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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 6, 2017 8:00am-9:01am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with rachel burden and rogerjohnson. the greatest sprinter of all time fails to secure a 20th global gold as he prepares to exit the world stage. it is just it isjust one it is just one of those things. i cannot say much, ijust did not execute when it mattered. so here at the london stadium, it was bronze for bolt — gold for gatlin. the controversial american stunned the crowd by taking the title. and he paid his own tribute to his great rival bolt. good morning it's sunday the 6th of august. ministers launch a review into the cost of energy — but consumer groups say it's "cold comfort" for households that are already paying too much. stop wrapping children in cotton wool — the chief inspector of schools says overzealous health and safety rules are holding pupils back.
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how to vacation like vladimir. we'lljoin russia's action man president as he goes on his summer holidays. and jay has the weather. quite a fresh start was quite a lot of bright weather and south and eastern areas hold on to the sunshine but more northern areas will see rain. the man said to be the world's greatest ever sprinter, usain bolt, has failed to win his last individual 100 metre race at the world athletics championships in london. bolt is retiring, after a career which saw him win 11 world titles and 8 olympic gold medals. he finished third, behind americans justin gatlin and christian coleman. gatlin has twice served doping bans. our sports editor dan roan watched the action unfold. with the night sky crackling with excitement, the fireworks gave a sense of what was to come. commentator: usain bolt!
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lapping up the adulation for one last time in an individual final, bolt knew this buildup hadn't been perfect, beaten in the semi—final by an american, christian coleman. his starts also have been shaky. bolt gets a pretty good start. so does coleman. coleman leading it. chasing hard. here he comes. and gatlin wins it! with coleman second, bolt was pushed into bronze, the disbelief sweeping round the stadium, the crowd making it more than clear what they thought of the winner. booing. gatlin had shocked the world, but he quickly moved from arrogance to humility. and as the american basked in unpopular glory, bolt gave an interview we're not used to seeing. it's just one of those things, you know what i mean? i can't say much. i just didn't execute when it matters. it wasn't meant to be this way.
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the crowd her expected usain bolt to win his final 100 metres race, not come third, and certainly not get beaten by a two times drug cheat injustin gatlin, who crashes the farewell party. it's the last thing track and field would have wanted. mistakes can happen. but you can come back hard and work hard for them and be accepted back. the crowd had experienced history, just not the history they expected. but bolt still bows out having transcended his sport. dan roan, bbc news, at the london stadium. an independent review into the cost of energy is being launched by the government — just days after british gas raised standard electricity prices by i2.5%. the business secretary, greg clark, says the report will examine how prices can be kept as low as possible — while ensuring the uk still meets its climate change targets. let's speak to our political correspondent, leila nathoo. good morning. it is a very a
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political issue and many people will roll their eyes, having been told their bills are increasing i2.5%. energy prices has been an anti—government's sites for some time with the result may promising a cap during the election but that has been dropped and there is now this independent review looking into the whole supply chain where costs can be reduced across the supply chain to bring bills down. although the review has been promised in the ma nifesto review has been promised in the manifesto it is clearly added some urgency by this british gas being the last of the big six to raise their prices earlier this week. this review will publish the report in 0ctober review will publish the report in october and consumer groups say it
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will not address the problem now but we will wait to see what the recommendations are. we'll be speaking to will hodson — co—founder of the big deal — a consumer group that advise people how to save money on their energy bills. that's at ten past. italian police have arrested a polish man accused of kidnapping and drugging a british model as she arrived for a photo shoot. the 20—year—old woman was attacked by two men and held captive for 6 days. it's alleged they threatened to hold an online auction for her unless a ransom was paid. 30 year old, lukasz pawel herba, who lives in britain, has been arrested on suspicion of kidnap and extortion. schools must stop trying "to wrap children in cotton wool" because it leaves them ill—prepared for the challenges of later life — that's the view of the chief inspector of schools. 0fsted's amanda spielman says over—the—top health and safety rules stop children developing resilience — and she wants new guidance for schools in england.
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andy moore reports. it's clear the chief inspector of schools is no fan of children in high—vis jackets. she says they look like troops of mini construction workers minus the hard hats. pupils, she claims, are being shortchanged by teachers trying to insulate them from every bump, germ, or bruise. take conkers for example. she says every minute spent trying to ban it takes away from the multitude of real dangers children face. she says this is her message. she wants children to be allowed to take full advantage of the freedom of childhood to explore the world around them. and so, to that end, the 1,800 school inspectors in england will be taking part in sessions next month called "when is safe, what really matters?" the aim is to get away from the tickbox culture of the past.
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there is also a warning today that children are spending too much of their free time on line. it comes from the children's commissioner in england saying youngsters are bingeing on social media in the same way they like to tuck into junk food. they say they want parents to regulate internet usage just like they would stop them eating cheeseburgers and chips for every meal. andy moore, bbc news. belgian officials have admitted they knew that eggs from dutch farms might be contaminated with an insecticide a month before the issue became public. belgium's food safety agency said it had kept quiet because of an ongoing fraud investigation. shops in belgium, the netherlands and germany, have removed the eggs from sale. tough new sanctions will be imposed on north korea following the country's recent intercontinental ballistic missile tests. the un voted unanimously for the resolution to ban some north korean exports, like iron, coal and lead, and to limit investments in the country. pyongyang has been under un
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sanctions for almost a decade — but refuses to end its nuclear programmes. meanwhile, the us secretary of state rex tillerson will meet his korean, russian, and chinese counterparts at the summit of the association of southeast asian nations in manila today. north korea's nuclear programme is expected to be a main topic. 0ur south asia correspondent jonathan head is in bangkok for us this morning. jonathan, what is happening today? no evidence in the past the north korean sanctions have work in terms of stopping their nuclear programme was smacked i don't think anybody thinks this time they will but the americans are looking for tougher action to squeeze the economy in north korea. they want pressure that makes north korea think again about pushing ahead with a missile programme that is not far of
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threatening the west coast of the usa in some form. there is a different perspective in asia where they recognise north korea is a very difficult customer what they believe engagement was quiet pressure is the only option. what is important about this meeting is your 27 asian countries, up until now the tom administration has not define what it thinks about asia and this is chasuble rex tillerson to build consensus, particularly with china and russia and that north korea is com pletely and russia and that north korea is completely isolated and try and persuadejohn completely isolated and try and persuade john mann this completely isolated and try and persuadejohn mann this is the beginning of more serious isolation —— persuade north korea. jonathan, thank you. president trump is beginning his 17 day golfing holiday, but his russian counterpart valdimir putin, had more
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energetic pursuits in mind, for his summer break. the president made a three day trip to the siberian wilderness — and he's been showing off his fishing, snorkelling and quad biking skills. 0ur moscow correspondent sarah rainsford reports. it's russia, it's summer, so it's time for vladimir putin's photo—shoot. and this year, the action—man president went fishing in siberia. the video footage ran for a full ten minutes on state television. the highlight was the pike—chase. this year, mr putin went underwater with a spear gun. the kremlin says he was hunting his prey for two hours. "i had to shoot twice," he admits, finally surfacing with his catch. after notching up 17 years in power, russia's leader is a dab hand at such stunts. he once took to the skies as a human crane. he is regularly
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snapped on his skates. commentator: vladimir putin! and horseriding is another action—man favourite for the judo black belt. this year, too, it was all about vladimir putin, the macho man, even at 64. the strong leader, ready as ever to stand up to the west. and, never shy of revealing a bit of flesh, mr putin took a moment to flex his muscles in the siberian sunshine. "now that's good fishing," he tells his entourage. sarah rainsford, bbc news, moscow. and in good shape for 64. yeah... not and in good shape for 64. yeah... n ot exa ctly and in good shape for 64. yeah... not exactly my pin—up is all i'm saying. consumers may welcome news of the government's independent review into the cost of energy in the same week that british gas announced it was raising
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electricity prices by 12.5%. it comes amid concerns about rising bill and will look at how prices could be kept as low as possible — while ensuring the uk can still meet its climate change targets. we're joined now by will hodson from the big deal — a consumer group that helps people save money on their energy bills. good morning. this is such a difficult topic for people and in a week where bills covered increased as anyone likely to take comfort from this review? cold comfort, if any. the key point is rising energy prices are a problem right now, this isa prices are a problem right now, this is a strategic report that will deliver benefits, if at all, many yea rs deliver benefits, if at all, many years from now and people will feel as though the government is taking the camera down the road. this is looking at costs as supposed
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to prices. the boss of british gas said wholesale prices were coming down and yet prices for consumers or increasing because of costs. the person running the review pledge to separate the myths from the facts with regard to energy costs which is probably a good idea because when british gas's ceo explained why they are putting up prices with reference to costs a lot of it was lampooned as nonsensical. there is a distinction between costs and prices. it is all very well if the report enables us to reduce costs for energy companies for generation and transmission but if they can still put up prices for consumers we have achieved nothing. that is a very difficult one because they make huge profits these companies but on the other hand, although their shareholders benefit,
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you could argue pension funds and we benefit in ways if these companies are benefit in ways if these companies a re successful. earlier this summer you have both britain's major political parties promising to deliver a price cap and if people want to see lower bills this year at a price cap is the only way to go. the government says it is doing everything it can to keep costs down for energy, do you not buy into that? i am not certain and i think we can look at the policy costs, british gas blamed policy costs for the fact that they put up prices last week, the government responded quite smartly by saying this is a tiny proportion of the cost you face it does not make sense. it makes sense to have this long—term review but we should absolutely not lose focus on exploitative pricing, the focus on exploitative pricing, the focus on exploitative pricing, the focus on costs in the entry system
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should not distract us mac compatible and greed in the energy companies. the whole point of creating a market in the energy sector was to try and keep costs down. is that market not working? which market is that? there are two. the point i am making is if you are out there are switching and trying to get a good deal you are constantly getting reasonable value for money. 0n the other hand, if you are not switching you will find yourself in a different market altogether where there is no competition. these are there is no competition. these are the people paying 30, 40% more energy than the neighbours and these are the people in desperate need of protection with a price cap. i have got onto the switching of thing because of listening to interviews like this and you can do it every year and it is not a hugely complicated thing to do, take 20 minutes or so to fill in the form. is that the advice, switch and get
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the best deal? you are very furrow on your forms, we think it takes five to ten minutes to switch. the important point to make is anyone who doesn't fa ncy point to make is anyone who doesn't fancy increasing bills, you do not need one of those bills to hand to switch, an estimate of your usage is nearly always good enough. thank you for your advice. i am glad to hear you do listen to some of these interviews. i have done so many of these interviews and listen to so many people saying switch but the best deal i could fight this year was still more expensive than the best deal i could find this year. —— best deal i could find this year. —— best deal i could find this year. —— best deal i find last year. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. usain bolt has failed to win his final individual 100 metre race at the world athletics championships. the eight time 0lympic champion came third, with america'sjustin gatlin taking
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gold. an independent review into the cost of energy has been launched — just days after british gas increased electricity prices by 12.5% for three million customers. also coming up in the programme: we'll take a look at how the heatwave that's sweeping europe is affecting tourism and we'll have the latest advice for holidaymakers. let's find out what the weather is looking like. from your photograph it looks like a promising start. for some of us it has been a lovely start to the day. a lovely start to south wales. you can see more close toward the north and west of the uk bringing a rather different start in northern ireland in particular. the cloud is courtesy of this atlantic load heading our way of bringing the
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breeze, cloud and some rain. that is moving ever eastwards through the day so things are going downhill in western scotland and northern england. things should brighten up in northern ireland with some showers still through the afternoon. taking well onto the early evening before reaching the north—east. these of the pennines are largely dry but west of the pennines are quite wet, cumbria in particular and the western side of the wheels also been quite wet. the south—west of england avoid this. it lovely afternoon really was patchy cloud and sunny spells. a decent afternoon at the london stadium. a decent day across the south—east. 0vernight the rain move products offered at eastwards, quite wet in north—west of england and wales. this weather.
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moving too far tomorrow. in light from the south—west of england through wales into the midlands. wet wet in the south—west of england. the far south—east should essentially be dry and toward kent and sussex will seek the best of the sunshine. through the week things are looking pretty unsettled. low pressure to the east of us and all these isobars coming down from the north of bringing the breeze with it and bringing unsettled weather, heavy rain and showers, quite windy also. with the north winds temperatures will be on the law sites. quite disappointing for the stage in august. —— on the low side. children can spend up to 15 hours a week and internet, according to
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.com. the children's commissioner for england says parents must regulate their exposure to these websites in their exposure to these websites in the same way the wood with fast food and payments must be proactive in stopping their children bingeing over the summer holidays. let's talk to her now. why is this such a concern? you, it is a concern because of two things, first, children tell mejust because of two things, first, children tell me just how pressured they feel about having to stay online. we have got children who come to me and say, i can't go off—line because people will notice. i can't let my friends down, i have to have that prison is online. that brings its own pressures and stresses and parents know about that and the need to proactively step in. if pa rents and the need to proactively step in. if parents are working and if their children are staying with friends or
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grandparents or holiday clubs, it's not so easy. we are talking about children as young as nine or ten. so whoever looks after them will be part of that parenting agreement. we are talking about talking to children about the long—term about how they spent their time online and just as we wa nt spent their time online and just as we want children to know it is great to have pizza and fast food but we do not need it all the time, that is exactly the same message was being online i am talking about. it is about understanding what being on my is now. children who have grown up in the digital age they think it is just the way we are but we note the internet is a very addictive, it targets children and we know children, particularly find very difficult to get off the internet.
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and adults as well have this problem so it is important to set an example. did you have recommended limits? i do not because this is moving very fast and it is about different children at different ages having different abilities so what i say is we are putting forward a digital five a day about being mindful online, connecting online, getting up online, connecting online, getting up and leaving your laptop alone but for parents, do not be afraid, have that conversation, we know children will say we desperately do not want to be the only one not online but as pa rents to be the only one not online but as parents we must be clear we need to help them set boundaries. when we spoke about this earlier, roger said with his children he has a lot of the ipad away. that seems slightly draconian but i did block away and they got them back briefly but i will take them
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away again because they spent most of yesterday on the ipad ‘s. i speak to parents who sent the whole time trying to work out to ta ke whole time trying to work out to take out whatever switch it is that turned the wi—fi off. we all know the internet is here to stay and we all know it has got great opportunities with it and we are not in any way saying this is a bad thing but as with everything there is dark corners and it is about understanding in children the information and resilience to be able to manage their time online. i have seen children and frantic at airports before going on the plane because they do not want to be off—line for that period of time and thatis off—line for that period of time and that is not healthy. you used the word resilience, that is the one used this morning by the chief inspector of schools who has said children must develop more resilience and they are being wrapped in cotton wool. health and
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safety is the catch term we use for this but they need more exposure to risk in schools. do dubai creek was smacked of the mac i said for a long time we need to build children's resilience. we do children no favours to keep them away from issues they need help in tackling as aduu issues they need help in tackling as adult and the digital world is one of those. thank you for letting us come into your home so early on a sunday morning. we appreciate it. my morning. we appreciate it. my children have not hidden the ipad is from me. one step ahead of you! and longfield of the reviews the papers here on breakfast and now it is time to look at what is making the headlines today. paul is here. nice to see you.
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jonathan aitken has written a comment piece in the sunday times today about the relationship between prison guards and inmates. he's done a short stretch himself a two days ago. he is the former conservative mp and cabinet minister who was convicted of perjury in 1999. he was convicted and sent to prison for 18 months and served seven. he is not working for a lot of prison charities. visits prisons across the country and we know there has been continuing u nrest know there has been continuing unrest in prisons and he put it down to one thing, basically prisons are run by consent, a bit like policing by consent. it is the relationship, he says, between the convicts and
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the opposites. he said he was pull them —— pleasantly surprised by the mutual respect between the two but todayit mutual respect between the two but today it is disturbingly different. why? because there is a lot less prison officers and he says success of cuts to numbers, from 25,000 prison officers to 18,000. prison officers we speak to would agree. absolutely. there are some suggestions given the army could be brought in when they are reaching crisis point. which would be very drastic. we do not want unrest in jails because it causes huge mayhem and fear amongst the community is nearby. they need more prison officers. he is very each —— critical of three justice secretaries who did not fight against these cuts. and they blamed george osborne, of
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course. we got about catching up on household jobs over the summer, one of them includes getting rid of the crash that has been clocked the methods for too long but according to the sun on sunday i should not ta ke to the sun on sunday i should not take it to the dump. cash in on thejunk is take it to the dump. cash in on the junk is the message but in particular electronicjunk. i think we all electronicjob and they are saying all mobile phones can sketch a fortune. the iphone two g, out in 2007, campbell for £500. a motor roller that was so heavy you would have a hernia picking it up and go for over £1000. is that because they have become collector's items? i think so. game boy, £1000.
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tamagotchi, whatever that is, £450. soa tamagotchi, whatever that is, £450. so a lot of money sitting in our attics. this is the mirror. talking about cornish pasties, pork pies. another brexit scare story. to do with prize pies. i am brexit scare story. to do with prize pies. iam no brexit scare story. to do with prize pies. i am no stranger to the odd pies. i am no stranger to the odd pie myself. it says they know they'll brexit could mean british favourites such as cornish pasties and what prize could be undercut by foreign imitations as they lose their protected staters. what with mary berry say about that? —— protected staters. this final story is one that will make a lot of people think, we lived in a kind of
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consumer culture where we do not consider a vote winner all those goods come from and how they admit and the impact of that —— where those goods come from. this is the other side of the dry for electric vehicles. where does the cobalt come from that goes into the cobalt come from that goes into the batteries that power the car? most of it comes from the democratic republic of congo and childminders as young as four, apparently, work forjust 8p per day. the rummage through mining tips, toxic red dust, to find traces of cobalt that can go off to gauge to be put into batteries to power cars. it is a real sobering story, the other side of the environmental dry to get electric cars, but the cost is children digging up this cobalt is a
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pretty awful. thank you, paul. coming up in the men's half an hour we will see how smart cars might need to be protected from cyber attacks. —— coming up in the next half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. coming up before nine, we'll have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the man said to be the world's
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greatest ever sprinter, usain bolt, has failed to win his last individual 100 meter race at the world athletics championships in london. bolt is retiring, after a career which saw him win 11 world titles and eight olympic gold medals. he finished third, behind americans justin gatlin and christian coleman. gatlin has twice served doping bans. an independent review into the cost of energy is being launched by the government, just days after british gas raised standard electricity prices by 12.5%. the business secretary, greg clark, says the report will examine how prices can be kept as low as possible, while ensuring the uk still meets its climate change targets. italian police have arrested a polish man accused of kidnapping and drugging a british model as she arrived for a photo shoot. the 20—year—old woman was attacked by two men and held captive for six days. it's alleged they threatened to hold an online auction for her unless a ransom was paid. 30—year—old, lukasz pawel herba, who lives in britain, has been arrested on suspicion of kidnap and extortion. schools must stop trying "to wrap
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children in cotton wool" because it leaves them ill—prepared for the challenges of later life — that's the view of the chief inspector of schools. 0fsted's amanda spielman says over the top health and safety rules stop children developing resilience and wants new guidance for schools in england. meanwhile the children's commissioner for england says parents need to regulate their children's social media use the same way they would with fast food. anne longfield said parents need be proactive in stopping their children from bingeing on the internet over the summer holidays. children aged five to 15 are spending 15 hours a week on the internet, according to 0fcom. belgian officials have admitted they knew that eggs from dutch farms might be contaminated with an insecticide a month before the issue became public. belgium's food safety agency said it had kept quiet because of an ongoing fraud investigation. shops in belgium, the netherlands and germany, have removed the eggs from sale.
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tough new sanctions will be imposed on north korea following the country's recent intercontinental ballistic missile tests. the un voted unanimously for the resolution to ban some north korean exports, like iron, coal and lead, and to limit investments in the country. pyongyang has been under un sanctions for almost a decade — but refuses to end its nuclear programmes. the us secretary of state rex tillerson will meet his korean, russian, and chinese counterparts at the summit of the association of southeast asian nations in manila today. mr tillerson willjoin talks about north korea's weapons programme, which is expected to be one of the main topics. last week the us claimed that china was not doing enough to stop north korea's nuclear ambitions. the debate is still raging. was
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gatlin a worthy winner? the medal ceremony is to come. will the club be asked to pipe down. people have been getting in touch. but the result we wanted, but don't blame gatlin. he has no shame at all. if you cheat, expect everyone not to like you. they are well within their rights to boo him. let's go to the stadium. jess is there now. it'll be interesting to see what reaction gatling gets when he receives that gold medal. absolutely. not the result we
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expected. we were expecting a golden goodbye, but it was gatling that one and in deeply these championships bolt has had issues with his start in getting out of the blocks. he left himself too much to do in the final last might. he wasn't able to stea m final last might. he wasn't able to steam past the opposition as we have seen steam past the opposition as we have seen him do so many times before. it was gatling, he has twice been banned for doping, that took the gold. his fellow american christian coleman took silver. that's what killed me. normally, i would get better turna rounds, but it didn't come together. that is what killed me. i felt like it was there. know what i mean? i didn't get it. that's why i lost. it is just one of those things. how are you managing the emotion? your last individual race in a championship?
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it's rough, do you know what i mean? a championship. i did my best. it is a surreal moment. i thought of all the things i would do if i did win and i did none of that. it was almost like 2004 all over again. i got a victory by a little margin and just got across the line with that excitement. it is amazing. usain bolt's last race. so many victories in so many losses. to run against him all of those years... yeah. well, you and thomas told us he
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didn't think that gatlin should be competing. gatling is running under the rules, but maybe the rules need to be looked at. he has been banned twice and i think he should be banned for life. he is running well, but some will argue that he has cheated before. elsewhere, british eyes on the track were focussed on laura muir who was running in the semi finals of the women's 1,500 metres. she comfortably qualified for the final. she came in second behind faith kipyegon. laura weightman also made it through her semi final. it was really surprising. i felt really good. a girl went down at one point. yeah, the 1500 is scrappy. i just wanted to get that final and i have done that now. katarina johnson—thompson has work to do today if she is to win a medal in the heptathlon.
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an impressive run in the 200 metres lifted her back up to fourth in the standings, and helped to repair some of the damage done after a poor high jump earlier in the day. i am not going to lie, it was very hard. there was a lot of crying. it was only event two. last year, after getting 1.98 in thejumping, i'm not going to let that happen again. let's bring you up—to—date with the rest of the day's sport. england are on top heading into day three of the fourth and final test against south africa at old trafford. jonny bairstow made 99 for england as they posted 362 in theirfirst innings. in reply, james anderson took four wickets on his home ground to help reduce the visitors to 220 for 9 in reply. england lead by 142 runs. it was nice to stick around with jonny bairstow for a bit. it was good to get to three figures. a fantastic knock. getting to 360, it is a competitive score. myjob is to take wickets. it is always nice to get a cluster.
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those three wickets after tea were key for the team. leigh griffiths scored the 200th goal of his club career as celtic began the defence of their scottish premiership title with a 4—1win over hearts. elsewhere there were wins for hibernian, ross county and stjohnstone. i'm joined now by former british sprinter darren campbell. you finally stopped dancing! so many boos for gatling last night.
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considering he had two drug barons, should he have been competing at all? anyone who knows the sport and lost the sport knows thatjust all? anyone who knows the sport and lost the sport knows that just think that men should not be here. it's almost like how many times do you need to get into problems with drugs to not be allowed to take part any more. this was always the scenario that we knew it could happen. we escaped in beijing and i really did put that down to justin gatling losing it more than usain bolt winning it. this time around though he learnt his lesson. he was an outside lane, which meant he didn't get caught up with usain bolt and would not have felt his search, which is what happens christian coleman. bolt knew coming into this championships that he would have to start well and that is why he was co nsta ntly start well and that is why he was constantly talking about heath sta rts constantly talking about heath starts because it would affect his
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rhythm. —— his start. but the turbo wasn't there like it used to be. we we re wasn't there like it used to be. we were both here last night and we heard the blues went gatling crossed the line. the fans really vented their frustrations, but are the frustrations misguided? —— gatlin. it is difficult for the fans who paid their hard earned money to come into the stadium. they would have paid a lot to come and watch usain bolt. the emotions were raw, so i won't criticise anyone for booing. what will say that moving forward to being medal ceremony tonight, let's being medal ceremony tonight, let's be silent and dignified about it. there are two other skies on the podium. those last memories.
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—— guys. we don't want it to look like we don't like americans. it's not that, we just don't like drug cheats. young children are in the stadium and parents will have to explain what is going on because young people went necessarily know the history of jason gatling. a whole can of worms was opened last mightand we whole can of worms was opened last might and we could not hide from it. u nfortu nately might and we could not hide from it. unfortunately it happened and usain bolt finish third, but christian coleman, whose future is bright. indeed. it wasn't all bad news. we still got to see a legend of the sport in action. what contribution do you think that usain bolt has made to sport in general? look, i knew about usain bolt on the age of
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15. i heard about this young athlete injamaica 15. i heard about this young athlete in jamaica who had 15. i heard about this young athlete injamaica who had run a time that i was producing at the age of 26, so you certainly know, that is a serious talent. then you hear about his height. usain bolt, his agenda was to become a legend, but he has gone further than that. he's one of the greatest sports people that has ever lived. he has putjamaica on the map in the way that bob marley did. usain bolt can walk away with his head held high. the way he handled the defeat just his head held high. the way he handled the defeatjust sums up the man. most people would go crazy. he's bigger than that, it's notjust about usain bolt, it's about the sport and what he can do to make a difference. for me, he has done everything he can do. the fairy tale would be him leaving this stadium with one more gold medal, but sometimes fairy tales don't play up
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that way. we all live happened last night, you are right. thank you for joining us. perhaps we didn't get the result that everyone wanted, but we saw usain bolt in action and he will be back on the track on saturday for the relay. thank you. i just want to redo this. the media has turned gatlin into a villain. do they realise how many cheats they have cheered? gatlin does not deserve the jeers from the crowd on what borders on bullying. blame those that make the rules, says sarah. he is allowed to run, so well done to him. the british athletics team are in back in action again today as the world championships continue today.
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here's a quick look ahead to some of the moments you won't want to miss. britain's top finisher at the london marathon josh griffiths britain's top finisher at the london marathonjosh griffiths will be one to keep an eye on. he qualified for the championships on his marathon debut. katarina johnson thomson hopes to emulatejessica ennis hill, but the current 0lympic hopes to emulatejessica ennis hill, but the current olympic champion if someone but the current olympic champion if someone to beat. elaine thompson will only run the 100 metres in london. there is coverage throughout the day from my 30 am and later on bbc one from 6:30pm. —— from my 30 pm. you're watching
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breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: usain bolt has failed to win his final individual 100 metre race at the world athletics championships. the eight time 0lympic champion came third, with america'sjustin gatlin taking gold. an independent review into the cost of energy has been launched — just days after british gas increased electricity prices by 12.5% for three million customers. parts of southern europe have been sweltering due to an unprecedented heatwave which is set to continue well into next week. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee has been in sicily, finding out how locals and tourists are coping with the heat. this is something else, isn't it? sicily. it's picture postcard. when you send bbc correspondents here, it looks amazing. but even the italians say it is too hot. we have had five days of scorching temperatures, 10 degrees more than it usually is at this time of year. it has been 44 degrees in the sun and 41 in the shade. the bbc crew were the only ones
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brave enough to be out here. to give you a sense of what it is like in and around sicily, the balkans, hungary, parts of spain, cordova, it is so bad that the government have said tourists, locals, they should spend time indoors in the afternoon because of a threat to public health. that means you are either indoors or are making use of the pools. what you are seeing in places usually full of people, they have turned into ghost towns. the cities, the squares, i have never seen anything like it. the sun is just coming in and it is around now that people start to re—emerge. late next week, it will go back to normal temperatures. but we have got intense heat like this for some time to come. poor old gavin. i would not want to
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be there in that kind of heat. let's get some more details. how much longer will it last? do we know. we will have to wait for a little while because it will be another scorching hot day across southern europe. there is a bit of a change on the way for spain and portugal in particular. cooler air is spreading from the north. temperatures should return to something nearer the norm later in the week, but across italy and the balkans we will be hanging onto the heat. back on our shores, a fresh start to the day. more clout towards the north and west, courtesy ofan towards the north and west, courtesy of an atlantic low—pressure
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towards the north and west, courtesy of a n atla ntic low— pressure system bringing wind, cloud and rain. a bit ofa bringing wind, cloud and rain. a bit of a different start to the day. the rain is on the move and will push its way into the western side of scotland. elsewhere it will be a pretty decent afternoon. the rain should move to northern ireland and it will brighten up to some degree, but showers will follow. wet across scotland, but the far north—east should be dry. wet on the western side of cumbria and wales, but not much in the south—west of england. it will be cloudy, but fine and dry. it will be cloudy, but fine and dry. it looks like a decent day at the london stadium for the world athletics through the day today. an increasing amount of cloud, but a decent day. this evening, we have wet, windy weather in the north—west. showers across scotland
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and northern ireland this evening and northern ireland this evening and overnight and then this line of rain does not move too far tomorrow. it will be wet in the south of —— in the south—west of england. the best of the sunshine will be on the south—eastern coast. looking ahead to the rest of this coming week, it looks rather unsettled. low—pressure to the east of the uk. quite a squeeze on those isobars on tuesday and wednesday. the weather fronts will bring rain and showers and it will bring rain and showers and it will be quite windy. all in all, it is looking a bit disappointing for august. back to you. hopefully it will get better. it doesn't have the same profile as football or volleyball,
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but handball is becoming more popular since it became a hit with audiences during the 2012 olympic games. now a brand new championship has started in the uk that's part of the european handball tour. so mike bushell decided to give it a go and where better to try it out, than on the golden sands of poole beach. there is something so appealing about sports on the beach. i can smile barbecues, there are people out on paddle boards, the seas inviting. it makes you feel that you are on holiday, which is why beach soccer started and also beach handball has grown to a certain extent. beach handball is a legacy of the london 2012 olympics when it
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hosts great britain were able to enter a handball team and the sports profile was given a huge boost. the sport wanted to make it appeal to a younger crowd, sport wanted to make it appeal to a younger crowd , so sport wanted to make it appeal to a younger crowd, so they bought it the breach the lee—macro beach. younger crowd, so they bought it the breach the lee-macro beach. some spectacular stuff has been phoning. in beach handball, you have trick shots and that accounts for two points. that was wide. because it is soft sand, you don't have to worry about landing on your feet. soft sand, you don't have to worry about landing on yourfeet. you can base plant on the floor. it is a work in progress! i think that was a flu ke. work in progress! i think that was a fluke. it is so accessible and breaks all the stereotypes of netball, rugby and all that. any
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level can play, anyone can come in. girls in particular don't care about throwing themselves in the sand. what we do tackling, it's more comfortable to land on the floor.fi is like you are on the beach and you are not in the hall or year—round. beach handball, three steps are many could drop it. it is four aside, plus the keeper. use: the normal way. of course, you are on sam, so it isa way. of course, you are on sam, so it is a bit more tricky. it's a nice physicality of rugby, but some more of the speed and guile that you get with football. you can dive around more. ten minutes and i'm absolutely exhausted. it's running up and down on the sand, it's like treading trea cle. on the sand, it's like treading treacle. but at least there is a quick way of cooling down. mike
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bushell, bbc news, poole. smart vehicles which are connected to the internet can making life easierfor drivers, allowing them to access maps, travel information and digital radio services. but there are warnings that unless manufacturers improve security, hackers could target them to access personal data or even take control of the car. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. cars can do far more for drivers now than ever before. they can park themselves... they can even drive themselves. but all that technology also makes them vulnerable to cyber attack, so the government says it wants to act by forcing carmakers to do more to prevent vehicles from being hacked remotely. that includes stealing personal details such as phone numbers stored with the car. but also to prevent the car itself from being controlled remotely while you are at the wheel.
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maybe cyber security could actually affect the safety of our cars, but it has been the case that some of the hacks that have been around can affect the safety of cars, it can affect the steering wheel to putting the brakes on so this isn't a new problem but perhaps more of a new focus on another problem. although it's not publishing any new legislation nor has it carried out any specific research into the scale if any of the issue, the government still wants manufacturers to think about the risks of a cyber attack on the private vehicles of the future. fully autonomous vehicles will be with us in the next few years and we need to make sure there's public acceptability and secondly that they are designed to be cyber robust. britain hopes to become the go to place for modern car technology, including self driving cars and electric vehicles. the advances are rapid. always staying in front of the hackers, though, will be an equal challenge. joe lynam, bbc news. joining us now from our london
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newsroom is technology writer 0lly mann. good morning. is this a serious threat? why would hackers want to get into ourcars? threat? why would hackers want to get into our cars? it's not necessarily that they want control of our cars. the real doomsday stuff, and it did happen a few years ago, hackers were able to gain control of cars whilst they were on the road. that is the doomsday scenario, but more realistically, as with any other hack, it is about money. like the hack we saw into the nhsafew money. like the hack we saw into the nhs a few months ago, is the same. if someone hacked into your electric
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car, maybe it won't start and would come up with a message then i won't start of lisicki me $2000. if you use the same password for your car as you use your bank, that is valuable information for hackers, which is nothing to do with your car. didn't we also hear about issues with keyless cars and these being relatively easy to steal if you had a particular technique? yes. let us not detail the technique on air, but essentially, with any hack, that uses way to get into a system is to be there and keyless cars give you proximity to the car. if the system uses a usb stick them the best way to get into a network of ca rs best way to get into a network of cars would be to take a you the lee—macro usb stick —— to take a usb
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stick a couple of information. there area stick a couple of information. there are a lot of vulnerabilities, but at least the government are saying to manufacturers, do something about it. it won't resolve the problem, it isa it. it won't resolve the problem, it is a flag to hackers. better to try and establish some principles and at least the industry is aware of it. thank you. it does get you back to the basics of keeping your passwords secure. that's all from us today on breakfast. dan and louise will be back tomorrow from 6am, here on bbc one. until then, whatever you're up to, have a good sunday. bye— bye. this is bbc news. the headlines at nine: shock as usain bolt loses
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to a two—time drugs cheat. as crowds booed, justin gatlin defended his right to compete. i've done so much for the communities back home. i want them to know mistakes can happen. but you can come back and work hard for them. and you know you can be accepted back to your sport. president trump welcomes china and russia's backing for new un sanctions against north korea. a review into the cost of energy is dismissed as "cold comfort" by consumer groups — who say households are already paying too much. also: an exciting line—up on day 3 of the world athletics championships in london, including — katarina johnson—thompson continues in the heptathlon — today sees the final three events, starting with the long
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