? we got to the airport in plenty of time, checked in our bags, security checks, it wasn't a
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problem. we looked at the board that told us we needed to go to an area of barcelona airport, we were quite near the area, waiting for our gate number. that came up half an hour before the plane was due to take off. little did we know that we had to go through an extra passport control where there were over 1000 people trying to get four flights, a flight people trying to get four flights, a flight to moscow, to the usa, and two rya nair flights. flight to moscow, to the usa, and two ryanair flights. people were shouting in the crowd, is anyone else for the birmingham flight? there was a show of hands. two men from our flight tried to go to the front to say, can we go through, we are going to miss our flight? the security staff were rude and abusive, demanded they go back to the end of the queue or they would be thrown out of barcelona airport. it was absolutely horrendous, so by
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the time we got to the gate, gate 42, the gate was closed although the bridge was still attached to the plane. there were 22 of us, we begged to go on the plane and they said they could not let us on the plane but it took them half an hour to get our luggage off the plane. this has caused an absolute nightmare for all of us through missed flight connections, financial cost, mental cost, my son is autistic, there was a little baby llama, a lady that needed life—saving injections, it was awful, absolutely awful. how much has this cost you? it sounds awful but in terms of money, how much has it cost you? we had to find another hotel, we were not given any help with hotels, so a day's loss of work, it costjust with hotels, so a day's loss of work, it cost just over £500 extra because there were no flights until the next day. £500? i want to bring
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in thomas, thank you forjoining us. we heard kate's story, how many other british passengers like kate we re other british passengers like kate were affected or will be affected? we have not seen the recent numbers, but what i have just heard is quite disturbing, it is a real scandal that because of the lack of resources in some of the airports, we are talking about a minority of airports, it hasjust caused all the disruption. the exact figures i have not seen since yesterday, unfortunately. these tighter security measures have been in place since april, so why these horrific delays now? the delays, as far as i understand, at least two national governments, france and spain, just recently, because of our campaign, have finally promised to put in new
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staffing resources but unfortunately we have not seen any concrete improvement in the field, so it is airports like malaga, majorca, a big problem this weekend with palmer do majorca and loan which will face hundreds of thousands of passengers going through the airport, lisbon is another one, paris, so we have unfortunately not seen any concrete improvement but what is encouraging ata improvement but what is encouraging at a political level, everything is being done, so julian at a political level, everything is being done, sojulian king, eu commissioner for security measures, has recently, only yesterday, i believe, urged those national governments to get their act together and put the resources in place because of the urgency of the situation. if picking up a phone and saying to another country, can you put more staff on and sort this out, is that going to have the effect that it needs to immediately? what happens to all those passengers who are travelling, this is the busiest weekend, the busiest weeks for travel in the year? yes, as you just
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heard, air travel is quite complex, airports are involved, they have a responsibility but also national governments, in this case this is national governments' responsibility, not the airport or airlines. we do what we can, unfortunately hundreds of flights have been delayed for an average of 30 minutes, some more, some less, so we do what we can to accommodate our passengers and passengers should contact airlines if they have any more questions but we do what we can in this situation, which is getting a bit out of control in terms of security checks. let me bring in daniel, thank you forjoining us. what happened to you? basically i missed two flights with my partner due to the heavy queues and extra checks. the problem for me is that, like i say, when you are understaffed there are not enough in place to vent deal with the mass of people that are coming through.
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let's just go back to the fact that you missed two flights, how did that happen? i left enough time to make my first flight but as i got through all the checks and whatever else, i was then told they had closed the gate two minutes before. my name was not called out, my partner's name, there was no information passed on to me to let me know i was about to miss the flight, as well as heavy queues and security checks, and then from there and i missed another flight from there and i missed another flight for the same reason, pretty much, so it is a massive miscommunication, that was the main thing. it sounds like a very stressful situation. how did you and your girlfriend cope, and what could have been done to make a bad situation better? me and my partner are still struggling quite a bit with everything going on, we have put lives to get back to after our holiday and we want to make sure our story is heard, but it has been very
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difficult mentally and physically, like kate said, we were with kate at the time it happened, but with extra checks, do need more staff, and the day after, when a flight was issued to us, the eu passport checks was open, whereas the day before, when there were five flights, one to the uk, it was not open. so it is time wasting, really, it is as if we were not meant to catch the flight. do you know if you can get any compensation for the missed flight? that is what we are trying to do, and extra stress and time—consuming because we are putting through claims from travel insurance and trying to see who we can talk to, which is another thing, struggling to find information on who we can go to find information on who we can go to for these things. do you think they will be able to get compensation? i don't think so. it is doubtful. what we are hearing
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is the queues will be longer. you need to leave extra time, you might be lucky and get through in ten minutes. my girlfriend went to mediocre and got through in 15 minutes. —— majorca. busy when planes are arriving at the same time and departing on the same time. these new checks will not help that, so leave the extra time. how much time? it is not an exact science. how much time did you leave, daniel? we were there two hours before but there was information for passengers to be there three hours before but that information was passed out. kate, how long will you there before yourflight? kate, how long will you there before your flight? three hours before but they didn't put the gate number up until half an hour before the plane was due to go. then we have this extra passport control that we didn't realise. we couldn't have gone through because we didn't have
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the information. thank you. that is the information. thank you. that is the point, people don't realise they have to go through another control area. you've gone through security and that is it, no, you have passport control as well so bear it in mind and get there in plenty of time. he might find it is unnecessary, but then you might find there is a big queue. it is a big risk to take, so head off a little bit earlier. also there is the worry. i was in argentina a few years ago and the queues were horrendous and i got there three hours early and i knew there might beissues hours early and i knew there might be issues and i almost missed my flight. be issues and i almost missed my flight. they did get on, but i was worried all that time. it is not just missing the flag, it is the stress as well. you might end up sitting in the departure lounge for another hour but it is better than the worry of potentially missing your flight. any other advice, are there other places worse than others? places like majorca, palmer, they have 3000 flights coming in
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this weekend so it is the more popular places that will be busier. but if you are going to some little rural airport, chances are you will be the only flight coming in so not much of an issue. some airports clearly, by the sounds of it, need to do more in putting in resources. british airports have been leading the way in this and it is with things like epassport gates. the gate will check the information automatically and you will get through much quicker. so more staff, and things like epassport will make these things quicker. but it is a learning curve, it has onlyjust been brought in. if you want to share your stories with us if you are travelling this weekend or are abroad and having difficulties. coming up: today is the final day for the public consultation into the grenfell tower inquiry. 0ur reporter has been speaking to a
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survivor and that interview will be coming up in half an hour. the 2017 world athletics championships kick off tonight at the olympic park in east london. usain bolt and mo farah will be taking to global stage for the last time at the competition — bidding to crown their track careers with more gold medals. bolt plans to compete in the one hundred metres and the four by one hundred metre relay as he bids fareetell to the seozt. , , meanwhile great britain's farah, who will switch to road racing next season, seeks to complete an unprecedented fifth double in the 5000 and 10,000 metres races, having won both titles at the last two olympic games. we can cross now live to the olympic park, where our reporterjessica creighton can tell us more about what to expect. it is very exciting. fans are in for a treat. all the action will take place in that very stadium behind me. for the british athletes it is a
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stadium that has created happy memories. five years ago at the london olympics. who could forget the special time, super saturday where it seemed to be reigning gold medals for british athletes. that medals for british athletes. that medal count is expected for the british athletes, six to eight medals. 0ne british athletes, six to eight medals. one of those british athletes who will hopefully get britain towards that medal count is sirmo, he britain towards that medal count is sir mo, he will be on the track tonight running in the 10,000 metre final. it was at this track where he entered superstardom. it was here when he won his first 0lympic medals in the 5,000m and the 10,000 metres and it really propelled him into the limelight. you would expect him to do very well this evening when he goes up against the world's bass. also, you might expect to possibly wina also, you might expect to possibly win a medal. not tonight, she is running in the heats, laura muir or
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in the 1500 metres. she is trying to doa in the 1500 metres. she is trying to do a famous double, running in the 1500 metres and the 5,000m. can she do it? it will be a big as, considering she has had a good season but has suffered with an injury just season but has suffered with an injuryjust back in season but has suffered with an injury just back in june. season but has suffered with an injuryjust back injune. we will see how it has affected her confidence, but the british fans, with this being a home world championships, the fans will be roaring on both mo farah and lowering your tonight for the opening day of these championships. the stage is set and the weather looks great. this is using's bolt last ever competitive appearance, i almost believe it? what is athletics going to do without such a special character as usain bolt. he is an 11 time world champion, has eight 0lympic medals to his name. this is a man who has lit up running tracks around the world for over a decade.
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he has won pretty much everything there is to win. fans across the globe love him. let's take a look at some of the people who can remember the first time they watched usain bolt in action. the first time i saw bolt run was athens 2004. i thought he had incredible talent, but a little bit gangly. i never would have thought he would be the world record—holder at 100 metres. i first remember seeing usain bolt perform in 2009, in berlin. i had just won the heptathlon and was doing my lap of honour with the rest of the heptathletes and we were actually track—side watching him run his world record in the 100 metres, and that was just incredible to see. i'm talking about thejunior pan—american games, way back in the day, when he first did something that the whole country was like, whoa! he ran the race, he won it, and he saluted jamaica. everyone was like — this kid, national hero! someone like that, his stamp cannot be erased. i remember the first time i saw usain bolt running was on tv, of course, then i had the chance
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to see him as i was living in belgium. i was still a kid, and young athletes were running after him to get a signature and his bib. i got his bib, and i put it on my wall for years! the first time i saw usain bolt was 2008, so that was on tv, back at home on my couch. this really inspired me as an athlete, back then, thinking back to watching what he's done — it has really inspired and motivated me as an athlete. he has inspired so many, i was lucky enough to be in the stadium for the 2012 olympics and i have never seen a crowd react in the way they react to him. his unique personality, his incredible performances, they love everything about him. sport in general, notjust athletics, will miss this character. he will be in the opening rounds of the 100 and
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the opening rounds of the 100 and the tonight and i can only dream of the tonight and i can only dream of the reception he is going to get. a few days later towards the end of these championships he will be running in the four by 100 and the relay with his jamaican team—mates, obviously. after that, he retires. this will be his last major championship. it is quite a sad day. i cannot wait for tonight. what is teamgb‘s target for the world championships? they expect to reach about six to eight medals. i have already spoken to ed warner today, the head of uk athletics. he is very confident that team gb will reach that medal target. it is a young and inexperienced team. the likes of jessica ennis—hill have retired, greg rutherford, 0lympic jessica ennis—hill have retired, greg rutherford, olympic champion on 2012 on super saturday in the long jump 2012 on super saturday in the long jump is injured. where will the medals come from? they have the
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likes of sir mo who will be going for the double gold in the 5000 and 10,000. laurini your in the 1500 metre heats tonight. sophie hitchon in the hammer, she is a possibility on the track. in the 100 and it is, usain bolt will be running, but the british athlete cgu jet has been talking himself up in the build—up to these world championships saying he has seen a few chinks in the armada usain bolt, and if he gets to the final, he could beat usain bolt. he said once he gets to the starting line of the 100 metres, it is anyone's. it will be interesting to see if he can back it up with a good performance. we will have to wait and see. y very much. coming up, marcus hutchins from devon has been accused of creating malware to
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devon has been accused of creating malwa re to steal devon has been accused of creating malware to steal bank details. we get the latest. let's get the latest weather update, with lucy martin. how is it looking this weekend? it is looking 0k in the uk this weekend but hot temperatures across europe. about 45 degrees celsius above the average. we have high humidity at the moment which means it is quite unpleasant and the heat is more difficult. you can see the temperatures in italy today. they are going to reach about 46 celsius. that is so hot. and way above what we would expect to see. the average is about 30 celsius, 15 celsius above average. and 48.5 celsius is the highest recorded temperature in italy. i don't think we will beat that over the next few days but we could see the local records beaten. added in at the moment we have the worst drought we have seen in italy
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for 60 years. it is having a big impact at the moment. they are desperate for it to cool down? it isa desperate for it to cool down? it is a different story across the uk at the moment and that is thanks to this area of low pressure. and thatis to this area of low pressure. and that is moving slowly towards the east as we move through the day. we are looking at a day of sunny spells and showers. plenty of sunny spells around england and wales, lots of dry weather. feeling warmer banks to lighter winds than yesterday. a day of sunny spells and showers in northern ireland. it could be heavy into the afternoon. the odd rumble of thunder not out of the question. for scotland, cloudy day with bright intervals developing but we could see some heavy showers in the south—east with the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures reaching 23 celsius in the south—east. if you are going to the golf, it is looking like a cloudy day. there will be a
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few showery outbreaks of rain at times. some bright intervals here and there but a cloudy day and though showers could be heavy into the afternoon. 0vernight, a few showers in the north, but they should ease and lots of clear and dry spells across england and wales. showers feeding into wales as we move into the early hours. set us up for the day tomorrow. tomorrow is looking like a day of sunny spells and showers. showers pretty much anywhere, but mainly they will be focused across wales and into the midlands and later in the east anglia. a band of showers across central and southern scotland as well. temperatures cooler with a maximum of 21 celsius tomorrow in the south—east. as we move into the weekend we will start to see a ridge of high pressure and into sunday sorry we have a ridge of high pressure which will settle things down but an area of low pressure not
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far away. a fresh start to the day on sunday, plenty of brightness around with showers but we will see the rain edging in from the west into northern ireland and later into scotland. showers on the way as we move through saturday. dry and bright weather around but starting to see some more unsettled, showery rain pushing in from the west later. hello, i'm tina daheley, in for victoria. as the consultation on what should be included in the grenfell tower fire inquiry comes to an end, we hear from residents about how they're coping with flashbacks following the tragedy. i was iwas ina i was in a corner and it was at the stage where, i'm going to die now, whatever happens, i'm going to die. and i said to myself, if i'm going to die, i may as well die trying. so i got to die, i may as well die trying. so igota to die, i may as well die trying. so i got a t—shirt, wet it, put it on my mouth, and ijust went for it, i went for it, i went for it. you can hear more from christos in a few minutes' time. and we'll hear from a woman who escaped the fire.
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she says survivors are suffering online abuse, and she is calling for it to stop. the first step to possible criminal charges in the investigation into russian meddling in the us presidential election. president trump has rubbished the investigation. the russia story is a totalfabrication. it's just an excuse for the greatest loss in the history of american politics, that's all it is. cheering and the man who helped bring down the worldwide cyber attack that hit the worldwide cyber attack that hit the nhs is now in a us court accused of creating malware that steals bank details. and i am at the olympic park for the world athletics championships, five yea rs world athletics championships, five years today since super saturday. 0rganisers will certainly hope for yet memorable moments. good morning.
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here's martine in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the deadline for submissions on what the grenfell tower fire inquiry should cover expires at 5pm this afternoon. hundreds of suggestions have already been received. the head of the inquiry, sir martin moore—bick, promised to consider a broad range of evidence when he launched a public consultation into the terms of reference injuly. christos fairbairn lived on the 15th floor of grenfell, and spoke to this programme about battling the smoke to escape. just going for it, trying to breed in it, finding the exit. bouncing down the stairs. i thought it was the holes from the fire people going through the floors, i didn't realise that it was actually bodies i was
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stepping on until i got further down and actually tripped over, i will never forget this man's face, it was an iraqi man lying on the floor, he was gone, and i tripped over him and realised that it was bodies, a stair fall of bodies on the stairs. in the us, the investigation into russian attempts to interfere in last year's presidential election is gathering pace. it's emerged that special counsel robert mueller has convened a grand jury in washington, the first step towards possible criminal charges. president trump poured scorn on the inquiry, saying it was a "total fabrication". a british computer expert who helped stop the wannacry cyber attack that crippled the nhs has appeared before a judge in the us over alleged links with other malicious software. marcus hutchins, who's 23 and from devon, was arrested in las vegas on suspicion of distributing malware designed to steal bank and credit card details. oxford university has urged one of its employees, who's suspected of murdering a man in chicago, to hand himself into the us authorities.
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andrew warren, who's 56, is wanted alongside an american professor, in connection with the death of a man found with multiple stab wounds. royal bank of scotland has reported its first half—year profit in three years. the bank, which is still predominantly owned by the taxpayer, made almost £940 million in the six months to the end ofjune, compared with a loss of £2 billion in the same period last year. police in australia say two men charged with plotting to bring down a plane were taking directions from a senior commander in the so—called islamic state group in syria. investigators believe they had made a bomb using military—grade explosives. a third man is still being questioned. one of the world's tallest residential buildings, the torch tower in dubai, has caught fire for the second time in two years. firefighters say the 79—storey building was evacuated without any injuries and the blaze is now under control. a previous fire in 2015 was blamed, in part, on flammable cladding. parts of europe are experiencing their warmest sustained heatwave
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in more than a decade. temperatures peaked at more than 40 degrees in parts of italy, spain and the balkans. several countries have issued health warnings as temperatures continue to soar, while some regions are also contending with drought and forest fires. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. you have been getting in touch on our story about queues at some airports in europe because of security arrangements that have been introduced by the european commission. frederick e—mailed to say, two friends of mine arrived at heathrow terminal free from paris yesterday and waited over an hour to get through immigration, so delays are not limited to europe but also occur in british airports. mr conway on twitter says, sorry, all of those whingeing need to get a grip, delay or getting their safety? i would take getting there safely
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every time! keep them coming in. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. it's over seven weeks since the grenfell tower fire, and on this programme we've spoken to many of the tragedy‘s survivors. 0ur reporter michael cowan has been catching up with lillian, a survivor he met in the days after the fire. the day after this terrible tragedy, we met lillian. she escaped the tenth floor with nothing but the clothes on her back. so, what do you want from the council in the coming days? i just want assurance. i want assurance that they are going to take care of us and they are going to make sure that each person at least has the temporary accommodation. or, you know, organising for more permanent accommodation. because this is just temporary. it hasn't really sunk in, but i know that it will once everybody has gone, and you are just in your room alone.
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everything will come, you know, and you are like, "what just happened ? " yeah. a lot of people today have expressed some anger, some frustration at the authorities. at the situation, at the fact that this could happen. yeah. do you feel that, or are you just focused on, "what do i do now?" at the moment i'm actually... i know the anger will come, i am sad because lots of people died. so, i am asking questions to myself as well. i mean, how did this happen? how did this happen to this extent? and how did the fire spread so fast? what went wrong? what could have been avoided? all these questions i'm asking myself, but i don't know the answers. i don't know...
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i don't know where my future is now. yeah. the following week, we met again outside her hotel. you said it's been very chaotic, you were told to go to this place, then that place, and there's no coordination. how difficult is that on a day—to—day basis? it is very difficult, first of all it's very hot and we're not eating properly. we're not sitting down and eating properly. we're just getting news from charities orfrom people. "oh, you need to do this," or "you need to go there." but they're not really telling us, the authorities are not really telling us. some things we just hear... the only thing we had was the letter that they gave us to go to the post office and get some financial help. emergency funds. that's about it. we haven't had anything yet. how do you feel now, six days on, about your treatment from the authorities,
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from the council? horrendous. i would say that, because they haven't got back to us up to today. it's the other volunteers now that are getting help to us. the other councils that are coming in to help. but, i don't know if we have heard anything from them. when you're alone in that hotel room, then everything starts coming into your head, and then you start thinking of all sorts of things. and it's terrible. it's terrible. you need somebody to talk to. that's the moment you need somebody to talk to, you're all alone. you need somebody to talk to, but... obviously, you mean quite traumatic things? yeah, yeah. things we shouldn't have seen. lives have been lost. lots and lots of lives have been lost.
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why? could it have been stopped? absolutely, it could have been stopped. are there are people responsible for it? yeah! they have to be. the plan was to keep meeting with lillian regularly to document her life in the wake of the fire. but after this interview, plagued by nightmares and deteriorating mental health, she told us she could not continue with filming. we still spoke regularly and, seven weeks on, lillian has agreed to meet with me again. we first met you the day after the fire. we then met you one week after the fire. yeah. how far do you think you have moved on from that now? umm... i'm still not in a good place.
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i wouldn't call it a good place. i'm on medication. i've gotten help through counselling. so, that is good. one thing you've told me that has been worrying you is the abuse that grenfell survivors are getting, from certain members of the public? what sort of abuse are we talking about? it's, erm, the internet abuse. very nasty comments, some of them i wouldn't even repeat. very nasty comments. and its people thinking we are having a free ride. but we're not having a free ride. it's people thinking we're taking advantage. we aren't taking advantage. what are we taking advantage of? it's people thinking, "this person doesn't
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deserve to speak up," just because you are from grenfell. you said you have seen incredibly racist comments made. when you've been through what you've been through, how does it feel to see reactions like that from the public? it's scary. for me, it's scary. erm... it's just scary because i feel scared to tell anybody now that i'm from the tower, because you don't know what their reaction will be. we didn't want to be in the fire, we didn't burn the tower by ourselves. no, it'sjust something that happened. we didn't ask for it. so, we're now living in hotels. we don't want to live in hotels. nobody wants to live in a hotel for a month or more. the nightmares, are they all focused on the tower and that night? it is all about fire and running for your life, and just hearing
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screams and people... knowing there are people dead inside, or running away from something. or, it could be me running away from something, not necessarily fire, but those are the dreams you get. it's always running away from something. of people falling... from the tower. which is not nice. no. of children crying. which is not nice. we're seven weeks on from the fire. you've been staying in the hotel for seven weeks, nearly two months. how much longer are you expecting to be there? i think i'm there until 1st september. so, as far as i know, i am still there up to 1st september, so i don't know where i am living. to the outside, i look like i'm 0k.
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i'm always smiling. but, i'm crying inside. have you come to terms with the fact yet that everything you owned is gone? no. no, i'm still blocking it. and it's painful to remember some of the things, sometimes. because these are things i've had for a long time. like my father's picture. which... my father is dead now. that particular picture, my mum doesn't have it, my brothers don't have it, my sisters don't have it, nobody has it. it was the only picture that i had, and it's gone. how hurtful is it, when you've been through what you've been through, and people are saying vicious, racist things about the survivors? erm, the only thing that i can say is... i wouldn't wish it on anybody, even my worst enemy. i wouldn't.
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it could happen to you. it could happen to you, and you wouldn't know what to do. just like we don't know what to do now. so, it could happen to you as well. so, please, stop. stop with the abuse. it's a human thing. it can happen to anybody. and it could happen to you tomorrow, and i would be the one holding... trying to hold you up. you know, lift you up, out of your tragedy. so, please, stop. whoever they are, stop. just stop. just stop, please. a british computer expert who stopped a worldwide cyber attack
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which crippled parts of the nhs has been arrested by the fbi in the united states over alleged links to other malicious software. marcus hutchins, who is 23 and from devon, is accused of creating malware to steal bank details. he had been in las vegas attending the black hat and def con cyber—security conferences. the uk's national cyber security centre has said it was aware of the situation with fellow cyber—security researchers expressing surprise at the indictment. we can now speak to robert schifreen, a former uk—based computer hacker and magazine editor, and the founder of it security awareness training programme securitysmart.co.uk. and naomi colvin from the courage foundation. the irony, being arrested at hacking
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conference, what does this mean? he was arrested just as he was about to board his flight home. it looks like they were taking advantage so the united states didn't have to take extradition procedures. this was the quy extradition procedures. this was the guy who saved the nhs a couple of months ago? yes, it shut down hospitals and affected one third of nhs trusts probably the first malware attack to constitute a threat to life. marcus tudgay world an incredible service in stopping it in its tracks when he did. he did disproportionately benefit people before the united states because he did it before the east coast woke up
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and turned their computers on. it was based on a dangerous exploit which had been developed and used by the national security agency, which they then lost control of and he is cleaning up the nsa's mess. very embarrassing for them and a cynic might think this has something to do with his arrest in vegas. are you a cynic? i agree it was done to avoid any extradition problems because we have had cases in the past like gary mckinnon, when there were political debates over here and in the us as to whether he should have been extradited to face hacking charges in america. when you have 15,000 hackers and security experts, researchers and so on in the us, if they want to arrest somebody, they can catch them there. if they do it just before he is about to leave, everyone else has gone, the media has gone and they can grab him. it
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does sound strange to allege he has been creating malwa re, does sound strange to allege he has been creating malware, creating banking trojans... i will stop you for one second, for people who don't know what malware is, banking trojans, explain what they are. malware is bad software, anything that gets onto your computer typically because you will receive an e—mail attachment that appears to come from a friend or someone you know and it says, click here to open this attachment, see some photos or download some photos or videos, but it installs programmes on your computer that start to do things in the background without your knowledge. what this banking trojan allegedly did, which he is the allegedly did, which he is the alleged to have written, is, it installed programmes on your computer so when you log into your online bank it notices you have done that and it grabs the passwords you type and sends them down the internet to the hacker so they now have your online banking details, your username and passwords. you don't know they have got it and they
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can log into your online bank and steal your money. these things are really dangerous. there is also a very fine line, a lot of hackers out there, a lot of people who call themselves and indeed are, security researchers. it can be a very fine line. if you are a security researcher and you want to know what the hackers are doing and thinking, what techniques they are using, you might hang out in the online hacking forums, you might even pretend to be a hacker. he might even add met to having written certain hacking programmes, even if you didn't, just to gain the trust of other hackers and cyber criminals. it is a very murky world, lets hope they have some evidence to prove whether he did ordidn't some evidence to prove whether he did or didn't because it will come to court, probably. there may be a trial. but it is early to speculate to say he did or didn't do it because the whole world of it security is very strange. he has
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been accused of six accounts of hacking related crimes. going back to the nhs attack and that is only found out about this guy, can you remind reminders of what happened and his involvement in stopping it? the outbreak which hit the nhs, it hit lots of broadcast organisations across the world, some very large companies, either because they were directly affected all be shut down the system is fearing they might be. it is run somewhere, the e—mail attachments you receive, you click on the attachment because they think it is legitimate. but you have started a programme running written by criminals that encrypt all your files and they scramble your documents so you cannot use your computer until you pay some money to get the password. that is what that is. what the programmers of this did, they'd built in a killswitch. so if they ever wanted to remotely stop it from spreading, all they had to do is create a website with a
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certain name. because it check whether the website existed. if it did, it stopped running. this website clearly didn't exist, marcus noticed in the code that is what it was looking for. he went and created a website with that name which sends all the millions of copies of this malware out there, noticed the website existed and that was the instruction to stop spreading and so therefore stopped spreading. was this intentional or accidental marcus‘ part? this intentional or accidental marcus' part? we think it was a deliberate ploy by the writers to build in this killswitch. he wasn't 100% sure what it was going to do but he noticed when he analysed the code, it was checking for this nonexistent website, so he thought he would try to create a website under the name it he would try to create a website underthe name it was he would try to create a website under the name it was checking for and it stop spreading. and it did indeed, as has been said, solved a lot of problems and save people a lot of problems and save people a lot of problems and save people a lot of time, including the us because they happens at that point,
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woken up and started work, so he did a good service to a lot of people. what‘s the difference between us in the uk look at marcus and treat them, in the way that the us does? there is a disparity in the way computer can crimes are dealt with. it is too early to say whether the star charges against marcus woolsack. marcus will appear in court in las vegas today. he will enter a plea, he will have to go to wisconsin where the charges have been filed, to be arraigned. because he is from the uk, he may not be granted bail. if he was in the uk, he would be granted bail. that is bad news, not only us prisons unpleasant, he will not have access toa unpleasant, he will not have access to a computer, he will not have access to the digital evidence which would help him participate in his own defence. the jail time cover potential jail time own defence. the jail time cover potentialjail time between the uk and the us, there is no comparison.
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if convicted on this indictment, marcus faces decades in jail. would you like to comment on that as well, robert? i agree, there is a difference in some cases. what he is alleged to have done, created and sold this banking malware and made a couple of thousand dollars out of it. to be facing 40 years injail and such a hope rai file case of earning a couple of thousand dollars is very strange. it is not unprecedented. in the 80s, when i was hacking and i was charged with hacking, but i was acquitted because there was no law against it at that time, iwas there was no law against it at that time, i was alleged to have been hacking and deprive people out of £11 worth of computer time. it led toa £11 worth of computer time. it led to a multi—million pound court case, it cost a lot of people a lot of time and it involved tenjudges, the house of lords and so on. but all i allegedly did was defraud people out
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of £11 worth of computer time they would have otherwise paid for. we do tend to overreact and perhaps it is another example the law enforcement community and the judicially don't understand how to deal with computer crime and online crime. and in such an online world, they really need to. thank you very much indeed. no child deserves to be bullied, but many are. all the children interviewed were victims of bullying and they give children advice on how to deal with it. when i was on the bus, they would ta ke when i was on the bus, they would take my shoes and put them in the bin, then slapped me across the face things and i had marks on my face. bin, then slapped me across the face things and i had marks on my facelj was alone and scary and i did know what do or who to turn to. your life becomes surrounded and engulfed by the bullying. he don't know anything but that bullying and that torment.
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and the feelings it brings about. you wake up in the morning and you think, there is a point, i don't have the energy to go in and face that. i walk with a limp and that was a perfect opportunity for people to bollini. one particular namejust kept going round and it struck the three years. where you a victim of bullying? you lose control of it. the important thing is to give the control back. speak out, there are social network platforms you can speak to. there is childline. social network platforms you can speak to. there is childlinelj found writing how i felt, often i would fill out a whole page. each one represented to me represented something. the small one is one small things happen, the big one is when big things happen. i've had tickets to go and see wicked in london. anybody who has seen it is a hard—hitting musical, someone who
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has been tormented because of the way she looks. that inspired me to go and say something to a teacher and speak to my parents about it and say, this is happening, i am not comfortable with what is happening at the moment. can you please help me? express how you feel, because i found showing my drawings, the teachers were trying to help me. because they could see how much it was upsetting me. when you start off—loading what has happened, it is unbelievable how relaxing it can be knowing somebody else knows what has happened. every single day our try and write a positive message, it would help me focus on the positives. don't change because somebody wants you to, focus on who you are, don't let anybody bring you down. still to come...
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president trump remains defiant that he did nothing wrong over russia, as the man investigating convenes a grand jury, which could bring about possible criminal charges. with the news, here‘s martine in the bbc newsroom. good morning. the deadline for submissions on what the grenfell tower fire inquiry should cover expires at 5pm this afternoon. hundreds of suggestions have already been received. the head of the inquiry, sir martin moore—bick, promised to consider a broad range of evidence when he launched a public consultation into the terms of reference injuly. in the us, the investigation into russian attempts to interfere in last year‘s presidential election is gathering pace. it‘s emerged that special counsel robert mueller has convened a grand jury in washington, the first step towards possible criminal charges. president trump poured scorn on the inquiry, saying it was a "total fabrication". a british computer expert who helped stop the wannacry cyber attack that crippled the nhs has appeared before a judge in the us over alleged links with other malicious software. marcus hutchins, who‘s 23 and from devon, was arrested in las vegas on suspicion of distributing malware designed to steal bank and credit card details.
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oxford university has urged one of its employees, who‘s suspected of murdering a man in chicago, to hand himself into the us authorities. andrew warren, who‘s 56, is wanted alongside an american professor, in connection with the death of a man found with multiple stab wounds. royal bank of scotland has reported its first half—year profit in three years. the bank, which is still predominantly owned by the taxpayer, made almost £940 million in the six months to the end ofjune, compared with a loss of £2 billion in the same period last year. that‘s a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. jessica is at the olympic park in london. you are there for the world championships? welcome back to the
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london stage where the best athletes will descend on the stadium tonight for the world athletics championships. there were so many happy memories back in the stadium for the london olympics five years ago. it is five years to the day since super saturday when it seemed to be reigning gold medals for team gb in the stadium behind me. for the fa ns gb in the stadium behind me. for the fans lucky enough to have a ticket for tonight, they are in for a treat, as you say, they get dizzy two legends in the sport competing. first up will be usain bolt, the jamaican sprinter has long lit up tracks around the world for well over a decade now. he goes in the opening rounds in the opening heats of the 100 me to is. and this will be his final major championship appearance before he hangs up his spikes. he has said he is retiring at the end of the season. what a shame that will be, you have to ask yourself how much would a sport of athletics ms a special character. also on the track, sir mo farah will
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be in action and he goes in the 10,000 metre final. it was on this track five years ago that mo farah won his first 0lympic titles and really shot himself into superstardom. winning those double gold medals in the 5000 and the 10,000 metres. it will be a fitting end to his track career if he could replicate that success again. as much a set of excitement and anticipation for this event, there is also a cloud hanging over the sport of athletics at the moment in regards to doping, and the head of british athletics, ed warner, has been speaking about that this morning. in any walk of life, you find cheats around every corner. there's 2200 athletes here. will they all be clean? i doubt it. but are the authorities working really hard to root them out? yes. only yesterday, two ukrainian sprinters were banned provisionally, as a result of failing a drugs test.
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i think that's a good thing because if you were getting no failed tests right now, i would say the testers weren't working hard enough and the sport has a fight on its hands. i think it's gradually winning that battle, but it's going to be a long—term process. and disappointment for england‘s women footballers last night? yes, i watched the match and they seemed to be lacking confidence, they showed so much flair against scotland in the opening match, they showed great defence against spain in the second batch, then they beat france, who they had never beaten competitively before, and then germany went out, the reigning european champions and you just thought, this is england‘s time. but they came unstuck against the netherlands, it seemed like they just ran out of gas, unfortunately. despite being the highest ranked tea m despite being the highest ranked team left in the competition, the lionesses were beaten 3—0 and it means now that the dutch march on and they will face denmark in the final. some of the football to bring
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you, brazil forward final. some of the football to bring you, brazilforward neymar has signed for paris st germain for a world record fee of around £200 million. it smashes a previous deal set by paul pogba‘s transfer when he returned to manchester united last year and it is thought neymar will earn over £40 million per year as pa rt earn over £40 million per year as part of a five—year deal. some cricket news, in around half an hour england‘s cricketers start the fourth and final test against south africa at old trafford. james anderson will receive the honour of having a pavilion named after him, a case of james anderson having a pavilion named after him, a case ofjames anderson opening the bowling from the james anderson end! that will be interesting to see! bowling from the james anderson end! that will be interesting to seam certainly will! thank you, jess. the investigation into claims of russian meddling in the us election is heating up. now a grand jury has been set up — the first step towards possible criminal charges. in the us, grand juries are made up of members of the public who consider whether the evidence is strong enough to take to criminal trial. president trump has rubbished
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allegations of collusion. the reason why democrats only talk about the totally made up russia story is because they have no message, no agenda, and no vision. the russia story is a totalfabrication. it‘s just an excuse for the greatest loss in the history of american politics, that‘s all it is. itjust makes them feel better when they have nothing else to talk about... most people know there were no russians in our campaign, there never were. we didn‘t win because of russia we won because of you. that i can tell you. it‘s one more piece of bad news
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for the president in what‘s been another tumultuous week in washington where we‘ve seen yet more of his team come and go. let‘s remind ourselves of the characters new — and departed. a week ago today trump announced on twitter that he was appointing generaljohn kelly as the white house chief of staff, adding yet another military man to his top team. this makes him the highest—ranking employee at the white house. general kelly replaces reince priebus, who enjoyed just six months in the post before being sacked. and with kelly in — this man was out. anthony scaramucci — trump‘s new director of communications — and a bit of a loose cannon. he was sacked afterjust 10 days in thejob. then on wednesday, trump was forced
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to sign a bill imposing fresh sanctions against russia. it included new powers for congress to block any move by trump to remove those sanctions in the future. he called the bill ‘deeply flawed‘ — but it passed with overwhelming support. and this leaves us with the attorney generaljeff sessions, who has been publicly mocked and disparaged by trump. he‘s had a call from general kelly to say that his job is safe. we can speak now to lance price, a writer and commentator and former labour director of communications under tony blair. leslie vinjamuri is from the us, and is a political commentator and academic. and in washington is clarkjudge, a former speech writer for republican president ronald reagan. lamps, iwill lamps, i will start with you, as a former director of communications, how would you deal with somebody like donald trump? the problem with donald trump is, in essence, he is his own director of communications and communicate in a way which is entirely his own, completely unprecedented, and is impossible, it seems, to discipline. people have tried. thejob of his seems, to discipline. people have tried. the job of his communications staff seems to be, most of the time, to explain what he meant with his
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tweets, often in the middle of night, which generate news as soon as they are broadcast. i think general kelly, just appointed as chief of staff, clearly a disciplinarian, who wants to try to impose discipline on the white house and its staff, has an enormous task on his hands because frankly the least disciplined member of the team appears to be the president. we have said before he seems to be running his presidency on twitter, is there anything you can do to stop that? you take his phone away! but he would find another way of doing it, this man is determined to do it his own way and, to put it politely, thatis own way and, to put it politely, that is a pretty unusual way of going about governing the united states of america, the most powerful nation in the world. he will find their way to communicate, but he believes, clearly, you saw that with the crowd he was addressing there in west virginia, that his supporters are behind him
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and it does not matter what the media establishment, political establishment in dc say about him, he is right, his gut instinct are the ones to follow, and he will not be deflected from it. we will have to see whether or not the american people are willing to go along with that for very much longer. how do you think, leslie, donald trump will deal with the intensification of the inquiry into claims of collusion between russia and the tramp campaign, and what does the grandeur in mean? i think the grand jewellery isa very in mean? i think the grand jewellery is a very clear signal that the investigations are being taken very seriously by the special counsel and that they are ratcheting it up, and there was a cent at one point that maybe this person was under threat of being let go by the president, but remember that president trump right now is under fire from all sorts of dimensions, he is under attack within the white house, not succeeding with congress at all, the afforda ble succeeding with congress at all, the affordable care act revision that he wanted did not pass, so he is now moving on to immigration, and he is
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trying to rule not only through twitter, which is very important, but trying to legislate or pass directives through executive orders. he basically says to the executive branch, this is what you need to do, and he is doing this at a very high rate compared to past presidents, which is a sign he is struggling to work with congress to pass any of his key legislative items, so he is ina very his key legislative items, so he is in a very difficult position and we have seen over the last week he is really trying to hold on to that base, going hard on immigration. 0ne trying to hold on to that base, going hard on immigration. one of the puzzles here is that if you look at his attacks on his attorney general, jeff sessions, it is puzzling. sessions was the first person confined, the first person that supported donald trump. he pursues donald trump's line, he is tough on crime and immigration, all the things donald trump wants, and yet because sessions recused himself from the russia investigation, donald trump has taken a hard line on him so i think donald trump is clearly very under attack and the worst thing now is the russia
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investigations are going forward, the grand jury is a very big signal so this is not something he will handle very well. atop top summer for the president. tell us more about the grand jury. the grand jury gives power to the special counsel to subpoena documents, require witnesses to turn up and testify under oath. remember there has witnesses to turn up and testify under oath. rememberthere has been a lot of discussion amongst those individuals that have gone before congress about whether those hearings will be open and closed, whether they will be under oath or not, the special counsel has a different level of authority and by empowering grandjury he different level of authority and by empowering grand jury he has even more, so it is a very, very controversial step, it won't be well received by the white house, and it signals to the public and to washington that these investigations are tremendously serious and could result in indictments. does this mean criminal charges will be filed? it means there is a possibility, it is absolutely something that is possible, by no means that it will
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happen. let's bring in clerk. what is your reaction to the latest developments? first of all i would say the executive orders are simply a response to his predecessor's excessive use of executive orders, basically he is under windows. the grand jury, the morning reports have it so far that they are focused on briefly former national—security adviser flynn, but as your prior guest said we don't know yet what it means. it does mean that robert mueller is following this investigation aggressively, we knew that already. while this is a headline, i'm not sure much of it is new, and so we don't really know. we know the president did have a chaotic white house, had become more chaotic, and that he moved to fix
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it, that is why he bought in general kelly. it seems general kelly has moved rapidly and effectively to do that. several people are out, as you catalogued, and the white house is starting very quickly to seem disciplined, focused, something that it had not before. you think it is a smart move? oh, yes, i think it was overdue, but it takes a while, there isa overdue, but it takes a while, there is a story of abraham lincoln, he was one of the, one of the senators was one of the, one of the senators was complaining about how bad the head of the army was at that time, sort of similar to this, he was not affected, things were not moving, and lincoln said, well, who do you wa nt and lincoln said, well, who do you want me to replace him with? the guy said, the senator said, i don't care, just anybody. lincoln said, i cannotjust care, just anybody. lincoln said, i cannot just replace him care, just anybody. lincoln said, i cannotjust replace him with anybody, i have to have a name. so it took a while, as with lincoln,
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for donald trump to find a name, and now he has, he seems to have, general kelly seems to have moved quickly and efficiently. how has the republican party responded to what has been, for all of us watching all over the world, an extraordinary few weeks, the hiring, firing, bad—mouthing happening against the backdrop of russia retaliating against sanctions, north korean missile launch. what next? the world is in missile launch. what next? the world isina missile launch. what next? the world is in a bit of chaos now, right, and thatis is in a bit of chaos now, right, and that is notjust new, it has been developing for a long time, even russia's attempts at intruding in the 2016 election were ineffective, if anything they have backfired badly on the russians, they now have sanctions, the president wanted to have some kind of strategic opening, much as president 0bama had at the beginning of his term and president bush at the beginning of his, that
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is now in shambles and would be pursued, so it has been a bad week, a few months, for the russians. but this is, the president has moved to fix his problems and get his administration on track and i think that has been affected. lance, do you think general kelly will be able to fix donald trump‘s problems? one of the things he has to do is secure the loyalty of the rest of the white house staff because donald trump‘s biggest vulnerability is people in the white house thinking, this guy could fire me tomorrow, and they are right to think so based on the track record of the last few weeks and months! if you look back to the only president who was ever forced out of office, president nixon, their own people looking after their own skin when there was a grand jury decided to do deals and reveal what they knew, and he came unstuck. we have already seen this is the lee kee is the white house in living memory, donald
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trump white house in living memory, donald tru m p co nsta ntly white house in living memory, donald trump constantly being embarrassed by the leaks, for examples, telephone calls with the australian prime minister and mexican president. if general kelly cannot disciplined staff so they feel a sense of loyalty to the whole operation, including donald trump has got to demonstrate he can push through his legislative agenda. he wanted to repeal a bummer ca re agenda. he wanted to repeal a bummer care and that hasn't worked. his next item is immigration but also tax reform is essential. so far we haven't seen a plan, we haven't seen any details. this is difficult for congress because the requirement it is neutral in terms of cost, so the devil is in the details. there is no plan, so it is crucial for securing his support. his investment in infrastructure and
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jobs, there is no plan for this. he planned and infrastructure plan by signing an executive order. but there is dysfunction in the white house and working with the rest of his executive branch, appointing, there are over 400 people at high levels across the government that have not been appointed, the president has two named these individuals and get them through the senate confirmation process. the level of functioning government, there is so much that still has to be done, legislated lee and this is in the context of the russian investigations and very difficult, very low approval ratings, so it is not going to be easy. just a quick
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question, is it a problem that from‘s family are so close to his presidency? he trusts them and presidents go with those they trust. let me say something about his approval rating. this is an unusual presidency, to say the least. donald trump's approval ratings as a person have never been particularly high, in contrast to most presidents. even when he was elected will stop this is not that much of a deviation from those. what does win him, what won him the presidency, is his agenda. a great deal hovers agenda can be done through the executive order and that has been pursued. we will have to see, but my guess is, his supporters are not put off by all that has happened in washington. whether they have been galvanised by it. the consta nt have been galvanised by it. the constant drumbeat of opposition from
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the media and the resistance, as they call it, of the democrats in congress. all this has solidified his base and his voters. what we have seen, at the same time is, economic confidence has moved to new highs, along with the markets. i would not say the traditional measures of presidential strength with the voting public apply in this case. the democrats will be hard pressed to believe that and it won't be tested until the 2018 elections. but the trump presidency is not in the kind of danger the numbers would suggest. very quickly, is the white house really a dump, asjournalists
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have reported donald trump as saying? e—readers physically a dump? it isa saying? e—readers physically a dump? it is a very nice place. as we‘ve been hearing, today is the last chance for residents of the grenfell tower to have their say on the inquiry into the fire that changed their lives. the public consultation into what the inquiry should look into closes this evening it‘ll then be up to the prime minister theresa may to decide. there‘s already been so much anger and distrust about the inquiry. earlier i spoke to christos fairbairn who was on the 15th floor of grenfell where he‘d lived for two years. eve allison who is a conservative councillor on kensington and chelsea council and louise christian, the solicitor who represented all of the bereaved families in the lakanalfire inquest. i started by asking christos what he hoped would come from the public inquiry. i just want everyone who has lost, a lot of people who has lost family, i want them to have justice, lawful action happened, for them to be settled, you know? it is traumatised.
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i don‘t want this to continue and another situation of grenfell tower happen again because it seems like it will be because there‘s still cladding in places all over england. it could start all over again. if you could not repeat this again and do something about it, that willjust, you know, there‘s a lot of people out there who is mentally unstable to the fact that, could it happen here? we have cladding here and there is a lot of people unhappy at the end of the day. because as you can see in grenfell tower, within seconds, within 15 minutes, it was a ritual, it was on fire. there is a huge problem with trust now when it comes to kensington and chelsea council, how come people trust you and the council going forward?
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indeed. i would just like to say, i actually run about three wards. i run from norland, nottingham barnes and st helens ward, which is my ward. i see and talk to the average person that the rest of my colleagues would ordinarily not talk to. when you see posters up that say, corporate massacre rbkc is guilty of corporate massacre and that the people deserve and want justice, then you have two, you know, have some sort of feeling and some sort of depth to understand why should someone want to paint that up and i go about and i speak to people that man gazebos later at night, near the grenfell tower, full of information, provisions, water, food. these are the kind of people that this enquiry, public enquiry needs to reach. it's to reach the people
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that don't have a voice, the people that can't come on your lovely tv set and dress up nicely as we are. it is to the lady who comes from windsor, who served me tea other day at the assistance centre that's now in baard road. it's to the orthodox muslim, an eritrean lady that i was talking to who is traumatised herself, but yet she has to get up each and every day and go and help traumatised families. it is to all the silent muslim women who can't come forward for their cultural and societal reasons. they could tell me they can't come on your set and tell you why. people need answers and whether that means kensington and chelsea falls on our own sword, well so be it. because we need to be open, we need to be transparent and we need to be honest and that's the only way we are going to get the truth. yes, we are making great strides now
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in our packages of care with what we are offering to residents, but ordinarily, when i hear stories of people who have been in hotels for so long, cramped with their kids, their children, they need to be put into permanent housing as soon as possible. you can only live with a suitcase for so long. you need to be properly settled. do you think the enquiry can be trusted to get to the truth? the issue is this, we have reached this point now and we have got to have some degree of trust in the judge and go from there. because this is a democracy, it is not about he who shouts the loudest, so we have to give some sort of respect to that and go from there. but there is a lot of people who feel that, you know, they are not going to get properjustice. it doesn't matter what kensington and chelsea does, because the trust
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has already been broken. gre nfell should not have happened, but it did. there was some criticism of the enquiryjudge, sir martin moore—bick when he was appointed, understandably. what is your view of his appointment and do you think, if he doesn‘t have the respect of the survivors and the families, the residents, isn‘t that seriously worrying? i think he's a very experienced seniorjudge and i would trust him to carry out the role that he's been given. however, i do think that maybe the enquiry should consider appointing a couple of other experts who would reflect the diversity of the community. they should be independent people, not from the community. but that was done in the lawrence enquiry and was very effective. in my response to the consultation, i have recommended that to the enquiry as a possible way forward. do you want to respond, i could see you were nodding? you need someone who was actually
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there or part of it, at the end of the day, or someone from the community to speak, someone who has been there before, because it has more of an effect. because people in an enquiry, it is just business, it isjust them doing a job what they are doing. but if there is someone from the community who was actually been there, done it or was actually involved in it, it is more personal. and for me personally, a lot of people died and a lot of people are still missing. it is sad, very sad up to now. ijust hope it does get sorted out and it doesn‘t repeat itself and the people that suffered and lost families, but they can get on with their life in time to come. because it is, for me personally, i am still trying to cope with what happened. there‘s other people in there who has lost their family, their whole generation of families
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and for me personally, ijust hope that it doesn‘t repeat itself and the people who‘s been affected by it does get help, mentally, physically and can carry on with their life. christos fairbairn there who lived on the 15th floor of grenfell tower. the new irish prime minister is making his first official visit to northern ireland today. he‘s giving a speech at the university of belfast. he is talking about the future of the uk and ireland. the republic of ireland has changed to the point that it is built on respect and equality for all citizens, no matter what their beliefs or identity may be. it is a country that is home to 800,000 people who weren‘t born in ireland, making up 17% of the population. it is the first country in the world to vote by a national referendum to
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introduce marriage equality. we now have a new self—confident as an island, not on the edge of europe, but at the centre of the world and at the heart of the european home we helped to build. a founder member of the euro and the single market. we have taken place finally among the nations of the world. the professor of english has written the concept of english has written the concept of freedom has been a recurring melody in a national symphony. by thing we have found south of the border over the past few decades, the kind of freedom that some people thought was impossible has been achieved through the international symphony of membership of the european union. so i passionately believe that being european is an essential part of modern irish identity. it is an enhancement, not a dilution of who we are. and in my opinion, it is a tragedy of the
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brexit debate that appears that this common european identity is not valued by everyone on islands. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. high in charge on sunday but a fresh start but the next low—pressure bring showery outbreaks of rain again so don‘t put your umbrella away too soon. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am — the investigation intensifies in washington — a grand jury is assembled to look into claims that russia interfered
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in the election that brought president trump to power. they can't beat us at the voting booths, so they're trying to cheat you out of the future and the future that you want. police in australia say two men charged with plotting to bring down a plane were taking directions from islamic state. from so—called islamic state. a british cyber—security expert — who helped stop the cyberattack on the nhs — appears before a judge in the us for allegedly creating software to steal bank details. one of the world‘s tallest residential buildings — the torch tower in dubai — has caught fire for
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