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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 7, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the right to be forgotten. social media firms will have to delete your childhood posts if you ask them to. new laws will also ban companies from using pre—selected tick boxes to gather data. good morning, it's monday the 7th of august. also this morning: the body of a man who was reported missing a month ago sparking a huge search has been found at his house. now a police watchdog launch an investigation. good morning from waterloo station. one ofa good morning from waterloo station. one of a number of train stations gci’oss one of a number of train stations across london where delays are likely this august as engineering work starts. all the details
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shortly. and here at the london stadium it was a disappointing night for great britain at these world athletics championships. there was heartbreak for heptathlete katarina johnson—thompson, who was one of those who missed out on a medal. and coming to a street near you, the growing number of bikes you can rent and then leave anywhere when you've finished. and carol has the weather. today a band of rain crossing england and wales, not getting to the far south—east until later and the far south—east until later and the highgate sunshine and showers, the highgate sunshine and showers, the heaviest of which will be in scotland. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. new laws which will give people more control over what happens to their personal data online are to be introduced. the government is billing the changes as the right to be forgotten. people will be able to ask for personal data or material they posted when they were children to be deleted. the bill will also require people to give explicit consent for their information
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to be collected online, rather than firms relying on pre—selected tick boxes. and extra powers will be given to the information watchdog to issue fines of up to 17 million to businesses for breaking the rules. our political correspondent leila nathoo is in our westminster studio this morning. good morning to you. so much interest in the detail, what more can you tell us? louise, this is the government bringing into uk law eu regulations on data protection that are due to come in to force next year. so even though we'll be going through the brexit process, the government has decided these eu regulations are ones it wants to bring into domestic law. as you say, this is all about the use of personal data online, and this gives consumers more power, the government wa nts to re bala nce consumers more power, the government wants to rebalance the power between users of technology and those technology companies. so it's about how we protect our information online. as you say, we have a right
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to ask companies now, strengthening that right to ask companies to delete data they hold fast, making it easier to request from companies what data they hold, this law will do, and these tick boxes we are very used to, automatically giving companies consent, sometimes we don't notice what we are doing, they will be a thing of the past and we will be a thing of the past and we will have to give much more explicit consent for data be used online. labour is saying that they have already made it clear that they want children... people to be able to delete posts they made when they we re delete posts they made when they were under 18, so they are supportive of this. obviously we're waiting for some of the detail but this new bill is expected to be introduced in the commons in the autumn. thanks very much. we will be talking about this through the programme. the police watchdog in scotland is investigating after officers failed to find the body of a 64—year—old man who had been missing for a month. after weeks of searching using police divers, dogs and a helicopter, arnold mouat was found at his home near falkirk.
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andy moore reports. 64—year—old arnold mouat was reported missing by his family on 7july, the day after he'd last been seen in his own home. at the time, police scotland launched an investigation which included a search of that property, but no trace was found of mr mouat. there was also a large—scale search in the area around involving the police helicopter, divers, rescue teams and police dogs. then, yesterday, police confirmed that a body had been found in mr mouat‘s home. there was no explanation of where it was found or in what circumstances. his death is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious. police scotland say they had voluntarily referred the case to the independent watchdog, the police investigations and review commission. that same organisation started an investigation when police scotland failed to respond to an emergency call about a car that had crashed off the m9 near stirling in 2015. lamara bell died in hospital
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after being found in the wreckage three days later. she was discovered alongside her husband, john yuill, who was already dead. one independent review has already identified problems in police call handling. andy moore, bbc news. passangers using britain's busiest railway station have been warned to expect major disruption this month. ten of the 19 platforms at waterloo station will be closed for three weeks. steph is at waterloo station for us. steph, this is going to be a bit of a nightmare, isn't it? yeah, good morning, good morning, everyone, it will be a bad night if you're travelling in and out of london this month as so many do. already this morning you can see people looking at the signs and working out whether their train is running. also i've seen their train is running. also i've seen a their train is running. also i've seen a load of people in hard hats and high—viz, a lot of the people working on this site. waterloo is
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one of the uk's biggest train stations, something like 270,000 journeys are made in and out of this station every day so it's certainly very busy and this is all about improving the station so network rail, who maintain the tracks and some of the stations, are spending £400 million on this one to improve it. what they want to do is to lengthen some of the platforms so we can have longer trains and therefore get more passengers on, because anyone who travels in and out of london will know how busy it can be on the main commuter trains in and out of here. it's about increasing the capacity but it will mean a lot of disruption for people because we also understand this isn'tjust the only train station in london where it's happening, you've also got london bridge and sharyn kross, so there's going to be major delays. i'll be talking to network rail later to find out what it will mean for passengers. —— charring cross.
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more from the in a bit. thanks, steph, we will be there at waterloo station through the morning. good luck to everyone travelling through there! president trump and his south korean counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss north korea's recent missile tests. mr trump said he was happy and impressed with the unanimity at the united nations security council on north korea sanctions. chronic overcrowding in some of europe's top tourist hotspots is fuelling an angry backlash from residents, who say that a sharp rise in visitors is ruining neighbourhoods and making life intolerable. british tourists on board a sightseeing bus in barcelona feared they were being ambushed by terrorists when masked men attacked their open—top bus and slashed its tyres and covered it in graffiti. and we'll be talking about the protests at mass tourism at 7:10am this morning. brazilian police say a british woman has been shot and wounded near rio de janeiro. officials say a couple and their three children were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn. the woman's condition isn't thought
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to be life—threatening. the american sprinter justin gatlin, who won the 100m at the world athletics championships in london, was given a mixed reception yesterday evening at his medal ceremony. some of the crowd booed gatlin who has twice tested positive for drugs in his career. away from all the controversy around his win there was another significant medal ceremony, as natalie pirks reports. gold—medallist and world champion, representing the united states... smattering of boos for the champion, an unfamiliar medal around the neck of the jamaican, after his two doping bans, justin gatlin understandingly was the villain of the peace when he collected his gold for winning the 100 and final. this wasn't what usain bolt had planned,
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of course, but he still not the moment. cheats aren't meant to prosper. today then finally tribute and fourjessica ennis hill. cheated out of gold by a russian doper in 2011. six years she's waited for this upgrade on silver, no wonder she shed a tear. my husband said to me you're not going to cry, you? i said no, no, but i'd forgotten that feeling when you step out in an arena like this and actually hear the crowd cheering for you. from the old generation to the new. katarina johnson—thompson has long been considered britain's hair to ennis—hill's the capital one crown but ina ennis—hill's the capital one crown but in a major championships yet again she had her hopes plummeted. she let herself with too much to do in the final event, the 800 metres. eventually finished fifth overall. disappointment too for holly bradshaw. she had a great chance for
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a medal in the pole vault but after failing at 4.75, the dream was over and the emotion took hold. from gatlin to bowie. by the end of the night the usa had yet another shock 100 and champion. jamaica's darling elaine thompson was left for dust and out of the medals by tory bowie, she timed her run and heard it to perfection. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. and later this morning we'll be speaking to jessica ennis—hill's former coach. that's at 8:20am. that is toni minichiello. yesterday jess said that toni minichiello could help out katarina johnson—thompson on the mental side of things. we will talk to him about that as well as other things too. jeremy clarkson has said he won't be back at work for quite some time after being diagnosed with pneumonia. the former top gear presenter was admitted to hospital in majorca, where he's on holiday with his family.
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he said it was the first time he'd been off sick since he started working in 1978 and thanked fans for all their good wishes. were like to see some racing of a slightly different kind ? were like to see some racing of a slightly different kind? —— would you. the english village of bonsall were host to this rather egg—celent race. the annual world hen racing championships. as you can see competition was tough. after checking out their opponents and a little refuelling it was race time. some hens resorted to foul play but there could only ever be one winner. two if you count trainerjack. fowl play, referee! who won? egbert? a bit of speed at the end and jack was the trainer of the end and jack was the trainer of the winner. i think that is jack. well done, jack. i thinkjack won.
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seems a little disorganised but there he is. not quite like the 100 metres at the start. usain bolt was complaining about his blocks in the early round, maybe there was a block issue! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. let's have a look at the papers quickly. sticking with the athletics, quite a few of the papers have jessica athletics, quite a few of the papers havejessica ennis athletics, quite a few of the papers have jessica ennis hill on athletics, quite a few of the papers havejessica ennis hill on the front cover, she was fighting back the tea rs cover, she was fighting back the tears yesterday. must be an extraordinary moment to be on your own and given your gold. and knowing six years ago in 2011 when she felt she should have won those world championships and tatiana sinn over has since been stripped of that gold sojessica ennis has since been stripped of that gold so jessica ennis hill has since been stripped of that gold sojessica ennis hill is three—time world champion and one—time olympic champion, winning silver in rio last summer as well, the main story nhs abuse of mental patient is endemic, the warning over the use of force over record violence. various things
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on the front page of the daily telegraph, including that picture of jessica ennis hill yesterday, they are talking about the conservative party saying brexit negotiators have been accused of trying to ram through a £36 billion divorce bill while most of the cabinet is on holiday. talking about backlash from ministers and senior eurosceptic conservatives and they are talking about the nhs hiring british nurses. this is a lead story we have after a ban on website tick boxes and the ability to ask companies to remove things that you don't want online. front page of the daily mirror, they have a story with the british model who feared for her life every minute. she was taken abroad and you can read the full story in there. british cops told me there was a plot to kill diana, father's shock claim, henri paul claims uk police
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told him she was murdered. the guardian has this story that a couple of the papers mentioned, what they are calling an ivf postcode lottery, there have been cuts in various areas of england, 13 areas are restricting or stopping ivf treatment for women struggling to conceive since the start of the year. a further eight are consulting on taking similar steps. holland's captain celebrating, holding the euro 2017 trophy. stories from the inside pages, this is the sun, there's the former prime minister mr david cameron, quite easy to spot here with the ring around his head, putting his face in around his head, putting his face in a selfie taken by these two. vanessa price was getting a selfie with her husband, steve, and she later spotted david cameron in the background. this is at the wilderness festival, near the cotswolds, and his wife, sam cam, there. do you choose your holiday
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airport carefully? where you fly from? i try to, not always but i do. they are saying you can spend 14 times more based on your airport. one example, a family of four would pay £2941 to fly from heathrow to pharoah next saturday leaving at 425 4:25am but if you can wait an hour and you get to glasgow the same flight and you get to glasgow the same flight instead of £2941 would be £500. worth shopping around! you could travel first class on a train from euston to glasgow, stay in a 5—star hotel, get a limousine to the airport and still save thousands! the weather. it wasn't looking great yesterday. how was it going to be
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this week is looking unsettled. it will be unsettled. rain at times. showers. sunshine. cool and will be unsettled. rain at times. showers. sunshine. cooland breezy at times. this morning, a weather front going south taking rain with it. later, going to south—west england. as far as dorset. the other side of the country, rain in scotla nd side of the country, rain in scotland in the north. that could be thundery. dry weather for scotland, northern ireland, and northern england. you can expect showers here through the day and in wales. again, they are going through lincolnshire and the wash into norfolk and the midlands and down into the south—west. ahead of that, cloud. the south—east, dry and bright starts. through the day, this weather front will go up. the
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western end of it will. behind that, heavy showers. lighter showers in northern england. temperatures of 14- 21. 23- 24 is northern england. temperatures of 14— 21. 23— 24 is possible with the sunshine in kent and sussex. the athletics today. increasingly, as the weather front goes out, the cloud will build. the risk of rain later in the day in london. through the evening and overnight, this is the evening and overnight, this is the weather front. it will start to retreat north. dry weather around as well. a few showers and clear spells. overnight lows, 10— 15. tomorrow, well, this weatherfront is still with us. pivoting a little bit. low pressure not far away. they shall meet. a wet day in south—eastern england. scotland and northern ireland, sunshine and
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showers. the driest conditions. wet in wales as well. the weather front is pivoting. coming up from the near continent. wet. torrential downpours tomorrow for example in kent and southampton as well. the sunshine, well, it will feel pleasant enough. tuesday into wednesday, we still have that mixture of weather fronts. the rain is pushing down towards the south—east. it is dry behind it for the bulk of the uk with a few showers. temperatures by then, 15— 18. thursday, it is looking more dry for both of us. thank you. we will have more through the morning. birmingham is in danger of sinking in a "sea of rubbish," that's according to one councillor concerned at the backlog of waste that is mounting up on the city's streets. bin collectors are stepping up industrial action by refusing to work every day for two hours
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in a dispute overjob losses. kathryn stanczyszyn is there for us this morning. kathryn, why has this problem escalated? and problem escalated ? we and problem escalated? we can see a little bit of the scale and we can see a little bit of the scale of the problem. good morning. good morning. this has been a timely topic of conversation in birmingham this summer. it is not getting better. this dispute started at the end ofjune. some streets like this one that i am on an quinton have not seen one that i am on an quinton have not seen collections for at least a month. this pile is repeating a few times up the street. as you can see, it looks awful. i can tell you it smells pretty bad as well. and we have just seen a rat run behind. smells pretty bad as well. and we havejust seen a rat run behind. it is causing problems. people here are tearing their hair out. one person is having to take their bin bags to
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work to get rid of them, and one mother says she doesn't want her children playing outside because of the rubbish. it is concerning the city. i spoke to some of yesterday. for this woman, british summertime usually means hoping for hot weather. but not this year. 13- 15. that is because colin's rubbish has not being elected from his house endsjune. not being elected from his house ends june. —— not being elected from his house endsjune. —— collected. high temperatures make it worse. endsjune. —— collected. high temperatures make it worsem endsjune. —— collected. high temperatures make it worse. it is not very good. you are living somewhere in people see bags of rubbish at the front of your house. he is now having to store beanbags in his garden as well. —— bin bags. you see rats and foxes as well. it is disgusting. birmingham city council wants to modernise its waste service, but refuse workers say they
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are facing pay cuts. the collateral damage is visible to all, and it is attracting vermin. as you can see, there are many ripped bags. it is like takeaway, isn't it? one firm has seen a 20% increase in callouts over the past six weeks, and says this could cause public problems. rats carry diseases which are harmful to human beings. so, if a human being was to touch somewhere where a rat has urinated, it could cause a serious disease. people living here are concerned. it is going to get worse. if it gets warmer. . . going to get worse. if it gets warmer... the commonwealth games is coming. it is ridiculous. it is avoidable, the scale of it. there is no organisation for the distribution of this stuff. it doesn't look good. it doesn't smell good. there should
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be industrial action. intense talks continue between the two sides. last week, volunteers took to the streets to help clear up some of the worst areas. but with weeks of action left to go, it seems getting on top of this rubbish could prove difficult. it isa it is a game of cat and mouse between the birmingham city council and the unite members. unite says birmingham is trying to cut pay by £5,000 in some cases. birmingham city council says it is saving £5 million and modernising the area. what of the clean—up operation? birmingham city council says it has had emergency teams out this weekend with agency staff as well. it has cleared two thirds of the backlog. but there are still streets like this. some are saying we will believe it when we see it. quite a
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picture. we will speak to someone from birmingham city council about that. some people are having to keep bins inside their houses. the smell must be terrible. uk soldiers stationed are helping to fight poachers, who are threatening the existence of rare forest elephants in gabon. tens of thousands of elephants have been killed in the west african state of gabon, mostly for their ivory, but now, the british army is sharing tactics to teach gamekeepers how to track and stop the hunters. our defence correspondent, jonathan beale, reports. some of the images may be disturbing. we're travelling through the second—largest rainforest in the world trying to find an animal whose numbers have declined by more than 60% over the last ten years. and this is about as close as you'll ever get to them. forest elephants are wary of humans. we had to turn the engine off and stay silent.
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this close, they can charge. they're much smaller than the better—known savanna elephant, butjust as vulnerable to poachers, who target them for the same reason, their ivory. this is what's been happening to them, another victim to the poachers. 85% of gabon is covered in rainforest that stretches for thousands of square miles. this is the last sanctuary for the elusive forest elephant, but it's also ideal hiding and cover for the poachers who are killing them at an alarming rate. but they're being tracked down. and with the help of the british army. for the first time, we've been allowed to film the small team of uk soldiers who are helping train gabon's national park agency in their fight to save the elephant. gabon has got a real high density
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of forest elephants. that's why it's got a poaching problem. out here, training the gabonese national parks agency to combat that, both at the tactical and operational levels, means that the british army can make a difference in that fight against the illegal wildlife trade. after about 15 minutes... they've even brought in jungle warfare specialists, who, in this exercise, show them how to find and then arrest the poachers. but the british are also teaching them the importance of recovering evidence that might lead to prosecutions. among those being trained are former poachers who have now turned gamekeeper. ulrich says as a boy he used to hunt elephants with his father just to survive. that used to be tolerated, but not anymore. these days, the greatest threat to these elephants is not
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the locals, but criminal gangs who operate across the border. we're faced, you know, with organised crime cartels, you know, heavily armed. and they show no mercy. they come, they kill. and now, we're in a situation where, in most, in many of our national parks, it's a warzone. even with a global ban on the sale of ivory there's still an illegal trade. and hidden away in these forests, these elephants are still easy prey. jonathan beale, bbc news, gabon. it is lovely to see those beautiful animals. there is still plenty to come on breakfast this morning. animals. there is still plenty to come on breakfast this morningm is time for the news, travel, and
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weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. as we've been hearing, there will be major disruption for people using waterloo station from today. that is because of engineering work on the platforms. southwest trains have warned passengers stations such as vauxhall, clapham junction and woking will be "exceptionally busy" as a result. seven other stations will also be closed during the work, including chessington north and south, queenstown road, and earlsfield. a cabbie's shelter and a jewish cemetery are the latest buildings in london to be listed, seventy years after the scheme first started. the shelter in grosvenor gardens, one of only a handful left in london, has been given grade two listed status, as have the funeral buildings at the willesden jewish cemetery. the listings scheme was set up to protect historic buildings in the after many were damaged in the second world war. there are around 19,000 listed buildings in the capital. what's thought to be capital's first
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pub theatre since shakespearean times is moving. the kings head pub in north london has been in its latest location since 1970. stars like alan rickman and joanna lumley once performed there. from next autumn it'll be housed in the £400 million islington square development. it'll seat 250 people. the company's director says it's about keeping the doors open. our history is wonderful and this building holds a lot of memories for a lot of people. but it is not sustainable. and the truth is that this move means the kings head theatre will survive. we are gaining something that most theatres won't get, ourfuture something that most theatres won't get, our future back. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the m25 is busy anti—clockwise at the dartford tunnel after a lorry broke down in one of the tunnels earlier. in greenwich, creek road is closed for emergency gas works between the greenwich market and welland street. the a1 in the city is closed southbound at the barbican for roadworks. and in kidbrooke, kidbrooke park road is closed at the a2. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. any brightness this
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morning is going to be fairly short—lived. cloud is increasing as we go through the day. a grey day generally. patchy rain as well coming through. fairly patchy and quite light for the most part. we won't all see all of it. the further south and east, the more chance you have of seeing it and having a cloudy day. temperatures getting up to possibly 23 degrees celsius. quite warm in any brightness. heading through the night, that rain is trying to clear. temperatures getting to 14 degrees. clear skies the further is to why. cloudier the further west. —— furthest east. temperatures getting to 20 degrees. we start with a cooler period for the next few days. fairly changeable as well for the week ahead. wednesday is looking like a wet day
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once more. thursday, improving, brighter and drier. some sunshine around. friday is similar. until then, a lot of wet weather around and temperatures always in the high teens and low 20s, so it will need that bit cooler. summer is definitely hiding. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's monday the 7th of august. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment. and coming up today: uberfor bikes. they are supposed to transform our streets into clean and safe places, we'll ask if cycle—share schemes are being taken for a ride by vandals and thieves? would you swap a chocolate chip cookie for one made with crickets? we'll meet the couple on a mission to get more of us eating grub made from bugs. stories of strength and survival. the 10—year—old girl on the mission of a lifetime to find out
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what happened to her family during the partition of india 70 years ago. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. social media firms will soon have to delete information about their users when asked to do so under new proposals announced by the government. the data protection bill, which will go before parliament in the autumn, will also forbid companies from using pre—selected tick boxes to gather information and will give the information watchdog powers to issue fines of up to 17 million. the police watchdog in scotland is investigating why it took over a month to find the body of a man in his own home. divers, sniffer dogs and a helicopter were used ina high profile search operation to find anold mouat from bo'ness after his family reported him missing july. police scotland reported finding his body at home yesterday. thousands of commuters will have theirjourneys disrupted today because of major improvement work at britain's busiest railway station, waterloo in london.
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more than half of its platforms are closed so they can be extended to accommodate longer trains. network rail has warned of challenging days ahead for passengers. steph is at waterloo for us through the morning and we will be back with her very shortly. president trump and his south korean counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss north korea's recent missile tests. mr trump said he was happy and impressed with the agreement at the united nations security council on north korea sanctions. chronic overcrowding in some of europe's top tourist hotspots is fuelling an angry backlash from residents, who say that a sharp rise in visitors is ruining neighbourhoods and making life intolerable. british tourists on board a sightseeing bus in barcelona feared they were being ambushed by terrorists when masked men attacked their open—top bus and slashed its tyres and covered it in graffiti. brazilian police say a british woman has been shot and wounded near rio de janeiro.
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officials say a couple and their three children were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn. the woman's condition isn't thought to be life—threatening. all the sport with jessica, who all the sport withjessica, who is at the london stadium very shortly. she'll be telling us about last night, the medal ceremony. the american sprinter justin gatlin who won the 100m at the world athletics championships in london received a mixed reception from the crowd. fantastic night forjessica ennis hill, who is now a three—time world champion because she got a gold from day to in 2011 when she got the silver and tatiana genova got gold. —— daegu. we will be talking with her coach about that and plenty of other things later. jeremy clarkson has said he won't be back at work for quite some time after being diagnosed with pneumonia.
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the former top gear presenter was admitted to hospital in majorca, where he's on holiday with his family. he said it was the first time he'd been off sick since he started working in 1978 and thanked fans for all their good wishes. have a look at this! a brown bear has had a flipping good time after it entered an elderly woman's home in romania and ate a stack of pancakes straight from her table. it's one of a handful of hungry bears leaving the mountains for harghita, a county in central romania, to scavenge forfood in local bins, gardens and homes. experts say the bears won't attack unless provoked. i had ihada i had a friend working in south africa once, he woke up in the middle of the night and a massive baboon was in his hotel room, it opened the patio window. he just lay perfectly still in his bedroom. the baboon was looking around for food. found a bar of chocolate in his
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suitcase and sat there at the end of the bed, ate the entire bar of chocolate, and then they had a staring match and then jumped back out of the window. extraordinary! if you have any animal based stories, hopefully with a happy ending, just like that, let us know. let's speak to jess who is at the london stadium for us ahead of day four of the world athletics championships. so much to talk about, where should we start? good morning, no animals here but a few birds. what a day yesterday. a bit disappointing for the brits. the world at have stood up the brits. the world at have stood up at the world championships and they have made their mark, yesterday it was an opportunity for the british athletes to impress in front of this incredible home support but actually they just fell short and it was quite a disappointing day. in
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the heptathlon katarina johnson—thompson was touted to win a medal but she could only finish fifth. johnson thompson had plenty of work to do after a poor highjump on saturday but performed admirably in the three events yesterday, finishing second in her 800 metres heat. but she'd ultimately left herself too far behind. the olympic champion, belgium's nafi thiam, won gold. i feel like i've got a lot of talent to show and i feel like one of these days it will happen for me. i felt like it's the second event and i knew it was always going to be difficult bouncing back. ifeel like i've done a good job trying to find myself normally, now i feel a bit defeatist but i've tried to change my attitude a bit and i feel like i've come back and showed even though i've had a difficult time in the second event, i'm a fighter. kjt wasn't the only one to miss out. pole vaulter holly bradshaw finished sixth in herfinal. she failed to get over with the bar set at 4.75m. she had the height but her knee caught the bar on the way down.
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huge disappointment for her. better news in the men's marathon, where callum hawkins equalled the best performance by a british athlete at a world championships by finishing fourth. the 25—year—old scot missed out on the medals but clocked an impressive personal best time of 2:10:17. and we'll be speaking to callum later here on bbc breakfast. there was drama in the final of the women's100m, no british interest in this one but for the second night running, an american athlete surprised the jamaican favourite in the race. this time it was tori bowie, who produced a powerful finish to claim gold by one hundredth of a second. jamaican favourite the olympic champion elaine thompson could only finish fifth. we were talking yesterday about
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justin gatlin obviously becoming the world 100 and champion here. now, it was right here that the various medal ceremonies were held yesterday. there was debate about whether he would be booed by the crowd. let's ta ke would be booed by the crowd. let's take a look. world champion, representing the united states of america, justin gatlin! booing yes, there were some boos but it i reckon it was more of a mixed reception for gatlin from the london crowd last night. lord coe, who presented him with the medal, had earlier said that the two—time drugs cheat beating usain bolt was not the perfect script. there was a bigger cheer forjessica ennis—hill, though. she received her gold from the 2011 games after the athlete that had beaten her was found to have doped.
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it's great to be honest, it couldn't have been a better time to receive the medal other than at the time. so, yeah, i'm very thankful it's been here and i've been able to say bye— bye been here and i've been able to say bye — bye for been here and i've been able to say bye—bye for one last time. i felt like i haven't forgot an ounce of feeling about how it felt five years ago stepping out into the stadium, but actually i had kind of forgotten that feeling a little bit and actually standing here and hearing the crowd again, itjust brought it all flooding back and that's why it's so emotional. england will be looking to wrap up the fourth test and a series win against south africa this morning. (00v) they'll resume on 224 for eight in their second innings, leading by 360 runs. it was thanks largely to some late big hitting from moeen ali, who even managed to pick out
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teammate jonny bairstow on the balcony during his innings! arsenal won the fa community shield for the 15th time by beating chelsea 4—1 on penalties at wembley. chelsea took the lead early in the second half but gunners new signing sead kolasinac equalised with ten minutes left to take the match to penalties. chelsea missed twice before olivier giroud struck the winning spot kick for the fa cup holders. rangers started their scottish premiership season beating motherwell 2—1 and aberdeen won 2—0. double olympic silver—medallist jonathan brownlee could only finish fourth at the montreal leg of the world triathlon series. he struggled on the run in canada as spain's javier gomez took the win. jonny brownlee of course, one of the
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stars at london 2012, dan. i want to say, the medals haven't really so far been coming in for great britain, they have a target of six to eight and they've only won one so far so it's hard to see where they're going to come from. thanks for the moment. what else have we got to look forward to today, no morning session in the stadium today? there isn't but i'm very excited to see what sophie hitchen can do, she is the hammer thrower and can you imagine, she used to be able ballerina. the nets are off at the moment but this large structure with the purple polls will be the hammer. the nets go around the outside and if you've seen the hammer, incredible sport, they spin at 360 degrees at such speed and then they released the hammer to the field as you can see and sophie hitchon will hopefully be in the
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medals. we don't know yet, we will have to see how she gets on. she comes on to the field a bit later this evening and it will be interesting to see how she gets on. you can see how the ballet helps! experiment, see you later! ellie doyle and also laura milne and lori wakeman in action, a busy evening but no morning section. a bit of switching tonight between bbc one and bbc two. i don't mind when that happens. i go with the switching! in the future, social media firms will be forced to delete information about you, if you ask them, it is part of a raft of new measures aimed at giving people a greater "right to be forgotten" online. from next may, the data protection bill, should make it simpler for people to control how companies use and store their personal details. brian lord is the former deputy director of intelligence and cyber operations at gchq, the government listening station. hejoins us from our bristol newsroom.
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good morning. good morning. can i ask first up how these measures will be put into practice? the devil is always the detail with these kinds of things. in effect what we have is a regulation which starts to try to control two things, one is how our data is used and how our data is stored and protected. i think the principle of this regulation is sound. i think what we need to be able to do is look at the detail of how it's going to happen because i think there are a lot of pitfalls ahead if actually the benefit of this, which is people feeling far more comfortable transacting online, and their data will be protected, i think it's a good first step to have the regulation in place, the implementation is the key thing. can i try to run through an example to give people a clear idea. let's say i posted something on facebook when i was 16 that i wanted to take down because i thought it was detrimental
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to getting a job and i didn't want others to see that, can i apply to facebook and ask for it to be removed and they have to do it? you can and underthe removed and they have to do it? you can and under the principles of the data protection regulation, they will have to do that. that's a great example, but of course what we also have to check is what has facebook, to take the example, done with that picture before hand ? to take the example, done with that picture beforehand? has it given that information to anyone else, sold it to anyone else, can it track that information and track the flow of that information all the way through? on the flipside there has to bea through? on the flipside there has to be a recognition about how you have protected that photograph, have you put privacy settings around it or have you allowed any random person to copy it and put it across the internet. this is what i mean about the detail. how do we make people safe online without having expectations of a service which is just totally impractical? these new
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measures are pa rt just totally impractical? these new measures are part of eu regulations that are filtering down. is this all addressing a growing issue, are these coming into force because people are saying i want to do this andi people are saying i want to do this and i can't at the moment? what's happening here is as we've seen we've had an explosion of technology, we as the public, and the industry, have increased that technology at speed. it's only now that the risks associated with that are coming to light and this regulation is a way of trying to balance that risk in a way that i've always said let's try to normalise some of the risks online. these are the measures coming into place next year which are supposed to recalibrate some of that. will those companies play ball?|j think they will. this is the direction of travel. the largest ones are starting to, as we have
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seen ones are starting to, as we have seen with the posting of terrorist material. i think, seen with the posting of terrorist material. ithink, in seen with the posting of terrorist material. i think, in the end, they will. as with all things, the solution will never be perfect. what we need to do is get the social media companies in this example to start moving towards slightly more social responsibility. we as the public need to recognise the solution is never as straightforward as it can be, but it can certainly be better than it is now. thank you very much. it is good to talk to you. everyone watching will have there own views about what they want to have removed, for example. there own views about what they want to have removed, for examplem makes me thankful social media was not around when i grew up. extremely thankful in many ways. we will not go into them. everything is out there, isn't it? photographs and everything. it is so hard to be a child these days. send us your thoughts. and the weather. good
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morning. you are showers. some will be heavy. cool and breezy. the driest day will be thursday. for some of us, wednesday. a weather front at the moment moving slowly south. in doing so, later in the day it will go up. rain in the far north of scotland. aberdeenshire, heavy and thundery showers. at the moment, dry weather would showers in the west. northern england and northern ireland scene showers. wales, cloud around with showers. wales, cloud around with showers. this is the weather front extending towards the wash and south west england. cloud is wielding ahead of that. the driest conditions will be in the far south—east. the
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weather front goes south—east. it is going up across the midlands and the isles of scilly. then it goes across the midlands. behind that, sunshine and showers. the heaviest will be in scotla nd and showers. the heaviest will be in scotland and northern ireland. the athletics. we are looking at the afternoon. it should be dry early in the afternoon. the cloud is thickening as the weather front goes south. the odd bit of rain coming out of that later. than the rain goes north through the night. —— then. mist and fog in the south—west. showers in the north—west of scotland and northern ireland. that brings us to tomorrow. the weather front pivots in the direction of the south—east. a weather front coming up from the near continent. labelled meat and it will be a wet day in central and
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southern england and the south—east corner. “— southern england and the south—east corner. —— they will meet. torrential downpours in parts of kent heading towards hampshire and east anglia. north of that, scotland and northern ireland, sunshine and showers. more heavy rain the next day on wednesday. surface water issues without. the bulk of the uk, it is dry. —— with that. what is striking is that weather is different to europe. absolutely different. they have had extremely high temperatures in southern europe. temperatures into the 40s and even mid— 40s for some. droughts in italy. water rationing. in the next few days, temperatures in europe will come down a bit. it will still be hot and humid, but not as much as it has been. i was not prepared for wet weather this morning when i left the house. you
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weren't? i had to go back in for a coat. thousands of dockless bikes have appeared up and down the country over the past few months. they are located using a mobile app, and can be unlocked and hired for as little as 50p. i was cycling around the office.|j heard you were quite reckless. but not all of them are staying on the road. police in manchester say some have been dumped in canals, bins and hedges, in bristol, one company says around 100 of their bicycles have been vandalised. so, is cycle—sharing and similar schemes really the future of getting around ? fiona lamdin reports. communal cycling in our capital is a common sight. but now thousands of dockless bicycles that can be parked anywhere are appearing on our streets. i have come to bristol because this is the first place in the country to have dockless b i cycles. the country to have dockless bicycles. i have downloaded the app
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and as you can see there 100 is available right now the big we will find the nearest one. just around the corner, as promised, it is waiting for me. with the app i scan the barcode, the bicycle is unlocked, i am the barcode, the bicycle is unlocked, iam ready the barcode, the bicycle is unlocked, i am ready to go. they arrived three months ago and already the take—up is quite promising. they get written 1500 times a day. we are the first dockless bike sharing initiative in the uk. there are some problems. one in eight have been vandalised. and some are found with wheels missing. are people looking after them? most are doing well but we have had issues. about 900 cases so we have had issues. about 900 cases so far. it is a decent car.
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automatic. it is notjust bicycles we are sharing. this man has 28 ca rs. we are sharing. this man has 28 cars. today he is giving one of them to will. i don't use them very often. when i do need one, it makes sense to use one someone else often. when i do need one, it makes sense to use one someone else is not using. i had an injury and i could not walk. so why was sitting at home thinking i have two family cars in my driveway and they are not being used. i put them on a platform on the internet gold hirecar and both of them were rented out. —— cold. one day i gave it out and we had none and my wife needed one. we bought a new one and i rented that out as well. bot like the bicycles, one of them has been damaged. out as well. bot like the bicycles, one of them has been damagedlj out as well. bot like the bicycles, one of them has been damaged. i said please be careful. later he sent me a picture and said i have had an
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accident. —— one hour. he said it was heartbreaking. many people are hiring out cars for as little as £15 a day. in 15- 20 years' time, it will be abnormal to have your own car. the cost ofjourneys will come down substantially as we go towards a future where cars are autonomous, electric, and shared. not everyone agrees this is the only way forward for the future of transport. we need to recognise human behaviour in all of this. a lot of people like to own things and they will want to carry on owning things into the future. pa rt on owning things into the future. part of the future, not all of it. but with hundreds more rolling into our cities each month, it looks like dockless bikes will be on our roads for the foreseeable future. we have one in the studio. i promise not to writers around the studio. —— ride
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it around the. and this is a quick look at some of the key moments in the athletics ahead. there is no morning session today. we start with a former ballet dancer, sophie hitchon, who got bronze in rio last summer in the hammer throw. she is up at 7am. next is the former european champion and two—time commonwealth silver—medallist, a lay doyle. she goesin silver—medallist, a lay doyle. she goes in the 400 metre hurdles at 730. finally, the two lauras are in the final. laura muir qualified second in her semi—final and is going for the 5000 double. if you wa nt to going for the 5000 double. if you want to keep up with the action, go
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to bbc two first, then one, then two for the final half—hour of the coverage. to bbc two first, then one, then two for the final half—hour of the coverage. that to bbc two first, then one, then two for the final half—hour of the coverage. that was to bbc two first, then one, then two for the final half—hour of the coverage. that was a to bbc two first, then one, then two for the final half—hour of the coverage. that was a bit to bbc two first, then one, then two for the final half—hour of the coverage. that was a bit of to bbc two first, then one, then two for the final half—hour of the coverage. that was a bit of channel hopping. and now for another type of hopping. and now for another type of hopping. bugs. eating them. similar to beef and chicken. it makes you feel squeamish. i have some for you. thank you so much. what would you like? cricket powder. cricket cookies that look like they are made of raisins. this is a biscuit. it has crickets and it. this smells a bit like a pet shop.
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-- in it. we are talking about this because we have guests on later who say this is the future of food. because we have guests on later who say this is the future of foodm is time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. we will be back with the headlines at 7am. good morning from bbc london news. i am victoria hollins. as we've been hearing, there will be major disruption for people using waterloo station from today. that is because of engineering work on the platforms. southwest trains have warned passengers stations such as vauxhall, clapham junction and woking will be "exceptionally busy" as a result. seven other stations will also be closed during the work, including chessington north and south, queenstown road, and earlsfield. a cabbie's shelter and a jewish cemetery are the latest buildings in london to be listed, 70 years after the scheme first started. the shelter in grosvenor gardens, one of only a handful left in london, has been given grade two listed status, as have the funeral buildings at the willesden jewish cemetery. the listings scheme was set up to protect historic buildings in the after many were damaged
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in the second world war. there are around 19,000 listed buildings in the capital. what's thought to be capital's first pub theatre since shakespearean times is moving. the kings head pub in north london has been in its latest location since 1970. stars like alan rickman and joanna lumley once performed there. from next autumn it'll be housed in the £400 million islington square development. it'll seat 250 people. the company's director says it's about keeping the doors open. our history is wonderful and this building holds a lot of memories for a lot of people. but it's not sustainable. and the truth is that this move means the kings head theatre will survive. we're gaining something that theatres don't get, which is we're gaining sustainability and we're gaining ourfuture back. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but on the london overgropund, there is no service romford
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to upminster because of a faulty train. the m25 is busy anti—clockwise at the dartford tunnel after a lorry broke down in one of the tunnels earlier. in greenwich, creek road is closed for emergency gas works between the greenwich market and welland street. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. well, any brightness this morning is going to be fairly short—lived. that's because cloud is increasing as we go through the day. a grey day generally. a bit of patchy rain as well coming through. it is going to be fairly patchy and quite light for the most part. we won't all see that. the further south and east, the more chance you have of seeing it and just having a cloudy day. temperatures getting up to possibly 23 degrees celsius. quite warm in any brightness. heading through the night, that rain is trying to clear. temperatures getting to 13—14 degrees. clear skies the further east you are. cloudier the further west. temperatures getting to 20 degrees. we start with a cooler period
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for the next few days. fairly changeable as well for the week ahead. wednesday is looking like a wet day once more. thursday, an improving picture, brighter and drier. some sunshine around. friday is similar. until then, a lot of wet weather around and temperatures always in the high teens and low 20s, so it will be that bit cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the breakfast sofa. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin.
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the right to be forgotten. social media firms will have to delete your childhood posts if you ask them to. new laws will also ban companies from using pre—selected tick boxes to gather data. good morning, it is monday 7 august. also this morning: the body of a man who was reported missing a month ago, sparking a huge search, has been found at his house. now, the police watchdog launches an investigation. good morning from waterloo station. the number of train stations across
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london which will be facing major disruption this summer, as engineering work takes place. i will have all the details shortly. here at the london stadium — two ceremonies, two very different champions. boos again forjustin gatlin at the 100m medal ceremony, but warm applause for jessica ennis—hill, as she received her retrospective medal from six years ago. and i am in birmingham, where an ongoing dispute to refuse workers and the city council is starting to lead to concerns over public health. and carol has the weather. good morning. we have got a weather front crossing us today, particularly across england and wales, taking some rain with it. kind that some brighter skies but also some showers, some of which will be heavy and thundery, especially across scotland and northern ireland. but i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: new laws which will give people more control
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over what happens to their personal data online are to be introduced. the government is billing the changes as the right to be forgotten. people will be able to ask for personal data or material they posted when they were children to be deleted. the bill will also require people to give explicit consent for their information to be collected online, rather than firms relying on pre—selected tick boxes, and extra powers will be given to the information watchdog to issue fines of up to £17 million to businesses for breaking the rules. our political correspondent leila nathoo is in our westminster studio this morning. good morning to you. thank you so much forjoining us. the figures, really, the interesting thing will be the details. what more do we know? this is a law which is due to go before parliament in the autumn, but it is based on eu regulations that were already due to come into force next year, and this bill is
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designed to bring those eu regulations into uk law, to provide continuity after brexit. so as you say, they are sweeping new powers for consumers, really, this right to be forgotten, the right to ask tech companies to delete information that they hold on you, the right to know what information they do actually hold on you. and as you say, these tick boxes which we are very used to seeing, we gloss over them, we don't even realise they are there, they will be a thing of the past and you will be a thing of the past and you will have to give your exquisite consent to hand over your information. and the definition of personal information will be expanded under these proposals to include things like ip addresses —— explicit consent. so it is a reshaping of the rights that we as users of tech companies have but the details will be worked out when this bill comes before parliament in the autumn. new laws which will give people more control over what happens to their personal data online are to be introduced.
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the police watchdog in scotland is investigating after officers failed to find the body of a 64—year—old man who had been missing for a month. after weeks of searching, using police divers, dogs, volunteers, and a helicopter, arnold mouat was found at his home near falkirk. andy moore reports. 64—year—old arnold mouat was reported missing by his family on 7july, the day after he had last been seen in his own home. at the time, police scotland launched an investigation, which included a search of that property, but no trace was found of mr mouat. there was also a large—scale search in the area around, involving the police helicopter, divers, mountain rescue teams and police dogs. then, yesterday, police confirmed that a body had been found in mr mouat‘s home. there was no explanation of where it was found, or in what circumstances. his death is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious. police scotland say they had voluntarily referred the case to the independent watchdog, the police investigations and review commissioner. that same organisation started an investigation when police scotland failed to respond to an emergency call about a car
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that had crashed off the m9 near stirling in 2015. lamara bell died in hospital after being found in the wreckage three days later. she was discovered alongside her husband, john yuill, who was already dead. one independent review has already identified problems in police call handling. andy moore, bbc news. passengers using britain's busiest railway station have been warned to expect major disruption this month. ten of the 19 platforms at waterloo station will be closed for three weeks. steph is at waterloo station for us. you have a few passengers behind you, as you would expect, but it will be a nightmare for passengers. yes, it is. good morning everybody. it will be a nightmare for everyone travelling out of london through august. as you can see, already a
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lot of people here. lots of engineers beyond the gates working on the platforms. this is one of the busiest train stations in the uk. there is something like 270,000 journeys made in and out of this station every day, so this is all about improving things for passengers. so network rail, who maintain the rail lines and run some of the stations, they are spending £400 million on this one to improve it. so as i say there are about 1000 engineers working on this project every single day, up to the 28th of august, and what they are trying to do is to increase the capacity here. so they are making the platforms longer in the hope they can have longer in the hope they can have longer trains so there will be more space for passengers and more seats as well. it is a big project. it is going to cause disruption. i don't know if you can read the science behind me but they are saying about these platforms being closed. lots of people turning up and wondering where they will get their trains from. they say it will impact about
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1496 from. they say it will impact about 14% of the trains from here. it is not just this station. 14% of the trains from here. it is notjust this station. there is also charrington ‘s and london bridge, where you will see significant disruption —— charing cross. i will be talking to them a bit later on in the programme to find out what it will mean for passengers. more from me in will mean for passengers. more from meina will mean for passengers. more from me in a bit. and we shall be back at waterloo a little bit later on in the programme. it will be one of those months, i think. the programme. it will be one of those months, ithink. if the programme. it will be one of those months, i think. if you are preparing to travel, at least there is an early warning that they will be disruption. i suppose at least it is august, that is why they are trying to do it now. president trump and his south korean counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss north korea's recent missile tests. mr trump said he was happy and impressed with the agreement at the united nations security council on north korea sanctions. brazilian police say a british woman has been shot and wounded near rio de janeiro. officials say a couple and their three children were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn. the woman's condition isn't thought to be life—threatening.
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the american sprinter justin gatlin, who won the 100m at the world athletics championships in london, was given a mixed reception yesterday evening at his medal ceremony. some of the crowd booed gatlin, who has twice tested positive for drugs in his career. away from all the controversy around his win, there was another significant medal ceremony, as natalie pirks reports. announcer: gold-medallist and world champion, representing the united states... a smattering of boos for the champion. an unfamiliar medal around the neck of the jamaican. after his two doping bans, justin gatlin understandably was the villain of the piece when he collected his gold for winning the 100m final. this wasn't what usain bolt had planned, of course, but he still milked the moment. cheats aren't meant to prosper. today then, finally, retribution forjessica ennis—hill, cheated out of gold
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by a russian doper in 2011. six years she has waited for this upgrade on silver. no wonder she shed a tear. my husband said to me, "you're not going to cry, are you?" i said, "no, no." but i'd forgotten that feeling, when you step out in an arena like this, and actually hear the crowd cheering for you. from the old generation to the new, katarina johnson—thompson has long been considered britain's heir to ennis—hill's heptathlon crown. but yet again, in a major championships, her hopes plummeted. despite a season's—best in the javelin, she had left herself far too much to do in the final event, the 800m. eventually, she finished fifth overall. there was disappointment too for holly bradshaw. she had a great chance for a medal in the pole vault, but after failing at 4.75m, the dream was over and the emotion took hold. from gatlin to bowie,
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by the end of the night, the usa had yet another shock 100m champion. jamaica's darling elaine thompson was left for dust and out of the medals by tori bowie. she timed her run and her dip to perfection. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. this is the view of the london stadium this morning, host to the world athletics championships. and a little later this morning we will be speaking to jessica ennis—hill's former coach. that is at 8:20am. he knows a little bit about virtually every single field event, and we will be speaking to him a little later on. the village of bonsall were host to this rather egg—celent race — the annual world hen racing championships. as you can see, competition was tough. they absolutely go off at quite some
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pace here. there was all sorts happening as they tried to convince their hands to move a little faster than they were currently. these two we re than they were currently. these two were disqualified, i have been reliably informed, for fighting were disqualified, i have been reliably informed, forfighting —— hens. and some of the names you could see that,, egg—wina, all sorts of funds. what a moment forjack, the winner of the world hen racing championships. chronic overcrowding in some of europe's top tourist hotspots is fuelling an angry backlash from residents, who say that a sharp rise
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in visitors is ruining neighbourhoods and making life intolerable. there have been a series of protests in spain. more than 75 million people visited the country last year, a record number. the most serious trouble was in barcelona. in one incident, masked protestors attacked a tourist bus and daubed "tourism kills neighbourhoods" on it. some locals claim that uncontrolled visitor numbers are ruining neighbourhoods, forcing up rents because landlords can make more money from tourists. spanish officials insist visitors are still welcome. and it is notjust spain where tourist numbers are causing problems. in italy, rome is considering restricting access to certain parts of the city, including the trevi fountain, and dubrovnik is planning to restrict the number of cruise ships that can visit the croatian city. victoria is from the association of british travel agents. thank you for joining us. let's talk specifically about what is going on in spain and
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this incident in a tourist bus sounds very frightening for people there. what do you make of what is going on? yes, well, clearly they have used very intimidating tactics in the spanish authorities have come out and condemned those. the first thing to say is we support condemnation of the use of these kinds of intimidating tactics. it is clearly a protest, and we have seen protest in this country, anticapitalist protest in this country in the last few years, and the advice, first and foremost, if you are out there, is to be wary of any sort of demonstrations of that nature. and you know, be vigilant. we know that the foreign office have actually not change their travel advice, so that is the other important thing to just keep an eye on. and you arrive in the city, you have been looking forward to visit, and you see tourists go home, you are not welcome. it changes the tone of your holiday, doesn't it? yes,
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well, it is a nice thing to see. it is is important to put this in context, clearly the overwhelming majority of spanish people, this is a group as i understand that of 20 people who protested in barcelona. tourism is very important to countries like spain, and it has been for many, many years, and tourists in general are made to feel very, very welcome. clearly it is important that the government gets on top of it. interesting that some people are talking about the shift from booked holidays to people, for example, finding a place to stay on the internet, just peer to peer. is there a change, do you think, in the nature of tourism? there are certainly greater challenges. the number—1 challenge is that no one really knows the volumes of people coming in. if you think about it, in the past you could have numbers of people, hotel beds, you would understand the volumes. at the moment it is virtually impossible for people in major cities to understand the volumes, and that is why we are seeing protests in other countries as well. we also know there are issues about pushing out
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local residents. if you are living and working in a city and people can make more money out of subletting their home, then that clearly is an issue. in cities where they have got a really strong tourism product, if you like, it is really important they do get on top of that, because it will ultimately have a damaging impact on the destination, unless people prop lee understand the impacts that that is having. would it be sensible for them to restrict numbers able to see the trevi fountain? we just need the government to have a better understanding of tourism. it is not in any one's interest for that destination, that city, sights and visits, to be restricted to people. while they are not fully understanding what is going on, the reality is, there is inconsistency around the way these companies are
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licensed and regulated. hotels are licensed and regulated. hotels are licensed and regulated. hotels are licensed and regulated. understanding has not kept pace. these are the things the government and local authorities in these destinations need to get on top of. another thing to talk about. long delays at european airports because of these changes. will that continued? feedback from people on the ground is that the delays at the moment, they are long, but actually, it is the biggest and busiest time of the year, the start of the summer. people are going on holidays that you can expect long queues. the advice is leave some extra time. you don't want to go hours and hours earlier, as you will be stuck, but
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leave some time. it is a busy time of year. what happens is people miss their flights because of long delays? we have seen a few on packaged tours of people missing flights. operators will get you there in plenty of time. it is on your shoulders to do that. you don't have rights if you miss your flight. it is important you leave plenty of time to arrive at the airport and check—in with plenty of time. time to arrive at the airport and check-in with plenty of time. thank you very much. a mixed weather picture across the uk. live pictures from the bbc helicopter. is it really a bbc helicopter? we will claim it as that anyway. this is the south of england. i don't know exactly where it is. it set off from brighton on its way to waterloo so i guess that must be sussex. let us know. it
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might be woking. good morning, woking. here is the weather. carol has beat the helicopter. woking. here is the weather. carol has beat the helicopterlj woking. here is the weather. carol has beat the helicopter. i have a nice picture to show you, but nothing like that. this is what the weather will do this week. another u nsettled weather will do this week. another unsettled week. rain and showers at times. sunshine at times as well. cool and breezy. at the moment, we have a weather front going south across england and wales. a bit of rain overnight fragment in at the moment that will get up later on. a front in the north of scotland producing rain. later in aberdeenshire, showers. showers in the west this morning. dry weather as well. northern ireland and england, bright spells and sunny spells and a few showers. cloud for wales, yorkshire, the weatherfront,
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producing rain and drizzle. ahead of that, the cloud is building. sunshine in the far south—east of england. through the day, that front goes south, pipping up in the south—western flank so be it is the far south—east that has the brightest conditions. scotland, northern ireland, sunshine. light winds. feeling pleasant. a few showers. the heaviest of which will be in scotland. the athletics taking place today to be the weather front is coming south. the cloud will continue to build. in the afternoon, we have a risk of rain. through the evening this front will be in southern counties. then it goes north through the night. dry weather behind that and ahead of that. a peppering of showers. mist and fog in the south—west. that will clear tomorrow morning. this is the weather front producing rain lifting towards the south—east again. low
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pressure coming up from the near continent means that will bring in heavy showers. they will meet. rain in the morning 1st thing. showers. torrential downpours in east anglia and into hampshire, not forgetting tend. rain moving through the midlands and wales. northern england, scotland, northern ireland, backin england, scotland, northern ireland, back in the sunshine and showers. heading into wednesday, more heavy rain in the south—eastern corner heading towards the channel islands. that could lead to surface water issues. something to bear in mind. north of that, bright skies again with sunshine. just a few showers. we were talking last week about what is happening in other parts of europe. as you can see, yesterday was still hot. 43. today, temperatures are coming down a little bit, retreating towards greece, turkey, and the middle east. they are still high. we have lost a
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few warnings. bear in mind, it is still hot and humid. showers around. torrential showers. clearing. still hot and humid. showers around. torrentialshowers. clearing. for ourselves towards the end of the week, after a dry day on thursday, sunshine and showers on friday with some rain. the temperatures in europe are something, aren't they? why are you eating a banana? we were talking about eating bugs earlier. it isa talking about eating bugs earlier. it is a source of protein. it could be better for the environment. it is a source of protein. it could be betterfor the environment. i it is a source of protein. it could be better for the environment. i ate a cricket. well... i smell a bit like a pet shop. i have to tell you, the taste has remained in my mouth area for quite some time. i said i would it anything. you are not being
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a good advert for eating crickets. you will do used to it. what is the word i am looking for? in the interests of the environment... that is what i am looking for... i will continue to eat it. i am on my nice cup of tea. the thing is, i was going to try one, but you are putting me off. and now we will talk about rubbish. birmingham is in danger of sinking in a "sea of rubbish," that's according to one councillor concerned at the backlog of waste that is mounting up on the city's streets. bin collectors are stepping up industrial action by refusing to work every day for two hours in a dispute overjob losses. kathryn stanczyszyn is there for us this morning. kathryn, why has this problem escalated? we are getting a sense of how bad it is and what is going on. good morning. there is no such thing as
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bin day in birmingham any more. you put your rubbish outside and it is collected whenever. i am in quinton. there are huge amounts of bin bags up there are huge amounts of bin bags up and down the street. it smells bad and temperatures aren't even that high. i have seen one rat and i don't want to see another one. a man told me he cannot open this windows. it is concern over this that the public is now worried about, public health. for this woman, british summertime usually means hoping for some hot weather. but not this year. 13—14—15 bags. that is because colin's rubbish has not being elected that is because colin's rubbish has not being collected from his house sincejune.
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high temperatures would make it worse. it is not very good. you are living somewhere and people see bags of rubbish at the front of your house. he is now having to store bin bags in his back garden as well. you see rats and foxes as well. cats rip the bags up. there are actually maggots. i know that from seeing them myself. it is disgusting. birmingham city council wants to modernise its waste service, but refuse workers say they are facing pay cuts. the collateral damage is visible to all, and it is attracting vermin. as you can see, there are many ripped bags here. it is like takeaway, isn't it? one firm has seen a 20% increase in callouts over the past six weeks, and says this could cause public problems. rats carry many diseases which are harmful to human beings. it is carried in their urine.
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so, if a human being was to touch a bag where where a rat has urinated, it could cause a serious disease. people living here are concerned. residents here are concerned. it is going to get worse. if it gets warmer... we are bidding for the commonwealth games. it is ridiculous. it is avoidable, the scale of it. there is nojustification for this stuff. it doesn't look good. it doesn't smell good. there should be industrial action. intense talks continue between the two sides. last week, volunteers took to the streets to help clear up some of the worst areas. but with weeks of action left to go, it seems getting on top of this rubbish could prove difficult. the latest from united, the union, is there were open talks last week but there are two sticking points,
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such as pay grading. they say they are facing a £5,000 pay drop. birmingham city council says there are nojob birmingham city council says there are no job losses and they will offer people jobs elsewhere. they say they have to do this to make the waste service more modern and efficient. but with plant stoppages going on in late september, people on streets like these are hopeful for a solution really soon. —— planned. use a you have seen a rat. —— you say that is a serious problem. thank you so much for the moment. can we get a picture of that helicopter shot? we should do this every morning. have it floating around over the uk and pick a spot and figure out where people are. the reason the helicopter is up is because we are talking about waterloo and the trains. we are not
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in control of the helicopter. people might think the bbc has far too much cash. we are making the most of it. we will have more on the weather edit a bit later on. but while we continue to be fascinated by this footage, we will have the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i am victoria hollins. as we've been hearing, there will be major disruption for people using waterloo station from today. that is because of engineering work on the platforms. southwest trains have warned passengers stations such as vauxhall, clapham junction and woking will be "exceptionally busy" as a result. seven other stations will also be closed during the work, including chessington north and south, queenstown road, and earlsfield. a cabbie's shelter and a jewish cemetery are the latest buildings in london to be listed, 70 years after the scheme first started. the shelter in grosvenor gardens,
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one of only a handful left in london, has been given grade two listed status, as have the funeral buildings at the willesden jewish cemetery. the listings scheme was set up to protect historic buildings in the after many were damaged in the second world war. there are around 19,000 listed buildings in the capital. what's thought to be capital's first pub theatre since shakespearean times is moving. the kings head pub in north london has been in its latest location since 1970. stars like alan rickman and joanna lumley once performed there. from next autumn it'll be housed in the £400 million islington square development. it'll seat 250 people. the company's director says it's about keeping the doors open. our history is wonderful and this building holds a lot of memories for a lot of people. but it's not sustainable. and the truth is that this move means the kings head theatre will survive. we're gaining something that theatres don't get, which is we're gaining sustainability and we're gaining ourfuture back.
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let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but on the london overgropund, there is no service romford to upminster because of a faulty train. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. well, any brightness this morning is going to be fairly short—lived. that's because cloud is increasing as we head through the day. a grey day generally. a bit of patchy rain as well coming through. it is going to be fairly patchy and quite light for the most part. we won't all see that. the further south and east, the more chance you have of not seeing it and just having a cloudy day. temperatures getting up to possibly 23 degrees celsius. quite warm in any brightness. heading through the night, that rain is trying to clear. temperatures getting to 13—14 degrees.
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clear skies the further east you are. cloudier the further west. temperatures getting to 20 degrees. we start a cooler period for the next few days. very changeable as well for the week ahead. wednesday is looking like a very wet day once more. thursday, an improving picture, brighter and drier. some sunshine around. friday is similar. until then, a lot of wet weather around and temperatures always in the high teens and low 20s, so it will be that little bit cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the breakfast sofa. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. new laws which will give people more control over what happens to their personal data online are to be introduced. people will be able to ask for posts or material they posted
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when they were children to be deleted. the bill will also require explicit consent for information to be collected online, rather than firms relying on pre—selected tick boxes. the police watchdog in scotland is investigating why it took over a month to find the body of a man in his own home. divers, sniffer dogs and a helicopter were used in a high—profile search operation to find arnold mouat, from bo'ness, after his family reported him missing july. police scotland reported finding his body at home yesterday. thousands of commuters will have theirjourneys disrupted today, because of major improvement work at britain's busiest railway station, waterloo, in london. ten of its 24 platforms are closed so they can be extended to accommodate longer trains. network rail has warned of challenging days ahead for passengers. president trump and his south korean counterpart have spoken by phone
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to discuss north korea's recent missile tests. mr trump said he was happy and impressed with the agreement at the united nations security council on north korea sanctions. brazilian police say a british woman has been shot and wounded near rio de janeiro. officials say a couple and their three children were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn. the woman's condition isn't thought to be life—threatening. a village in romania has been overrun with bears, upsetting local residents. a handful of hungry bears has left the mountains for harghita, to scavenge for food in local bins, gardens and homes. i could see that they're running for those people. in one incident, a brown bear entered an elderly woman's home and ate a stack of pancakes
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straight from her table. experts say the bears won't attack unless provoked. i was talking earlier about my friend who is in south africa, and a baboon entered his hotel room, stared at him for quite sometime, a chocolate and then left. and tha nkfully chocolate and then left. and thankfully our breakfast viewers have come up with some lovable encounters. one viewer in zambia came out and walked straight into a bull elephant and on the same trip they were charged by a hippo. another was charged by a steel on a tasmanian beach —— seal. another was charged by a steel on a tasmanian beach -- seal. stopped for a picnic in the rockies, noticed a big pile of hot bear poo. jack says a herd of gear used to wander into the tennis courts where i worked. he used to scare them off with a hoover
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—— deer. you want to get the hoover out to scare the deer away. coming up: carol will bring you the weather in ten minutes' time. she has been talking about cold and extremely hot temperatures on the continent. 8 million people plus we re continent. 8 million people plus were watching usain bolt get the bronze medal on saturday night. the stadium today will be packed once again. plenty to look forward to. let's speak to jessica, who is at the london stadium for us, ahead of day four of the world athletics championships. you would not want to be standing there later, you might get a hammer in the face! yes, as you can see, i am right near the hammer in closure. it was very much mixed emotions in the stadium last night. on the one hand you had one of britain's favourite athletes, jessica ennis—hill, to warm applause receiving her retrospective gold medalfrom receiving her retrospective gold medal from the 2011 world
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championships. on the other hand you have justin gatlin championships. on the other hand you havejustin gatlin receiving his 100m gold medal, and there was much talk, much debate, about the kind of reception he would receive after his two drug bans. we spoke to darren campbell yesterday, and he said that he could understand the fans wanting to express their frustration, but he also said that fans probably should not boo, but should remain silent. judge for yourself the reception thatjustin gatlin judge for yourself the reception that justin gatlin got. representing the united states of america, justin gatlin. as you can see, some boos but very much some cheers. lord coe, who presented him with the medal, had earlier said that the two—time drugs cheat beating usain bolt was not the perfect script. earlier in the evening, there was a bigger cheer forjessica ennis—hill, though. she received her retrospective gold medal from the 2011 games,
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after the athlete that had beaten her was found to have doped. it's great to be honest, it couldn't have been a better time to receive the medal other than at the time. so, yeah, i'm very thankful it's been here and i've been able to say bye for one last time. i felt like i hadn't forgot an ounce of feeling about how it felt five years ago stepping out into the stadium, but actually i had kind of forgotten that feeling a little bit and actually standing here and hearing the crowd again, itjust brought it all flooding back and that's why it's so emotional. of course, the athlete hoping to take overjessica ennis—hill's mantle in the heptathlon is katarina johnson—thompson, but yesterday she could only finish fifth in the heptathlon. johnson—thompson had plenty of work to do after a poor highjump on saturday, but performed admirably in the three events yesterday, finishing second in her 800m heat. but she had ultimately left herself too far behind. the olympic champion, belgium's nafi thiam, won gold. i feel like i've got a lot of talent
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to show and i feel like one of these days it'll happen for me. i felt like it's the second event and i knew it was always going to be difficult bouncing back. ifeel like i've done a good job trying to find myself normally, i feel a bit defeatist but i've tried to change my attitude a little bit and ifeel like i've come back and showed even though i've had a difficult time in the second event, i'm a fighter. kjt wasn't the only one to miss out. pole—vaulter holly bradshaw finished sixth in herfinal. she failed to get over with the bar set at 4.75m. she had the height, but her knee caught the bar on the way down. huge disappointment for her. better news in the men's marathon, where callum hawkins equalled the best performance by a british athlete in the men's marathon at a world championships, by finishing fourth. the 25—year—old scot missed out on the medals, but clocked an impressive personal best time of two hours, 10.17 minutes.
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and we will be speaking to callum later here on bbc breakfast. away from here, england will be looking to wrap up the fourth test and a series win against south africa this morning. they will resume on 224—8 in their second innings, leading by 360 runs. it was thanks largely to some late big hitting from moeen ali, who even managed to pick out teammate jonny bairstow on the balcony during his innings. arsenal won the fa community shield for the 15th time by beating chelsea 4—1 on penalties at wembley. chelsea took the lead early in the second half, but arsenal equalised with ten minutes left, to take the match to penalties. chelsea missed twice, before olivier giroud struck the winning spot—kick for the fa cup holders. elsewhere, rangers started
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their scottish premiership season with a 2—1win at motherwell, while aberdeen beat hamilton 2—0. now, you did mention i might get hit in the face by a hammer if i was to stand here. iam in the in the face by a hammer if i was to stand here. i am in the hammer in closure and this is where britain's sophie hitchen will go in the final of that event in the evening session. also to look forward to, laura mewar and laura weightman going in the 1500 metre final. there haven't been many medals here for great britain, but hopefully there should be a bit more to cheer about for british fans by this evening —— muir. thank you very much, jessica. that is where the action will be taking place later on. shalli that is where the action will be taking place later on. shall i tell you where you can watch it? you have
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to do you where you can watch it? you have todoa you where you can watch it? you have to do a bit of channel hopping. on bbc two from 6:30pm until 8:30pm and then bbc one from 8:30pm until 10:30 p-m-, then bbc one from 8:30pm until 10:30 p.m., and then we can go back. then bbc one from 8:30pm until 10:30 p.m. , and then we can go back. and then bbc one from 8:30pm until 10:30 p.m., and then we can go back. and a hammer is at 7pm, and then laura muir in the 1500, and the 5000 as well. i won't ask you what time that is. that is a little bit later on today. just on the whole justin gatlin thing, he was roundly booed when he won the 100m. yesterday darren campbell said you should fall silent and not cheer and not boo either. one of his bands was
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overturned because of this medication for being diagnosed with attention deficit disorder as a child —— bans. he disputes the other as well. that is not to say he hasn't been banned, but it is interesting here is booed roundly and everyone sees him as a super villain when so many athletes across many sports have been banned for drugs but don't get the same treatment as justin gatlin. send us your thoughts on that. it is a bit of the usain bolt effect, as well. i suggested over the weekend and was roundly pilloried, even by members of my own family. good luck with that, dan. commuters and tourists have been warned to prepare for major disruption to theirjourneys into london this august, with thousands of trains cancelled or delayed because of engineering works. steph is at waterloo station for us. they are busy. good morning everybody. there is a shift change going on at the moment, and as you
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can see here, some of the site workers. around 1000 will be working everyday on improving waterloo station. it is one of the busiest in the uk, with something like 270,000 journeys made in and out of it every day. it is all about improvement. they are not working at the moment because there is a shift change. about ten minutes ago it was absolutely manic here, and there we re absolutely manic here, and there were lots of digging noises and things. i am were lots of digging noises and things. iam relieved were lots of digging noises and things. i am relieved to have a bit ofa things. i am relieved to have a bit of a quieter time so we can have a chat with some of our guest. how important are these engineering works? these works are absolutely crucial. this is the busiest station in the country and on many of these trains coming in on the morning it is standing room only. severe levels of overcrowding. so although it is going to be very disrupted this month, the hope is afterwards it will be a less crowded station, bringing relief to lots of passengers. of course, it is only pa rt of passengers. of course, it is only part of the solution to overcrowding, and we also need to do
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things like introduced fairly priced part—time season—ticket so people can choose to work from home and work flexibly. there are, as you say, going to be major disruption, not just this train say, going to be major disruption, notjust this train station. passengers aware of this? lots of holidaymakers will be using the stations as well. there has been a good programme of communication. online, offline, lots of signs up. but i hope that passengers who use other stations and change at waterloo won't crowd the network elsewhere. i am going to nick browne don't introduce you to another guest as well. mark as the chief executive of network rail, which maintains the rail lines and some of the stations. can you explain what has happened. in terms of what they are doing,
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what engineering work is going on? we are extending the length of the first four platforms at waterloo so we can bring ten car trains in. we will increase the capacity of this station by about 30% over the next year or so, station by about 30% over the next year or so, which is 45,000 more people every day being able to use trains coming into london. so it is a real transformation, actually, of waterloo station. and for the people who will use this station. it is going to cause major disruption, though, isn't it? and for the commuters who use it will cause problems for them getting in and out of work. also for holidaymakers, it isa of work. also for holidaymakers, it is a nightmare when you face train delays and cancellations. is a nightmare when you face train delays and cancellationslj is a nightmare when you face train delays and cancellations. i can only apologise, but i think people can see when they look at the scale of these works that there is no other way to do this, we have to remove all the railways, all the point systems to extend the platform. there is no other way to do it. so three weeks of disruption, yes, but decades of fantastically improved services. the train network is not
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known particularly for being punctual, with things like the engineering works. is everything going to be on time? will it be right in september? we have planned this but i hope military precision, 1000 people working night and day on this project over the next three weeks. i this project over the next three weeks. lam this project over the next three weeks. i am confident, this project over the next three weeks. lam confident, but this project over the next three weeks. i am confident, but there is always the chance that things will go wrong, but we have got contingency plans. we have worked really brilliantly across the industry to make sure that this is a success. industry to make sure that this is a success. and what about people facing delays in cancellations? will get compensation? well, that is not really an issue for network rail, thatis really an issue for network rail, that is train operators who can resolve these issues. people will have a fantastically improved service for years ahead. the shift is about to start. there will be more from me in a bit. we will be more from me in a bit. we will see you later. the helicopter
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is on its way to waterloo this morning. yes. a picture of what is going on. it left this morning from the brighton area. we have seen weybridge. now it is in wimbledon. weybridge. now it is in wimbledon. we will have more on the weather later on. the weather in the foreground seems ok. you can see foreboding clouds in the background at wimbledon. carol has a technical issue but she is solving it. i know her. shared bicycle schemes are a cheap and green way to travel around our towns and cities but most of them need to be returned to a specific place. now, dockless bikes are changing all that. using a mobile app, they can be located and left anywhere, ideally, on a pavement,
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but there have been reports of people finding them dumped in back gardens, canals, and even up trees. so, is britain really ready to embrace and bike—share? fiona lamdin has been finding out. communal cycling in our capital is a common sight. but now thousands of dockless bikes that can be parked anywhere are appearing on our streets. i have come to bristol because this is the first place in the country to have dockless bicycles. i have downloaded the app, and as you can see there hundreds available right now. we'll find the nearest one. just around the corner, as promised, it is waiting for me. with the app, i scan the barcode, the bike is unlocked, and i'm ready to go. they arrived three months ago, and already the take—up is quite promising. they get ridden 1,500 times a day. we are the first dockless bike—sharing initiative in the uk. there are some problems. one in eight have been vandalised. and some are found with wheels missing. but with hundreds more rolling into our cities each month,
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it looks like dockless bikes will be on our roads for the foreseeable future. i have one of them over here. steve pyer is the uk general manager of mobike, the company behind dockless bikes, and hejoins us now. thank you forjoining us. it is a cool bicycle to look at. do you really think we can move to a system where we are genuinely using them all time? absolutely. you can get them to go anywhere. when they are that common and easy to use, it becomes more available. there have been problems with them being dumped in places it is not suitable for bikes to be. what about that? we have had a few. but in the scheme of things, thousands of success stories, it is a minority. tell me,
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ifi stories, it is a minority. tell me, if i wanted to use this bike, i would have an application on my phone. you would know i had borrowed this bicycle. yes. you open the camera and it opens the locker the back with the qr code. when you lock it again, yourjourney ends and you ta ke it again, yourjourney ends and you take the payment. it reduces the balance whenever you use it. in other councils, we know for example in some places, the council has confiscated them. do you have many problems with councils? manchester has been a good plane nearing start for us outside of china. we work with councils completely and we don't work without a memorandum and understanding from the council. who
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is using these bicycles? everyone. just look at twitter. you can see the people who have not been on a bicycle for years saying it is brilliant! why choose this design? it isa brilliant! why choose this design? it is a sturdy bike. would you mind ifi it is a sturdy bike. would you mind if i had it is a sturdy bike. would you mind ifihada it is a sturdy bike. would you mind if i had a bit ofa it is a sturdy bike. would you mind if i had a bit of a go? keep having a chat. tell us about the design. we designed it specifically. a tight corner. are you a bit nervous? yes. iam corner. are you a bit nervous? yes. i am nervous about the cameras. it does not have a chain. the lights are on it. the wheels are automatic. they are locked to keep it in place. what about safety? it is a personal thing but i always wear a bicycle helmet. to people wear them? we encourage people to do that. just
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make sure you go to a shop and get one fitted specifically for your head. thank you very much and hopefully you get this one back. as he goes in cycles off into the sunset, we will have the weather. a fine view indeed. this morning it is u nsettled fine view indeed. this morning it is unsettled in many parts of the uk. rain and sunshine. some have showers. that is how it is going to look through the course of this week. unsettled. it will continue. a bit of this and a bit of that. you can see the weather front responsible this morning moving across england and wales and heading south. it will head up later on, especially in the south—west. rain. thundery showers in aberdeenshire. northern england and also northern ireland, well, looking at bright
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spells and sunshine and a few showers. tending to be lighter than scotland. a bit of cloud in the midlands and wales with a few showers. a band of rain. again, drizzled on the eastern side. the western side will pick up during the day. south kent and sussex hang on to the sunshine for the longest. the highest temperatures. 23 is possible. north of the weather front, a regime of sunshine and showers. the athletics today. increasingly, the cloud will build as the weather front goes out. later on, the chance of the odd spot of rain coming out of it as it continues down and to the south. deny the changes its mind and goes north again. —— tonight, it changes. one or two showers. mist and fog patches as well in south—west england. that will lift quite readily tomorrow morning. a weather
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front going towards the south—east. low pressure from the near continent. they will meet eventually through the day. heavy downpours. north of that, more dry and bright. again, sunshine and showers for northern england, northern ireland, scotland. and wet day in wales as well. torrential downpours in south hampshire, kent, east anglia. wednesday. more of the same. again, heavy rain in the south—eastern corner which could lead to some surface water issues. north of that, dry conditions with fewer showers. the end of the week. thursday is looking not too shabby for most of us. looking not too shabby for most of us. again, dry weather around. clearing in the south—east. brightening up. friday, more rain in the forecasts. a few showers as well. at the top of the broadcaster said it was going to be unsettled. i was not lying. you never would.
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thank you. thank you. we will see you at quarter past eight this morning. welsh cakes sprinkled with cinnamon and marbled with mealworms. burgers made with a blend of toasted crickets, grasshoppers, spinach, and sundried tomatoes. this isn't any old food, no this is bug grub food. are you in? to some, it might sound like food hell, but these are the dishes on offer from a couple who in a new bbc one documentary want to change our perception about food made with insects. entomologist, sarah beynon, joins us now. good morning. thank you very much. good morning. thank you very much. good morning. thank you very much. good morning. he has already tried a cricket and a cookie with crickets in it. that second one was nice. i am still tasting the cricket. the individual cricket. those of the ingredients ground up into a powder. it would be like tasting a piece of meat rather than a finished dish. the idea is to change the way we look at food and possibly help the
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environment. absolutely. first of all, the food has to taste great. no one will make any difference in sustainable food unless the food tastes good. they have to be sustainable to produce. that is where i come in as a scientist. it is about how we can feed a population efficiently looking out to the environment at the same time. you can produce the same quantity of protein with 25 times less feed and a fraction of the greenhouse gas emissions than livestock and beef. if we want to live sustainably and leave room for wildlife as well, we can adopt it in insects. we have a lot to ask you and you will be back in it lot to ask you and you will be back inita lot to ask you and you will be back in it a bit later. thank you very much for that brief introduction into eating bugs. they all taste
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different. thank you very much. i had one that tasted like licorice once. and now for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking this morning. see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. as we've been hearing, there will be major disruption for people using waterloo station from today. that is because of engineering work on the platforms. southwest trains have warned passengers stations such as vauxhall, clapham junction and woking will be "exceptionally busy" as a result. seven other stations will also be closed during the work, including chessington north and south, queenstown road, and earlsfield. a60 a 60 new role boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder following a shooting in chelmsford. —— 16—year—old boy. the victim was 34 yea rs 16—year—old boy. the victim was 34
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years old. others have been arrested. what's thought to be capital's first pub theatre since shakespearean times is moving. the kings head pub in north london has been in its latest location since 1970. stars like alan rickman and joanna lumley once performed there. from next autumn it'll be housed in the £400 million islington square development. it'll seat 250 people. the company's director says it's about keeping the doors open. our history is wonderful and this building holds a lot of memories for a lot of people. but it's not sustainable. and the truth is that this move means the kings head theatre will survive. we're gaining something that theatres don't get, which is we're gaining sustainability and we're gaining ourfuture back. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but on the london overgropund, there is no service romford to upminster because of a faulty train. the m25 is busy anti—clockwise at the dartford tunnel after a lorry broke down in one of the tunnels earlier. in greenwich, creek road is closed for emergency gas works
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between the greenwich market and welland street. let's have a check on the weather now with georgina burnett. good morning. well, any brightness this morning is going to be fairly short—lived. that's because cloud is increasing as we head through the day. a grey day generally. a bit of patchy rain as well coming through. it is going to be fairly patchy and quite light for the most part. we won't all see that. the further south and east, the more chance you have of not seeing it and just having a cloudy day. temperatures getting up to possibly 23 degrees celsius. quite warm in any brightness. heading through the night, that rain is trying to clear. temperatures getting to 13—14 degrees. clear skies the further east you are. cloudier the further west. temperatures getting to 20 degrees. we start a cooler period for the next few days. very changeable as well for the week ahead. wednesday is looking like a very wet day once more. thursday, an improving picture, brighter and drier. some sunshine around. friday is similar. until then, a lot of wet weather around and temperatures always
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in the high teens and low 20s, so it will be that little bit cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the breakfast sofa. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the right to be forgotten. social media firms will have to delete your childhood posts if you ask them to. new laws will also ban companies from using pre—selected tick boxes to gather data. good morning, it's monday, 7th, august.
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the body of a man who was reported missing a month ago, sparking a huge search, has been found at his house. now a police watchdog launches an investigation. good morning from waterloo station where, as you can see, there is major engineering work. it is one of the number of stations in london where there will be major disruptions. i will have the details shortly. good morning, at the london stadium, two ceremonies, two very different champions. boos again forjustin gatlin at the 100m medal ceremony. but warm applause for jessica ennis hill as she received her retrospective medal from six years ago. and good morning from birmingham where a bin strike means some people
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have not had rubbish collected since june leading to this and concerns over public health. and carol has the weather. it is looking on settled with a weather front moving across england and wales taking rain with it and behind it sunshine and showers, the heaviest in northern ireland and scotland, but they could also be thundery. good morning. new laws which will give people more control over what happens to their personal data online are to be introduced. the government is billing the changes as the right to be forgotten. people will be able to ask for personal data or material they posted when they were children to be deleted. the bill will also require people to give explicit consent for their information to be collected online, rather than firms relying on pre—selected tick boxes. extra powers will be given to the
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information watchdog to issue fines up information watchdog to issue fines up to £70 million to businesses if they break the rules. our political correspondent, leila nathoo, is in our westminster studio this morning. we were speaking earlier to someone who used to work for gchq who suggested they are eu regulations filtering to us in britain. that is right, eu regulations due to have come in next year. what this bill will do is bring those regulations into uk law, so they are in existence and have continuity after brexit. these regulations are measures to rebalance the rights we have as consumers and users of tech companies over our information we put online and we are able to ask companies to disclose what information they hold on us and ask them to remove things we do not like
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and the tick boxes, things we might gloss over, not notice, we accept, agreed to information being used in certain ways will become a thing of the past. instead we will have to give consent for data to be taken and used. the idea is these measures. data being used and perhaps being passed on. so the information commissioner, watchdog, will have powers to fine up to £70 million, or 4% of global turnover in the case of serious data breaches and soa the case of serious data breaches and so a deterrent for companies not to miss use data. we will get more detail when the bill comes before the house of commons later this year. if you want more information on that there is plenty on the bbc website. the police watchdog in scotland is investigating after officers failed to find the body of a 64—year—old man who had been missing for a month. after weeks of searching using police divers, dogs, volunteers, and a helicopter, arnold mouat was found at his home near falkirk. andy moore reports.
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64—year—old arnold mouat was reported missing by his family on 7thjuly, the day after he had last been seen in his own home. at the time, police scotland launched an investigation, which included a search of that property, but no trace was found of mr mouat. there was also a large—scale search in the area around, involving the police helicopter, divers, mountain rescue teams and police dogs. then, yesterday, police confirmed that a body had been found in mr mouat‘s home. there was no explanation of where it was found, or in what circumstances. his death is being treated as unexplained but not suspicious. police scotland said they had voluntarily referred the case to the independent watchdog, the police investigations and review commissioner. that same organisation started an investigation when police scotland failed to respond to an emergency call about a car that had crashed off the m9 near stirling in 2015. lamara bell died in hospital after being found in the wreckage three days later.
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she was discovered alongside her partner, john yuill, who was already dead. one independent review has already identified problems in police call handling. andy moore, bbc news. passengers using britain's busiest railway station have been warned to expect major disruption this month. 10 of the 24 platforms at waterloo station will be closed for three weeks. steph is at waterloo station for us. we can see why it will have an impact on commuters. good morning. good morning. it is really busy. you can see waterloo station, the main hub, and then a lot of machinery and people working on major engineering works that will go one the whole of august. this is the busiest train station in the uk
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with something like 270,000 journeys made every day. this is about improving the service. anybody who travels in and out of london will know how busy it can be so network rail that maintains the lines and some stations are spending £400 million on the project. you can see just how busy it is this morning. this is about extending the length of the platforms. so that trains can be longer and therefore you can fit more people onto them and passengers will have more room on those trains. it is not just will have more room on those trains. it is notjust this station where we will see engineering work. you have london bridge, charing cross. at this station i understand there will be around 40% ofjourneys affected but there has been a lot of information going out. a lot of people use this to commute in and
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out of london. i will be chatting to guests later about why this is so important to happen and what it might mean for passengers. i love seeing this, it looks amazing. they have planned for it so long. we will be back with you later. diggers all over the place. very busy waterloo station but not in terms of passengers on the platform. president trump and his south korean counterpart have spoken by phone to discuss north korea's recent missile tests. mr trump said he was happy and impressed with the agreement at the united nations security council on north korea sanctions. chronic overcrowding in some of europe's top tourist hotspots is fuelling an angry backlash from residents, who say that a sharp rise in visitors is ruining neighbourhoods and making life intolerable. british tourists on board a sightseeing bus in barcelona feared they were being ambushed by terrorists when masked men attacked their open—top bus and slashed its tyres and covered it in graffiti. brazilian police say a british woman
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has been shot and wounded near rio de janeiro. officials say a couple and their three children were targeted by an armed group after taking a wrong turn. the woman's condition isn't thought to be life threatening. the american sprinterjustin gatlin who won the 100 metres at the world athletics championships in london was given a mixed reception yesterday evening at his medal ceremony. some of the crowd booed him. he has twice tested positive for drugs in his career. away from all the controversy around his win, there was another significant medal ceremony as natalie pirks reports. announcer: gold-medallist and world champion, representing the united states of america... a smattering of boos for the champion. an unfamiliar medal around the neck of the jamaican. after his two doping bans, justin gatlin understandably was the villain of the piece when he collected his gold
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for winning the 100m final. this wasn't what usain bolt had planned, of course, but he still milked the moment. cheats aren't meant to prosper. today then, finally, retribution forjessica ennis—hill, cheated out of gold by a russian doper in 2011. six years she has waited for this upgrade on silver. no wonder she shed a tear. my husband said to me, "you're not going to cry, are you?" i said, "no, no." but i'd forgotten that feeling, when you step out in an arena like this, and actually hear the crowd cheering for you. from the old generation to the new, katarina johnson—thompson has long been considered britain's heir to ennis—hill's heptathlon crown. but yet again, in a major championships, her hopes plummeted. despite a season's best in the javelin, she had left herself far too much to do in the final event, the 800m. eventually, she finished fifth overall. there was disappointment
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too for holly bradshaw. she had a great chance for a medal in the pole vault, but after failing at 4.75m, the dream was over, and the emotion took hold. from gatlin to bowie, by the end of the night, the usa had yet another shock 100m champion. jamaica's darling elaine thompson was left for dust and out of the medals by tori bowie. she timed her run and her dip to perfection. natalie pirks, bbc news, at the london stadium. this is the view of the london stadium this morning, host to the world athletics championships. in ten minutes, we'll speak to jessica ennis—hill's former coach. that's at 8.20am. so much to talk to him about. we are loving our helicopter shots
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this morning. i'm not sure that is. we do not have that many helicopters! the village of bonsall were host to this race. the annual world hen racing championships. as you can see competition was tough. i think you said they were disqualified for fighting. some hens resorted to foul play but there could only ever be one winner. two, if you count trainerjack. fa ntastically fantastically sprinting for the line. he was clearly delighted. but confused and delighted. jack and his hen cooked it. birmingham is in danger of sinking in a "sea of rubbish", that's according to one councillor concerned at the backlog of waste that is mounting up on the city's streets.
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it's a story we've been following on breakfast. we have got a sense this morning of what is going on with piles of rubbish. bin collectors are now stepping up industrial action by refusing to work every day for two hours in a dispute overjob losses. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. for colin, british summertime usually means hoping for some hot weather. but not this year. 13—14—15 bags. that is because colin's rubbish has not being collected from his house sincejune. high temperatures would make a bad situation worse. it is not very good. you are living somewhere and people see bags of rubbish at the front of your house. he is now having to store bin bags in his back garden as well. i have seen rats and foxes.
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cats rip the bags up. there are actually maggots. i know that from seeing them myself. it is disgusting. birmingham city council wants to modernise its waste service, but refuse workers say they are facing pay cuts. and have been striking two hours a day throughout july and and have been striking two hours a day throughoutjuly and now three hours a day. the collateral damage is visible to all, and it is attracting vermin. as you can see, there are many ripped bags here. it is like takeaway for them, isn't it? one pest control firm has seen a 20% increase in callouts over the past six weeks, and says this could cause public problems. rats carry many diseases, weils is harmful to human beings. it is carried in their urine. so, if a human being was to touch a bag where a rat has urinated, it could pass on a serious disease. residents here are concerned.
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it is going to get worse. if it gets warmer... we are bidding for the commonwealth games. it is ridiculous. it is avoidable, the scale of it. there is no organisation for distrubuting this stuff. it doesn't look good. it doesn't smell good. intense talks continue between the two sides. last week, volunteers took to the streets to help clear up some of the worst areas. but with weeks of action left to go, it seems getting on top of this rubbish could prove difficult. let's speak to jacqui kennedy from birmingham city council who is in our newsroom for us this morning. thanks for your time on this. we have seen grim pictures of piles of rubbish. we have been in birmingham seeing streets and pathways covered. why has it taken so long to find a resolution? we wa nt resolution? we want to make our waste management
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service effective and efficient and economic and be consistent in terms of how we deliver the service with other local authorities. that is something unfortunately we have not come to an agreement with the trade unions yet. why is there no back—up plan in place? we have heard from angry residents and seen the situation. is it unacceptable what is happening? we are two—thirds of the way through our recovery plan. the actual dispute started at the end ofjune, but we saw a significant increase in missed collections earlier than the actual industrial action started. todayis actual industrial action started. today is the start of week three. we're bang on time in terms of the plan. the two—thirds of the city have been cleared, that's two—thirds of 8200 streets. and two—thirds of over 330,000 properties. with respect, nobody wants to hear that you're to thirds of the way through
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your plan if they haven't had their rubbish collected for four weeks?” apologise to the people of birmingham, but appreciate their patience so far. if we have a waste management service it must be effective and efficient because otherwise we're spending money on that service rather than other key services for the local authority. the union are saying you're more interested in conflict than finding a resolution. is that true? no, absolutely not. the whole point of this restrict ture is we've really considered it. there are nojob losses associated to this restrict ture. we've got roles at the same salary for all of the people impacted by the changes and actually, we're having some very positive dialogue with the trade union colleagues. ok, that positive dialogue, where is that going to lead? if dialogue, where is that going to lead ? if people dialogue, where is that going to lead? if people are watching this morning with a pile of rubbish outside their house, when are they going to get that rubbish collected? we're hoping for a speedy resolution. how quickly is a speedy resolution? that's a matter for the
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on going negotiations. are we talking days? are we talking weeks? as soon as possible. again, but if you've got a pile of rubbish outside your house, as soon as you've got a pile of rubbish outside your house, as soon as possible, for some people is not good enough? your house, as soon as possible, for some people is not good enough7m where we've got the third week, we will be clearing all that rubbish by the end of this week so i can give some assurances to people who haven't had their bins collected recently, that will happen this week. i know you say it will happen as soon as week. i know you say it will happen as soon as possible. can you see a resolution in sight or are the two sides nowhere near other? i'm optimistic that there will be a resolution to this dispute. hopefully you are correct and there will be a resolution because all sorts of issues for residents of birmingham. we have been there live and seen the piles of rubbish on the street. it is really affecting residents. shall we find out about the weather? there is a storm cloud
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behind carol. good morning. we have had showers. some of us will see thundery weather, but this week is going to be unsettled. there will be rain at times, showers at times. we will see sunshine, but it will be cool and breezy. now what we have today is this weather front which is slowly sinking southwards. it's fragmenting, but later it will pep up. low pressure is driving our weather and you you can see all this cloud swirling around the area of low pressure. some showers across northern ireland, scotland and northern england as well as wales. not everywhere, but there are some around this morning. so weather front sinks southwards. the cloud building ahead of t behind the cloud will start to break and we will see sunshine this afternoon for north wales, northern england and scotland and northern ireland, but the rain will pep up across the south—west as we go through the course of the afternoon. fur‘ heading out, take your brolly with you is probably
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good advice. you can see the rain across southern good advice. you can see the rain across southern areas. good advice. you can see the rain across southern areas. not into the far south of sussex or kentment here we'll hang on to sunshine. temperatures could get up to 23 celsius, but you can see the cloud associated with that band. further north, we run into the cloud and the midlands and then it breaks and we will see sunshine and showers across northern england. showers in northern england. showers in northern england. showers in northern england tending to be lighter than they will be in scotla nd lighter than they will be in scotland and in aberdeenshire and caithness, some of them could not just be heavy, but thundery. for northern ireland, you have some bright spells, sunshine and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and across wales, not immune to a shower, but it will be a brighter afternoon compared to this morning. now, through this evening and overnight, this weather front, now, through this evening and overnight, this weatherfront, this wiggly one here, tends to move back northwards for a time. we could see some mist and fog forming across parts of south—west england and we've got a few showers in the west and also the north, but equally a lot of dry weather. tomorrow, this is our weather front. again, lot of dry weather. tomorrow, this is our weatherfront. again, it changes its mind and heads become to the south—east joining forces changes its mind and heads become to the south—eastjoining forces with this area of low pressure. coming up
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from the nor continent. so for parts of the south—east through the course of the south—east through the course of the south—east through the course of the day, look how they merge and we will see heavy downpours, especially for east anglia and kent and south hampshire, but we will see the rain getting into gloucestershire, wales, dorset as well, and there will be showers across northern england, northern ireland, and scotland, but again, the best of the weather in these three areas with sunshine in between. then as we move from tuesday into wednesday more rain across the south—eastern quarter of the uk. some heavy downpours once again. by then we could be looking at some issues with surface water and flooding, but as we push north and flooding, but as we push north and west, drier and brighter with sunshine and fewer showers, lou and dan. studio: i'm sure you've heard the news that molly king from the saturdays has been the first co ntesta nt saturdays has been the first contestant revealed for this yea r‘s strictly. would you have some words
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of advice as a former contestant yourself? yes, just enjoy it. don't be worried about it and it doesn't matter how good or boy. just really enjoy it is my advice. very good advice, carol, thank you very much indeed. i think she will be very good indeed. frankie bridge from the saturdays, they're working their way through the saturdays. hold on to your hats, one at a time, everybody! it was meant to be a glittering farewell to the sprint legend, usain bolt. instead, boos rang round the london stadium last night as justin gatlin, who has twice been suspended for being a drugs cheat, collected his 100 metres world championship gold. jessica ennis—hill was cheered to the rafters as she was presented with the 2011 heptathlon title. the original winner, tatyana chernova, was stripped of the title last year for doping. let's speak to jessica's former coach, toni minichiello who is at the london stadium for us. he has been part of the bbc team for
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the last few days. good morning toni. nice to speak to you? good morning. i know jessica toni. nice to speak to you? good morning. i knowjessica got toni. nice to speak to you? good morning. i know jessica got a little bit emotional yesterday. as her coach for so many years, what were you like now you can say that jessica is officially a three time world champion? it's really pleasing, you know, to finally get the medal and everything be cleared up the medal and everything be cleared up from that point of view. no, really proud of her and the way she conducts herself through all her life on the track and off. at the time, when you looked back, did you think something was a miss? it's a strange situation withjess. it was her under performance that got her a silver medal. she had a really bad javelin. it was more her under performance that allowed tatyana chernova or whoever to come in and win the gold medal. so, it's a slightly different position. it's not theyjessica was at the top of
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her game and performed really well and was beaten by a drug cheat. it's and was beaten by a drug cheat. it's a little bit different and we've had that conversation over time. i'm just wondering how it affects an athlete? this many years later suddenly you're there with a gold medal. what were her emotions, do you think? i think being back in this stadium after 2012 was such a respectful, responsive supportive crowd is just fantastic and i think you saw that in her emotion and her i°y you saw that in her emotion and her joy from that and the fact that her young son and her husband and family members, itjust young son and her husband and family members, it just made young son and her husband and family members, itjust made it a lovely fitting tribute and a fitting tribute to the whole of her career. you both are part of the bbc team this time around for the world athletic championships and with jessica out of the picture a lot of attention on katarina johnson—thompson who finished fifth in the heptathlon and failed to win a medal. jessica suggested yesterday she should call on your services for
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help. it seems toni, it's the mental side of the heptathlon that's proving an issue for kat. you're laughing watching pictures of the heptathlon from yesterday. what is the issue? could you have be of service to her? that's not within my gift to give or anything like that. an athlete makes a decision about where they want support. she made her decision. she is moving in the direction. that's something that you'd have to ask her. when you come toa you'd have to ask her. when you come to a major championships we know it is the pinnacle of the season. you should really perform and produce a season's best or a personal best at this championships. if you're not doing that then you're under performing at this championships. so, and! performing at this championships. so, and i think also, another point here, we sort of assumed that she was going to get a medal. the lady was going to get a medal. the lady was ranked fourth in the world. it would have been awkward for her to have won a medal. she would have had
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to really have raised her game. yes, there are a couple of events that could have gone better, but that's multi—events. there is always something you can work on and there is always something you can improve. we know thatjustin gatlin was booed by some members of the crowd. some people watching yesterday. what do you make of that? i think it was more of an ooh than a boo. it was a respectful crowd. there was no noise during the national anthem. there is a lot of people heading to work on a monday morning, they're going to work, they're earning money and they buy a ticket and use that earnings to buy a ticket and you come in and watch it. do we hear booing at football matches? yes, we do. the crowd is entitled to express its opinion of the entertainment that's presented to it. so, i have no problem with the way the crowd conducted themselves, they were respectful at the times that you need to be respectful and they expressed their opinion
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appropriately. and it wasn't the whole of the crowd. it was more of an ooh than a boo if i'm brutally honest. that's sport. that's drama. that's why we come and watch it. that's why we come and watch it. that's why we come and watch it. that's why we're so fixed on it. toni, do you think there might be a decent medal in the hammer later on? i think sophie hitchin is one to watch. tune in and watch that. it will be a fascinating competition andi will be a fascinating competition and i think she is a really good prospect. the way she qualified in the qualification, she did it with just one throw so that shows a confidence in her own abilities and of course, laura muir. i love your choice of words more than a ooh than a boo! you're watching breakfast. this is waterloo station this morning. commuters and tourists are being warned there
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is going to be major disruption because of major works. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. if you're looking for hot weather this forecast will not give you a great amount of joy this forecast will not give you a great amount ofjoy because it will be unsettled this week with rain at times and while temperatures of about the average for the time of year, it will feel cool and breezy from time to time and this morning we have a weather front moving south. it brings outbreaks of rain across southern south. it brings outbreaks of rain across southern areas. south. it brings outbreaks of rain across southern areas. meanwhile, further north and west, brighter skies, sunshine coming through. showers in scotland and northern ireland. maximum temperature is 17 up ireland. maximum temperature is 17 up to 21 celsius. through this evening heavier rain in central and southern central areas, are possible. on tuesday, a messy picture with cloud, outbreaks of rain. again, temperatures above the
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average. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. prosecutors in south korea demand a twelve—year prison sentence for the heir to the samsung empire. that is our top story, live from london. before his arrest, jay y lee was gearing up to take over samsung. he's now accused of bribing the country's former president and could face more than a decade injail. we will have the details. also in the programme, turning off the taps with 50 dollar oil the new normal, are we in line for another cut in production?
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